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"BUR" 2003 Obituary


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BUREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-06 published
BUREY, Reverend Owen Leslie (Jack)
A resident of Chatham, died in Toronto on Thursday, October 2, 2003 at the age of 67. Born in Saint Ann, Bamboo, Jamaica, son of the late Viola and Joseph BUREY, and step-son of the late Doris BUREY. Beloved husband of Detha (ANDERSON) BUREY of Chatham. Dear father of Karen BUREY and Wayne BUREY (Toronto,) Steven BUREY (London), Richard BUREY, Esther BUREY, and Florence BUREY (Toronto), and predeceased by an infant son. Loving grandfather of Troy, Tyla, Trystenne, and Tasia. Brother of Madge, Rose, Lil, Cynth, Laurel, Charlie, Lloyd, David, Owen and John, and predeceased by 1 sister and 2 brothers. Also survived by several aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews. Reverend BUREY had been Pastor of Sandwich Baptist Curch, Windsor and member of the Free and Accepted Masons. Family will receive Friends at the McKinlay Funeral Home, 459 St. Clair Street, Chatham on Wednesday 2-4: 30 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service from St. Paul's Congregational Church, 450 Park Avenue West, Chatham, on Thursday, October 9, 2003 at 11 a.m. Interment Memorial Cemetery, North Buxton. Donations made by cheque to the Canadian Cancer Society appreciated. The Free Masons will conduct a Memorial Service at the Funeral Home on Tuesday at 7: 30 p.m. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com

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BURGESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-26 published
COLTHART, John Marshall M.D.
Born March 31, 1916 in Rodney, Ontario, died April 24, 2003 in Uxbridge, Ontario. Graduate University of Western Ontario Medicine '42, Major in Royal Canadian Army Medical Corp World War 2 overseas, family physician in East York 1946-1954, industrial physician with Bell Canada in Toronto 1954-1965, Western Electric/American Telephone and Telegraph in Chicago 1965-1969, Xerox in Rochester, New York 1969-1980 before retiring to Beaverton, Ontario and Clearwater, Florida. John was predeceased by his parents, James and Jeanie (THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON) COLTHART, and his wife, Shirley Mae (FITCH) M.D., University of Western Ontario Medicine '42. Father (father-in-law) of Jim of San Diego, California, Doctors Carol (Bob) BROCK in North York, Ontario, Peggy (Bob) McCALLA in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Alice (Rick) DANIEL in Calgary, Alberta and Joan (Dave) ROBERTSON in Shortsville, New York; grandfather of Christie COLTHART, Lisa (Andrew) SCHNEPPENHEIM, John Michael COLTHART, Mike BROCK, Heather (Tom) WHEELER, Catherine BROCK, Andy McCALLA, Matt (Jen) McCALLA, Jen (Dan) BEDETTE, James ROBERTSON, Shirley and Sarah DANIEL and great-grandfather of Christie's son, Kyle BURGESS. He was loved, respected and treasured by family, Friends and patients alike. A celebration of his life will be held at Markham Bible Chapel, 50 Cairns Drive, Markham, Ontario, west of McGowan Road, south from 16th Avenue, on Monday, May 5, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. In remembrance, donations can be made to the Shirley M. Colthart Fund (c/o John P. Robarts Research Institute, P.O. Box 5015, London, Ontario N6A 5K8), or the Trans-Canada Trail Foundation or a charity of your choice. Arrangements by Mangan Funeral Home, Beaverton, Ontario (705) 426-5777.

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BURGIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
BUTORAC, Franciscus " Frank" Anthony
Passed away on Wednesday, December, 24 at Terrace on the Square in Waterloo, Ontario, where he had been a resident for the past five years. Vital until the end, he died of complications from the flu in his 91st year. Born on April 30, 1913, in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Frank was the son of John and Kate BUTORAC, who had come to Canada from Croatia as young adults. The eldest among four children and the only son, Frank left school as a teen to work in his father's grocery store in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, eventually taking over after his father's retirement. Frank married Jean Henrietta BURGIN in the mid 1930's and began a family, proudly providing for his son Donald and three daughters, Sharon, Pamela and Oriana. With entrepreneurial intelligence and a strong work ethic, Frank sold his grocery store and bought the Kirkland Lake Canadian Tire franchise in 1954. He was proud of his business success, but Frank's greatest passion was sport. He was a hard-driving hockey coach and scouted for the Toronto Maple Leafs in the northern region. Frank was also an avid curler and competed at the national level in the Canadian Briar. After retiring from retail in 1973, Frank and his wife spent winters in Florida, where he took up golf. He enjoyed the game until a few years before his death. His Friends and family knew Frank as a strong, practical and straightforward man who showed his sense of humor by teasing those he held most dear. He was also quietly compassionate and stayed by his wife Jean's side during her first bout with cancer in the late 70's, and another prior to her death in 1984, always speaking of her with gentle kindness long after her death. 'Boots' as he was known by his closest Friends, will be missed and remembered fondly, but his business acumen and indomitable energy in all he did will live on through his four children, 12 grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. Friends are invited to share their memories of Frank with his family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home on Saturday (today) December 27, 2003 from 3-4 p.m. The service to celebrate Frank's life will be held in the chapel of the funeral home at 4 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family. Donations may be arranged through the funeral home at 519-745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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BURKART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-29 published
FAICHNEY, Kathryn Helena (née SIEGNER)
Kay died December 26, 2003, at Victoria Place, Kitchener, Ontario, after a period of declining health related to Alzheimer's Disease. She turned 81 on May 30 of this year.
Wife for 55 years of the late Leslie FAICHNEY. Mother of Sheila (Paul MURDOCK), John, and Jennifer (Paul MILLETT). Grandmother of Sara (Cameron SMITH) and Thomasina MURDOCK. Sister of John SIEGNER (Mary SCHAFER) and Carolyn (Stephen BURKART.) Sister-in-law of Bette FAICHNEY.
Kay grew up in Kitchener and recalled with special fondness her grandparents J.M. and Helena SCHNEIDER. She studied history and library science at MacMaster and Toronto Universities, and pursued careers as a librarian and homemaker, living in Montreal, New York State, New Jersey, Ohio, and Kitchener-Waterloo. In recent years she was active in the Canadian Federation of University Women. She found pleasure in books, theatre, and jazz, but took her greatest satisfaction in her family and Friends.
Special thanks to many devoted caregivers at Victoria Place, as well as, particularly, Bekira, Hedy, Jackie, Tania, Sarah, and Sky.
Friends will be received at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo, on Wednesday, December 31, 2003, from 1-2 p.m. A memorial service will be held in the chapel at 2 p.m., Margaret NALLY officiating. Interment (private) at Woodland Cemetery, Kitchener, will occur prior to the service.

