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"CAM" 2003 Obituary


CAMERON  CAMPBELL  CAMPEAU 

CAMERON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Katherine (Kae) PLAUNT
Died peacefully at York Extendicare, Sudbury, on May 9, 2003 in her 90th year, with her children at her side. Cherished daughter of the late Mildred and W.B. PLAUNT. Predeceased by her loving husband, Dr. R. MacKay THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON in 1981. Dearly remembered by her children: Andy (Mandy TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Toronto, Kathie THOMAS (Richard,) Judy MAKI (Tom) and Robin (Mary Lou McKINLEY) of Sudbury. Adored Nana to Allen DAY (Erin CAMERON), Andy DAY (Carla GIUSTO), Kathy, Jodi, Alex, Nikki, Fraser, Michael, Jamie, Scott and great-grandmother to Alexander. Beloved sister of Marian MAHAFFY (Guy, predeceased,) Bill PLAUNT, predeceased (Agnes,) Helen VOLLANS (Maurice, predeceased,) Donald PLAUNT, predeceased, Royal Canadian Air Force, World War 2 and Jean BENNESS, predeceased (Barry, predeceased.) Loving sister-in-law to George WRIGHT of Hanover, Ruth LAWS of Almonte, Murray THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Ottawa and Muriel VALENTIN of Stuttgart, Germany. Auntie Kae will be fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews and their families in the PLAUNT and THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON clans.
Born in Renfrew on April 29, 1914, she moved to Sudbury in 1924 where her father established his lumber business. She attended Central Public and Sudbury High School, Branksome Hall and graduated from the School of Nursing, University of Toronto, in 1937. After working in Toronto in public health, she returned to Sudbury the following year where she met and married Mac.
Kae loved to golf and curl, and took an avid interest in her family's history. She was very talented in the traditional arts, enjoying knitting, quilting and cooking. As an active community volunteer, she belonged to the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire where she was Regent and to the Salvation Army as an organizer for the annual fund raising drive and board member. She loved to travel with her husband and Friends, but her favourite place in the world was Lake Pogamasing where her parents established a family camp in 1941 and where she spent every summer with her family. She loved to entertain her Friends and her children's Friends, especially at Pog. We were blessed to have a mother and grandmother who stressed the importance of family, community and responsibility. She loved to bring people together and do things for them, to share her interests and her talents, she was kind and considerate to all she met, and along with Dad taught us how to dance and have fun.
Special thanks from the family to Dr. Reg KUSNIERCZYK and his staff, the Walford staff and Dr. ROCH and staff on the fifth floor of York Extendicare for their devoted and caring attention to Mother.
In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to Young Men's Christian Association Sudbury.
Memorial service in the R.J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury, Tuesday, May 13th, 2003 at 11: 30 a.m. Cremation followed by interment at Lake Pogamasing. Friends may call 6-9 p.m. Monday, or gather in the chapel after 11 a.m. Tuesday.

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CAMERON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
KIRKUP, Professor Richard July 19, 1933 - May 9, 2003
Professor Richard KIRKUP died peacefully at home at the age of 69 with the ''Love of His Life'', Linda CAMERON now KIRKUP and his favorite baby sister, Wanda nursing him and by his side to the end. Many prayers sustained him plus special bedside prayers, caring and Christian love given with great gentleness and affection by international student, Donald, his tenant, and Catherine, his special nurse. His death was free of pain and filled with comfort and love and was indeed a gentle transition to a better place to be with God. Richard will be greatly missed by longtime friend, companion and wife, Linda Cameron KIRKUP, Richard's brother Donald KIRKUP, sister Wanda, cousin Diane, cousin Carolyn KIRKUP, his many relatives and Friends mourn his death. If you wish to donate in memory of his name, his favorite charities were the World Wild Life Foundation, Charities supporting animal welfare, the environment or those most vulnerable in our society. A memorial service will be held at a later date to be announced for Friends and family to share Richard's stories and to celebrate his life. In the care of the Gordon F. Tompkins Funeral Homes, Central Chapel (613)546-5454, gftompkins-central.ca

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CAMERON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-17 published
CAMERON, Docia Lorraine Bennett.
Born April 14, 1917, Russell Springs, Logan County, Kansas; died, Edmonton, April 16, 2003. Predeceased by her husband Norman S. CAMERON, sisters Stella and Irene, and brothers Emory, Bill, Guy, and Ivan. Mourned by daughter Jane CAMERON, Toronto, son Duncan (Yolande GRISÉ) Chelsea, Quebec, her brother Don (Georgie) LEWISTON, Idaho, and special Friends Michelle, Kevin and Olivia TOM, Penticton, British Columbia. Like her parents Charles and Mary she was an Alberta pioneer, arriving as a young child in the farm country in the Forestburg area. Her youth was spent in the world depression which so affected the prairies; at 22 she witnessed the outbreak of World War 2. Bride of a Naval lieutenant she lived in Esquimalt, Prince Rupert, Halifax, and Toronto during the war years. With her husband overseas, she established the family home in Edmonton until a family move to Vancouver in 1966. Shortly after Norman died in 1992 she returned to Edmonton. She was a passionate Canadian, an admirer of her contemporary Pierre Elliot Trudeau, a lover of good books, gardens, antiques, and the opera on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. A wonderful story teller, her sense of humour endeared her to many. She thrived on lively conversation, good drink, and fine cuisine. Independent minded, a fierce defender of all those she loved, and a steadfast opponent of mean spirited governments, she lived her life fully. In her memory donations may be made to the Parkland Institute, University of Alberta.

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CAMERON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-24 published
COBLENTZ, Harry Stagg
Born in London, England, June 12, 1926 and died on Saturday, September 20, 2003. He dearly loved, and was dearly loved by, his wife Josephine (Craig) and his children, Linda (Bernard BECK,) Jenny (Edmund STELMACHER,) Craig (Bonnie CAMERON,) and Eliza (Michael KENDRICK.) He will be greatly missed and lovingly remembered by his grandchildren, Amy (Warren STEVENS,) Andrew, Aaron, Bianca, Ailish, Maggie, Hunter, Parkes, and Rennie, and great-grand_sons Sajen and Cannon.
He was educated at King's College, Durham University and University of North Carolina. He worked in the Planning profession in London, England, Toronto Township, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Arizona. He was professor of planning at Waterloo, Arizona State, and Pennsylvania State Universities.
Friends and family will gather to celebrate his beautiful life at Saint John's Anglican Church in Elora, Friday, September 26 at 3: 30 p.m. In memory of his lifelong passion for learning, teaching, and books, remembrances to the Waterloo Region Library, Elmira Branch, Children's Department, would be greatly appreciated by his family.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-26 published
M. Irene SLOSS
In loving memory of M. Irene Sloss, December 1, 1931 to March 14, 2003.
Irene SLOSS, a resident of Evansville, died as the result of a car accident on Friday, March 14, 2003 at the age of 71 years. She was born in Little Current, daughter of the late Andrew and Sarah (MIDDAUGH) CAMPBELL, and had trained as a secretary, but her life was working alongside Marvin on their farm. She was a hard working lady, who enjoyed cooking and having company visit, but her true love in life was her family. Irene was a loving and caring wife, mother, grandmother and sister. Many fond memories will be cherished by all who knew her.
