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"BUC" 2003 Obituary


BUCHAN  BUCHANAN  BUCHER  BUCK  BUCKIEWICZ  BUCKLAND  BUCKLEY  BUCKMAN  BUCKNELL 

BUCHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-10 published
Died This Day -- Lord Tweedsmuir, 1940
Monday, February 10, 2003, Page R7
Scottish aristocrat born August 26, 1875, served as Governor-General from 1935 to 1940 and, as John BUCHAN, wrote such classic thrillers as The Thirty-Nine Steps; instituted the Governor-General's Literary Awards in 1937; died in Montreal.

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BUCHANAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
BUCHANAN, Audrey Cameron
At the Cambridge Memorial Hospital, on Sunday, February 23, 2003, in her 90th year. Audrey BUCHANAN (née SMAIL,) formerly of Toronto, was the beloved wife, for over 60 years, of the late Stanley BUCHANAN (2000.) Dear mother of Betty BUCHANAN of Toronto, and Nancy RZESZUTKO and her husband, Walt, of Cambridge; loved grandmother of Sian SILLS and Mark FRANKLIN of Toronto, Erin and Michael HARTMAN of Burlington and Kathryn and Corryn RZESZUTKO of Cambridge dear sister of Alex SMAIL of Oakville; dear sister-in-law of Alfred BUCHANAN of Toronto; and special aunt of Kathleen SMAIL of Tualatin, Oregon, Pat BRANDON of Coldwater, Ontario, Blake and Allison SMAIL, Bruce and Judy SMAIL, all of St. Joseph's Island, Ontario, and Janet SMAIL of Sault Saint Marie. Audrey graduated in nursing from Women's College Hospital in 1937, following which she became Night Supervisor of The Ontario Hospital in Saint Thomas. Since her retirement from nursing, Audrey had been actively involved with the Alumnae Association of Women's College Hospital. She treasured the long, happy summers spent with children and grandchildren at the family cottage at Floral Park on Lake Couchiching. Since 2001, she resided at Queen's Square Terrace in Cambridge, Ontario, where she found a happy and fulfilling life surrounded by new best Friends and kind caregivers. Friends will be received at Coutts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 96 St. Andrews Street, Cambridge (wwwfuneralscanada.com), on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted in the funeral home chapel on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 at 3 p.m. A reception will follow in the Coutts Family Reception Cottage. Spring interment will take place at Carlyle Cemetery in Iron Bridge, Ontario. As expressions of sympathy, donations may be made to Women's College Hospital Alumnae Memorial Fund, 58 Lascelles Boulevard, Toronto, Ontario M5P 2E1.

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BUCHANAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-01 published
EBBS, Adèle ''Couchie'' Page (STATTEN)
Died serenely, at peace, on Saturday, June 28, 2003, in her own home 10 days before her 94th birthday. Lovingly cared for by her son John, his partner Bill YEADAN and other compassionate caregivers. Companion since 1924 of the late Dr. Harry EBBS (1906 - 2000). ''Their portages often diverged but they paddled as one.'' Daughter of the late Taylor ''Chief'' and Ethel ''Tonakela'' STATTEN. Sister of Dr. Tay STATTEN and the late Dr. Page STATTEN. Wonderful mother to Bobsie, Susan, John EBBS. ''Geeya'' was so proud of her grandchildren (children of Jim HAYHURST and Sue EBBS) Cindy HAYHURST (Scott HANSON), Jimmy HAYHURST (Beth) and Barbara HAYHURST (Paddy FLYNN.) ''NanaGeeya'' was joyously entertained by her great-grandchildren Ben, Cameron, Griffen HANSON; Statten, Quinn, Tatum HAYHURSAINT_Dear to her always, Eleanor PARMENTER and Jean BUCHANAN. From birth Couchie summered under canvass, first at Geneva Park, Lake Couchiching, where her father directed the Central Toronto Young Men's Christian Association camp and from 1913 when the Stattens took a lease on Canoe Lake, Algonquin Park. In 1921 and 1924 Camps Ahmek and Wapomeo were founded. Graduate of Brown P.S., Bishop Strachan School, University College U31T, O.C.E. Inductee of the University of Toronto Sports Hall of Fame. Teacher at Oakwood Collegiate, after which she assumed full-time directorship of Wapomeo until retirement in 1975. Involved member of the Canadian, Ontario and American Camping Associations, Bolton Camp Committee, Young Men's Christian Association Board. Founding member of the Society of Camp Directors. Supporter of the Taylor Statten Bursary Fund and Camp Tonakela in Madra, India. Recipient of the Directors' Award of Friends of Algonquin. Patron of the Tom Thomson exhibit, in memory of her husband, at the Algonquin Park Visitors Centre. Loyal sister of Kappa Kappa Gamma. Avid member of the Federation of Ontario Naturalists, Toronto Mycology Society, the Toronto Camera Club, Rotary Club of Toronto Inner Wheel, Women's Auxiliary at the Hospital for Sick Children, University Women's Club. Enthusiastic member of Osler Bluff Ski Club and Rosedale Golf Club. Founding member of Lawrence Park Community Church. She and Harry travelled widely sharing their passion for children in camping, paediatric medicine and other youth causes. Her strong leadership, fairness, integrity, wisdom and instinct to see the good in all has touched thousands and will be her legacy for generations. If you wish, remember Couchie by donating to The Camping Archives, Bata Library, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7B8 or to any of the above organizations. In early September a Celebration of her Life will be held at Lawrence Park Community Church, Toronto. Friends on Canoe Lake are invited to renimisce and tell tall tales at her beloved Little Wapomeo Island on Monday, July 7th, 3-6 p.m. Memories may be posted at www.firesoffriendship.com. ''Here Let the Northwoods' Spirit Kindle Fires of Friendship.''

