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"CAN" 2003 Obituary


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CANDY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-04 published
Died This Day -- John CANDY, 1994
Tuesday, March 4, 2003 - Page R7
Actor born in Toronto on October 31, 1950; educated and grew up in suburb of Scarborough; in late 1970s, joined cast of Second City comedy troupe and SCTV show; swiched to film and won parts in such movies as Radio Candy, 1941, Stripes, National Lampoon's Vacation, The Three Amigos!, Summer Rental, Brewster's Millions, The Great Outdoors, Splash, Planes Trains and Automobiles, Little Shop of Horrors, Home Alone, JFK, Uncle Buck, Camp Candy and Cool Runnings; died of heart attack while on location in Mexico.

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CANDY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
Visionary performer waged war on trivial art
Her trademark was a experimental process that embraced dance, music, text, mime, clown, ritual and mask
By Paula CITRON Friday, April 11, 2003 - Page R13
Canada has lost a powerful force in experimental theatre and dance. Director, dancer, actor, writer and choreographer Elizabeth SZATHMARY died last month in Toronto.
While she will be remembered as a dynamic figure, her artistic life will remain a contradiction. At the beginning of her career, Ms. SZATHMARY was one of the gilded darlings of Toronto's burgeoning experimental theatre. At the end, she was seen by some as a marginalized, religious eccentric who put on plays in church basements.
To her long-time Friends and loyalists, however, Ms. SZATHMARY's life was a spiritual journey in which art, religion and morality were inextricably intertwined in a nobility of purpose.
Ms. SZATHMARY was born in New York on October 12, 1937, to Jewish-Hungarian parents. Her mother was an unhappy former opera singer and vaudeville performer and her father was a composer and arranger who wrote the theme for the popular television show Get Smart and who abandoned his family. Ms. SZATHMARY attended New York's High School of Performing Arts and later performed with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet under choreographer Antony TUDOR.
A ravishing beauty with masses of long, jet-black curls and compelling light-coloured eyes, Ms. SZATHMARY attracted followers throughout her career. She was, says Toronto choreographer David EARLE, a powerful, mysterious presence and a charismatic performer.
Another admirer was Canadian Robert SWERDLOW. Mr. TUDOR's piano accompanist, he fell in love with the beautiful young dancer and followed her to France where Ms. SZATHMARY danced with such companies as Les Ballets Classique de Monte Carlo and Les Ballets Contemporains de Paris. He was the first of many artists to be inspired by Ms. SZATHMARY.
"Elizabeth was a theatre philosopher who wanted to save the world through the beauty and truth of her art," Mr. SWERDLOW said.
The couple relocated to Montreal in the mid-sixties where Mr. SWERDLOW got a job with the National Film Board. One assignment brought him to Toronto, and it was Ms. SZATHMARY who persuaded him to settle there because of the city's "happening" dance scene. Performing under the name Elizabeth SWERDLOW, she first worked with Mr. EARLE and the future co-founders of Toronto Dance Theatre.
In 1969, Mr. SWERDLOW took an unexpected windfall of $30,000 and built his wife a performing venue of her own. In this way, Global Village Theatre emerged from a former Royal Canadian Mounted Police stable and the couple went on to became synonymous with a new wave of provocative, political, issue-oriented theatre.
Mr. SWERDLOW provided the words and music, and co-wrote the shows Elizabeth co-wrote, choreographed, directed and was the featured performer. Importantly, she was the visionary who came up with original concepts and her trademark, multidisciplinary theatrical process embraced dance, music, text, mime, clown, ritual and mask.
Among their better-known collaborations was Blue.S.A., an indictment of the "American empire," and Justine, the story of a young girl who gains wisdom through the vicissitudes of life. A huge hit, Justine went to New York where it won off-Broadway awards and enjoyed a long run.
Its success meant Global Village became a stopping place for others. Gilda RADNER, John CANDY and Salome BEY represented just some of the talent that passed through. Later, when Ms. SZATHMARY founded Inner Stage Theatre, she helped propel the early careers of Antoni CIMOLINO and Donald CARRIER of the Stratford Festival, Jeannette ZINGG and Marshall PYNKOSKI of Opera Atelier and Native American performer Raoul TRUJILLO.
In the mid-seventies, Ms. SZATHMARY experienced a religious conversion and became a devout Christian.
For Mr. SWERDLOW, it was the last straw in an already turbulent relationship. After the couple split up, Ms. SZATHMARY founded Inner Stage, a name that expressed her desire to produce art that would transform and heal through spirituality. To better strike out on her own, she also shed the SWERDLOW name. Until the 1990s, the main work of Inner Stage was a series of acclaimed morality tales -- or modern fables as Ms. SZATHMARY called them which toured schools from coast to coast. She also explored the storytelling power of Native American myths and turned to such themes as the plight of street youth or to the Holocaust from a teenager's point of view. Her final project, No Fixed Address, attempted to air the true voice of the homeless by both telling their stories and casting them as actors.
By all accounts, Ms. SZATHMARY was a true eccentric who personalized everything. Her computer, for example, was called Daisy. Her home was a living museum dominated by a family of cats who occupied their own stools at the dining table, held conversations and sent out Christmas cards to the pets of Friends. Spiritual sayings, religious art and theatre memorabilia covered every scrap of wall and floor space. On an even more personal level, Ms. SZATHMARY kept a journal of religious visions and dreams written in ornate calligraphy and illustrated in Hungarian folk-style art. What is more, she described ecstatic events and augurisms, including a personal affinity with bison, as if such occurrences were as routine as the weather.
In her work, Ms. SZATHMARY demanded perfection, which meant she often proved impossible to work alongside. Friends and colleagues Robert MASON, Julia AMES and Peter GUGELER all talk about Ms. SZATHMARY's middle-of-the-night phone calls -- and the fact that she brooked no criticism or contrary opinions. All the same, their devotion never lessened.
"She was a queen and we were her subjects," said Mr. GUGELER. "Elizabeth never left you once she got ahold of you."
Guerrilla theatre, grass-roots theatre, shoe-string theatre, theatre against all odds, a "let's-make-a-show" mentality -- that was the brave, artistic world in which Ms. SZATHMARY waged her war against what she saw as frivolous or commercial art. In 1989, Inner Stage lost its operating grant and from that time on she financed her own productions. During the last year that she was able to work, she earned a pitiful $5,000.
Ms. SZATHMARY continued to perform in all her productions, turning more to straight acting as her dancing powers declined. Even so, she never gave up the stage to anyone.
Elizabeth SZATHMARY died of rectal cancer in Toronto on March 28. A memorial service will be held at the Church of the Redeemer, 162 Bloor St. W., Toronto, at 3 p.m. on April 27.