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BURKHOLDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-21 published
HUGHES, William Henry
Bill died of lymphoma on August 19th, 2003 at his home in New Denver, British Columbia. He was a faculty member in the Philosophy Department at the University of Guelph from its inception in 1965 until his retirement in 1997. Bill was above all an educator. At the family dinner table, in the University classroom, in his writings, and in his service to youth music and community arts organizations he took great pleasure in helping young people to think with clarity and to make informed and moral choices in their daily lives. His essential goodness, and his tolerance and respect for others shone through his relationships with his family, Friends and colleagues. He will be remembered with love by his wife Daphne, daughters Miranda and Anna, sons Jeremy and Jonathan, son-in-law Charles BURKHOLDER, daughters-in-law Emma and Robin, his brothers Barry and Richard, sisters-in-law Margaret HUGHES and Dawn CAVE, his nieces and nephews, and his eight beloved grandchildren (Erin, Noah, Sophie, Fiona, Oliver, Jessica, Alexander and Paige). A celebration of Bill's life will be held in Guelph Ontario at a later date. If desired, donations may be made to the Philosophy Department, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, where a memorial scholarship fund is being organized.

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BURK/BURKE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Rick FRANCIS
Funeral services for Mr. Rick FRANCIS, age 47 years, who died Saturday, May 17, 2003, were held on Tuesday evening in the Blake Funeral Chapel in Thunder Bay, ON, led by Reverend Larry KROKER of Saint Anne's Church. Eulogies were offered by Kevin MAIN, Jaymie PENNY, Paul FRANCIS, Jennifer O'NEIL and Tamara BROWN. Numerous co-workers from the city of Thunder Bay, fellow coaches from minor hockey, neighbors, Friends and family attended the service. Removal was then made to Little Current, for visitation and Funeral Mass in Saint Bernard's Church celebrated by Reverend Bert FOLIOT S.J. on Thursday, May 22, 2003. The readings were proclaimed by Celina McGREGOR, Jennifer KEYS, Raquel KOENIG and PollyAnna McNALLY. Eulogies were offered by Kerry FRANCIS, Raymond FRANCIS, Jenny McGRAW, Paul FRANCIS and Ruthanne FRANCIS. The offertory gifts were presented by Kerry and Brenda FRANCIS. The Soloist was Rosa PITAWANAKWAT- BURK/BURKE accompanied by the organist Thomas NESHIKWE. Services were largely attended by long time Friends, members of Saint Bernard Church, and family. Honourary Pallbearers were Jeff FRANCIS and David LARSON. The Active Pallbearers were Allan ESHKAWKOGAN, Paul FRANCIS Jr., Robert McGRAW Jr., Craig KOENIG, Mike McNALLY and Chris KEYS.

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BURK/BURKE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Vernon Robert BURK/BURKE
In loving memory of Vernon Robert BURK/BURKE, September 19, 1940 to May 30, 2003.
King passed on to the spirit world at his residence in Wikwemikong on Friday, May 30, 2003 at the age of 62 years. Thirty years of service at the Unimin Quarry in Killarney, as a Heavy Loader Operator. Beloved husband of Violet Rosa PITAWANAKWAT- BURK/BURKE of Wikwemikong. Loving son of the late Walter and Eva (ROQUE) BURK/BURKE, Brothers Kenneth and Elva, Willard and Neldra, Leonard (predeceased) and Millie, Wayne and Susan, sisters Margaret and Ray LARIVIERE and Lucy (predeceased). Dearly missed by MaryAnn and Bonn, Jean and Rob, Mervyn, Beverly and Dave, Cathy and Jason, Grandchildren Gitchi, Amber, Nodin, Naomi, Steven, Sebastian, Bronson, Blossom, Jaynee, Thunder and Lyric, Great grandchildren Darnell, Javin, Waawaskwanehn, Shay-Lynn and Tristen. Visitors were welcomed at Holy Cross Church on Monday, June 2. Funeral Mass on Wednesday, June 4 at 11: 00 am, also in the church. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home. "Remember the King"