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BUCHANAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
Nova Scotians proudly recall a political icon
By Kevin COX, Thursday, December 18, 2003 - Page A10
Halifax -- To many Canadians, Robert STANFIELD was a hard-luck opposition leader in the wrong place at the wrong time, but in his home province, he inspired fierce pride as a political icon.
Yesterday, the flags flew at half-mast at Province House, where he served four terms as premier from 1956-1967, and mourners signed a book of condolences for Mr. STANFIELD, who died in Ottawa at 89 on Tuesday.
"Robert STANFIELD brought a remarkable understanding of our country based on respect, strength and civility that was, and is, missing in public life," Premier John HAMM said yesterday. Mr. HAMM's low-key country style has been compared to that of Mr. STANFIELD. "We will always wonder how Canada would have moved forward with Robert STANFIELD as prime minister."
Colleagues remembered him as a compassionate, honest and decent leader who reluctantly entered partisan politics in 1949 to rebuild the Progressive Conservative Party after it had been shut out in the provincial election three years earlier.
He took the unusual step of refusing to attack the governing Liberals under long-time premier Angus L. MacDONALD, and instead chose to build up the Tory organization, which would dominate the province for decades.
He overcame the tragic death of his first wife, Joyce, in a car crash in 1954 and took the Conservatives to power two years later.
Senator John BUCHANAN, who was Nova Scotia premier for 13 years, recalled campaigning as a political rookie under Mr. STANFIELD's banner in 1967.
"Bob STANFIELD was a household name in this province. In my constituency, I would meet people I had never known before and they'd look at the badge I was wearing and say, 'Good, you're a STANFIELD man.'"
Mr. STANFIELD's folksy, earnest manner, coupled with an often self-deprecating dry wit, disguised an ambitious reform program that he brought to the economically depressed Atlantic province with a tradition of political patronage.
Under Mr. STANFIELD, the Tories undertook sweeping education changes, building several new schools, introducing vocational institutions and providing more funds for universities.
But his most controversial move was to establish one of the first provincial economic development agencies in Canada -- Industrial Estates Ltd. -- to attract industry to the province.
Entrepreneurs including grocer Frank SOBEY signed on to provide provincial money to bring businesses to Nova Scotia.
The agency had a couple of embarrassing failures that cost the government millions of dollars, but also created thousands of jobs.
Mr. BUCHANAN also spoke of Mr. STANFIELD's calm demeanour.
The senator recalled Mr. STANFIELD placidly watching in a Halifax curling club as the results came in from the 1972 election when the tally was seesawing and jubilant supporters believed that he would become prime minister.
"About 11 p.m., he just decided that he and his wife would go back to the hotel and they were going to get a good night's rest and see what would happen the next day," Mr. BUCHANAN recalled.
The next morning, Mr. STANFIELD found out the Liberals had won the election by two seats.
The homespun, Lincolnesque qualities that endeared Mr. STANFIELD to Nova Scotians were no match for the emotional Trudeaumania that swept the country in the 1968 election campaign.

