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"BIS" 2003 Obituary


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BISAILLON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
BISAILLON, Ronald Bruce (Ron)
After a sudden illness at the Kingston General Hospital on Tuesday, March 4, 2003 with his family by his side. Beloved husband of Lise PEPIN. Dear son of Ruth of Kingston and the late Gerard BISAILLON. Dear father of Brad (Tracey,) Jamie (Martin) and step-father of Stephane LEGAULT (Kathi) and Marc LEGAULT. Dear grandfather of Faith and Julia. Dear brother of Gerry (Joan), Robert (Janet) and brother-in-law of Maurice (Francine), Jean-Guy (Henriette), Gaetan (Claire), Pierre (Sylvie), Paul, Nicole and Yvon (Rollande). Survived also by several nieces and nephews. Friends will be received at the Gordon F. Tompkins Funeral Home, Township Chapel, 435 Davis Drive (Waterloo Village) on Friday evening from 7-9 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. till 11: 00 a.m. Service will be held in the Chapel on Saturday March 8th at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation. Friends desiring may contribute in Ron's memory to the Lung Association or the Kidney Foundation. In the care of the Gordon F. Tompkins Funeral Homes Township Chapels 546-5150 gftompkins-township.ca

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BISHOP o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-09 published
Last fighter pilot of the Great War
Canadian aviator, a bankteller in peacetime, was 'just doing his duty'
By Allison LAWLOR Thursday, January 9, 2003, Page R7
Henry BOTTERELL, the last of the fighter pilots that fought in the First World War, has died in Toronto. He was 106.
Mr. BOTTERELL, who up until in his late 90s was swimming almost every day, died peacefully at the Sunnybrook Veterans Hospital, now part of Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, on Friday, less than two months after celebrating his 106th birthday.
One of 16 surviving Canadian veterans of the First World War profiled in a Globe and Mail series in November, Henry BOTTERELL was believed to be the last fighter pilot from the 1914-1918 conflict, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Mr. BOTTERELL declined to take part in the series of interviews, but at a special air-force celebration four years earlier he recalled his days as a fighter pilot.
"I had good hands," he said then. "I didn't have the fighting acumen of some, like Billy BISHOP. I was just a bank clerk. I wasn't one of the very best, but I had my share of action."
On August 29, 1918, Flight Lieutenant BOTTERELL flew his Sopwith Camel over Vitry, France. After dropping four bombs on a railway station, he was heading back to his airfield when he encountered a German observation balloon. He fired 400 rounds into the balloon with his aircraft machine gun.
With the balloon ablaze, the soldier leaped from the basket and opened his parachute. As the flaming remains of the balloon fell to the ground, Mr. BOTTERELL had enough time to swing around and shoot his enemy, but didn't. Instead, he snapped him a chivalrous salute before heading back to base. The moment was captured by aviation artist Robert TAILOR/TAYLOR, in his painting Balloon Buster.
"He was an adventurer," said Jon STRAW, a friend and former director of the Great War Flying Museum in Brampton, Ontario Mr. STRAW is also working on a book on Canadian pilots who served in the First World War with Allan SNOWIE, a retired naval aviator who is now a pilot with Air Canada.
Like many of the veterans from the First World War, Mr. BOTTERELL didn't consider his war efforts to be heroic.
"He didn't think it was any big deal, he thought he was just doing his duty," Mr. STRAW said.
In 1916, Mr. BOTTERELL was working for the Bank of North America (now the Bank of Montreal) when his older brother Edward, who played football for the Toronto Argonauts, was killed overseas by a sniper. A few months later, Henry, then 20, enlisted with the Royal Naval Air Service and was sent to England to train as a fighter pilot.
His sister, Edith, who worked as a secretary for an admiral at the time, had helped him get what she thought would be a safer assignment in the war. But that didn't prove to be true. At one point in the war, new pilots had a life expectancy of three weeks.
Mr. BOTTERELL's flying career got off to a difficult start. Engine failure caused him to crash on only his second takeoff in September, 1917, at Dunkirk, France. He suffered head injuries, a fractured leg, and broken teeth and spent six months in hospital. He was eventually demobilized as disabled and discharged. But he later re-enlisted and qualified as a fighter pilot again and returned to France in early 1918.
His flight log reveals that he was attached to the 208th Squadron serving in France from May 11 to November 27, 1918. His records show that during that time, he flew patrols and fought over places including Serny, Estrées and Arras. He then transferred to Belgium, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Wing Commander Neil MEADOWS, the commanding officer of Royal Air Force 208 Squadron, said in his condolences to Mr. BOTTERELL's family that Henry "remains, an inspiration to our trainee pilots. I do feel that we have lost a tangible part of what we are, and what we aspire to be.
"Undoubtedly, he did not view his actions as out of the ordinary, but his courage and dedication to duty are an example that I hope our trainees will emulate in their own flying careers," he wrote on behalf of the squadron. "I am sure, therefore, that his spirit will live on with the young pilots that continue to serve on 208 Squadron."
During his war service, Mr. BOTTERELL flew a variety of planes, but the Camel, which got its name from the hump created by two machine guns imbedded under its cowling, was his favourite. He had one particular close call, when on a flight a bullet ripped through his ear and smashed his goggles.