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BURK/BURKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-22 published
Joseph Patrick BURK/BURKE
By Kevin MURPHY, Monday, December 22, 2003 - Page A20
Defence lawyer, father, friend, Red Sox fan. Born August 27, 1949, in Boston, Massachusetts. Died September 29 in Ottawa, from an adverse reaction to Interferon, aged 54.
When Joe BURK/BURKE swore the barrister's oath at his call to the Ontario Bar in 1992, he held an eagle feather in his hand and eschewed the Law Society's formal pledge of allegiance to Her Majesty the Queen. No self-respecting expatriate Irish-Catholic from West Roxbury, Massachusetts., could have done otherwise.
In a world filled with cynics and manipulators, Joe BURK/BURKE was a diehard idealist. All who spent time with him, whether at the ballpark or in the courthouse cafeteria, loved him for his lack of pretension. When the high-and-mighty blustered, Joe BURK/BURKE dug in his heels and held the line.
Joe came by his idealism honestly. His coming of age as a social activist brought him from parochial roots in Boston to a slew of college campuses across North America. There he became a fervent anti-war protester and draft opponent in the 1960s and 1970s. While attending the University of Arizona, Joe once parked himself at an Reserve Officer Training Corps booth and handed out antiwar pamphlets.
A mature graduate from Queen's University Law School, Joe took his political convictions and Friendships to heart. He had a strong sense of social justice and he saw himself as a force for change in a criminal justice system in which the poor and the disadvantaged, the aboriginal and persons of colour, were too often marginalized. Joe's law office walls bore posters that championed Hurricane Carter, Angela Davis and poverty law causes. An active member of the Law Union of Ontario -- an organization of activist lawyers - -- Joe advocated for prisoners' rights inside and out of the Canadian corrections system.
Joe was well-read in diverse disciplines. His bookshelf accommodated the works of Karl Marx as readily as Eugene O'Neill and Rumpole of the Bailey. Joe immersed himself in the musical soundtracks of his times and was a regular and keen patron of the folk-music scene in Canada. He counted works by David Wiffen, Jesse Winchester and Fred Eaglesmith as selections in his voluminous record library, and he travelled the summer festival circuit.
Canada adopted Joe BURK/BURKE as much as the other way round. He worked in the Quebec health-care system for many years as a perfusionist a specialist responsible for a patient's blood circulation during cardiac surgery. While a hospital worker in Montreal, Joe met and married his now ex-wife, Luce, with whom he had a son, Jerome, now 19 and a college football prospect who shares his father's stubborn allegiance to underdog New England sports franchises.
In the mid-1960s Joe had a motorcycle accident that required surgery. He contracted hepatitis C from a blood transfusion and struggled for the rest of his life to overcome deteriorating health. When he finally succumbed on the last weekend of September, he was also battling diabetes and the side-effects of Interferon therapy.
Long before Nick Nolte made it fashionable, blue hospital scrubs were Joe's off-hours casual wear of choice at "the Hacienda," his third-storey walk-up in downtown Ottawa. It was a warm and welcoming venue where Trivial Pursuit, pizza and beer were the usual late-night pastimes and seats around Joe's snug dining room table were coveted.
Joe's law-office answering machine greeting pretty much captured his left-leaning sentiments and adopted sense of national pride: a snippet of Buddy Guy singing followed by a friendly admonition to prospective defendants delivered in a warm, bilingual Boston brogue: "If you are calling from police custody, please do not make any statements. Merci."
Kevin MURPHY is a friend of Joe BURK/BURKE.

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BURK/BURKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
GREENBLATT, David
On Tuesday, December 23, 2003, died comfortably at home surrounded by his loving family, at the age of 84. David GREENBLATT, beloved husband of Hilda. Loving father and father-in-law of Michael and Beth, Jesse and Joyce, Steven, and Caroline. Dear brother of the late Mitzi BURK/BURKE, and Ena PAUL. Devoted Zaida of Melodie, Elisha, Adam, and Joshua. David was the proprietor of Advance Lumber and Wrecking Company. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (one light west of Dufferin), for service on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Pride of Israel section of Mount Sinai Memorial Park. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the David Greenblatt Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto M6A 2C3, (416) 780-0324.

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BURMASTER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
Florence Adeline WITTY
In loving memory of Florence Adeline WITTY, April 20, 1923 to June 25, 2003.
Adeline WITTY, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Wednesday, June 25, 2003 at the age of 80 years.
She was born in Salter Township, daughter of the late August and Florence {HOULE} BURMASTER. Adeline had a strong sense of community, always willing to help when needed. She was a member of the Mills Women's Institute and enjoyed knitting, sewing, quilting and will be remembered also for being a great cook.
Adeline was predeceased by her beloved husband Grant, June 1, 2002. Loved and loving mother of Ches and his wife Donna of Hanmer, Cliff and his wife Lorie of Thessalon, Bruce and his wife Linda of Gore Bay and Peter of Toronto. Proud grandmother of Kevin, Craig, Derek, Teresa, Trevor, Tom, Jim, Stephanie, Emily and Joshua and great grandchildren Katherine and Kaleb. Dear sister of Alfred, Alvin, Geraldine and Brenda. Predeceased by brothers Orville and Aubrey. Friends called at the Culgin Funeral Home on Thursday, June 26, 2003. The funeral service was held in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel of the Culgin Funeral Home on Friday, June 27, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. with Rev. Frank HANER officiating. Interment in Gordon Cemetery.

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BURNETT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Joan Beverley BURNETT
In loving memory of Joan Beverley BURNETT who passed away peacefully at St. Joseph Health Centre on Monday, December 30, 2002.
Cherished mother of Bruce and Rosemary, Murray and Debbi, Randy and Maryellen, Karen and Mark, Linda and friend Kevin, Kevin and friend Melanie. Will be missed by her grandchildren Shannon and Joel, Kraig and Brett, Jason and Wendy, Kris and Laura, Sarah and Jennifer, Duke and Snowy. Also missed by siblings, Shirley GUINN, Marilyn HOLMES, Jim STILL (Ellen), Rick STILL (Mildred), Ross STILL and Winnie STILL (Brian predeceased).
Visitation was on Wednesday, January 1, 2003. Funeral service was held on Thursday, January 2, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Burial to follow at a later date.