Dearly loved wife of Marvin SLOSS of Evansville. Loving and loved mother of Vicki NOON (husband Ed predeceased,) Terry and husband Paul TUBB of British Columbia, proud grandmother of Kirstin (deceased) and Holly NOON. Dear sister of Lorraine MONTGOMERY (husband Mel predeceased) and Jim CAMPBELL (wife Bernadette predeceased.) Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home on Thursday, March 20, 2003. The funeral service was held in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel on Friday, March 21, 2003 with Pastor Erwin THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and Father Robert FOLIOT officiating. Spring interment in Mills Cemetery.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
Annie Melissa GRAVELLE
In loving memory of Annie Melissa GRAVELLE, peacefully at Manitoulin Centennial Manor on Monday, April 14, 2003 age 82 years.
Predeceased by husband Percy GRAVELLE. Predeceased by daughter Gail. Remembered by son-in-law Al McPHERSON. Cherished Grandmother of Perry and wife Rita CAMPBELL of Naughton, Sherry Lynn and husband Gilles, Cara and husband Henry. Loved Great Grandmother of Dustin, Sara and Nigel CAMPBELL, Danielle and Kristen. Remembered by sister Verna and husband Stewart MIDDAUGH, brothers Grant and wife Ethel BOWERMAN and Don and wife June BOWERMAN. Predeceased by Virgie Young, Cleve BOWERMAN, Clara BLACKBURN, Leonard BOWERMAN, Ruby YOUNG and Mildred MIDDAUGH.
There will be a gathering of Friends on Saturday, April 19, 2003 at 1: 30 to remember and celebrate Annie’s life at the family home in Whitefish Falls. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
CAMPBELL
-In memory of Ivan E. born December 8, 1923 and passed away on April 20, 1973.
It's been thirty years since that painful April day,
We try to understand why you were taken away.
We miss your laugh, and love and smile,
If only you could have stayed with us for a longer while.
So many others still have their Dad,
Watching and wishing only makes us sad.
Pictures and memories we have to share,
They help us all remember how much we care.
-Love from daughters Norma Jean and Gloria, son-in-law Walter, and grandchildren Jeffrey and Amy.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-23 published
Maurice Russell CAMPBELL
In loving memory of Maurice Russell CAMPBELL, November 3, 1930 to April 5, 2003.
Maurice CAMPBELL, a resident of Gore Bay and formerly of Ice Lake, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Saturday, April 5, 2003 at the age of 72 years He was born in Carnarvon Township, son of the late Russell and Mildred (LEWIS) CAMPBELL. Maurice had worked as a mechanic for over 40 years, for McDougall Construction, McQuarrie Motors and Manitoulin Transport. When he was able, Maurice enjoyed hunting and fishing. Dearly loved husband of Jean CAMPBELL of Gore Bay. Loved father of Marilyn of Mindemoya, Rick and his wife Laurie of Spring Bay, Ron and his wife Bonnie of Ice Lake, Stephen of Sudbury and Tracy and husband Steve VYSE of Mindemoya. Loving grandfather of Ryan, Leslie, Colin, Krystal and TecaBoo and Chevy. Dear brother of Ivan CAMPBELL of Sudbury, Blaine CAMPBELL of Spring Bay, Myrna PATTERSON of Gore Bay, Edith LOGAN of Lively and Keith CAMPBELL of Milton. Predeceased by one sister Berniece. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Cremation will take place and a memorial service will be held at a later date. Culgin Funeral Home

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-03 published
Ina ADDISON
In loving memory of Ina ADDISON, August 27, 1914 to August 22, 2003.
Ina ADDISON, a resident of Gordon Township, passed away at Manitoulin Lodge on Friday, August 22, 2003 at the age of 88 years. She was born in Gordon Township, daughter of William and Ida (WOOD) LINLEY. Ina was predeceased by brothers William and Herbert and sisters Edith (CAMPBELL, WILSON) and May (MORDEN.) Ina enjoyed quilting, flowers and gardening. Her greatest love other than the cattle was her family and all the gatherings they enjoyed over the years. Ina married Joe WILSON on August 9, 1933 and they lived their married life on the farm in Gordon, where Ken and Beth GIBBS now reside. Joe died on April 27, 1981 and on May 4, 1985 Ina married Clarence ADDISON. Clarence died on March 18, 1995. Ina's daughter, and only child, Eldean GIBBS (Mrs. Jack,) died on March 29, 1995. Ina's faith in God got her through this sad time but she spent many lonely days. Clarence and Ina lived in Evansville where his daughter Sheila and her husband Frank HARLEY now spend their holidays. They then moved to Mill Site Apartments and in October 2002, Ina moved to Manitoulin Lodge. Ina leaves to mourn her son-in-law, Jack GIBBS (friend June,) grand_son Ken GIBBS (wife Beth) and her beloved great-grandchildren, Loren, John, and Krysten GIBBS, and her stepchildren, Chester ADDISON (wife Pat deceased,) Stan and Joan ADDISON, Sheila and Frank HARLEY and step-grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She will also be remembered by many nieces and nephews to whom she was a very special aunt. Friend called the Culgin Funeral Home on Sunday, August 24, 2003. The Funeral Service was held on Monday, August 25, 2003 with Pastor Erwin Thompson officiating. Interment in Gordon Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
Patricia Joan STERRITT
In loving memory of Patricia Joan STERRITT (née MORRIS) a resident of Manitowaning, died at Laurentian Hospital, Sudbury, on Sunday, October 19, 2003 at the age of 69.
Pat was born in Brampton, daughter of the late Gilbert and Mona (TRIMBLE) MORRIS. Will be dearly missed by her loving husband Malcolm SINCLAIR STERRITT and her children Richard (Rick) STERRITT of Brampton, Wendy (GRAY/GREY) and husband Jim of Palgrave, Robert and wife Lorie of Caledon East, Carl and wife Karen of Alton. Her six grandchildren Mandy, Laura, Nicole, Samantha, Jake and Benjamin will miss their "Nanny"
Predeceased by brothers Robert and Brian and survived by dear sister Virginia and husband Yvon GALIPEAU of Milton, Gail GRIFFITH of Brampton, Mary (CLARIDGE) and husband Hap of Salmon Arm, BC, Julie (CAMPBELL) and husband Brian of Brampton, brothers John, of Brampton and Grant and wife Pam of Chatham. Visitation was held on Monday, October 20, 2003. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, October 21, 2003 all at St. Paul's Anglican Church, Manitowaning, Ontario. Reverend Canon Bain PEEVER officiating. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-27 published
Jet pilot helped hold North American Air Defence Command fort
Career military man proud how command handled Russian false alarm
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, January 27, 2003, Page R7
Lieutenant-General Robert MORTON became interested in flying as a youngster in the Ottawa Valley community of Almonte, where he often spent long hours gluing photographs of aircraft into his scrapbook.
"He wanted to be a fighter pilot, he was always talking about airplanes," recalled his wife Pat. "Later in life, he once told me: 'I can't believe they are paying me to fly.' He loved it so much."
Gen. MORTON, who received his pilot's wings in 1960 and went on to become deputy commander-in-chief of the North American Air Defence Command in Colorado, died on December 7 in Ottawa. He was 65.