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CANES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
DIMMER, Peter Anthony
Peacefully passed away on March 7, 2003 at Belmont House, Toronto at age 88. Beloved husband of Shirley (née SCHRAM) for 50 years. Father of David, Diana, Gregory, and his wife Elaine. He will be fondly remembered by his two grandchildren Alexandra and Michael. Peter was born in London, England in 1915, and came to Canada in 1950 after serving with the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. In 1993, he was inducted into the Canadian Tennis Hall of Fame. This was recognition of 40 years developing the game in Ontario. Peter served as the pro-manager of the Queen's Club for over 30 years. He brought tennis instruction to many community clubs in southern Ontario. In 1970 Peter started his own tennis school which ran for 15 years. The family will receive Friends at Turner and Porter Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windemere, on Sunday from 2-5 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at Kingsway Lambton United Church at the corner of Prince Edward Drive and the Kingsway on Monday, March 10 at 3: 30 p.m. A reception will follow at the Queen's Club, 568 Dupont Street from 5-7 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Belmont House Foundation, 55 Belmont Street, Toronto, Ontario M5R 1R1 or CANES Home Support Services, 925 Albion Road, Suite 309, Etobicoke, Ontario M9V 1A6 would be appreciated.

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CANHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-07 published
BERCOVITCH, Patricia (Pat) nee: COWAN
After a 2½ year unwavering, brave and courageous battle with colon cancer, Pat died peacefully with dignity at her home on July 05, 2003. Beloved wife of Morley, survived by mother-in-law Sadie CANHAM, dear sister of Mary CHARIOT (Larry,) brother Ted COWAN (Lucy,) brother Jim COWAN (Sheila,) predeceased by sister Barbara McGURK (Bob.) She will be missed by numerous loving nieces and nephews, along with their children, many aunts, uncles, cousins and caring Friends. Trained as a nurse and a teacher, she worked in many capacities in her field, then came to Wasaga Beach as the owner of the 'old' IGA, touching the hearts of many people along the way. Pat was most at home when boating on Georgian Bay. She will be remembered as a loyal friend, loving sister and a devoted wife. Thanks to Dr. James LANE for the compassionate care he gave Pat. Service at the Steeles Memorial Chapel, 390 Steeles Avenue West (between Bathurst and Yonge), Toronto, on Monday, July 07, 2003 at 11 a.m. Shiva at 65 Knox Road East, Wasaga Beach. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Pat Bercovitch Foundation at the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital would be greatly appreciated.