"I went out like a light for a few minutes, and I recovered just before I crashed," he once said.
Henry John Lawrence BOTTERELL was born in 1896 in Ottawa to Henry and Annie BOTTERELL. His mother raised him after his father died of pneumonia when Henry was a young boy. Henry attended Lisgar Collegiate Institute in Ottawa. An athletic young man, he played football like his older brother and remained physically active throughout his life.
"He was a loner," said his son Edward BOTTERELL, adding that his father enjoyed sports he would do alone such as swimming, cross-country skiing and sailing. In 1919, he returned to Canada and to banking as an assistant chief accountant. He remained with the Bank of Montreal until his retirement in the 1960s. As a souvenir from the war he brought back a Belgian fence post that had snagged the wing of his Camel on a low-level flights. It is now in the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.
In 1929 he married and moved with his wife Maud to Montreal. They raised two children before his wife died in 1983 after suffering several strokes. During the Second World War, Mr. BOTTERELL commanded an Air Cadet Squadron, in Quebec, though he himself never took to the air. After returning home in 1919, he gave up flying.
In 1999, Mr. BOTTERELL was the guest of honour at a mess dinner commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Royal Canadian Air Force. That same year he celebrated his own 102nd birthday at a hotel in Lille, France, where he and other Canadian veterans were marking the 80th anniversary of the end of the War.
Despite his failing memory, his son Edward said his father was "moved by the experience."
Mr. BOTTERELL is survived by daughter Frances MARQUETTE of Houston, Texas, and son Edward BOTTERELL of Mississauga, Ontario
Henry BOTTERELL, aviator and banker; born in Ottawa on November 7, 1896, died in Toronto on January 3, 2003.

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BISHOP o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
Melba Rosamond SWEET
By Jean BISHOP Monday, May 12, 2003 - Page A16
Pioneer, farmer, daughter, sister, aunt, friend. Born December 20, 1900, in Malahide Township, Ontario Died January 17, in St. Thomas, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 102.
Melba SWEET, youngest child of John and Rosamond McKenney SWEET, was deeply rooted in pioneer tradition.
Beginning in 1842, her grandfather cleared the land and built all the buildings on what came to be her farm, just one road north of Aylmer, Ontario In addition, a tragic event in the McKENNEY family had a great influence on Melba's life. In November, 1869, diphtheria struck. In five weeks time, six of the youngest of the 11 McKENNEY children died as a result. Three years later, a little girl named Rosamond was born. She was Melba's mother. Parents, and siblings ranging in age from 12 to 20, lavished love on this baby and vied with each other to teach her pioneer skills.
Rosamond's three children, Gene, Maud and Melba, thrived in the atmosphere she created with her sunny disposition, great sense of humour and mastery of all sorts of skills from breaking and riding horses to gardening or making hairpin lace.
Melba was a true pioneer, herself. She was in her thirties before electricity came to the farm. That meant cooking and heating with wood, no refrigeration or electric washing machine, milking cows by hand, no indoor bathroom. In those days, if you needed something, you made it yourself. And there wasn't much that was beyond Rosamond's skills -- and that she didn't teach to Melba.
Practically all meat, fruits and vegetables were grown and preserved on the farm. Melba's father used to say, "You won't find any tin cans on this place." Clothes for both women and men were sewn at home; soap was made from wood ashes and lye. This meant working long hours. All her life Melba felt she should rise at 4: 30 a.m. to get everything done.
From an early age she took over food preparation. Cooking on a wood-burning range she produced incredible meals for her family and for parties with Friends. Food was always plentiful and delicious. Melba fondly remembered those years when her sister, Maud, after a few years of teaching and working as a bookkeeper in Detroit, came home to stay. They expanded their mother's gardens, adding extensive plots of spring bulbs along the road and a 50-foot long row of delphiniums for bouquets to decorate the church.
In the winters, Melba and Maud worked on handicrafts with Rosamond, making beautiful quilts and hooked rugs, handmade lingerie and pillow cases with crocheted lace borders and inserts. The years passed so happily that Melba declined several offers of marriage to stay on at home.
Melba and Maud took tender care of their father and mother, who lived to celebrate their 72nd wedding anniversary. Their father lived to the age of 96 and Rosamond, who was born in that house, lived there all her 98 years.
After Maud's death from a heart attack 34 years ago, Melba took over the farm books and work on the grounds. Into her 90s, she mowed two acres of lawn, kept two large freezers filled with food for herself and her farming partner, who worked the dairy farm on shares. She also did seasonal jobs, such as cleaning out eavestroughs or going out an upstairs window onto the kitchen roof to put on storm windows.
Determined to live life in her own way, Melba managed to stay in her home with the help of good Friends and homecare workers until a fall put her in hospital in May, 2002. Friends and family and caregivers cherished the special individual she remained until the end.
Jean BISHOP is Melba's niece.

