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"BIN" 2003 Obituary


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BINCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-04 published
Wilma Ruth KYLE
By Patricia HUNTER Thursday, September 4, 2003 - Page A28
Wife, mother, grandmother, volunteer, world traveller. Born November 12, 1915, in Toronto. Died March 28 in Niagara Falls, Ontario, of congestive heart failure, aged 87.
Wilma sounds like such a plain name and my mother was anything but: she was a beautiful woman who was intelligent, kind, loving, and fun-loving. She often said that she was supposed to be a boy and be named after her Uncle Bill, Wilfred Reese BINCH. However, my dad, her family and her Friends called her "Willie."
Willie and her parents, Ernie and Ella YOUNG, and her brother, Jerry, lived in the west end of Toronto. Mom attended Keele Street Public School and she made some lifelong Friends there. She and her Friends at Humberside Collegiate started a bridge club, calling themselves The Lucky Thirteen. They had great fun together and one summer they rented a cottage at Grand Bend, Ontario.
One evening six medical students crashed a dance at University College at the University of Toronto. Cam KYLE asked Willie YOUNG to dance and then he asked if he could drive her home and she said yes. When he took her home, she told him that she should write down her phone number for him because there were a lot of Youngs in the phone book. Cam didn't call for about two weeks and Willie was starting to wonder if he was ever going to phone her. When he finally did call and asked if he could come and see her, he brought along his best friend for moral support. This was the beginning of a four-year courtship and 62 years of marriage.
After completing her B.A., Mom worked for six weeks at Eaton's in the accounting department. She made $13 a week and before she left to get married, she was offered a promotion and a raise to $18 a week.
Dad completed his junior internship at St. Michael's Hospital and joined the newly formed medical corps in the Royal Canadian Air Force. This was July, 1940. Dad couldn't get leave to come to Toronto to get married, so my parents were married in Winnipeg on Valentine's Day, 1941.
After being raised a city girl in Toronto, Mom's life changed dramatically, living in the wild west called Manitoba. She learned how to cook on a wood stove and shoot prairie chickens with a shotgun. Mom would drive the car and dad would stand on the running board and shoot. When they reversed roles, my mother broke her collarbone as the gun discharged.
The next several years tested my mother's inner strength. Dad was posted overseas for three years when my brother, Bill, was an infant. This meant that Mom was a single mother like many women during the war. As well, her father died of heart disease at the early age of 52. After the war, Dad completed his surgical training and my brothers, Bob and Peter, and I arrived on the scene.
Jumping ahead to life in Niagara Falls, Mom worked hard on the home front while dad established his medical practice. Mom enjoyed gardening and grew beautiful flowers, especially roses and African violets. Other activities included reading, curling, theatre, and volunteer work. But mostly, she looked after dad and us and this was a full-time job, especially when we were young. I didn't realize until I was much older that everyone's mother didn't stay up late at night sewing ballet and skating costumes after putting in a full day.
Travel was a big part of my parents' life together. Not only did it enrich their lives, teaching them about other cultures around the world, but my mother often had some funny stories to tell. She certainly was able to laugh at herself.
At her funeral, granddaughter Shannon described Willie as being loving, adventurous, intelligent, and a bit of a worrywart. After years of training from my mother, we all say to our own children, "Call when you get there."
Patricia is Wilma's daughter.

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BINCIK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-26 published
GRENFELL, Douglas Paul
Our beloved Paul died peacefully, Sunday 23 March, 2003 at Toronto Grace Hospital, in the loving setting of the Palliative Care Unit, thus ending a two year adventure with a brain tumour. He leaves a circle of constant Friends and a grieving family: mother Gwendoline, wife Sally, parents-in-law Richard and Kathleen LITCH, his children and Sally's, Jennifer and her husband Thomas and their sons Ian and Daniel, Philip and his partner Albert Liu, Lisa and her husband Nicholas SAMSTAG, Laura and her husband Gabriel BINCIK and their daughters Hanna and Julia, Amelia WALLNER and her partner Todd DYER, Anna WALLNER and her husband Blair QUINN, the LITCH and MERCER families and cousins in England. Predeceased by his father Harold. Also remembered by Molly LOGAN.