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BURNETT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
BURNETT
-In loving memory of a dear grandmother, Mary, who passed away November 15, 1995.
Your presence we miss
Your memory we treasure
Loving you always
Forgetting you never.
-Jack, Paula, Dustin, Chris and Julie.

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BURNETT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
William Alton " Bill" LEESON
In loving memory of William Alton "Bill" LEESON who passed away Tuesday morning, October 28, 2003 at his residence in Val Caron at the age of 54 years. Beloved husband of Joyce (BURNETT) LEESON of Val Caron. Loving father of Jennifer (husband Michael THERRIEN) of Hanmer, Rick (wife Nikki) and Craig all of Val Caron. Proud grandfather of Michaela, Crystal, Cody and Keara. Dear son of Loretta (McMULLEN) MacKI of Webbwood and Robert LEESON (predeceased.) Dear brother of Ron LEESON (wife Joan) of Webbwood, Larry LEESON of British Columbia, and Ivan LEESON (predeceased.) Sadly missed by his special canine companion "Nix". Bill enjoyed music, dancing, fishing and hunting and family times. He served as a boy scout and cub leader for over 10 years. Bill retired from INCO in 1998 after 30 years of service as an electrician. He greatly cared for and enjoyed his family, Bill leaves them a wonderful legacy of strength and love and he will remain forever in their hearts.
Funeral service was held at the Lougheed Funeral Home, Val Caron/Blezard Valley Chapel 1815 Main Street, Val Caron on Friday, October 31, 2003. Interment at The Valley East Cemetery.

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BURNETT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
BURNETT
-In loving memory of Mary, a dearly loved Mother and Grandmother who passed away November 15, 1995.
Deep are the memories,
Precious they stay,
No amount of time,
Can take them away.
--Love, John and Amy.

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BURNETT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-22 published
BURNETT
-In loving memory of a dear mother and grandmother, Joan, who passed away on December 30, 2002.
If roses grow in Heaven,
Lord please pick a bunch for us,
Place them in our Mother's arms
And tell her they're from us.
Tell her we love her and miss her,
And when she turns to smile,
Place a kiss upon her cheek
And hold her for awhile.
Because remembering her is easy,
We do it every day.
But there's an ache within our hearts
Because we are missing her today.
-Always remembered in our hearts, Linda, Karen, Kevin, Randy, Murray, Bruce and families.

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BURNETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-15 published
ANSLEY, John A.
Of Peterborough, Ontario, died peacefully, on Saturday, April 12, 2003, at the age of 61 years. He leaves his beloved wife of 34 years Gail (née MADORE) and their son James. son of Mrs. Grace PETERSON (née McINTOSH) of Ottawa and the late Dr. Harold ANSLEY of Ottawa and Barrie, and his late stepfather Ted PETERSON. Also surviving are his sister Ms. Sherrill ANSLEY (Jim,) William ANSLEY of Ottawa, cousins Susan and Kenneth BURNETT of W. Vancouver, Sandy and Peter QUINN of Roberts Creek, British Columbia, and John and Cordelia McINTOSH of Victoria, British Columbia, and their families. John graduated from Ashbury College in Ottawa and attended Carleton University before becoming advertising, sales and marketing manager in the window and door industry. For many years he was active in community volunteer work with a special interest in boating. His family wishes to thank Dr. Stephan RAGAZ of Peterborough, Dr. Bryce TAILOR/TAYLOR of Toronto General Hospital and the loving nurses at the Palliative Care Unit in Peterborough.
Friends will be received on Wednesday, April 16th, 2003 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. at the Highland Park Visitation and Reception Centre on Bensfort Road at River Road South, Peterborough, 705-745-6984 or 1-800-672-9652. There will be a Funeral Service at the same location on Thursday, April 17th at 2 p.m. followed by a reception.
In lieu of flowers, donations to the Palliative Care Unit Peterborough Regional Health Centre would be appreciated. John will be missed by his family and Friends who respected him for his integrity, positive attitude and his humour.

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BURNS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-19 published
SMITH, Margaret Blakely (née BURNS)
Died peacefully at the Scarborough Hospital, Grace Division, of cancer, on February 16, 2003. Daughter of Charles BURNS and Sara Margaret BLAKELY. Sister of Katharine Steele (BURNS, YOUNG) PICKEN. Beloved wife of James Edwin (Ted) SMITH and a wonderful mother to Katharine Blakely SMITH and James Charles SMITH (Cheryl.) Grandmother of Althea ALISON and Michelle Meagan SMITH, and ''Grandma'' to Robin MILLER and Ciera and Ryan GAUTREAU. Born in Ottawa, she was a graduate of Glebe Collegiate and Queen's University where she was a member of the Senior Ladies hockey and basketball teams. For five years she enjoyed teaching high school in Manotick until her marriage to Ted in 1948. The family moved from Ottawa to Toronto in 1963. A memorial service will be held at the Trinity Presbyterian Church, 2737 Bayview Avenue (south of Hwy. 401), on Saturday, February 22, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Spring interment of cremated remains will be held in Norway Bay, Quebec. If you wish, in lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Trinity Memorial Fund, 2737 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M2L 1C5.