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BISHOP o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-08 published
VILA, Helen Jeanette
59, died on Sunday, July 6, 2003, at her home in Scotch Hill, Pictou Co., Nova Scotia. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, she was a daughter of the late Alan P. VILA and Jeanette (McVICAR) VILA. Helen attended schools in Chippawa, Ontario, and Baldwin, New York, where she excelled in sports and music. She graduated with Honours in English from McGill University and with a master teacher certificate from the Ontario College of Education at the University of Toronto. For several years, Helen taught English at Lawrence Park Collegiate Institute and film arts at Sheridan College in Toronto. Later, she and her late companion Trini PEREZ had a home craft business in woodworking and jewelry in Stoney Creek, Ontario, which they continued in Pictou. In recent years, Helen sang in the Hosannah Gospel Choir at the United Church of Canada, Lyons Brook, served as a volunteer at the Maritime Odd Fellows home, and worked at the job placement center and the library. She is survived by her sisters and brothers, Mary SHAW and her husband Robert of Palo Alto, California; John VILA and his partner Terry BISHOP of Guttenberg, New Jersey; James VILA and his wife Tanya of Tilton, New Hampshire; Elizabeth ROGAN and her husband Edward of Glastonbury, Connecticut; and Anne VILA and her husband Steven JACOBS of Needham, Massachusetts; and by five nieces -- Catherine VILA, Carolyn ROGAN, Jenny ROGAN, Julia JACOBS, and Anne ROGAN; four nephews -- Mark SHAW, Andrew SHAW, Jonathan SHAW and Daniel JACOBS; four grandnieces -- Jessica, Kaeli, Alissa and Zoë; one grandnephew -- Max; and two stepnieces -- Tracy MESSINGER and Kerri PACHOMOW. Helen will be dearly missed by her companion, Margaret MacCULLOCH, who cared for her during her long illness. Visitation will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. on Friday, July 11, at the McLaren Funeral Home, 246 Faulkland Street, Pictou. The funeral will be held at the United Church in Lyons Brook at 2 p.m. on Saturday, July 12, Mary MacDERMID officiating. Interment at the Scotch Hill Cemetery will be followed by a reception at the church hall. Her family requests that, in lieu of flowers, memorial donations be made to the Canadian Cancer Society -- Nova Scotia Division, the Humane Society of Canada, or to Palliative Care of the Aberdeen Hospital.

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BISHOP o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-11 published
The crash of a Canadian hero
Lest we forget, Roy MacGREGOR traces the spectacular feats and the sad fall of a flying ace
By Roy MacGREGOR, Tuesday, November 11, 2003 - Page A1
Ottawa -- Here is as good a place as any to lay a small poppy on Remembrance Day.
It is nothing but a concrete dock ramp on the Ontario shore of the Ottawa River, not far downstream from the Parliament Buildings.
There is nothing here to say what happened that cold March day back in 1930, and on this, a fine brisk morning in November, 73 years later, there is only a lone biker, a man walking two setters along the path that twists along this quiet spot, and a small, single-engine airplane revving in the background as it prepares to take off from the little Rockcliffe airstrip.
Seventy-three years ago, another small plane took off from this airfield, turned sharply over the distant trees, flew low and full-throttle over the runway and went into a steep climb that eventually cut out the engine and sent the new Fairchild twisting toward this spot -- instantly killing Canada's most-decorated war hero.
Will BARKER, 35, of Dauphin, Manitoba
Perhaps you've heard of him. Likely not. He is, in some ways, the test case for Lest We Forget.
Lieutenant-Colonel William George BARKER won the Victoria Cross for what many believe was the greatest dogfight of the First World War.
He was alone in his Sopwith Snipe over Bois de Marmal, France, on October 27, 1918, when he was attacked, official reports say, by 60 enemy aircraft -- Mr. BARKER, who rarely talked of his war experience, always said 15 -- and he shot down three before passing out from devastating wounds to both legs and his arm, only to come to again in mid-air, turn on the fighter intending to put an end to him and bring down a fourth before he himself crash-landed in full view of astonished British troops, who were even more amazed when they got to the plane and found him still alive, if barely.
The four that one day took Mr. BARKER's list to 50 downed aircraft. He returned to Canada as Lt.-Col. William George BARKER, V.C., D.S.O. and enough other medals to lay claim to being Canada's most honoured combatant -- if he'd ever cared to do so. As British Air Chief Marshal Sir Philip JOUBERT wrote, "Of all the flyers of the two World Wars, none was greater than BARKER."
He came home and went into the aviation business with another Canadian Victoria Cross winner, Billy BISHOP. He married Mr. BISHOP's wealthy cousin, Jean SMITH, and had a miserable next dozen years. The business failed, the marriage teetered, he suffered depression and terrible pain from his injuries, and the previous non-drinker soon became a drinker.
It seemed life was taking a turn for the better in January of 1930 when Fairchild hired him to help sell planes to the Canadian government. A test pilot had been sent to show off the plane at Rockcliffe, but the veteran fighter unfortunately insisted on taking it up himself for a run.
Some say he committed suicide here; some say he was showing off for an 18-year-old daughter of another Rockcliffe pilot; his biographer believes he was just being too aggressive with a new, unknown machine and "screwed up."
They held the funeral in Toronto, with a cortege two miles long, 2,000 uniformed men, honour guards from four countries and 50,000 people lining the streets. As they carried the coffin into Mount Pleasant Cemetery, six biplanes swooped down, sprinkling rose petals over the crowd.
"His name," Sir Arthur CURRIE announced, "will live forever in the annals of the country which he served so nobly."