Cremation. Service of Thanksgiving for Paul's life will be at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, M4V 1R5, (416) 925-5977, Monday 31 March at 11 a.m. with The Reverend Dr. Andrew STIRLING officiating. Kindnesses to others or gifts to the Gerry and Nancy Pencer Centre for Brain Tumours, 610 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 2M9 (416) 946-6560 or to Paul's Church would honour his memory.
''...Sorrow and Love flow mingled down...''

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BINDING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-09 published
BINDING, Dr. Frederick Richard Stadelman (May 13, 1938 - August Died suddenly at Cape Chin, at the age of 65. Predeceased by his father, Fred STADELMAN in 1938, his step-father Fred BINDING in 1979, and his mother Gertrude BINDING in 1997. He is survived by his brother Bob (Karen) of Winnipeg, their three children, Rob, Dave and Kathy (Dave) and his grandniece Anika, and cousins in Canada and Switzerland. Fred was born and raised in Winnipeg and holds degrees from the University of Manitoba. He graduated with a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Kansas and began his teaching career at Memorial University in Saint John's, Newfoundland in 1996. In 1971, he began teaching at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo and retired from that position in June, 2003. He was Marshall of the University and Dean of Greek Life. Fred was active in the Kitchener-Waterloo community with the Pioneer Sportsmen Club as Builder, President and Director, with Special Olympics and the Bruce Trail Association as well as many other groups in the area. He was also very involved with International Competitive Shooting as a competitor, official and manager. He participated in Olympic, Commonwealth and Pan American Games, Canadian National and Provincial Championships. Cremation has taken place. A Memorial Service will be held at First United Church, 16 William Street at King Street, Waterloo, at 11 a.m. on Monday, August 11, 2003. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation in Fred's memory to Ontario's Special Olympics Inc., K-W and District Special Olympics or the Pioneer Sportsmen Club, 211 Pioneer Tower Road, Kitchener, or the charity of your choice and may be arranged by calling the Edward R. Good Funeral Home at 519-745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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BINDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-12 published
Died This Day -- 13 school canoeists, 1978
Thursday, June 12, 2003 - Page R9
Adventure outing by Saint John's School, Claremont, Ontario, struck by high winds on Lake Temiskaming, single capsize caused panic and the upset of other canoes, led to deaths of teacher Mark DEANNY and boys
Todd MICHELL,
Barry NELSON,
Jody O'GORMAN,
Timothy PRYCE,
David GREANEY,
Andy HERMAN,
Simon CROFT,
Tim HOPKINS,
Tom KENNY,
Scott BINDON,
Kevin BLACK,
Fraser BOURCHIER
Autopsies showed all drowned but that some had been in water 12 hours before death occurred.

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BINGHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-14 published
COOK, Bernard James
Bernard died peacefully and with dignity at North York General Hospital on February 11, 2003, following a brief illness in his 81st year. Beloved husband of Edythe COOK and the late Gertrude (Trudy) COOK. Bernard will be greatly missed by his daughters Patricia HENRY (Mike) and Mary TOD (Ian) and sons David BINGHAM (Diane) and Bruce BINGHAM (Mary.) He leaves behind 9 grandchildren, Karen BOWES, Kim REEP, Lesley TOD, Brian TOD, Kate BINGHAM, Elizabeth BINGHAM, Michael BINGHAM, Mickey HENRY and Alex HENRY and great grand_son Jonathan REEP. Bernie COOK, a World War 2 veteran who served with the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals in England and Northern Europe, was a proud employee of Canadian Pacific Railway throughout his career and was respected by all. The family extends thanks to the excellent nursing staff at North York General Hospital. Friends may call at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles), on Friday February 14 from 2- 4 and 6 - 8 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Leo's Church (277 Royal York Road) on Saturday, February 15 at 10 a.m. Please join us for a reception following the mass to celebrate Bernard's life at 33 Elmhurst Avenue. Private family interment. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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BINGHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