He attended Almonte High School, which, despite having 360 students, turned out a handful of Canadian Armed Forces air-force generals, including Major-General B.R. CAMPBELL and Don STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and Murray RAMSBOTTOM, both brigadier-generals. They jokingly referred to themselves as the Almonte Mafia.
Prior to graduation, Gen. MORTON toyed with the idea of becoming a pharmacist but opted for a career in the military, which would pay his way through university and cater to his interest in flying. After Grade 13, he joined the air force and spent two years at Royal Roads Military College in Victoria, before finishing his studies at the Royal Military College in Kingston. It was the beginning of a 37-year career. He learned to fly during the summers and received his wings when he graduated from Royal Military College with a B.Sc.
"He was bright, energetic and full of life," recalls Gen. RAMSBOTTOM, retired and living in Cumberland, Ontario "In our high-school days, I'd say his interest in flying was not all apparent. We were more interested in basketball, academics and socializing."
After pilot training, Gen. MORTON was posted to France where until 1963 he served as a fighter pilot with 421 Fighter Squadron in Grostenquin, flying CF-86 Sabres, the Korean War-era jet.
During his career, he flew many different types of aircraft, including the CF-101 Voodoo twin-engine interceptor, the T-39 Saberliner and the T-33 Shooting star, which was Canada's main advanced fighter trainer for decades. He also flew the CF-104 Starfighter, a tricky supersonic plane nicknamed the "widow maker" by German pilots.
He returned to Ottawa in 1963 and was assigned to air-force headquarters, holding several administrative jobs. From 1966 to 1968, he was a flying instructor in Gimli, Manitoba His first posting to Colorado Springs was in 1968 as a major, his second in 1978 as colonel and his third as lieutenant-general in 1989. In between, he held a number of posts, including commander of the North American Air Defence Command base at North Bay, Ontario, chief of staff operations of Fourth Allied Tactical Air Force in Hiedelberg, Germany, and base operations officer and flight commander, 416 Squadron at Canadian Forces Base in Chatham, New Brunswick.
He was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general in 1982, major-general in 1984 and lieutenant-general in 1989.
During one of his stints with North American Air Defence Command, which was established to protect Canada and the United States from surprise attacks, Gen. MORTON was command director inside Cheyenne Mountain, the bunker carved out of a Colorado mountain that was designed to withstand a direct hit from a nuclear warhead.
On a number of occasions during his career, there were false alarms, including a burst of solar energy during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan that set off radar stations in Alaska and across the Canadian Arctic. This put North American Air Defence Command and Strategic Air Command systems on a heightened state of alert while the command and control network worked quickly to assure it was not a real attack.
"This was a significant thing when you consider the consequences of a bad decision," said Gen. MORTON's son Bruce. "In the post-event analysis, after the mountain had made the ultimate decision that it was not an attack and our forces were ordered to stand down, my father, his people and North American Air Defence Command, were proud that they had all done their jobs properly."
While working with North American Air Defence Command, Gen. MORTON knew the Soviet Union tested North American defences by sending flights along the Arctic and Labrador coasts. On one such trip, he ordered CF-18 fighters into the air to photograph the Canadian fighter shadowing the Soviet plane, proving to the North American public that the defence system had a real job to do.
Gen. MORTON retired in 1992 to become a member of the Air Command Advisory Council, a body set up to advise Canada's air-force leadership. He also served as honorary national president of the Air Force Association of Canada from 1994 to 1999 and under his leadership it grew to 20,000 members from 12,000, said executive director Bob TRACEY. The association is a lobby group with the goal of improving Canada's military.
Mr. TRACEY, who worked for Gen. MORTON in Colorado, remembers his former boss as a commander who understood the needs and wants of his troops. "He could get an awful lot of work out of people with him."
Gen. MORTON, a devoted family man, met his wife in Grade 5; they started going steady at age 15, and married at 23. They had two children, Bruce and Jennie. Gen. MORTON also leaves his father Stanley.
Robert MORTON, air force officer; born in Almonte, Ontario, March 23, 1937; died in Ottawa, December 7, 2002.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
HARRIS, Noni, R.N.
Died April 6th, 2003, of cancer, at home in her 60th year. The pain has mercifully ended. Her husband Terry of Meaford Township, their daughter Kim of New York, their son Glen of Thornbury and three grandchildren, Kyle, Jacob and Juliet, survive her. She is also survived by her father, Don CAMPBELL of Port Hope as well as brothers Bruce of Toronto and Michael of Calgary and their families. Noni was an enthusiastic sailor, photographer, skier, and lover of animals and nature. She will best be remembered by her many Friends to whom she was a constant support. A ''celebration of her life'' will be held at the family home on Sunday, April 20 at 1 p.m. Please fax (519) 538-0160 or email glencroft@bmts.com for directions. Donations in her memory to the Meaford Hall Fund, 12 Nelson Street, Meaford, Ontario M4L 1N6 would be appreciated.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-16 published
CAMPBELL, William Logan 'Bill'
Died April 9, 2003, in Camp Hill Veterans' Memorial Building, Halifax, at the age of 83. Survived by his wife Enid (BOWEN,) daughter Leslie MacKINNON, grand_son Beau (Michelle,) great-grand_son Alexander, daughter-in-law Lynn and grand_son Aaron; predeceased by son Bob in 1974. Bill joined the Canadian Army in 1939. After retiring in 1969 with the rank of lieutenant colonel, he was active in municipal and provincial politics. A memorial service will be held at a later date in Saint John's Anglican Church, York Mills, Ontario.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
JOHNSON, Eleanor Jean, née CAMPBELL (October 17, 1915 - May 9, died peacefully after 3 weeks of acute illness. She grew up in Ottawa, travelled and worked in Canada and then in Washington as part of the war effort. Inspired by the work of the Saint John Ambulance, she joined as a volunteer and went to England in 1945 where she met her beloved Arthur Norman JOHNSON, her lifetime partner, whom she married in 1946. She was a community volunteer her whole life. For 35 years she worked with High Horizons, an organization she credits with her continued good health through years of battling a variety of conditions. She was a bird watcher, cottage lover, trusted friend to many people and an adored wife, mother, grandmother and great-grand-mother. The daughter of the late Ida M. CAMPBELL and Donald L. CAMPBELL, she is survived by 'Johnny' JOHNSON, her husband, her 2 daughters Jennifer BROOKS and Barbara THOMAS, her sons-in-law Bruce BROOKS and D'Arcy MARTIN, her grandchildren Karen ELLIS, Debbie FAULDS, Janette THOMAS and Geoff BROOKS, and their partners Shawn ELLIS, Sean FAULDS, Sean KONDRA and Thach-Thao PHAN. Her great grandchildren are Devon and Shanice ELLIS. Friends are invited to meet the family at the West Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 150 Woodroffe Avenue at Richmond Road on Tuesday May 13 from 6 to 8 p.m. and to celebrate her life at a Memorial Service to be held in the Chapel on Wednesday May 14 at 2 p.m. The Chapel is wheelchair accessible. In lieu of flowers donations in her name would be welcomed at High Horizons, c/o Mackay United Church, 39 Dufferin Avenue, Ottawa, K1M 2H3.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-19 published
Peter George Raoul CAMPBELL
By Richard NIELSEN Monday, May 19, 2003 - Page A14
Diplomat, broadcaster, friend. Born February 22, 1916, in Dublin, Ireland. Died March 23 in Toronto, of a stroke, aged 87.