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CANIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-15 published
Radio pioneer built network
He founded Ontario's first French-language radio station in 1951 when his local station denied francophones airtime.
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, June 16, 2003 - Page R7
He started in business as a butcher, and later was a soldier and a hotelier, but Conrad LAVIGNE's first love was show business. Whether he was operating the television stations in Northern Ontario that became the largest privately owned television broadcast system in the world, appearing at the staid proceedings of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, or at conventions, Mr. LAVIGNE often delighted those within earshot with jokes, stories, witty comments -- even singing.
Like the time he sang grace during the annual meeting of the Association for French Language Broadcasters in the 1970s.
"Members of the head table, including myself and Premier Bill DAVIS, walked into the room and stood behind our chairs," recalls Pierre JUNEAU, chairman of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission from 1968 to 1975.
"Mr. LAVIGNE, who was chairman of the French-language broadcasters group, began singing grace in French, and with his very strong voice. People felt sort of strange with this."
When he was done, Mr. LAVIGNE looked at Premier DAVIS and quipped: "Well, Mr. Premier, this is to show you that when you are chairman, you can do whatever you like."
J. Lyman POTTS, former vice-president of Standard Broadcasting, remembers the time in the early 1960s when Mr. LAVIGNE appeared before the Board of Broadcast Governors -- predecessor of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission -- in support of a radio or television station licensing application.
At the beginning of his presentation, Mr. LAVIGNE expressed his regrets that Board of Broadcast Governors member Bernard GOULET had died at few days earlier. Then, without skipping a beat, he looked toward the ceiling and said: "If Bernie were here today, I think he would vote for my application."
"It broke up the room," says Mr. POTTS. "If ever a meeting got dull he'd liven things up. It was a joy to find him at meetings. He was a unique personality."
Mr. LAVIGNE, who was born in the small town of Chénéville, Quebec, on November 2, 1916, and raised in Cochrane, Ontario, died in Timmins, Ontario on April 16 following a lengthy battle with emphysema. He was 86.
Friends, family and business associates say Mr. LAVIGNE had show business in his blood in his late teens. On many evenings, the young man who moved to Timmins from Cochrane at age 18 to open a small grocery store and butcher shop with his uncle would act in plays in the hall of a local church. But he didn't get into the entertainment business in a big way until after he helped Canada's war effort, got married and started his life as an entrepreneur in the hotel business.
In 1942, he sold his butcher shop and enlisted in the Canadian infantry. He became a commando training officer while stationed at Vernon, British Columbia, and in 1944 headed overseas. While on a furlough from Vernon he returned to Timmins and married Jeanne CANIE. The couple raised seven children.
Mr. LAVIGNE returned to Canada in 1946 and bought the Prince George Hotel in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, which at the time was a booming gold-mining town. He sold the business in 1950.
He entered the world of media and entertainment by founding CFCL, the first French-language radio station in Ontario in 1951, in what, essentially, was his way of ensuring the area's large French-speaking population had a voice in the North.
Michelle DE COURVILLE NICOL of Ottawa said her father launched the station after a group of francophones that he was part of in Kirkland Lake was told by the manager of an English-language radio station that they would no longer be given regular air time to discuss issues of interest to French people.