CASEY, Francis (Frank) J. b. 1912 (London, England)
On June 15th, 2003, in his 92nd year, Frank Casey died peacefully. He lived life well and joyfully, and leaves a remarkable legacy of family, business, and service to his church and community. Frank's career in insurance began in 1934 with Lloyd's in London, England. In 1937, he married Frances PETERS. Their long and happy marriage was a true partnership. Frank served as a Sergeant Major in the British Army in the Second World War before emigrating to Canada in 1948 and settling with his family in Toronto. He was the founder and president of Frank J. Casey Insurance Brokers, which for more than fifty years has been a north Toronto institution. His personal approach and dedication to the well-being of his clients made many of them into life-long Friends. He was a stalwart of his parish, St. Monica's, where he was a long-time member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society; and in the greater community he served as the first president of Sancta Maria House, which provides shelter, counselling and support for at-risk teenage girls. Frank took enormous pride and pleasure in his family, and he will be greatly missed by us all. Loving father of Patricia BINGHAM and her husband Richard; the late Catherine BOUWMEISTER and her husband John; Dr. John CASEY and his wife Therese; Anne CHEETHAM and her late husband Francis; Frank G. CASEY; and Angela BRANSCOMBE and her husband Harley. Devoted grandfather to Richard, Christopher and Deirdre BINGHAM; Paul, Janet, John Mark and Michael BOUWMEISTER; Clare, Stephanie, and Daniel CHEETHAM; and Paul, Jean, Marta-Marie and Phillippe CASEY. Great-grandfather to Andrew, Francesca-Anne, Brendan, Caitlin, Thomas and Liam. The family thanks his many caregivers and the staff at Central Park Lodge. Friends may call at the Trull Funeral Home, 2704 Yonge Street, Tuesday, June 17th from 2-4 p.m. and from 7-9 p.m. Mass of Christian burial at St. Monica's Catholic Church, 44 Broadway Avenue, on Wednesday, June 18th at 1: 30 p.m. Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery. If desired, a remembrance may be made to Sancta Maria House, 102 Bernard Avenue, Toronto M5R 1R9; (416) 925-7333. He always believed himself to be a blessed and lucky man. We were blessed to have had him.

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BINGO o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
WABINOGESHIG Maxie Isadore ASSINEWAI
In Loving Memory of WABINOGESHIG, Maxie Isadore ASSINEWAI, Fish, Eagle and Bear Clan, 49 years.
Max began his Spirit Journey Sunday, November 02, 2003 at his favourite place, Perch Lake in Sheguiandah First Nation. Beloved husband and best friend to Shauna (née PITAWANAKWAT) ASSINEWAI. Loving father to Derek, Adrienne, Nicole, Brian and Maggie. Proud grandfather of Cole and Eric. Dear son of Evelyn and Jacob ASSINEWAI (predeceased) and Isabel and John McGRAW of Wikwemikong. Will be sadly missed by special in-laws (Walter GONAWABI of Wikwemikong, Gail JACOBS of Serpent River and Ken BISSON of M'Chigeeng). Dear brother to Steven, Wendy, Raymond, Josephine, Julius (wife Mary), Thomas (predeceased), Jeanette (husband Darcy PAQUET,) Norman (wife Frances) all of Wikwemikong. Son-in-law to Malcom and Connie PITAWANAKWAT of Wikwemikong. Cherished brother-in-law to Rachel (Todd), Mark (Tanya), Lisa (Gord), Wendy, Dawn, Walton, Ralphie (Wendy), Shannon, Raven, Alison and Tim (predeceased). He is also survived by his many nieces and nephews and his families of Birch Island, Rousseau River (Manitoba) and Red Lake (Minnesota).
Max's life path was guided by the culture and traditions of the Anishinabek. He was Ogitch'dah, Eagle Staff Carrier, Pipe Carrier, and respected spiritual healer. He will also be missed by his traditional societies to which he belonged: Windigo, Big Drum, Mide(win), Wiidehgokaan and Giiskaa. His devotion to this people led him to be a political leader and advisor for Sheguiandah First Nation, neighboring First Nations and the Metis Nation.
Max enjoyed hunting, gambling, BINGO, cultural gatherings, pow-wows, children, visiting, hockey and traveling extensively throughout Mother Earth.
Most of all, Max will be remembered for the time he took to share with his sense of humour and for his willingness to always help others at anytime.