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BUCHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
BUCHER, Eileen Mary
Passed away peacefully on March 3, 2003, at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto in her 92nd year. Beloved wife of Clemens JOSEPH. Mother of Mary Jo GASCON and her husband Louis, and Loretta GSELL and her husband Alain. Grandmother to François, Lise, Elizabeth, and Rose-Marie, Joseph, Therese, Jean, and Anne. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (South of Eglinton Avenue East) from 7-9 p.m. on Wednesday. Funeral Mass will be held at 10 o'clock Thursday at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, 78 Clifton Road. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery.

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BUCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Suzanne Katherine (née BUCK)
Peacefully, at the Cancer Palliative Care Unit of Sunnybrook & Women's College Health Sciences Centre - Sunnybrook Campus, on Tuesday, February 18, 2003. Suzanne (Sue), of Toronto, in her 68th year. Dearly loved and loving wife of 45 years of Dr. Barclay G. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, mother of Paul and Ian (Heather) STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, and sister of Peter (Victoria) BUCK. Fondly remembered by Irene STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and Dr. Donald A. (Peggy) STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. A Service of Remembrance will be held at Saint John's York Mills Anglican Church, 19 Don Ridge Drive, Toronto, on Wednesday, February 26th at 2: 00 p.m. A reception will follow at the church. If desired, donations may be made to the Freeman Centre for Palliative Care, c/o North York General Hospital (416-756-6214).

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BUCKIEWICZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-28 published
BUCKIEWICZ, Halina
Died in her 87th year on October 26, 2003, attended by her family. A Funeral Mass is being held at St. Casimir's Church, 156 Roncesvalles Ave., at 9 a.m. on Friday, October 31, 2003, and her surviving children Irene, Marek, and Marta, and grandchildren Kate, Tara, and Alexander wish to welcome her Friends to the Turner and Porter Roncesvalles Chapel, 436 Roncesvalles Ave., on Thursday evening between 6 and 8 p.m. The family would like to extend their gratitude to the nurses at Sunnybrook Hospital for their care and generosity.

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BUCKLAND o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Denise Catherine OLMSTEAD
In loving memory of Denise Catherine OLMSTEAD, October 25, 1925 to December 20, 2002.
Denise OLMSTEAD, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge, Gore Bay and formerly of Mississauga, died at the Mindemoya Hospital, on Friday, December 20, 2002 at the age of 77 years. She was born in London, England, daughter of the late Wm. Timothy and Anne (BUCKLAND) WALKER. Denise has been an R.N. in the R.A.F. and also at the Scarborough Centenary Hospital and the Trillium Hospital, Mississauga. She had been a very active person, having been a member of the Girl Guides Lion's Club, and had been Co-founder of the Parents Without Partners Chapter in her area. She was fondly referred to as "the Duchess", and will be remembered as a lady who kept others organized. Her greatest joys were being involved with her many Friends, her family and PWP. Through these relationships, she was an inspiration and mentor to many. Denise never "gave up" and her inspiration and love of life will be cherished by family and all who knew her. Dearly loved and loving mother of Gloria and Bill KENNEDY of London and Terry and Rosanne OLMSTEAD of Gore Bay. Proud grandmother of Jessica, Jason and Jennifer. Dear sister of Bill and his wife Ruth WALKER of Kingston and Pat KERRISON of England. Also survived by many nieces and nephews.
Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home, Gore Bay, on Monday December 23, 2002. The funeral service was conducted with Fr. Bert FOLIOT officiating. Cremation to follow. Culgin Funeral Home