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BURRIDGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
Toronto's musical Mr. Chips
Headmaster of private Crescent School took over a rundown building and fixed its wiring, plumbing and even its furnace until a newer structure could be found
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, July 10, 2003 - Page R5
He was the first Canadian-born principal of a Toronto boys' school that for its first 50 years had hired only British headmasters. Bill BURRIDGE, who has died at the age of 79, remained at Toronto's Crescent School until 1986.
The boys at the school both respected him and feared him. The father of one former head boy remembers "Mr. BURRIDGE" as a man who could "cut through the BS. The boys knew they couldn't get away with anything with him. But he was a wonderful teacher."
Mr. BURRIDGE was an unlikely Mr. Chips. If you looked back at his early school career, no one would have picked him for the job as a headmaster at a private school.
William BURRIDGE was a working class boy who was born in Toronto on August 16, 1923. His father, an English immigrant, was a painter for Imperial Oil. Young Bill went to Western Technical-Commercial School to become an electrician.
But like many of his generation, the Second World War wrought changes in his life.
He went into the Royal Canadian Air Force as an electrician. One of his first postings was to Dorval Airport in Montreal, a military field during the war, where one of his fellow electricians, Phil JONES, remembered they worked on odd planes for the Royal Canadian Air Force, odd because they were not the standard aircraft flown by Bomber Command. They were American planes, twin-engined B-25 bombers and the long range four engine B-24 Liberators.
One big B-24 was unique. It was named Commando and its bomb racks had been stripped out to make it into a passenger plane, with two private bunks for Winston Churchill, the wartime British Prime Minister and his doctor. The plane was parked at Dorval a lot of the time, from where it could easily head out to Bermuda, West Africa or to Cairo, or across the Atlantic to Britain. The aircraft was serviced by Royal Canadian Air Force electricians, including Mr. BURRIDGE. The posting provided interesting stories for him to tell in later life.
Mr. BURRIDGE and the other electricians were sent to different bases, including one just outside Vancouver. While there they used to pick up extra money on their leave by hitchhiking across the border to Seattle to work as drivers and warehousemen at a fruit-packing plant. The war meant a shortage of men and the Canadian airmen were given weekend work, no questions asked.
A professional musician on the double bass since the age of 17, through the war Mr. BURRIDGE played in pickup bands and an Royal Canadian Air Force band, along with Mr. Jones and others.
When Mr. BURRIDGE came home from the war he kept playing. During the late forties he played at dances at the Young Men's Christian Association and at clubs such as the Rex. In the fifties he played in the Benny Lewis Orchestra at places such as the Casa Loma and the Palace Pier, then a dance hall, now a family of condos on Lake Ontario. He played with the jazz great Moe KAUFMAN and did some session work with the jazz singers Peggy LEE and Pearl BAILEY.
Mr. BURRIDGE also played during the summers at resorts in the Muskokas. To get there he had to book an extra seat on the lake steamer Segwun for his big bass.
A short time after the war Mr. BURRIDGE decided to take advantage of the free education earned by his wartime service. He went to the University of Toronto and graduated in 1950 in arts and sciences. He worked as a salesman for General Foods for a year and then started teaching school, first in Coppercliff in northern Ontario and then in Scarborough near Toronto.
By the late fifties he was a principal in Whitby, just outside Toronto. But a car accident on the way to school influenced his view of things. His car slipped on ice and broadsided a telephone pole. Although unhurt, the crash made him ready for a change. One day he was on jury duty at a courtroom in downtown Toronto and spotted an ad in the Globe and Mail for a grade 5 teacher at Crescent School. He applied and got the job.
Crescent School was then on the old Massey estate on Dawes Road at Victoria Park. When he started there were only nine teachers, 100 students and the school went from kindergarten to grade 8.
Mr. BURRIDGE introduced music to the curriculum and became a popular teacher. When the headmaster was ill he took over on a part-time basis, becoming headmaster on his predecessor's death in 1966.
At the time, Crescent School was a mess. The building was falling apart and the headmaster was called on to fix the electrical work, the plumbing and even the furnace. He helped in the search for a new building and in 1972 the school moved to the old Garfield Weston Estate at Bayview Avenue and Post Road.
Over the years Crescent School changed and dropped the lower grades and expanded as far as the last grade of high school. Mr. BURRIDGE remained headmaster until 1971 and stayed on teaching and as assistant director of the Lower School until his retirement in 1986.
In private, Mr. BURRIDGE was also a Mr. Fixit. He helped keep up some family rental properties and often workered on his old Buicks or his house in suburban Ajax, Ontario, on a lot of almost half an acre. His other hobby was keeping bees.
Bill BURRIDGE leaves his wife Faith, to whom he was married for 54 years, and his three children, Reid, Rob and Hope.

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BURROUGHS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-19 published
HALL, Harold John
At Providence Centre, Toronto, on Tuesday, June 17, 2003. Harold died peacefully, in his 87th year. Predeceased by his beloved wife Patricia. Father of Ken, Carol, and son-in-law Tom GRIFFITHS. Grandfather of Alexander and Sarah. Brother of Helen and brother-in-law of Betty. Missed by Mabel BURROUGHS and family. A private family service will be held. In memory of Harold, donations to Providence Centre, 3276 St. Clair Avenue East, Toronto M1L 1W1, would be appreciated.

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BURROUGHS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-01 published
Royal Canadian Air Force fighter pilot won the Distinguished Flying Cross
By Tom HAWTHORN, Saturday, November 1, 2003 - Page F12
Ottawa -- George BURROUGHS was a Mustang pilot whose attacks on enemy installations in the Second World War earned him the Distinguished Flying Cross. He has died in Ottawa and the age of 82.
Mr. BURROUGHS, who had enlisted in Toronto on April 29, 1941, the day before his 20th birthday, served as a flight lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Air Force's No. 414 Squadron. He provided reconnaissance for the Dieppe raid of 1942, as well as for the D-Day invasion of Normandy two years later.
After the war, he attended the University of Toronto, collecting coins from pay phones as a summer job for Bell Canada. He retired from the company in 1983 as a senior executive.
Mr. BURROUGHS died on September 3 after long suffering from Parkinson's disease. He leaves Mary (née ARMSTRONG,) his wife of 59 years a son and two daughters.