Wake Services was held at the Sheguiandah First Nation Community Centre on Tuesday, November 04, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. Funeral Services will be celebrated on Friday, November 07, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. at the Sheguiandah First Nation Community Centre. Interment at his residence, Feast to follow. Bourcier Funeral Home, Espanola.

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BINHAMMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
Leafs trusted their doctor
Talented M.D. specialized in hand surgery. 'He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons.'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 3, 2003 - Page F10
Nothing about Jim MURRAY's hands indicated that he was a surgeon. Large and gnarled with undulating fingernails, those hands played bagpipes, patched up Toronto Maple Leafs and Team Canada players and restored form and function to other hands.
Dr. MURRAY, a plastic surgeon who was the first Canadian doctor to devote his practice to hand surgery, died last month at the age of 82.
"His hands looked more like those of a prize fighter than a surgeon. His fingers were bent, "said Robert McFARLANE, a retired plastic surgeon with a special interest in hands and a close friend of Dr. MURRAY. "It didn't seem to make a difference. He had tremendous skill."
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY brought together plastic and orthopedic surgeons to form a hand unit at Toronto's Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, the city's first. "His concept was to pull together the expertise of different surgeons, "said Paul BINHAMMER, once a student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at the hospital, now part of the Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
Dr. MURRAY assembled a highly skilled team. Among them were orthopedic surgeon Robert McMURTRY, who went on to become dean of medicine at the University of Western Ontario, and plastic surgeon and nerve expert Susan MacKINNON, who is now a professor in the United States.
But before rising to prominence in the field of hand surgery, Dr. MURRAY gained fame in hockey circles. Serving as one of the Toronto Maple Leafs team doctors from 1948 to 1964, he was greatly trusted by players. When cut during games on the road, they left their wounds unstitched until he could tend to them at home.
"He'd come at you with those fingers and they were just so big, you'd wonder how he was ever able to stitch as neat as he did," said former Leaf defenceman Bobby BAUN, who played professional hockey for 17 years.
Mr. BAUN estimates that Dr. MURRAY put in half of his 143 career stitches.
Under instructions from Leaf owner Conn SMYTHE, injured players were not to be rushed back into the lineup, according to Hugh SMYTHE, another Leaf doctor and Mr. SMYTHE's son. "This was a heavy and not always popular role, "he said.
During the 1964 Stanley Cup finals, it became especially challenging.
Entering Game 6, the Detroit Red Wings led the series against the Leafs 3-2. Playing in Detroit on April 23, with the scored tied at 3-3 in the third period, Mr. BAUN first was hit on his right leg by a slapshot from Gordie HOWE and then, after a faceoff, spun on the leg, which gave way.
X-rays delayed at Mr. BAUN's insistence showed a small broken bone, just above the ankle. He spent six weeks in a cast.
But that came after the series ended. During its sixth game, Mr. BAUN was tended to by Dr. MURRAY and other team doctors. After being carried off the ice, he asked Dr. MURRAY if he could hurt his leg any more. The doctor replied no. "Having someone like Jim tell me that, I could believe him, "Mr. BAUN said.
With his leg taped and frozen, Mr. BAUN continued playing. Within the first two minutes of the first overtime period, he scored the winning goal and kept the Leafs in the series.
Mr. BAUN didn't miss a shift during Game 7, and neither did teammate Red KELLY, who had torn knee ligaments during the previous game. The Leafs won the seventh game 4-0 and the Stanley Cup, their third in a row and their fifth during Dr. MURRAY's time with the team.
That year, Dr. MURRAY resigned and 20 years later joked to The Toronto Star that it was he who had led them to the five Stanley Cups.
If he took the connection between his presence and the Leafs' wins lightly, Punch IMLACH, then the team's coach, did not. Mr. IMLACH had become convinced that Dr. MURRAY brought the team good luck, the doctor told the Star in a 1972 story.
The newspaper was interviewing Dr. MURRAY about his appointment as a doctor to Team Canada for the Canada-Russia hockey series. In the article headlined "Good luck charm for Team Canada, " he recalled how during the 1967 Stanley Cup playoffs, Mr. IMLACH invited him to a Leaf game in Chicago, believing that he would bring the team good luck.