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BUCKLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-22 published
Champ didn't tell his mother
Toronto fighter was talked into boxing by his brothers during the Thirties as a way to make more money
By Barbara SILVERSTEIN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, March 22, 2003 - Page F11
When Leon SLAN became Canada's champion heavyweight boxer, he didn't tell his mother. She disapproved of the sport, so he kept the news to himself -- though not for long. Mr. SLAN, who died last month at the age of 86, had for years fought under another name and managed to escape his mother's wrath until 1936, when he won the national amateur title and the irresistibility of fame upset his comfortable obscurity.
The modest Mr. SLAN went on to become a successful Toronto businessman who had so allowed boxing to settle into his past that in 1986 most of his Friends were surprised when he was inducted into the Canadian Boxing Hall of Fame. It astonished everyone that the man they knew as the co-owner of a luggage-making company was known in boxing circles as Lennie STEIN, holder of the Canadian amateur heavyweight title from 1935 to 1937.
A quiet and unassuming giant of a man, his wife described him as invariably soft-spoken. "I never heard him raise his voice once in all the years we were married, Isabel SLAN said.
By all accounts, Mr. SLAN's mild demeanour belied his prowess in the ring, said his son, Jon SLAN. " For a man who was a champion at a blood sport, he was the gentlest person you ever met."
Born in Winnipeg to Russian immigrants on June 28, 1916, Mr. SLAN was the second of three sons. In 1922, the family moved to the Annex area of Toronto where he attended Harbord Collegiate Institute. His father, Joseph SLAN, was a struggling tailor with interesting ideas about the garment industry. In 1931, he headed a co-operative called Work-Togs Limited. It consisted of a small band of tailors who were to share in the profits. The project suffered from poor timing: It came on the scene at the height of the Depression and failed dismally.
In 1934, Joseph SLAN died in poverty and Leon and his two brothers Bob, who was born in 1914, and Jack, born in 1918 -- had to provide for their mother. Bringing home meagre paycheques from what little work they could find, the three decided to find a supplement.
At the time, boxing was a popular spectator sport and one of the few that was open to Jewish athletes. Bob and Jack knew that a good fighter could earn a decent living in the ring. Their eyes fell on Leon. At 17, their 6-foot-2, 200-pound, athletic brother towered over most grown men.
"Leon was big and strong and Bob and Jack thought he should be boxing, Mrs. SLAN said. "The family needed the money."
They persuaded him to give it a try and promised their support, she said. "They took him to over the gym. There they were, the three boys walking down the street arm-in-arm with Leon in the middle. They all walked over together to sign Leon up."
They didn't consult their mother. In fact, the brothers decided to enter the fight name Lennie STEIN, so she wouldn't read about Leon in the papers and worry.
As it turned out, the new Lennie STEIN was a natural. Mr. SLAN won his first major fight in a Round 1 knockout over the Toronto Golden Gloves title holder. " STEIN is durable and exceptionally fast for a heavyweight, " The Toronto Star reported in 1935. "He has the ability to rain punishment on his opponents with both hands."
In this way, he won almost all of his major fights. It helped, too, that his coach happened to be Maxie KADIN, a legend in Ontario boxing. Out of 40 bouts, Mr. SLAN netted 34 wins, 22 by knockout, and six losses.
A fighter who possessed a dogged and implacable manner, he was popular with the fans.
"He was known for not staying down on the canvas, Jon SLAN said. "On those rare times when he was decked, he always refused the referee's outstretched hand and picked himself up."
Yet, for all his success, Mr. SLAN rejected the opportunity to go fully professional. A manager and promoter from New York had seen him in a bout with a certain German boxer and saw possibilities.
"He wanted to promote him as the Great White Jewish Hope, " Jon said.
The German boxer happened to be the brother of Max SCHMELING, the Aryan protégé of Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich, who in 1936 had defeated the otherwise invincible Joe LOUIS in the upset of the century. To make it even more interesting, the manager proved to be the famous John BUCKLEY, who called the shots for Jack SHARKEY, a heavyweight who had beaten SCHMELING four years earlier.
"The promoter got so interested in this meeting of German and Jew that he offered my father a contract, but he didn't offer enough money, " Jon said.
The problem, it turned out, was that Mr. SLAN couldn't afford to turn professional, he once told a Globe and Mail reporter. "I was making good money then, $25 a week, and I was supporting my mother, " he said in 1988. "I asked him [Buckley] to put up $5,000 [and] he just laughed at me. He said he had hundreds of heavyweights."
Negotiations ended right there. "He was [only] interested in me because I was Jewish and that would go over big in New York."
It wasn't the only time that race emerged as an issue. Mr. SLAN had boxed under the auspices of the Young Men's Hebrew Association until 1936 when it was blackballed by the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada for withholding a portion of its proceeds. The money was earmarked for the Canadian Olympic effort, but the Young Men's Hebrew Association had refused to support the upcoming 1936 Berlin Games because of Germany's poor treatment of Jews. In the end, the Amateur Athletic Union permitted Mr. SLAN to enter as an independent and he went on to fight unattached to win the Toronto and national titles.
"It seemed so easy at the time, " he said in 1988. "I was a very quiet kid, but when I won, I became such a hero."
That glory turned out to be the undoing of Lennie STEIN, the fighter -- though it was all something of an anticlimax. The one thing Leon SLAN had feared on his way up through the ranks came to nothing: his mother finally found out that he boxed and then failed to react -- at least, not that anyone in the family can remember.
"She just took it in her stride, said Isabel SLAN. " She was a Jewish mother from the old country. I don't think she really understood what boxing was all about."
Perhaps, too, it helped to smooth matters that her son's secret endeavours had ended in triumph. She can only have felt a mother's pride.
In 1937, Mr. SLAN retired from boxing and found a job at a produce stall in Toronto's old fruit terminal on Colborne Street and was later hired by his brother Bob, a proprietor of Dominion Citrus Ltd. It was tough work with long hours, Mrs. SLAN said. "Leon would have to get up at 2 o'clock in the morning to go unload the fruits and vegetables off the trucks."
Even so, he still had some time for boxing. After working long days at the market, he taught athletics at the Young Men's Hebrew Association and it was there that he met Isabel MARGOLIAN. A concert pianist newly arrived from Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, she happened to take one of his boxing classes for women.
"We were all lined up in a row, punching bags, " she remembered. "Leon came up to me and told me I wasn't punching hard enough. Then he took my hand and hit it into the bag to show me how to do it. I felt my bones crunch, but I didn't say anything."
As it turned out, he had broken her hand. When he learned what had happened, he phoned her and thus began a different relationship. They married in 1942 and later that year Mr. SLAN enlisted in the army where he ended up in the Queen's Own Rifles. While in the army, he returned to boxing and won the 1942 Canadian Army heavyweight title.
After the war, the SLAN brothers founded Dominion Luggage in Toronto's garment district, a company that started small with eight workers and grew into a successful enterprise employing 200. Each brother had a different responsibility -- Jack was the designer, Bob took care of the administration and Leon was the salesman.
"It was a job that really suited him, Mrs. SLAN said. "He was very personable [and] sold to Eaton's, Simpsons, Air Canada -- all the big companies. He became good Friends with many of the buyers."
The three brothers enjoyed a comfortable relationship built on affection and loyalty, Jon said.
"Bob liked to fish, so he took Thursdays and Fridays off to go to his cottage. My father took Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons off to golf."
Jack, the creative force among them, rarely left the business but never begrudged his brothers their leisure time.
"They had the perfect partnership, " said Jon, a relationship anchored by their mother. "They were her surrogate husbands. I don't think there was a SLAN wife who felt that she wasn't playing second fiddle to my grandmother."
The brothers went to her house every day for lunch until she was 90. "She made old-time Jewish food. Her definition of borscht was sour cream with a touch of beets, " Jon said. "She cooked with chicken fat and the boys loved it."
Sophie SLAN died in 1984 at the age of 93.
In 1972, the SLANs sold Dominion Luggage to Warrington Products, a large conglomerate. "Warrington made them an offer they couldn't turn down, " Isabel said.
Even so, the brothers' relationship continued into retirement. "They called each other every day, even when their health was failing, " Jon said. "Bob died in 2000 and Jack in 2002. My father took their deaths very hard."
Although he never boxed again, Mr. SLAN played sports well into his 70s and could still show his mettle. He had taken up tennis at about the age of 40 and, when he couldn't get a membership at the exclusive Toronto Lawn Tennis Club in Rosedale, he co-founded the York Racquets Tennis Club. It opened in 1964, directly across the street from the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club.
Mr. SLAN died of heart failure in Toronto on February 11. He leaves his wife Isabel, son Jon and daughters Elynne GOLDKIND and Anna RISEN.