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BURROW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
Rev. John Francis MADDEN
By Joan Fidler BURROW and Reverend Bob MADDEN Wednesday, May 28, 2003 - Page A20
Son, brother, uncle, Basilian priest, teacher. Born October 30, 1921, in Detroit. Died January 5, in Toronto, of cancer, aged Picture a long stretch of red dirt road in the tropical forest of central Ghana, West Africa, in 1957. A minivan stops and disgorges five young Canadian university students, their Ghanaian guide, and their leader: a slight, youthful-looking priest from Toronto. He discreetly hands out the toilet paper as his companions disappear into the lush growth.
Father Jack MADDEN, C.S.B., was well-suited to be accompanying the students attending a seminar at the University of Accra in Ghana.
Born of Irish heritage, he was the eldest of three children of the late Patrick Henry MADDEN and Mary Agnes McKNIGHT. After graduating from high school, Jack came to Toronto to enter the novitiate of the Basilian Fathers. He was ordained a priest in 1948, pursued graduate studies at Harvard, and spent the rest of his life ministering and teaching in a variety of situations.
Father Jack was a much-beloved English professor at St. Michael's College, University of Toronto, in the 1950s and 1960s. He loved words and helped his students love them. He would recite by memory the etymology, the cognates in sister languages and the story of their development. Students learning Anglo-Saxon today still use his "Frequency Word List of Anglo-Saxon Poetry." He was approachable and never pedantic.
He used the storyteller method, and his enthusiasm for English literature inspired many of his students. Former students often refer to his vibrant presentation of the works of Chaucer; one such student still cherishes the image of "Father MADDEN sitting cross-legged on his desk, chuckling as he read aloud from The Canterbury Tales!" Many have said that he was one of the best teachers they ever had; all benefited from his zeal, intelligence, knowledge and compassion.
In 1969, he was assigned to Houston, Texas, where he combined ministry with teaching at the University of Saint Thomas. He also served successfully and effectively as chaplain to the parish grade-school. At that time, one colleague noted, "Saint Anne's must have the only grade-school in the world whose chaplain has a PhD from Harvard!"
In 1980, he went to St. Joseph's College, University of Alberta in Edmonton, where he was involved in campus ministry and taught theology. Other parish assignments were in Owen Sound, Ontario, and in Calgary.
Wherever he taught or worked in campus ministry, Father Jack combined the sacramental and education roles of his priestly calling as a Basilian. Along with his teaching and parochial duties, he gave retreats to priests, religious and laity in the United States and Canada. In almost every diocese and Basilian Institution in which he served, he was consulted by bishops, confrères, diocesan priests and religious on matters educational, spiritual, theological and liturgical.
Father Jack began to experience physical health difficulties early in 1980. In 1990, he fell victim to neuropathy, which increasingly affected his walking. At his request, he was appointed to Anglin House, the Basilian infirmary facility in Toronto on the St. Michael's College campus, taking up residence there in 1998. In 2002 he was diagnosed with cancer, which eventually confined him to bed until his death.
He finished his life's journey on a road paved with loving concern for others, a dynamic personality, a sense of humour, and a deep and joyous faith in God. He leaves his brother, Reverend Bob MADDEN, C.S.B.; his sister Patricia SYRING of Toledo, Ohio; six nieces and nephews and seven grand-nieces and nephews.
Joan Fidler BURROWS is a former student of John MADDEN; Father Bob, his brother.

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BURROWS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
Rev. John Francis MADDEN
By Joan Fidler BURROW and Reverend Bob MADDEN Wednesday, May 28, 2003 - Page A20
Son, brother, uncle, Basilian priest, teacher. Born October 30, 1921, in Detroit. Died January 5, in Toronto, of cancer, aged Picture a long stretch of red dirt road in the tropical forest of central Ghana, West Africa, in 1957. A minivan stops and disgorges five young Canadian university students, their Ghanaian guide, and their leader: a slight, youthful-looking priest from Toronto. He discreetly hands out the toilet paper as his companions disappear into the lush growth.
Father Jack MADDEN, C.S.B., was well-suited to be accompanying the students attending a seminar at the University of Accra in Ghana.
Born of Irish heritage, he was the eldest of three children of the late Patrick Henry MADDEN and Mary Agnes McKNIGHT. After graduating from high school, Jack came to Toronto to enter the novitiate of the Basilian Fathers. He was ordained a priest in 1948, pursued graduate studies at Harvard, and spent the rest of his life ministering and teaching in a variety of situations.
Father Jack was a much-beloved English professor at St. Michael's College, University of Toronto, in the 1950s and 1960s. He loved words and helped his students love them. He would recite by memory the etymology, the cognates in sister languages and the story of their development. Students learning Anglo-Saxon today still use his "Frequency Word List of Anglo-Saxon Poetry." He was approachable and never pedantic.
He used the storyteller method, and his enthusiasm for English literature inspired many of his students. Former students often refer to his vibrant presentation of the works of Chaucer; one such student still cherishes the image of "Father MADDEN sitting cross-legged on his desk, chuckling as he read aloud from The Canterbury Tales!" Many have said that he was one of the best teachers they ever had; all benefited from his zeal, intelligence, knowledge and compassion.
In 1969, he was assigned to Houston, Texas, where he combined ministry with teaching at the University of Saint Thomas. He also served successfully and effectively as chaplain to the parish grade-school. At that time, one colleague noted, "Saint Anne's must have the only grade-school in the world whose chaplain has a PhD from Harvard!"
In 1980, he went to St. Joseph's College, University of Alberta in Edmonton, where he was involved in campus ministry and taught theology. Other parish assignments were in Owen Sound, Ontario, and in Calgary.
Wherever he taught or worked in campus ministry, Father Jack combined the sacramental and education roles of his priestly calling as a Basilian. Along with his teaching and parochial duties, he gave retreats to priests, religious and laity in the United States and Canada. In almost every diocese and Basilian Institution in which he served, he was consulted by bishops, confrères, diocesan priests and religious on matters educational, spiritual, theological and liturgical.
Father Jack began to experience physical health difficulties early in 1980. In 1990, he fell victim to neuropathy, which increasingly affected his walking. At his request, he was appointed to Anglin House, the Basilian infirmary facility in Toronto on the St. Michael's College campus, taking up residence there in 1998. In 2002 he was diagnosed with cancer, which eventually confined him to bed until his death.
He finished his life's journey on a road paved with loving concern for others, a dynamic personality, a sense of humour, and a deep and joyous faith in God. He leaves his brother, Reverend Bob MADDEN, C.S.B.; his sister Patricia SYRING of Toledo, Ohio; six nieces and nephews and seven grand-nieces and nephews.
Joan Fidler BURROWS is a former student of John MADDEN; Father Bob, his brother.