Peter Campbell had three distinguished careers: in war, in diplomacy, and in broadcasting, with a short epilogue in education.
He received his primary education in England (his parents emigrated when he was 12) and in Canada. He was a scholarship-winning graduate of University of Toronto Schools, and proud all his life of the fine notices he received there as Lady Macbeth.
He got his B.A. from the University of Toronto where he was chess champion and won a scholarship to Harvard where he completed his M.A. in Classical Studies.
After Harvard, Peter joined the Royal Canadian Navy, serving in the North Atlantic, Britain and at the Normandy invasion where he commanded the leading large-troop carrier that took Canadians to Juno Beach. He spent most of his war as an officer on the corvette Eyebright.
His war service stayed with him, making him at ease with people with backgrounds very different than his own. Peter's highest praise was that someone had given a "sturdy" performance. Sturdiness was the quality he most admired, and that, I suspect, came from the demands of a bleak and threatening North Atlantic in the most unglamorous and unthreatening of "war" ships, the corvette.
But if the Navy demanded "sturdiness", the External Affairs Department, which he joined in 1946, rewarded brilliance. Peter CAMPBELL served with distinction in the Philippines, Washington and the Far East. While in Laos he is credited with having played an important role in the negotiation of the Laos agreement that successfully prevented Laos from becoming involved in the Vietnam War. There, while not yet 40, he achieved the rank of Ambassador as Canadian head of the International Supervisory Commission.
As usual, Peter's methods were unorthodox. The Paris daily Le Monde, reported in detail on a party at the Canadian Embassy, where a grand hall had been cleared of furniture so that two nets ("cages," I think, was the translation of the word used by Le Monde), could be placed at opposite ends of the room so that the guests could play hockey with the sticks and "rondelle" recently arrived from Ottawa "at the Ambassador's request... The game was a huge success but the many minor injuries sustained would probably prevent it from being widely imitated," Le Monde lamented.
In 1959, Peter joined Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a program organizer. He would rise to be head of the public affairs department. At the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, sturdiness and brilliance mellowed into judgment. His specialty was foreign affairs, but his style as a supervisor encouraged creativity as well as self-discipline.
When his department was amalgamated with the news department, bringing to an end, some would say, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's distinguished role as a forum for Canadian opinion, he became responsible for Broadcast Policy and Standards. He was kept on in that capacity even after his official retirement.
He also held a teaching position at York. There, he stimulated a sense of responsibility among students of broadcasting and film, and nothing in his life gave him as much satisfaction as the Honorary Doctor of Letters (Honoris Causa) awarded him on June 15, 1998.
On that day, he ended his address with the thought that "without passion and a lively critical sense, the spirit is dormant."
Peter's spirit remained "sturdy" through the whole of his 87 very productive years and his mind remained alert and his chess game formidable. As the Buddhists say, he was "a joyful presence amidst the sorrows of the world."
Richard NIELSEN was a friend and colleague of Peter CAMPBELL.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-02 published
Collecting art was his passion
British Columbia business leader donated 800 works, worth $5-million, to Vancouver gallery
Canadian Press and staff files Monday, June 2, 2003 - Page R7
Vancouver -- Vancouver businessman and art philanthropist J. Ron LONGSTAFFE has died of cancer. He was 69.
While Mr. LONGSTAFFE made his name in business at Canadian Forest Products and was also a lawyer and a Liberal Party activist, he will be best remembered for his donation of 800 works of art, valued at more than $5-million, to the Vancouver Art Gallery.
"One of the things I basically believe in is that art is there to be seen and enjoyed, not squirrelled away in vaults," the Ontario-born Mr. LONGSTAFFE once said of his collection. "I'm not one of those collectors who, having bought a work, says it's all mine and nobody else can see it."
Andy SYLVESTER, a partner at the Equinox Gallery, said that over the years, Mr. LONGSTAFFE and his wife Jacqueline donated a major and significant amount of art to the Vancouver Art Gallery.
"It is almost the core of the [gallery's] contemporary Canadian art collection," Mr. SYLVESTER said.
At shows, Mr. LONGSTAFFE loved to play a little game that involved picking a work to donate to the Vancouver Art Gallery and another to keep for a lifetime, Mr. SYLVESTER said.
Included in the LONGSTAFFEs' recent gift of 75 pieces of art to the gallery are works by Robert Davidson, Gathie Falk, Simon Tookoome, Maxwell Bates, Ann Kipling and Betty Goodwin. There are also various works on paper by Chuck Close, Richard Hamilton, Pablo Picasso and Alexander Calder.
Over the years, Mr. LONGSTAFFE, who was at one time executive director of Canadian Forest Products (now called Canfor), donated major works to the gallery by international artists such as David Hockney, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Paul-Emile Borduas, Charles Gagnon and Claude Tousignant.
Born and raised in Toronto, where he attended Upper Canada College, Mr. LONGSTAFFE went west to attend the University of British Columbia in the mid-fifties. Even then the pattern of buying art was already established in his life. His father had provided all the LONGSTAFFE children with money to buy art starting when they were 16.
During university, Ron LONGSTAFFE told The Globe and Mail in 1985, art collecting became a way of "livening up the walls of my apartment." Over the next decade, it became "a form of addiction," one that had seen him buy as many as five paintings a day.
Although he originally found the art world intimidating, he later counted a number of artists, such as Christopher and Mary Pratt, as Friends. He said that artists, as a group, are "more stimulating than a lot of businessmen.... They have a wider range of interests and are in touch with what young people are doing."
However, he remained deliberately untutored in fine-art history and found most art criticism "unreadable," and preferred to go with his gut instinct about work that "challenges me, stimulates me, and that I like enough to buy."
He said he never bought art as an investment, or simply because "it matched the drapes or looked good over the fireplace. That I couldn't house it was no reason not to have it."
In a private tour of the Vancouver Art Gallery, the LONGSTAFFE donations at that time revealed a surprising variety that was rich in contemporary art in general and French-Canadian painting in particular (including important works by Borduas, Gagnon, Lemieux and Tousignant). Little preference was shown for any one artist (except for Hockney and Vasarely, represented by 17 prints each, only a few of which were on display). Sculpture was rare. "Canada is short of really strong sculptors," he said at the time.
In the interview he said that, although his tastes changed greatly over the years, he intended "to collect until the day I die."
In recognition of Mr. LONGSTAFFE's donations, the gallery's third-floor exhibition space was named the J.R. LONGSTAFFE Gallery in 1983.
Senator Jack AUSTIN said from Ottawa that he had known Mr. LONGSTAFFE since he was a young man in law school during the mid-1950s.
"I was his law teacher in first year -- in contracts," he said.
Sen. AUSTIN said he knew Mr. LONGSTAFFE as a successful businessman, an active member of the federal Liberal Party and an art collector.
"He did many things and he did them well," he said. "I can only wish that there were more British Columbians that took part in federal politics with his energy and initiative."
In the 1993 federal election, Mr. LONGSTAFFE managed the campaign of Liberal Member of Parliament Hedy FRY, who defeated then prime minister Kim CAMPBELL.
His many positions included director of the Bank of Canada, vice-chairman of the Vancouver Board of Trade, and director of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet.