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BUCKLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-03 published
BELLAMY, Aline Marie Blanche (née BUCKLEY)
After a very brief illness, died on March 29, 2003, in Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec. Born May 27, 1927 in Trois-Rivières. After her marriage in 1947, Aline and her former husband, Arthur BELLAMY, settled in Rouyn-Noranda where they raised their two children, The Honourable Madam Justice Denise BELLAMY (Ian CUMMINGS) now resident in Toronto, Ontario, and Raymond BELLAMY (Suzan) now living in Cumberland, Ontario. She is survived by her granddaughter, Jennifer BELLAMY and by her sisters, Jeannine McDONNELL (Bill) of Revelstoke, British Columbia, and Brigitte BUCKLEY of Trois-Rivières. Her sister, Claire, predeceased her in 1998. She is also survived by her brother-in-law, Léo-Paul PELLERIN, her nephews, Paul, Pierre (Nicole) and Jean PELLERIN (Trois-Rivières and Cap-de-la-Madeleine) and by her niece, Linda NOËL (Trois-Rivières.) As was her wish, no service will be held and flowers are gratefully declined. Alternatively, a donation to The Osteoporosis Society of Canada (1-800-463-6842) 33 Laird Drive, Toronto, Ontario M4G 3S9 would have been greatly appreciated by Aline and is welcomed by her family.