His name, alas, is not even on the crypt -- only " SMITH," his wife's snobbish family who never really accepted the rough-hewn outsider from Manitoba.
Somehow, he became all but forgotten. Though Mr. BISHOP called Mr. BARKER "the deadliest air fighter that ever lived," it is Mr. BISHOP who lives on in the public imagination. Often, if Mr. BARKER is mentioned at all, "Billy" BARKER, as he was known to his air colleagues, is confused with "Billy" BISHOP.
A request for a government plaque to commemorate his Manitoba birthplace was rejected the first time, but there is now some small recognition thanks in large part to the work of Inky MARK, the Member of Parliament for Dauphin-Swan Lake and the excellent military biography, BARKER VC, produced a few years back by Wayne RALPH.
Mr. RALPH, a Newfoundlander now living in White Rock, British Columbia, thinks Mr. BARKER was simply too much "the warrior" for the Canadian appetite.
"He was an international superstar," says Mr. RALPH. " BARKER had all the traits of the great Hollywood heroes. He was disobedient, gregarious, flamboyant. He was a frontier kid, a classical figure in the American style of hero. Born in a log cabin, went on to fame and fortune, and died tragically at 35.
"Now he is basically buried in anonymity. To me, it's the perfect metaphor for Canada, where we bury our past."
Today, though, even if it is only a poppy dropped at the end of a concrete boat ramp, we will remember.

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BISHOP o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-28 published
MURRAY, Mari-Ellen
It is with great sorrow that we announce the death of Mari-Ellen MURRAY on Saturday, November 22nd, 2003 while vacationing in South Africa. A vibrant and determined woman, Mari-Ellen lived life as a perpetual adventure, unaltered by her battle with breast cancer. She died quickly and mercifully while pursuing her love of travel with her cherished husband Andrew BISHOP. Beloved daughter of Norman and Nerina MURRAY; granddaughter of Luigia SINELLI, sister of Jacqueline, Stephanie and Rob WATSON, Marisa and Paul GRETHER, and Christine; treasured Aunt Mimi of Madeleine and Cole WATSON; much-loved daughter-in-law of Trevor and Barbara BISHOP; sister-in-law of Timothy and Michael. Our inspiration and pillar of strength, she will be sorely missed by all who knew her. Visitation at Kopriva Taylor at 64 Lakeshore Road West in Oakville from 2: 00 to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Sunday, November 30th, 2003. The Funeral Mass will take place on Monday, December 1st at 1: 30 p.m. at St. Basil's Church, 50 St. Joseph Street at Bay Street in Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Ave. Toronto, M5G 2M9 or Willow Breast Cancer Support and Resource Services, 785 Queen Street East, Toronto, M4M 1H5 would be greatly appreciated.

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BISMONTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-05 published
A life cut short by severe acute respiratory syndrome
The only doctor to have died from the virus in North America, he was a caring professional and a loving family man
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, September 5, 2003 - Page R13
As the only doctor in North America to die of severe acute respiratory syndrome, Toronto physician Nestor YANGA may have gained more prominence in death than by anything he had accomplished in life.
He was a dedicated general practitioner, church volunteer and family man who was passionate about everything he did, according to Friends. A former president of the Canadian Filipino Medical Association, he loved dancing, gardening and spending time with his wife and two sons.
In the early days of the city's outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome, as doctors were still scrambling to identify and contain the alarming new disease, a patient turned up at Dr. YANGA's east-Toronto clinic who was a family member of one of the first carriers in Canada; two more family members came to see him two days later. In medical parlance, all would be known as "super-secretors" for the highly virulent and infectious strains they carried.
"He saw them in the waiting room and told them they'd better go to the hospital," said his friend, Dr. Bina COMENDADOR, a Richmond Hill, Ontario, psychiatrist.
Shortly afterwards Dr. YANGA came down with a slight fever, then a dry cough. When the symptoms worsened, he visited a newly instituted screening centre for severe acute respiratory syndrome and was told to get to Sunnybrook Hospital right away. "Being the doctor he was, he drove himself to the hospital and he never came out," Dr. COMENDADOR said.
He died after a four-month struggle with the disease on August 13 at the age of 54. He was the 44th severe acute respiratory syndrome victim in the Toronto area.
An estimated 2,000 people, including many provincial dignitaries, medical professionals and members of the city's Filipino community, paid their last respects to Dr. YANGA at a funeral in Toronto's St. Michael's Cathedral. In eulogies, he was depicted as a hero who had fallen on the front lines of medicine's unrelenting battle against illness of every kind.
"He contracted the disease while caring for one of his patients," said Dr. Larry ERLICK, president of the Ontario Medical Association. "It's a risk that physicians face every day."
As if to underscore that risk, two of the three doctors who worked with Dr. YANGA in the Lapsley Family Doctors Clinic were also infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome last April; one remains hospitalized while the other is still too weak to resume his medical duties; the fourth recently reopened the clinic and is struggling with a fourfold increase in patient load. As well, two nurses in the Toronto area have died of the virus after caring for severe acute respiratory syndrome-stricken patients.