"He was very proud of being a francophone," says Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL. " When he was told that his compatriots would no longer be welcome on the local station he said, 'Oh, ya!' and got the idea of starting a French-language radio station. He moved to Timmins, applied for a licence and got it."
CFCL soon attracted a faithful audience, especially in Northwestern Quebec, where it could be heard more clearly than French stations in Montreal.
In a 1988 interview with Northern Ontario Business, Mr. LAVIGNE remembered the time he hired a relative unknown named Stompin' Tom CONNORS to perform live on CFCL. The radio station was located above a jewellery store and the pounding from Mr. CONNORS's size-11 boots caused china to fall off the shelves in the store below.
Radio was his first love until the mid-1950s when, on a business trip to southern Ontario, he saw his first television broadcast, on WHAM from Rochester, New York He fell for the concept of television and he and an engineer friend drove to Rochester and learned everything they could about the magic medium of television.
Back in Timmins, Mr. LAVIGNE bought a hill in the north end of the town, named it Mont Sacré-Coeur, built a road to the foot of his hill, and began blasting rock and working in earnest to put a television station on the air. By 1956, CFCL-television was a reality.
"There was always the fear of failure because of the sparse population," Mr. LAVIGNE said at the time. "But we had an engineer with us named Roch DEMERS, who later became president of Telemedia, and together we started putting up rebroadcasting stations between 1957 and 1962."
Kapuskasing's rebroadcasting station was the first such facility in Canada, and it added another portion of the sparsely populated northeastern Ontario market to the growing station's network. Eventually, Mr. LAVIGNE built rebroadcasting stations in Chapleau and Moosonee, Ontario and Malartic, Quebec, and by the time expansion was completed, CFCL-television served 1.5 million people. Eventually, he built the station into the world's largest privately owned system.
For many years he appeared on a very popular CFCL program known as the President's Corner, during which he would sit on camera in a comfortable chair and read and respond to letters from viewers.
Between 1962 and 1970, Mr. LAVIGNE's television network entered the world of high technology with its own microwave network. Mr. LAVIGNE had the northeastern Ontario television market virtually all to himself for about 20 years until the Canadian Television Network (CTV) arrived on the scene. He reacted by building new stations in North Bay and Sudbury with a rebroadcasting station in Elliot Lake to serve Manitoulin Island. Expansion continued in 1976 with the purchase of a bankrupt television station in Pembroke, in the Ottawa Valley. Eventually, Mr. LAVIGNE's private network stretched from Moosonee to Ottawa, and from Hearst to Mattagami, Quebec
"When we first started we had the market all to ourselves," he told Northern Ontario Business. "We had 20 hours a week of local programming, and it was beautiful. We gave the North a unified voice. One time, during a forest fire near Chapleau, our messages arranged for accommodations for 1,000 people in Timmins."
Mr. LAVIGNE divested himself of his broadcasting holdings in 1980, primarily because he was refused permission to operate a cable television service in the North. He remained a director of Mid-Canada Television, the network that grew from his little Timmins station in 1956, and was chairman of the board of Northern Telephone Ltd. For a number of years, he served on the board of the National Bank of Canada, and for 10 years served on the board of ICG Utilities (formerly Inter City Gas.)
His life after broadcasting also included 20 years as a property developer in the Timmins area.
"He was always a physically active person," says Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL. "In the years he was setting up his television stations he would often go out with the engineers. He was not as happy sitting behind his desk."
Mr. LAVIGNE was elected to the Canadian Broadcasting Hall of Fame in 1990. His wife died in 1995. He leaves Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL and six other children, Marc, Andrée, Nicole, Jean-Luc, Pierre and Marie-France.