In 2001, Mr. LONGSTAFFE was inducted into the Order of Canada.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-07 published
CAMPBELL, Ruth Eleanor (née BEATSON)
Died on June 5, 2003 at Glynwood Retirement Residence. Predeceased by her husband Dr. Hoyle CAMPBELL. Loving mother of Dr. Kathryn CHALLONER and her husband Dorian and their children Christine, Byron and David; Virginia TONG and her husband David and their children Kathryn and Janet. A private interment will take place in the family plot at Mount Pleasant Cemetery.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
A remarkable life, and a friend to all
By Eric DUHATSCHEK Monday, June 23, 2003 - Page S1
Nashville -- Roger NEILSON's legacy in hockey will endure because he coached 1,000 games among eight National Hockey League teams, because he was an innovator and because he served as a mentor and a tutor to others during a Hall of Fame career.
But the contributions of NEILSON, who died Saturday in Peterborough, Ontario, at 69 after a lengthy battle with cancer, contain a vibrancy matched by few others because of the countless Friendships he developed during his lifetime.
The proof of that came in June of last year when a dozen of his closest Friends organized a tribute to NEILSON. It was held in Toronto, a day before the National Hockey League awards dinner, to make it easier for people to attend, which they did. More than 1,300 people were there.
NEILSON was responsible for helping several players and coaches get to the National Hockey League, including Bob GAINEY, Craig RAMSAY and Colin CAMPBELL, players on the Peterborough Petes junior team that NEILSON coached in the 1970s.
Among those who benefited from NEILSON's guidance was Florida Panthers coach Mike KEENAN. Scotty BAUMAN/BOWMAN, the Hall of Fame coach, recalled Saturday how NEILSON talked him into hiring KEENAN, who had also coached the Petes, into running the Buffalo Sabres' minor-league affiliate in Rochester, New York in the early 1980s.
"Roger didn't have any enemies," KEENAN said. "He lived his life in a principled way. He had a great deal of respect for people and found goodness in all of them. He was very unique and all of us were blessed to know him.
"I'm saddened by his passing, but to me, this is a life to be celebrated, a life that was so influential to many of us."
NEILSON had an endless fascination with the rulebook that forced the powers in whatever league he happened to be coaching in to revise and clarify each loophole he probed. For a penalty shot, he would put a defenceman in the crease instead of a goaltender, instructing the defenceman to rush the shooter as soon as the latter crossed the blueline, to hurry him into a mistake.
Once, when his team was already two players short with less than two minutes remaining in the game, NEILSON kept sending players over the boards, getting penalties for delaying the game. The strategy worked, taking time off the clock and upsetting the other team's flow. At that stage of the game, it didn't matter how many penalties NEILSON's team was taking. If a coach tried that tactic today, the opposition would be awarded a penalty shot.
NEILSON, whose last job was as an assistant coach with the Ottawa Senators, coached his 1,000th National Hockey League game on the final night of the 2001-02 regular season, temporarily filling in for Senators head coach Jacques MARTIN. NEILSON was involved with a dozen National Hockey League teams in a series of different capacities, including his eight different turns as a head coach. In 1982, he took the Vancouver Canucks to the Stanley Cup final, his one and only appearance in the championship series as a coach. The Canucks were swept by the New York Islanders.
It was during that playoff run that NEILSON placed a white towel on the end of a stick, a mock surrender to the on-ice officials.
In 1999, NEILSON was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a form of bone cancer, and needed a bone marrow transplant. He also developed skin cancer, the result of a lifetime of being outdoors, in the sun, usually in raggedy old shorts and T-shirts, with a well-worn baseball cap perched on his head.
"He put in an incredible, inspiring fight with an insidious disease," said KEENAN, who added that NEILSON kept in constant contact with his mother Thelma, after she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.
"They found strength in each other. That's the type of individual Roger was. He'd reach out and touch somebody who needed help. He was deathly in pain the last few times we spoke, but he would not let it influence his life."
The high regard for NEILSON was clear during the tribute for him last year. Former coach and Hockey Night in Canada analyst Harry NEALE, who worked with NEILSON in Vancouver, was the master of ceremonies. But he was so overcome by emotion so many times that he let his good friend Roger steal the show.
NEILSON's self-deprecating sense of humor surfaced when he scanned the crowd and suggested that everyone he'd ever said hello to in his lifetime had turned up for the event. He quipped that at $125 a ticket, it must be an National Hockey League production. What other organization would set the price so outrageously high?
NEILSON's health was deteriorating this spring, but he managed to accompany the Senators on the road for their second-round series against the Philadelphia Flyers. The Senators pushed the eventual Stanley Cup champions, the New Jersey Devils, to seven games in the Eastern Conference final before being eliminated.
NEILSON's speech to the team before Game 6, with the Senators trailing 3-1 in the series, was cited by the players and the coaching staff as the inspiration for their comeback against the Devils.
"The only sad part is we weren't able to win a Stanley Cup for him this year," Martin said.
With his health failing, NEILSON asked BAUMAN/BOWMAN to be the keynote speaker at his annual coaching clinic in Windsor earlier this month.
"I talked to him only a week ago," BAUMAN/BOWMAN said. "I said, 'The coaches in the National Hockey League are getting blamed a lot for the [defensive] style that teams are playing.' I said, 'You should blame Roger NEILSON because he's the one training all these coaches.'
"Roger was a special person. The people that follow hockey know what he went through. I truly think he battled it right to the end and it was hockey that probably kept Roger going." eduhatschek@globeandmail.ca
Remembering Roger NEILSON
"The coaches in the National Hockey League have been getting blamed a lot for the style of game the teams are playing. I said, 'You should blame Roger NEILSON because he's training all these coaches.' "He battled right to the end. Hockey and life for Roger were intertwined. That probably kept him going to the end. He never got married. He was married to hockey."
Scott BAUMAN/BOWMAN
"All the awards he won this year tell you about his hockey career's innovativeness and what kind of person he is. Some people are going to remember Roger for nothing to do with hockey just because of what a humanitarian he is. He put up an unbelievable battle. From when he found out how sick he was, if had happened to most people, they would have had their demise many months ago. He fought hard."
Jim GREGORY
"I know I haven't met a person who could equal Roger's passion for hockey. The honours bestowed on him in the past year, the Hockey Hall of Fame and the Order of Canada, did not come by accident. He has done so much for so many kids and I will always remember that legacy."
Harry NEALE
"He's an individual we can all be inspired by, by his ability to deal with some difficult situations in his own life. He has such a high level of respect for human beings. "He was fortunate in way he lived his life. It was impacted by his faith and his religion. He observed those principles on a daily basis, things most of us have a hard time dealing with. He saw the goodness in everyone else."
Mike KEENAN
"He did a lot of work at the grassroots level with his hockey camps, coaches' clinics, his baseball teams, his summer programs. He wasn't really in it for himself very much. "It's a word you use too often to make it special but in his case he was unique, he really was."
Bob GAINEY
"Hockey has lost a great mind, a great spirit, a great friend. The National Hockey League family mourns his loss but celebrates his legacy -- the generations of players he counselled, the coaches he moulded, the changes his imagination inspired and the millions of fans he entertained."
Gary BETTMAN
Life and times
Born: June 16, 1934, in Toronto.
Education: Roger NEILSON graduated from McMaster University in Hamilton with a degree in physical education.
Nickname: Captain Video because he was the first to analyze game videos to pick apart opponents' weaknesses.