Born in Malabon, the Philipines, on October 8, 1948, Nestor YANGA studied medicine at the University of Santo Tomas in Manila he specialized in surgery and graduated in 1975. He emigrated to Canada in 1981 and was married the same year in Toronto, having met his prospective bride, Remy, during a visit two years earlier.
Passing a rigorous set of medical exams in Canada, Dr. YANGA interned at a Newfoundland hospital for two months, then at two hospitals in Toronto. Intending to become a psychiatrist, he studied at McMaster University and at the University of Toronto, but withdrew in his third year, telling Friends he preferred to practise family medicine.
Toronto psychiatrist Dr. Dulce BISMONTE recalled that Dr. YANGA had inspired her to enter psychiatry and that she was very saddened when he told her he was leaving that field. "He was so compassionate and caring, he would have made an excellent psychiatrist," she said.
As a general practitioner, Dr. YANGA got to know many of his patients as people and often spent more time with them than strictly necessary, to the occasional consternation of patients in his waiting room. Any annoyance would invariably melt away, however, as the meticulous but easygoing doctor would bestow a similar level of care and warmth upon each waiting patient in turn.
"He was the kind of person you could respect and really care about, and I think his patients felt that too," Dr. COMENDADOR said. "He would make you feel that you were special and that you were the most important patient."
Dr. YANGA sometimes assisted with surgeries at Centenary Hospital and worked as a volunteer at the sexual assault clinic at Grace Hospital. He and his wife were also dedicated members of the Filipino-dominated charismatic Catholic group Bukas Loob Sa Diyos.
Having performed in his youth with a dance group, which toured all over Southeast Asia, Dr. YANGA retained a passion for ballroom dancing, which he did with his wife, and line dancing, which he did apart from her, with others. "Nestor loved to dance," Dr. BISMONTE observed. "He might have been on the chubby side, but he was a very graceful dancer."
He was, above all, a consummate family man who always reserved plenty of time to be with his family and usually took them with him to medical conferences at resorts. "His loss is a tragedy to his family as well as to all of his patients, and I don't know how we're going to overcome it," Dr. ERLICK said. "He had a huge following and it's hard to replace a physician like that."
Nestor YANGA leaves his wife Remy, sons Nelson, 20, and Ronald, 16, brother Emmanuel and father Lauro, all of Toronto.

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BISSELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-31 published
The dean of Canadian sociology
The first chair of a new University of Toronto department trained a generation of scholars
By Carol COOPER, Special to the Globe and Mail Friday, October 31, 2003 - Page R13
In 1938, with a doctorate in political science and anxious to achieve his dream of becoming a professor, Samuel Delbert CLARK reluctantly took the only position available to him at the University of Toronto, as its first full-time lecturer in sociology.
In doing so, S.D. CLARK became one of the country's early anglophone sociologists. During his career, his immense intellect, painstaking scholarship and prolific writing brought credibility and respect to the fledgling discipline. At a time when Canadian universities had few sociology departments, Prof. CLARK trained a generation of sociologists who spread out across the country, establishing sociology departments in other centres. And as an administrator at U of T, Prof. CLARK brought leading sociologists to the school.
The first sociologist born, raised and trained here, Prof. S. D. CLARK has died at the age of 93.
Incorporating the staples theory of his mentor, leading Canadian political economist Harold INNIS, the work of American historian F. J. TURNER, and sociologists Carl DAWSON and E. C. HUGHES of McGill University, among others, Prof. CLARK developed his own approach.
He studied social change on Canada's economic frontiers such as the fur trade, Western wheat farming, and the lumber and mining industries. He traced the development of those communities as the residents there, far from the cultural and financial institutions that controlled their lives and contending with distance and poverty, took their communities through a period of simultaneous disorganization and reorganization. From the struggle emerged new organizations and religious sects, such as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Social Credit Party.
Reflecting his university training in history, sociology and political science, Prof. CLARK brought a multifaceted approach to his research.
"He looked at things that were happening in Canada almost uniquely and tried to understand them and not to reduce it to some simplistic international generalization," said William MICHELSON, the S. D. Clark professor of sociology at the University of Toronto. "He really wanted to look into a multiplicity of factors."
Not everyone liked Prof. CLARK's approach to sociology, but nor did Prof. CLARK favour the Chicago School approach then taught at McGill University. Although he later altered his research methods, Prof. CLARK at first viewed the American approach dimly, seeing it as one of doorbell-ringing in order to ask stupid questions, one that scientifically quantified what happened in the present without exploring the past. Instead, he pored over archival material, studying the development of Canadian society from a historical perspective.
Books by Prof. CLARK, such as The Social Development of Canada, drew fire from historians, who challenged his theory and said sociology and history were incompatible. But the publications brought attention to the new discipline.
Born to a farming family on February 24, 1910, in Lloydminster, Alberta., Samuel Delbert CLARK was the second of five children. The family of Northern Irish descent had been established in Ontario since 1840 until it moved West in 1905.
Showing an early aptitude for school and a strong interest in history, Prof. CLARK graduated from the University of Saskatchewan with an honours B.A. in history and political science and an M.A. in history. Brushing aside suggestions that he become a high-school teacher and politician, Prof. CLARK aimed instead for a university position.