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BUCKLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-16 published
Jerome Hamilton BUCKLEY
Husband, father, professor. Born August 30, 1917, in Toronto. Died January 28 in Cambridge, Massachusetts., of natural causes, aged 85.
By Margaret ATWOOD and David STAINES, Page A24
Every American Thanksgiving, Jerry and Elizabeth Buckley would invite at least one of Terry's graduate students to their home in Belmont, Massachusetts., for the customary turkey dinner. (In the 1960s, the graduate student was Margaret ATWOOD; in the '70s, David STAINES.) There, surrounded by their three children, Nicholas, Victoria, and Eleanor, and other guests, Jerry would regale everyone with tales of Puritan ancestors, though they were not "his" ancestors both Jerry and Elizabeth were born and raised in Toronto, and they were distinctly Canadian in their gracious manners, their widespread generosity, and their affections. At a large institution such as Harvard, Jerry stood out for his kindness and humanity.
Jerry attended Humberside Collegiate Institute and then Victoria College in the University of Toronto, where his courses included Elizabethan literature offered by Northrop FRYE and Shakespeare offered by E. J. PRATT. As a young poet and critic, he reviewed new works by Robinson Jeffers and Virginia Woolf, and won a prize for an essay titled New Techniques in Contemporary Fiction. Graduating with a B.A. in 1939, he chose Harvard Graduate School, obtaining his PhD in 1942. On June 19, 1943, in Toronto, he married Elizabeth ADAM/ADAMS, his confidante and soul mate.
University teaching posts were thin on the ground in Canada during the Second World War. Jerry used to describe his one job interview with a Canadian university: They were less interested in his a academic credentials, he said, than in whether he was a Christian and whether he drank. If he did the latter, they made it clear that he must do it with the curtains closed so as not to corrupt the students. He took a job in the United States.
His teaching career took him to the University of Wisconsin, where he rose from instructor in 1942 to full professor in 1954 to Columbia University from 1954 until 1961; and to Harvard University, where he taught for 26 years 1987. Named Gurney Professor of English Literature in 1975, in this distinguished chair he followed Douglas BUSH and B. J. Whiting; BUSH, another ex-Canadian, welcomed Jerry BUCKLEY to Harvard, as Jerry recollected, "with open arrns... filled with theses."
A Harvard seminar on Victorian critics led by Howard Mumford Jones prodded Buckley's interest in William Ernest Henley, and his dissertation on Henley became his first published book, William Ernest Henley: A Study in the Counter-Decadence of the Nineties (1945). In 1951 he secured his reputation as a major Victorianist with The Victorian Temper, and in 1960 he re-established Tennyson's stature in literary studies with his Tennyson: The Growth of a Poet. The rise of Victorian studies owes very much to his dedicated scholarship and his inspiring leadership.
He was passionately devoted to his subject, so much so that he often seemed to become the incarnation of it. Former students remember with affection riveting oral performances of his favourite authors, such as Dickens. Striding across the room, long arms waving, he would "become" Mr. Micawber or Ebenezer Scrooge. His performances would be interspersed with strange bits of gossip, which he would also act out, becoming Tennyson at an advanced age, creeping around behind an alarmed woman at a garden party to inform her that her stays were creaking, or reciting with verve and relish one of Edward Lear's parodies of his beloved Tennyson. Many of Terry's former graduate students were at his funeral to pay tribute to a superb humanist and an equally superb friend.
Margaret ATWOOD and David STAINES were among Jerry BUCKLEY's graduate students.