Coaching career: NEILSON coached hockey teams for 50 years. He was a National Hockey League coach for Toronto, Buffalo, Vancouver, Los Angeles, the New York Rangers, Florida, Philadelphia and Ottawa. The Senators let him coach a game on April 13, 2002, so he could reach 1,000 for his career. He was an National Hockey League assistant in Buffalo, Chicago, St. Louis and Ottawa.
Major Honours: Elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in the builders category last year. Invested into the Order of Canada in May.
Tributes: ESPN Classic Canada will air a 24-hour tribute to NEILSON beginning today at 6 p.m. eastern daylight time. The programming will include a profile, footage from the famous white towel game during the 1982 Stanley Cup playoffs and his 1,000th game behind the bench.
Funeral: Services for NEILSON will be held at 2 p.m., Saturday at North View Pentecostal Church in Peterborough, Ontario (705-748-4573). The church is at the corner of Fairbairn Street and Tower Hill Road.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
CAMPBELL, Freda Margaret (née LECKIE)
Died peacefully in her 93rd year on 19 July 2003 at the wonderful May Court Hospice in Ottawa. Her son, Edward, sister, Fay and daughter-in-law Elizabeth were with her until the very end.
Freda was born and raised on a small farm near Unity, Saskatchewan, and went to Regina for high school and business college and then to Saskatoon. She was a happy-go-lucky flapper and sometimes photographer's model in the Roaring Twenties and a hard working young bookkeeper in the Dirty Thirties when a large share of her salary had to go to help support parents and younger brothers and sisters left behind on a dust-bowl farm. In 1939, just as the war was about to begin, she married Frank CAMPBELL, also from Saskatoon, a lieutenant in the Navy; by early 1943 she was a widow with one young son. Despite offers from some fine men she remained a widow. From the late fifties until the mid seventies she looked after her widowed mother and went back to work - in the taxation department of the city of Richmond, British Columbia where she lived until the late 1990s. She moved to Ottawa in 1998 to be near her son. Her daughter-in-law Elizabeth saw to her every need for the past few years, helping her to enjoy life to the fullest, in her own home and on her own terms until just a few days before her death.
Freda CAMPBELL was a reserved woman of strong principles, firm character and high standards. She was generous to all, sharing whatever good fortune came her way but keeping the slings and arrows to herself.
She is survived by her son, Edward (Ted) of Ottawa, daughter-in-law Elizabeth, also of Ottawa, and grand_sons Frank (a lieutenant in the Navy in Victoria) and Michael Andrew, a graduate student at the University of Calgary, and brothers and sisters Gordon, Julia (Morris) (both of Penticton, British Columbia), Armand (Toronto), Clayton (Texas) and Fay (Carvahlo) (Hawaii). She was predeceased by brothers Robert and Albert.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-22 published
MARSHALL, Gwendolyn May (née HALPENNY)
Died peacefully, on July 20, 2003, at Kingston General Hospital. Devoted wife of Borden and loving mother of Mary and her husband Frank PANI, Carole ''Kye'' MARSHALL and Wendy and her husband Stuart CAMPBELL. Proud grandmother of Jackie (Lawrence,) Tracy (Ken), Stephanie, Darren, Alison and Timothy and great-grandmother of Anthony and Bridget. We will always honour Gwen and remember her for her passion for life, joyful service to others, her unconditional love and immovable faith. Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (two lights west of Yonge) on Wednesday, July 23 from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service on Thursday at 10 a.m. from All Souls Anglican Church, 15 Clairtrell Road (one block west of Bayview, north from Sheppard). In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer Society would be gratefully appreciated.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-01 published
COX, Elford Bradley ''E.B.''
Died peacefully, in his 90th year, on Tuesday, July 29th, 2003, at Toronto General Hospital, with loving family by his side. He is survived by his wife Elizabeth ''Bet'' (CAMPBELL,) daughters Sally SPROULE (Dale) and Kathy SUTTON (Steve,) grandchildren Jason HARLOW (Cindy KRYSAK) and Jennifer HARLOW and great-granddaughters Elizabeth and Terran HARLOW, as well as nieces Donna and Frances. He was predeceased by his brother Arthur Berwyn COX. He will be remembered with love also by his many Friends, particularly Dean ALLEN of Toronto. A family service will be held August 9th. A memorial service to celebrate E.B.'s life and work as one of Canada's foremost sculptors is being planned for September. Expressions of sympathy in the form of donations to favourite charities will be appreciated.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
Father figure to the Canadian stage
British-trained Stratford character actor never craved starring roles
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, October 16, 2003 - Page R11
For Mervyn " Butch" BLAKE, entering a theatre was a magical experience, something he never tired of during an acting career that spanned close to three-quarters of a century. Mr. BLAKE, one of the most loved members of the Stratford Festival Company, died on October 9 at a Toronto nursing home after a long illness. He was 95.
"Theatre seems to give me life," Mr. BLAKE said in 1994. "I just feel marvellous when I enter the theatre... it's one of the things which keeps me going."
Over his long stage life that included 42 consecutive seasons with the Stratford Festival of Canada, Mr. BLAKE "had the distinction of playing in every single play of Shakespeare's," said Richard MONETTE, Stratford's artistic director.
"He had a great life in the theatre," Mr. MONETTE said.
Adored by both audiences and fellow actors, the veteran actor was known across Canada for his enormous talent and generosity of spirit. When he wasn't working at Stratford, he acted on the country's major stages and in television and film.
For seven seasons, he toured with the Canadian Players, bringing professional theatre to smaller towns. And in 1987, he won a Dora Mavor Moore Award for best performance in a featured role in a production of Saturday, Sunday, Monday at what was then called CentreStage (now CanStage).
"Everyone loved Butch without exception," said John NEVILLE, a former Stratford's artistic director.
Mervyn BLAKE was born on November 30, 1907, in Dehra Dun, India, where his father was a railway executive.
His father wanted him to become an engineer but after falling in love with the theatre, Mr. BLAKE was able to persuade his father to allow him to study at London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. In 1932, he graduated and soon made his professional stage debut at the Embassy Theatre in London
During the Second World War, he served in the British Army as a driver. It was during the war years that he is said to have got his nickname Butch. A witness to the horrors of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, Mr. BLAKE was present at the liberation of the camp by British troops. It was an experience that haunted him for the rest of his life.
At the war's end, he returned to England and to the stage. He married actress Christine BENNETT and spent the years between 1952 and 1955 at the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon. There he worked with many of the great British actors such as Sir Laurence OLIVIER, Sir Michael REDGRAVE and Dame Peggy ASHCROFT.
Despite his success on the British stage, he decided to join the Stratford Festival of Canada, then in its fifth season. With his family in tow, Mr. BLAKE moved to Canada and in 1957 appeared in a production of Hamlet with Christopher PLUMMER in the title role.
"He wasn't a leading actor," said actor and director Douglas CAMPBELL. "He was a supporting player. As a supporting player you couldn't get better."
Mr. BLAKE always saw himself as a character actor who never cared that much about starring roles, said Audrey ASHLEY, a former Ottawa Citizen theatre critic and author of Mr. BLAKE's 1999 biography With Love from Butch.
"He was one of those actors you never had to worry about," Ms. ASHLEY said. "You knew Butch was always going to do a good job."