He entered University of Toronto in 1931 to do a doctorate in political science and economic history. While the studies proved dry and disappointing, it was there that he first met Harold INNIS, read the works of Marx, Engels and North American left-wingers, and attended meetings of the radical League for Social Reconstruction. Disillusioned with his studies and short of funds, Prof. CLARK accepted a Saskatchewan Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire scholarship and headed for the London School of Economics in 1932. At the school, he received his first exposure to sociology, including the works of Prof. DAWSON at McGill.
After leaving London in 1933, Prof. CLARK arrived in Montreal, again strapped for cash. Hoping to collect a debt from a friend, who was then studying at McGill, Prof. CLARK stopped by his house. With the friend not home, Prof. CLARK then visited Prof. DAWSON, who offered him a research fellowship. After working on a project studying Canadian-American relations for two years and receiving an M.A. in sociology, Prof. CLARK returned to Toronto to continue his doctorate in political science.
In 1937 he accepted an appointment to teach political science and sociology at the University of Manitoba and stayed a year before returning once again to University of Toronto to complete his thesis and begin his career there.
As a proponent of a more British style of sociology, Prof. CLARK was favoured for the job over another Chicago-trained candidate, setting the academic direction for the school. Sociology was then run as a section under the department of anthropology, to be transferred a year later to the department of political economy. Except for occasional leaves, Prof. CLARK remained a fixture on campus, impeccably dressed in a woollen suit and sporting a pipe, until his retirement in 1976.
Shy and quiet, Prof. CLARK constantly cleared his throat and jingled the change in his pocket while lecturing.
"He never cracked a joke.... It was serious scholarship. You had to ask serious questions," recalled retired York University sociology professor Edward MANN, an early undergraduate student and later a doctoral student of Prof. CLARK. " Their [ INNIS and CLARK] religion was scholarship."
In that vein, Prof. CLARK never talked to the press about daily issues, saying it cheapened the discipline. And he practised rigorous scholarship.
"He had a tremendous amount of integrity," said Lorne TEPPERMAN, a University of Toronto sociology professor and former student of Prof. CLARK. " This was a guy who knew what he stood for, what he believed in. He was uncompromising. He had very high standards for himself and other people."
During the fifties, Prof. CLARK, an admirer of Lester PEARSON, exchanged his membership in the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation for that of the Liberal Party, the one endorsed by his wife, Rosemary. A graduate in economics from Columbia University, she edited all his works. By the sixties, Prof. CLARK had begun to study social change and urbanization, writing The Suburban Society and later, The New Urban Poor. Despite altering his research methods, dropping his historical research and adopting the American style of conducting questionnaires to collect data, he stopped short of tabulating them, arguing in The Suburban Society that "to lay claim to scientific precision... would be to falsify the competence of sociology."
And the man who studied social change became buffeted by it. While the sociology section had remained small during the forties and fifties, it ballooned during the sixties, becoming an independent department in 1963 with Prof. CLARK as its appointed head.
A capable administrator, Prof. CLARK brought feistiness to the job. "He was a very honest man," said Prof. TEPPERMAN. "He wasn't afraid on an argument, he wasn't afraid of a fight. If he liked you, he really liked you and if he didn't like you, he really didn't like you."
With the huge increase in sociology-department enrolment but small number of sociology graduates, Prof. CLARK looked outside the country to fill teaching positions. Most either came from the United States, or had been trained there.
While some scholars hailed Prof. CLARK for having eschewed American-style sociology and maintaining a Canadian approach, the young and sometimes radical newcomers with a markedly different approach regarded him as an oddball and an anachronism. And as an older, white, staunch Liberal Party-supporting male at the centre of an old-boy network, he represented everything they were fighting against. Accustomed to a more democratic academic culture at other schools, the new staff agitated for a greater say in the running of the department. When Prof. CLARK resisted, he was pushed out, and the chair became an elected position. He remained at the university until his retirement in 1976.
Outside of the university, throughout his career, Prof. CLARK served as an editor of The Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science, and as president of the Royal Society of Canada. In addition, he was appointed an Officer in the Order of Canada.
Despite the recognition he received, Prof. CLARK always felt that his older brother who took over the farm was the family success, according to his son, Edmund. And he enjoyed such simple pleasures as hockey. Once, while attending a dinner party at Claude BISSELL's house, then the president of U of T, Prof. CLARK asked where the television was and sat down to watch the hockey game. When questioned later, Prof. CLARK replied, "Anyone stupid enough to hold a party on a hockey night deserved to have the guests watch television in the den."
S.D. CLARK died on September 18. He leaves his wife, Rosemary, sons Edmund and Samuel, nine grandchildren and a sister, Grace. His daughter Ellen predeceased him.

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BISSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-29 published
Lawrence Stephen MIGWANS
In loving memory of Lawrence Stephen MIGWANS, September 26, 1925 to January 13, 2003.