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BUCKMAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-05 published
Marcel Alexander GORZYNSKI
In loving memory of Marcel Alexander GORZYNSKI, born January 16, 1925 in Poland, died February 23, 2003 at his residence on Manitoulin Island.
He married in 1948 in Germany to Lena (KAPPLER,) and they came to Canada in 1949 to Montreal. In 1950 he came to Sudbury and was hired at INCO. He was a millwright retiring in 1985. In 1975 he went camping on Manitoulin Island. While he was there he and his wife went out looking for waterfront property. They bought one on Lake Manitou and started building a camp. In 1986 he moved to Manitoulin Island permanently. Marcel enjoyed his life on Manitoulin Island to the fullest. He grew everything in the garden. He planted trees all around, Chestnut, Walnut, Apple, Pear and Grape. The flower garden was started too. Roses were his favourite. He had a green thumb for gardening and took great pride in his flowers and fruit. He was predeceased by his canine friend, Lady. Marcel battled non-Hodgin's lymphoma for two years. He died peacefully in his beloved home. We all miss him. Beloved husband of Lena (KAPPLER) GORZYNSKI of Sudbury. Loving father of Madeline (husband Terry BUCKMAN,) Patricia (husband Norm BODSON,) and Raymond (partner Debbie ROBERTSON) all of Sudbury. Cherished grandfather of Andrea and Stephanie. The Memorial Service was held in the R. J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street Sudbury on Thursday, February 27, 2003. Cremation at the Park Lawn Crematorium.

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BUCKMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-26 published
CHAMBERS, Dorothy Gail (née ALLEN) September 24, 2003
It is with great sadness that the family announces the death of Dorothy Gail CHAMBERS, in her 56th year. Beloved mother of Rebecca and Jesse; loyal, loving and supportive wife to Jim for over 32 years. Gail's loving presence will be missed by her brothers Glen and Gene and sister and brother-in-law Maureen and John and her extended family and Friends, too numerous to name. Gail lived fully engaged and with great humour, love and compassion with cancer for over 13 years. This was not a battle -- it was a co-existence with a disease that focused her energies on the things that were important to her, family, Friends, and a profound respect for the scared and the sacred and the spiritual, which she found in the natural world, particularly at her cottage in Muskoka. Gail will be sorely missed by the many Friends and relatives she touched in her life. Particular thanks must be given to the St. Elizabeth Visiting Nurses' Association home care who treated her with love and respect. Special thanks to Dr. Rob BUCKMAN who risked the very human trait of mixing health care with compassion and Friendship, also Dr. Molyn LESZCZ whose compassionate counselling helped her through the rough part of her difficult journey. Heartfelt thanks to Dr. Angela MAZZA- WHELAN who was present when Gail died in the loving embrace of her family. Thanks also to Doctors WARR and TOZER for their care. Also the unsung heroes of the health care system - the nurses. Cremation has taken place. A Celebration of Gail's life will take place on Saturday, September 27th at 2: 00 p.m. at Olivet United Church followed by a reception. Olivet United Church, 40 Empress Avenue at Prince George Street, Hamilton. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals would be appreciated by the family.

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BUCKNELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
Barbara KING (née MADAHBEE)
In loving memory of Barbara KING (née MADAHBEE) who passed away Thursday morning, October 30, 2003 at her residence at the age of 73 years.
Beloved wife of Raymond George KING, predeceased. Will be sadly missed by her children, Susan KING and Will PATHY, Jane KING and Ken PASTO, Debbie KING and Bill HOMER, Patrick KING (wife Jean) and predeceased by son Kevin KING. Special grandmother of Desmond and Grant KING. Dear sister of Anne BREYER, Jean ANDREWS, Ivan MADAHBEE, Lillian BUCKNELL, Archie MADAHBEE, Cecilia BAYERS, Linda THIBODEAU, Patsy CORBIERE, Tootsie PANAMICK, Patrick MADAHBEE and predeceased by Veronica McGRAW, Lawrence MADAHBEE, Elizabeth KING, Eli MADAHBEE, Morris MADAHBEE and Doris BREWER. Rested at the Sucker Creek Community Hall on Sunday, November 1, 2003. Funeral Mass was held at St. Bernard's Church, Little Current on Monday, November 3, 2003. Cremation. Lougheed Funeral Home Sudbury.

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