Known for his unfailing good nature and even temper, he enjoyed re-telling gaffes he had made on stage. Mr. MONETTE remembers one performance where Mr. BLAKE appeared on stage as the Sea Captain in Twelfth Night. The character Viola asks him, "What country, Friends, is this?" And instead of responding "This is Illyria, lady." Out of his mouth popped, "This is Orillia."
To the younger actors at Stratford, Mr. BLAKE was a father figure. "He was very fond of the young actors and would take them under his wing," Ms. ASHLEY said.
Stephen RUSSELL remembers arriving at Stratford for his first season in the mid-1970s. He was placed in the same dressing room as Mr. BLAKE, an experience he still holds close to his heart.
"He was one of the most generous human beings," Mr. RUSSELL said.
One of the areas Mr. BLAKE was most helpful in was teaching fellow actors how to apply stage makeup. He loved makeup and on his dressing-room table he had an old rabbit's foot that he would use to apply his face powder, Mr. RUSSELL said.
Aging didn't stop him from applying his own elaborate makeup. Playing the role of old Adam in As You Like It required him to go through the same makeup ritual when he was 70 years old as it did when he performed the role years earlier as a much younger man.
Aside from the stage, one of Mr. BLAKE's passions was cricket. During his first season in Stratford, he played on the festival's team and was responsible for starting a friendly, annual cricket match against the Shaw Festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake.
Each season, members of the two acting companies would come together for a civilized afternoon of cricket and tea. The Stratford team still goes by the name of Blake's Blokes.
In honour of his talent and dedication to the theatre, Mr. BLAKE was appointed a member of the Order of Canada in May, 1995.
"When he entered, the stage just lit up," Mr. RUSSELL said.
Mr. BLAKE leaves his wife Christine BENNETT; children Andrew and Bridget; and stepson Tim DAVISSON.
Details of a memorial service to be held in Stratford, Ontario, have yet to be announced.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
Sculptor 'entirely original'
A wood carver from a young age who made many public works, he was befriended by the Group of Seven and later carved their tombstone epitaphs
By Bill GLADSTONE, Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, November 15, 2003 - Page F10
A Canadian sculptor who as a young man was adopted by the Group of Seven has died in Toronto. E. B. COX, who prided himself on achieving artistic and commercial success without ever taking a penny in government grants, was 89.
Mr. COX was a young associate, of some of the Group of Seven with whom he went on northern sketching trips; A. Y. JACKSON once complimented him on his "good sense of form." He later carved their tombstone epitaphs.
A wood carver from a young age, he came to master stone and even the delicate art of faceting and carving precious stones; he also tried metal, ceramics and glass. Because he liked to work fast, he pioneered the use of power tools to quicken the chiselling process, a technique that purists initially disdained as a form of cheating.
According to one 1990s guide-book, he had "more sculpture on view in Toronto's public places than any other single artist." His 20-piece Garden of the Greek Gods, originally installed in the 1950s on the Georgian Peaks near Collingwood, Ontario, was later relocated to the far more populous grounds of the Canadian National Exhibition near the Dufferin Gate. The only fully human representation in the group, an 11-foot-high statue of Hercules, was carved from a six-tonne piece of Indiana limestone -- "the biggest piece of stone used by a sculptor in Canada," according to friend and patron, Ken SMITH.
Among his many other public works are a fish fountain for a courtyard at the former Park Plaza Hotel, a stone bear for the Guild Inn, a stone Orpheus for Victoria College, lavish countertops and railings for historic bank buildings, a large seated lady for McMaster University and whimsical creatures for a school yard in Milton, Ontario
Having mastered big, he also excelled at small: He used to claim that he invented coffee-table art. He carved little totem poles to put himself through university, and became known for his small bear sculptures, which he sold at popular prices, especially at Christmas. "At university, I damned near starved," he would explain. "I don't believe in starving artists."
Influenced by Iroquois and West Coast Haida art, he focused on bears, beavers, birds and other animals as well as human torsos, masks and heads; he often caught the animals in quirky fluid poses and never failed to capture their essential natures. He once crafted an all-Canadian limited-edition chess set for the Hudson's Bay Co., with beavers as pawns, coureurs de bois as knights, Indian princesses as queens, and so on. He was "the great bridge between aboriginal art and modern art," according to Mr. SMITH and others. A picture book about him, featuring an essay by Gary Michael DAULT, was published by Boston Mills Press in 1999.
"He was entirely original," said Toronto sculptor Dora DE PEDERY- HUNT. "Absolutely nobody else did what he did. What style he had was entirely his. I call him a real good sculptor, a real good artist."
The younger of two brothers, Elford Bradley COX was born on July 16, 1914, in Botha, Alberta., where his family made a short-lived attempt at farming; he learned to carve by watching his maternal grandfather whittle kindling by the fireside. He persisted in sculpting even though his pious father was vehemently opposed to the creation of "graven images," he told Toronto Life magazine in 1997. The family returned to Bowmanville, Ontario, where E. B. spent most of his childhood, and where his mother died suddenly after an epileptic attack when her favoured son was a young teenager. When it was time for him to go to university, "his father sent him off with $5, a suitcase and a wish of good luck," said Kathy SUTTON, the younger of his two daughters.
Studying languages at the University of Toronto from 1934 to 1938, Mr. COX was befriended by German professor and painter Barker FAIRLEY, who introduced him to A. Y. JACKSON, Fred VARLEY and Arthur LISMER of the Group of Seven.
Mr. COX started teaching languages at Upper Canada College, but soon left to join the war effort as an intelligence officer, interrogating prisoners of war in Europe.
Afterward, he resumed teaching at Upper Canada College, and devoted part of a summer to a school canoe trip on the Mississauga River the next summer he escorted a group of boys on an even more adventurous trip down the Churchill River in the barren lands. "That was just unheard-of in those years," recalled Terence A. WARDROP, who joined that expedition and became Mr. COX's lifelong friend and solicitor. "It was a big trip and it was almost historic the rivers and some of the lakes were unmapped in 1948."
Quitting his teaching job in 1949, Mr. COX married the former Betty CAMPBELL, bought a farm near Palgrave, Ontario, and discovered that he could survive as a full-time artist. (Although he considered government subsidies poisonous, he once applied for a government grant to study Canadian stones suitable for sculpting -- and was turned down. "I did my stone research without their damn-fool money," he told The Globe and Mail in 1970.) Moving to a rural property in north Toronto and later to a Victorian house in eastern Toronto, he separated from his wife but remained on excellent terms with her and their daughters.
Being partial to pranks, he once purchased a canoe for his wife as a gift and, to achieve maximum surprise, paddled it to the dock at the family cottage in a rented disguise. Along with his love of humour, Friends recall his sharp wit and his ability to cut through social pretense. "He said he wanted his gravestone to read, 'I told you I was sick,' " recalled art dealer John INGRAM. " That's what I remember about him -- his great sense of humour and just what a wonderful compassionate guy he was. He tried to give this air of being an old curmudgeon, but in fact, he was anything but."
Becoming a mentor to many young artists, Mr. COX generously shared his tools and experience with them. "He didn't have much mentoring when he was learning to be an artist -- people didn't help him so he took the opposite tack," said his daughter Kathy.