Larry MIGWANS, a resident of the Wellness Centre, M'Chigeeng, passed away at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Mindemoya on Monday, January 13, 2003 at the age of 77 years. He was born at M'Chigeeng, son of the late David and Madelene (DEBASSIGE) MIGWANS. Larry joined the army at the age of 16 and served overseas in World War 2, and was a member of Branch #177 Royal Canadian Legion, Little Current. He also enjoyed playing the violin and guitar, and working in his garden. Predeceased by his wife Desira (BEBONING) MIGWANS. Loving father of Mabel NOLAND, Caroline BEBONING, Patrick BEBONING, Martina MIGWANS, Lorraine, Patsy, Carol, Kerry and Brenda WEMIGWANS. Loved grandfather of several grandchildren and great grandchildren. Dear brother of Agnes (predeceased,) Annie BISSON, Regina, Raymond (predeceased,) Pauline CORBIERE (predeceased,) Melvina GERARD (predeceased,) Christine PAGE, Nora MIGWANS, Maurice, Kenneth and Francis MIGWANS. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called at the M'Chigeeng Complex. The funeral mass was celebrated at Immaculate Conception Church, M'Chigeeng, on Friday, January 17, 2003 with Father Robert FOLIOT as celebrant. Interment in M'Chigeeng Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home

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BISSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
WABINOGESHIG Maxie Isadore ASSINEWAI
In Loving Memory of WABINOGESHIG, Maxie Isadore ASSINEWAI, Fish, Eagle and Bear Clan, 49 years.
Max began his Spirit Journey Sunday, November 02, 2003 at his favourite place, Perch Lake in Sheguiandah First Nation. Beloved husband and best friend to Shauna (née PITAWANAKWAT) ASSINEWAI. Loving father to Derek, Adrienne, Nicole, Brian and Maggie. Proud grandfather of Cole and Eric. Dear son of Evelyn and Jacob ASSINEWAI (predeceased) and Isabel and John McGRAW of Wikwemikong. Will be sadly missed by special in-laws (Walter GONAWABI of Wikwemikong, Gail JACOBS of Serpent River and Ken BISSON of M'Chigeeng). Dear brother to Steven, Wendy, Raymond, Josephine, Julius (wife Mary), Thomas (predeceased), Jeanette (husband Darcy PAQUET,) Norman (wife Frances) all of Wikwemikong. Son-in-law to Malcom and Connie PITAWANAKWAT of Wikwemikong. Cherished brother-in-law to Rachel (Todd), Mark (Tanya), Lisa (Gord), Wendy, Dawn, Walton, Ralphie (Wendy), Shannon, Raven, Alison and Tim (predeceased). He is also survived by his many nieces and nephews and his families of Birch Island, Rousseau River (Manitoba) and Red Lake (Minnesota).
Max's life path was guided by the culture and traditions of the Anishinabek. He was Ogitch'dah, Eagle Staff Carrier, Pipe Carrier, and respected spiritual healer. He will also be missed by his traditional societies to which he belonged: Windigo, Big Drum, Mide(win), Wiidehgokaan and Giiskaa. His devotion to this people led him to be a political leader and advisor for Sheguiandah First Nation, neighboring First Nations and the Metis Nation.
Max enjoyed hunting, gambling, BINGO, cultural gatherings, pow-wows, children, visiting, hockey and traveling extensively throughout Mother Earth.
Most of all, Max will be remembered for the time he took to share with his sense of humour and for his willingness to always help others at anytime.
Wake Services was held at the Sheguiandah First Nation Community Centre on Tuesday, November 04, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. Funeral Services will be celebrated on Friday, November 07, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. at the Sheguiandah First Nation Community Centre. Interment at his residence, Feast to follow. Bourcier Funeral Home, Espanola.

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BISSONNETTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-19 published
MYNARSKI's man FRIDAY
Knocked unconscious, the young bomb aimer was saved when his flight engineer pushed him out of their stricken Lancaster
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - Page R7
Victoria -- A Second World War bomb aimer who survived an ill-fated mission during which his friend Andrew MYNARSKI was later awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for trying the save a trapped fellow crewman has died. Jack FRIDAY, who spent his peacetime career with Air Canada, died in Thunder Bay.
Mr. MYNARSKI's sacrifice awed a generation of children who learned of it in their school readers. Mr. FRIDAY was often asked to recount what happened aboard his doomed Lancaster as it burned over France. What many did not realize was that Mr. FRIDAY only learned the details of Mr. MYNARSKI's heroism after the end of the war.
On June 12, 1944, his Royal Canadian Air Force crew was assigned to bomb the railroad marshalling yards at Cambrai. The mission was similar to others in recent days, as No. 419 (Moose) Squadron attacked German reinforcements being rushed forward to repel Allied forces in Normandy.
Six days earlier, the crew had bombed coastal guns at Longues in the early-morning hours before the invasion fleet landed on D-Day. The Cambrai target -- their 13th mission -- was to be attacked on in the early morning hours of June 13. Later, superstitious survivors would speak of that coincidence as a missed omen.
Their Lancaster lifted off the runway at Middleton St. George in Yorkshire at 9: 44 p.m. on June 12. After crossing the English Channel, the bomber was coned -- caught in searchlights -- but the pilot, Flying Officer Arthur DE BREYNE, managed to manoeuvre his craft out of the dreaded lights.
The reprieve did not last long.
Rear gunner Patrick BROPHY, who sat in an isolated compartment at the rear of the aircraft, spotted an enemy fighter below. "Bogey astern! Six o'clock!" he shouted into the intercom, just before a Junkers 88 attacked.