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BURSEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
CURRIE, Alda Christina (née MAIR)
(1932-2003) We regret to announce the death of our mother and friend, she died peacefully at home surrounded by family and Friends. She was predeceased by her husband James CURRIE (1991.) Alda was a loving, caring, compassionate person and will be missed by many her children Bob (Charlotte YATES,) Andy (Rose CHAN,) Mary (John WOOD), Stewart, John (Elizabeth MASTROUTUCCI), and her seven much loved grand children, and her siblings, Arlington MAIR and Kathleen BURSEY, and much loved by her in-laws. During her illness Alda was cared for by her cousin Mary Ann DEACON and her sister Kathleen, and supported by her family and Friends. A Service to celebrate Alda's life will be held at the Beaconsfield United Church, 202 Woodside Road, Beaconsfield, Quebec at 1 p.m. on Monday, February 24, 2003. Donations in her name may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, and the Victoria Order of Nurses, and Child Haven.

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BURT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Theodor NAGLER
In loving memory of Theodor (Ted) NAGLER, 76 years, Friday evening, October 24, 2003 at the Mindemoya Hospital, Manitoulin Island.
Beloved husband of Marie (BURT) NAGLER. Loving father of Dr. James (Faye) NAGLER,
Susan (Larry) TOBIN, Marcia (Michael) BOND. Cherished Papa and Grandpa of Emily and Lauren NAGLER, Felice, Jocelyn, Benjamin and Jacob TOBIN, and Jenna and Rebecca BOND. Dear brother of Maria PETROVIC (husband Stephan (predeceased) of Kapuskasing (formerly Sudbury) and Lydia NAGLER of Zell am See, Austria. Predeceased by his mother Maria and father Josef NAGLER of Zell am See, Austria and brother-in-law Harold (Rena) BURT. Sadly missed by nieces Anne MILLS and Mary Lynn WILSON, and nephew Stephan PETROVIC. Ted retired in 1986 as Director of Plant Maintenance after 30 years of service at Sudbury Memorial Hospital. Following his retirement he moved to Mindemoya where he enjoyed all the outdoor activities each season brings on the Island.
Visitation was held on Monday, October 27, 2003 at St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, October 28, 2003 at St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church. Island Funeral Home

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BURTNICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-27 published
Mary KEENBERG
By Jonina WOOD Monday, January 27, 2003, Page A16
Wife, mother, grandmother. Born July 4, 1913, on a train passing through Fort William, Ontario (now part of Thunder Bay). Died September 26, 2002, in Winnipeg, of natural causes, aged 89.
I first met Mary KEENBERG in 1999 at the Manitoba Club in Winnipeg. With its Edwardian oak-panelled walls, deep chairs and old-world ambience, it was the perfect setting for Mary. She half-rose from her fireside chair to greet me -- a tiny, elegant, perfectly coiffed woman who smiled a warm welcome. Sweet-hearted yet somewhat imperious, she was a master of the quick quip. "We're the long and short of it," she once pointed out to a crowd, getting a huge laugh as I stood a full foot taller than she. But the meeting at the Manitoba Club had a deeper significance.
Mary was born on a train. Her parents, newly arrived from the shtetls of Russia, were on their way to a whistle stop in Saskatchewan called Mikado. They were part of the waves of immigrants inspired by Prime Minister Wilfrid LAURIER's international appeal to come settle Canada.
So they did. Mary's father, Maurice Max BURTNICK, opened a general store. To a brood that already included Tony, Sasha and Mary were added Louis, Polly, Harry and Allan. The sudden departure of Mary's mother left Mary to care for her younger siblings. This she did with a fierce and protective love that would come to be one of her defining character traits.
Mary was younger than most when she graduated from Grade 12 with the highest grades in all Saskatchewan. She taught Grades 1 to 12 in a one-room country schoolhouse near Canora, Saskatchewan, biding her time until she was 18 and could enter nursing at the General Hospital in Winnipeg. Once again, she graduated with the highest marks in her class.
With little money and the tough, physical demands of nursing, life cannot have been easy for her and it was during this time that she lost her much-beloved sister Polly in a fire back home, a tragedy which created a lifelong wound in Mary's heart.
Meanwhile, on a happier note, there was a young, Jewish doctor in the small Manitoban town of Baldur named Abe KEENBERG. Dr. KEENBERG was very busy (and also perhaps a tad lonely, the story goes), so one day he called his younger brother Lou who lived in Winnipeg. "Lou," he said, "I need a wife. Do you know any nice Jewish nurses?"
Lou soon invited Abe to meet Mary. It was a match. In 1938, they were married at the Royal Alex in Winnipeg. They formed a loving and effective team, first taking up residence in Glenboro, Manitoba, and then in 1945 moving to Winnipeg with their new son. Here, Mary took on what would become her life's passion: the fledgling state of Israel.
With her own children, she was equally zealous. If Patty or Ron came home with an A, Mary wanted to know what happened to the "plus." If ever they were taunted as Jews, they were to fight back. In the KEENBERG home, there was honour in a bloodied nose won fighting against racial slurs of any kind.
Tiny, but with the constitution of an ox, Mary was awhirl with her work, her children, her travels with Abe, and her Friends. When Abe died in 1987, she bravely carried on although devastated by his passing. She filled her time with work, bridge (she was an ace), and she was a friend to her grandchildren -- Megan, Kathryn and Adam.
But she was often lonely. She missed her Abe and was anxious to join him. This determined woman, who had fought her way from poor beginnings to membership in the Manitoba Club, was weary toward the end. Yet she was ever ladylike, ever gracious, ever the warrior.
Jonina WOOD is Mary's daughter-in-law