Always enthusiastic and full of ideas, he was usually in his workshop early in the morning -- and kept on working even after losing his sight in his final years. His home was full of fine sculpture and painting, including a portrait of Mr. COX by Mr. FAIRLEY that hung over the mantel. "It was a lovely place, and by the time you got out of there, you were in a buying fever," Mr. SMITH recalled. "E.B. himself was part of the fun of buying stuff. People were just charmed by the atmosphere he created." He was also famously not particular about the prices he asked from genuine admirers of his work.
As for his art's place in the world, he was confident it would last, at least in the physical sense. "We'd have these long philosophical talks about whether there was an afterlife and what legacy to leave behind," friend Eric CONROY recalled. "He'd say that his stone works would be there long after Rembrandt's paintings had crumbled."
E. B. COX died in Toronto on July 29, leaving his wife Betty, daughters Sally SPROULE and Kathy SUTTON, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-05 published
COTTIER, Roy Thomas
At home in London, Ontario, on November 29, 2003, Roy Thomas COTTIER, aged 82. He is survived by two daughters, Candyce Bebensee COTTIER and Sherris Cottier SHANK, one son, Derek Lee COTTIER, and five grandchildren. He was the beloved husband of Jean Bebensee COTTIER, who died December 29, 1998 at the age of 79. Mr. COTTIER held senior executive positions with a number of prominent North American companies, including W.R. Grace and Co., Molson Companies Limited and Massey-Ferguson Ltd. From 1973 until his retirement in 1985, Mr. COTTIER served as a senior executive of Northern Telecom Limited, now known as Nortel Networks Corp., retiring as Senior Vice President - Corporate Relations. In that position, he had global responsibility for the direction of all corporate and financial communications, investor relations, government relations and public affairs. He was also a member of the corporation's executive council, the senior management body which established corporate policies, objectives and strategies. Upon his retirement, Mr. COTTIER served as a consultant to the Department of International Trade of the Government of Canada and director of the International Trade Advisory Committee. Mr. COTTIER was also a director of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, the International Business Council of Canada, the Institute for Political Involvement and the Ontario Association of Art Galleries, as well as a member of the advisory boards of the University of Toronto Business School and the Canadian Music Centre. Mr. COTTIER was born in Portsmouth, England, and educated in English private schools. He joined the army of the United Kingdom in 1939, serving as a Commando and attaining the rank of Lieutenant. After surviving four years as a prisoner of war, he was demobilized in 1946 and immigrated to Canada. Interment will be at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London, Ontario; family only. No flowers please, but memorial contributions to the Parkwood Hospital Foundation for the Jean Bebensee Cottier and Roy Cottier Award for Rehabilitation Staff Development are welcomed and encouraged. Contributions may be forwarded to the Parkwood Hospital Foundation, 801 Commissioners Road, E., London, Ontario N6C 5J1. For further information concerning the Foundation or the Award, please contact Michelle CAMPBELL, Executive Director of the Foundation, at (519) 685-4030.

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CAMPBELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
Ottawa bids STANFIELD goodbye
'He was a sage.... He was quite extraordinary,' Charest says at funeral
By Kim LUNMAN, Saturday, December 20, 2003 - Page A9
Ottawa -- Robert STANFIELD was fondly remembered yesterday as a sage statesman.
The former Nova Scotia premier and federal Progressive Conservative leader remained one of the country's most respected politicians even years after leaving the national arena, Tory Senator Lowell MURRAY told more than 100 mourners yesterday at Mr. STANFIELD's funeral in Ottawa.
"There has survived perhaps only the kernel of something, but its essence in the Canadian consciousness -- that once, uniquely, there was STANFIELD, leader of a major party, a man of such civility, such humanity, such integrity, who adorned our national life," Mr. MURRAY said
Mr. STANFIELD, who suffered a stroke several years ago, died Tuesday in Ottawa. He was 89.
At the private ceremony at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, he was remembered as a respected politician with a dry wit. He will be buried today in Halifax's Camp Hill cemetery.
Politicians of all stripes attended the service to pay tribute. Outside the church, Prime Minister Paul MARTIN told reporters his father and Mr. STANFIELD were "great Friends. My father had huge admiration for Mr. STANFIELD. And I actually shudder to think what the two of them are doing up there right now, the amount of discussions that are going on."
Mr. MARTIN said he remembered Mr. STANFIELD for his "great sense of decency, integrity, and his deep, deep love of country." Progressive Conservative Leader Peter MacKAY said Canada has lost "one of its greatest statesmen, a person who raised the standard of politics and public service.... He was very much substance over style."
"He was a sage," Quebec Liberal Premier Jean Charest, the former federal Tory leader, said. Mr. STANFIELD "looked at life with a bit of a smile, I think. He was quite extraordinary."
Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON called Mr. STANFIELD remarkable, "a man of deep conviction, a man who was decent and fair and honest and very funny." Other political colleagues at the funeral included former Tory prime ministers Kim CAMPBELL and Joe CLARK and former Tory cabinet minister Flora MacDONALD.
Mr. STANFIELD married three times. His first wife died in a crash in 1954 and his second wife died of cancer in 1976. He married his third wife, Anne Henderson AUSTIN, in 1978. He had four children.
Even as the service was going on in Ottawa, hundreds of people filed into the Nova Scotia legislature in Halifax to sign a book of condolence next to a portrait of the former premier, who led the province for 11 years, from 1956 to 1967.
Mr. STANFIELD led the federal Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 against Pierre TRUDEAU and was known within the party as the greatest prime minister Canada never had.
In his later years, he was regarded as the Conservatives' conscience, representing the party's progressive side on social issues. He supported Mr. TRUDEAU's Official Languages Act despite a revolt by his fellow Tory members of parliament and also backed abolishing the death penalty.
He was born in Truro into a family famous for its underwear business and became a lawyer before turning to politics.
Bespectacled and known for his slow-speaking style, Mr. STANFIELD conveyed an awkward image that contrasted sharply with the youthful, charismatic Mr. Trudeau, costing the party every election it fought under his leadership.
But he came within two seats of office in the 1972 election when the Liberals defeated the Conservatives by 109 to 107 seats.
Two years later, the Liberals regained their majority and Mr. STANFIELD announced his decision to step down. He was succeeded by Mr. CLARK in 1976.

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CAMPEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-15 published
Moira "Molly" BLEA
At North Bay General Hospital, Scollard Site, Saturday, January 12, 2003.
Moira DONOVAN beloved wife of James BLEA in her 76th year. Loving mother of Janet LABRECQUE (John) of Callander and David BLEA (Donna) of Keswick. Lovingly remembered by eight grandchildren, Jennifer CAMPEAU (Jean-Marc,) Joanne TAILOR/TAYLOR (Maxwell), Jeannie KENNEDY (Troy), Stephan, Sara, Adam, Issac, and Aaron BLEA and five great grandchildren, Jessica, Jenna, Molly, Meagan and Kyle. Dear sister of Richard DONOVAN (Marianne.) Dear aunt of Bridget MacKAY (David) and great aunt of Abigail, James and Darcy. Visitation at the McQuinty Funeral Home, Wednesday, January 15 from 1: 30 to 2:00 p.m. Funeral Service will be conducted in the McQuinty Funeral Home Chapel at 2: 00 p.m. Cremation to follow. McQuinty Funeral Home, 591 Cassells St. North Bay, Ont. P1B 3Z8. 705-472-8520.

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