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CANNARD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Albert George WEBB
In loving memory of Albert George WEBB, April 9, 1921 to December 24, 2002.
Albert WEBB, a resident of Providence Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital, on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 at the age of 81 years. He was born in Durham, and had lived on Manitoulin for the past 6 years. Previous to that, Al had lived in Elliott Lake and Armstrong. He had a great love of the north country, which led him to his job as a bush pilot He truly loved his work, and spent many enjoyable years pursuing his love of the north and of flying. Al was a veteran of WW2, having served overseas.
Survived by his beloved partner Val TAILOR/TAYLOR of Providence Bay, and her family. Will be sadly missed by Ruby CANNARD, the Mike SPRACK family, Linda and Al BAILEY, Harvey and Diane DEBASSIGE, Lloyd JACKSON and Marshall RICHARD of Elliott Lake, Ryan HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Jim HARASYM. Survived by many Friends in the Armstrong, Elliott Lake and Manitoulin area. Also survived by sons Warren and Chris, and one brother in the Hamilton area.
At Al's request, there will be no funeral service. Cremation will take place.
Val TAILOR/TAYLOR would like to thank the doctors and nurses at Mindemoya Hospital for the wonderful care and concern given to Al and herself, during this time. Words cannot express the appreciation. Culgin Funeral Home

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CANNARD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-15 published
CANNARD
--In loving memory of my wife Sara, who passed away on January 16, 2000.
Though her smile is gone forever,
And her hand I cannot touch.
Still I have so many memories,
Of the one I loved so much.
Her memory is my keepsake,
With which I will never part,
God has her in his keeping,
I have her in my heart.
-Lovingly remembered, D.O.

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CANNON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-21 published
RILEY, Mickey
Born in London, England, March 13, 1940, died suddenly in Vancouver, his home for 40 years, on Tuesday, June 17th, 2003. Predeceased by his beloved soulmate, Karen, his parents Jessie and Danny RILEY and his sister, Maureen CANNON. Survived by his sisters Megan ABBOTT and Kelly RILEY and all the extended family members. A Memorial Service will be held at the Kearney Funeral Chapel, 1096 West Broadway, Vancouver (near Oak and Broadway) at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, June 25th, 2003, for family and Friends. ''Mickey, you are in our thoughts and may you rest in peace''.
Kearney Funeral Home (604) 736-0268

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CANTOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-07 published
MORGAN, Margaret Kathleen (née DAVIS)
Died in her sleep at her home in Toronto on Thursay, June 5, 2003. Beloved wife for 56 years of the late Robert MORGAN. Dear mother of Robert Davis MORGAN (Karen) and Lynn CANTOR. Proud grandma to Scott MORGAN (Nicole), David MORGAN, Adam CANTOR and Sarah Alexandra CANTOR. Predeceased by her older brother, Gordon DAVIS, and her twin Frederick DAVIS. Best pal of Marian CARTER for 75 years. Margaret was born in Winnipeg in 1915. Before her marriage she worked for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Winnipeg. Her marriage to Bob took her to Halifax, Saint John, Ottawa, Edmonton, London, Ontario and finally Toronto where a lifelong love of the ballet led her to become involved with the newly formed National Ballet of Canada. She founded the National Ballet's ''Paper Things'' store, and was President of the Volunteer Committee. She was a Past-President of the Southern Ontario Unit of the Herb Society of America, a member of the Toronto Herb Society, and a Governor of Sunnybrook Hospital. Her joyful spirit and sense of fun will be sadly missed by her vast network of Friends who played bridge with her at the York Club, golfed with her at The Toronto Hunt, marveled at her creative talents with The Garden Club of Toronto, and partied with her at Goodwood, Longboat Key and Muir Park. She loved life and she lived with amazing grace.
A memorial service will be held at Lawrence Park Community Church, 2180 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, on Tuesday, June 10 at 2 o'clock p.m. In honour of Margaret's commitment to the ballet, donations in her memory may be made to Development, Special Gifts, The National Ballet of Canada, 470 Queen's Quay West, Toronto, Ontario M5V 3K4. Arrangements in the care of Trull 'North Toronto' Funeral Home andCremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence) 416-488-1101

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