Mr. DE BREYNE threw the bomber into an evasive corkscrew. In an instant, though, his plane was rocked by three explosions. Both port engines were knocked out and the wing set afire. A hydraulic line in the fuselage had also been severed and the midsection of the plane was burning.
The pilot ordered the crew to evacuate as he struggled to prevent the Lancaster from going into a dive. Mr. FRIDAY's duty as bomb aimer was to release the escape hatch. As he did so, the rushing wind whipped the steel door open, striking him above the right eye.
Flight engineer Roy VIGARS was the first among the other crew to clamber to the hatch.
"I made my way down to the bomb-aimer's position and found Jack FRIDAY slumped on the floor, unconscious," Mr. VIGARS told Bette PAGE for her 1989 book, Mynarski's Lanc. "I rolled him over, clipped on his parachute pack, and slid him over to the escape hatch and dropped him through the opening while holding on to the ripcord."
The act was risky, as the parachute could have wrapped around the craft's tail wheel. Mr. VIGARS saw that Mr. FRIDAY's parachute had opened clear of the bomber. He then jumped, followed by wireless operator James KELLY, navigator Robert BODIE and the pilot, who had recovered control of the bomber and set it on a gentle descent.
Unknown to those men, a terrible drama was being played out at the rear of the flaming craft.
As Warrant Officer MYNARSKI prepared to jump, he looked back to see that Flying Officer Patrick BROPHY was still at his rear-gunner's position.
Mr. MYNARSKI, the mid-upper gunner, crawled through the burning fuselage, his uniform and parachute catching fire. Mr. BROPHY was trapped in his seat and the men struggled desperately to free him.
Finally, Mr. BROPHY told Mr. MYNARSKI to jump without him.
Mr. MYNARSKI crawled back through the fire, stood at the door, saluted his doomed comrade, and leapt into the inky sky with his uniform and parachute in flames.
Aboard the Lancaster, Mr. BROPHY prepared for certain death.
Some miles away, Mr. FRIDAY floated unconscious to earth by parachute, landing near a chateau at Hedauville. A pair of farm workers found him in a vineyard the next morning. He was taken to a local doctor who feared reprisals for treating an Allied airman. The injured man was turned over to the Germans.
Mr. FRIDAY finally regained consciousness on June 17, wakening in a prison cell in Amiens. He feared he had lost his eye. A fellow prisoner peeked beneath Mr. FRIDAY's bandages and saw that a flap of skin was blocking his vision. The wound had not been stitched.
Mr. FRIDAY was reunited with Mr. VIGARS as their captors prepared to transport prisoners to Germany.
The pair were sent to an interrogation centre near Frankfurt, before being transferred to Stalag Luft 7 at Bankau, outside Breslau (now Wroclaw), in Silesia near Poland.
The men were separated again on January 18, 1945, as the Germans marched prisoners out of the camp ahead of the advancing Soviet army. The forced march was arduous. Many died of disease, exposure and exhaustion. Mr. FRIDAY survived by stealing frozen beets and potatoes from farmer's fields. He would later remember the only warm night of the march was spent in a barn, where he snuggled overnight with a cow. Mr. FRIDAY was at last liberated by the Soviets in April.
He returned to England in May, where, as recounted in the 1992 book, The Evaders, he prepared a statement, the brevity of which perfectly captured his sense of the dramatic events. "Took off from Middleton St. George. Do not remember briefing or takeoff. First thing I remember is coming to in a hospital in Amiens."
Only later did he learn what happened aboard the Lancaster. As the bomber crashed, the port wing struck a tree, causing the plane to veer violently to the left. The force freed Mr. BROPHY from his turret prison and he landed against a tree, far away from the burning wreckage. He had survived.
Mr. MYNARSKI, the son of Polish immigrants and a leather worker in civilian life, was not as fortunate. He was found by the French, but was so badly burned that he soon died from his injuries. He was 27.
The other crewmen, including Mr. BROPHY, evaded capture with the assistance of French civilians.
John William FRIDAY was the third son born to a pharmacist in Port Arthur, Ontario, on December 21, 1921. He graduated from Port Arthur Collegiate Institute before joining the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1942. He was demobilized with the rank of flying officer. He worked as an Air Canada passenger agent for 31 years before retiring in 1985.
In 1988, he joined his former crew mates in ceremonies marking the dedication of a restored Lancaster at the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum at Mount Hope, Ontario The aircraft, which was refurbished in the colours and markings of the crew's plane, has been designated the MYNARSKI Memorial Lancaster. MYNARSKI's name also graces a string of three lakes in Manitoba, as well as a park, a school and a civic ward in his hometown of Winnipeg.
Mr. FRIDAY died of cancer in Thunder Bay, Ontario, on June 22. He leaves Shirley (née BISSONNETTE,) his wife of 54 years, five children and four younger sisters. He was predeceased by two brothers.
Mr. BROPHY, whose life he tried to save, died at age 68 at St. Catharines, Ontario, in 1991. According to the second edition of MYNARSKI's Lanc, Mr. VIGARS, who saved Mr. FRIDAY's life, died in 1989 at Guildford, England; Mr. DE BREYNE died at St. Lambert, Quebec, in 1991; and, Mr. BODIE died in Vancouver in 1994. Mr. FRIDAY's death leaves James KELLY of Toronto as the only survivor.

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