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BURTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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BURTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-19 published
GRAY/GREY, The Honourable Wesley Gibson, B.A., LL.B., LL.D., Q.C. (Lieutenant (N) Royal Canadian Navy, Justice, Supreme Court of Ontario; Treasurer and C.E.O., The Law Society of Upper Canada original Smoke Lake Lease Holder)
Died peacefully, At Toronto, on Wednesday, June 18, 2003 after a short illness. Gibson, beloved husband of Nancy BURTON for 60 years. Dear father of Patsy (Tim PORTER,) Katy WAUGH (Ralph EIBNER,) and Barbara (Dudleigh COYLE.) Loving Grandpa of Suzanna and Rosalind PORTER; Maggie WELT (Bruno) and Emily WAUGH; Nancy, David and Patrick COYLE. He will be sadly missed by his sister Estelle CUNNINGHAM and her family. Special thanks to the medical team at St. Michael's Hospital who took such good care of him. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Friday, June 20th, Service at Rosedale United Church, 159 Roxborough Drive (M4W 1X7), on Saturday, June 21st at 11 o'clock. Interment at Saint John's Norway Cemetery on Monday, June 23rd at 10 o'clock. In lieu of flowers, donations to St. Michael's Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto M5B 1W8, or Rosedale United Church.

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BURTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-26 published
MAY, Stephanie Middleton
Sculptor, Pianist, Activist, Writer, Raconteur. ''She was the first to complain.'' (what she always said she would want for an epitaph.) Born New York, April 16, 1927. Died Margaree Harbour, Nova Scotia, peacefully, unexpectedly, at home on August 23, 2003. Predeceased by parents, Thomas Hazlehurst MIDDLETON of Charleston, South Carolina, and Ruth Vincent STEPHENS of Wales and Ohio. Survived by loving husband of fifty five years, John Middleton MAY of Margaree Harbour, brother, Thomas Hazlehurst MIDDLETON (Jeannie MIDDLETON) of Los Angeles. Dearly missed by son Geoffrey Middleton MAY and his wife Rebecca-Lynne MacDONALD- MAY of Margaree Harbour and grand_son, Andrew Charles MacDONALD of Ottawa, and daughter Elizabeth Evans MAY and granddaughter Victoria Cate May BURTON of New Edinburgh, Ottawa. Stephanie MAY had a rich, rewarding and exciting life. As a young woman, she was a competitive figure skater. In the 1950s and 1960s, she became a leader in the civil rights and peace movement in the U.S. With 17 Nobel Laureates, including Bertrand Russell and Linus Pauling, she sued the governments of the U.S., United Kingdom and U.S.S.R. to stop atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. With Norman Cousins, she was a founding member of the Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy. She addressed 100,000 people at the 1961 Aldermaston March rally in Trafalgar Square and, later, went on a six day hunger strike to oppose Soviet nuclear testing, drawing international media attention. Stephanie MAY worked with the Hartford Council of Churches to advance civil rights, social justice and urban renewal. Opposing the war in Vietnam, she helped found Dissenting Democrats, leading to the challenge by Senator Eugene McCarthy to Lyndon Johnson's presidency. Her work for peace candidates led to President Richard Nixon including her name on his infamous ''Enemies List.'' She was an accomplished portrait sculptor, having been urged to study sculpture by Eleanor Roosevelt. She was also a professional pianist. In 1973, the family moved to Cape Breton Island and Stephanie MAY applied her considerable talents and energy to establishing Schooner Village, a restaurant and gift shop on the Cabot Trail, where she played piano on board the Schooner Restaurant. Sadly, the business is no more, as it was demolished to make way for the new bridge. She also worked on environmental causes in Nova Scotia, sacrificing retirement acreage over-looking the Bras D'Or Lake to Scott Paper in a court case against the use of Agent Orange. A service to celebrate her life and praise the glory of God in whose hands she now rejoices will be held on Thursday, August 28th at 2 p.m. at the Calvin United Church in Margaree Harbour. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Sierra Club of Canada, 412-1 Nicholas Street, Ottawa, K1N 7B7, would be much appreciated.

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