"If it had been anybody else but Punch, I'd have dismissed it as a joke. But he really needed to win and he honestly believed my presence would make a difference, "Dr. MURRAY was quoted as saying.
The Leafs won not only that game, but, with Dr. MURRAY in attendance for the remainder of the series, the Stanley Cup. The Leafs haven't won a Stanley Cup since.
And the Star's headline proved prophetic. Team Canada won the Canada-Russia series when Paul HENDERSON scored with 34 seconds left in the eighth game.
Born in Toronto on May 14, 1920, James Findlay MURRAY was the youngest of three children. His father ran a store at Yonge and Queen Streets in downtown Toronto and died before the birth of his third child.
Dr. MURRAY attributed his curvy fingernails to his mother's malnutrition when she was pregnant with him, said his youngest son Hugh. Within a few years, she had remarried, and his stepfather helped to raise him.
An avid athlete, Dr. MURRAY played football during his high school and university days, so much so that once, when forbidden by his mother to play for his high-school team because he had had pneumonia, he practised and played in secret.
That lasted until his picture appeared in the Star running for a touchdown. He was immediately placed on the disabled list.
Awarded the George Biggs trophy for sportsmanship, leadership and scholarship, Dr. MURRAY graduated from medical school in 1943 and spent two years in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps, finishing as a captain.
After a year of general practice in Belleville, Ontario, he trained in plastic surgery at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with A. W. FARMER, whom many consider to be the father of Canadian hand surgery.
A humble man, who drove less-than-fancy cars, Dr. MURRAY was known for his ability to relate to everyone. "He was a doctor and an esteemed member of society, but it didn't matter to him," Hugh MURRAY said. "He considered himself an everyday person. He was as comfortable, if not more comfortable, dealing with just working guys."
In 1953, Dr. MURRAY joined the Toronto East General and Orthopedic Hospital as head of plastic surgery and organized a specialized hand clinic, according to Bernd NEU, another former student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at North York General Hospital.
"It's because the hand is such an important part of the body, not just physically, but aesthetically, "Dr. MURRAY, a specialist in soft tissue and the reconstruction of flexor tendons, said in 1984 to explain the dedication of hand surgeons.
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY left Toronto East General, where he had been surgeon-in-chief since 1976, to head the hand unit at Sunnybrook Medical Centre, taking a cut in pay to do so.
At the time, plastic surgeons could earn $2,000 for a face-lift and $106.50 for a carpal-tunnel release.
Dr. MURRAY derived great satisfaction from the help his hands gave others. Once in a clinic at Toronto East General, he and Dr. NEU came upon a patient with only a thumb and little finger on one hand.
"This is a wonderful hand, "he told Dr. NEU. " Look at how dirty and callused it is."
After several surgeries, Dr. MURRAY had restored the worker's hand to the point where the man could use it once again to earn a living.
"What to other people would look like a devastating loss, to Dr. MURRAY and the patient, this was a hand to be proud of, Dr. NEU said.
As a hand consultant beginning in 1974 at the Downsview Rehabilitation Centre of the Workers' Compensation Board, Dr. MURRAY treated those injured in industrial accidents, often surmounting language barriers to do so.
"He could speak to them [the patients] in basic English, so they could understand how seriously he took their problems, and how everything was being done that could be done for them, "Dr. NEU said.
In a 1996 letter to Dr. MURRAY, another of his former residents recalled how once on rounds, the doctor lifted the sheets to examine a paraplegic patient, only to find the man soiled. Instead of calling for hospital staff to clean the man, Dr. MURRAY performed the task himself.
"That little lesson reminded me that being a doctor is not just being a cutter, "the physician wrote.
Not only did he have a natural way with people, Dr. MURRAY was a gifted surgeon.
"He was a talented person with original ways of doing things," Dr. McFARLANE said. "He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons."
Appointed a lecturer at the University of Toronto in 1953, Dr. MURRAY was first an assistant and associate professor, becoming a full professor in 1979. He developed the first hand surgery fellowship training program in Canada in 1981, Dr. NEU said.
As well as teaching at the university, Dr. MURRAY trained surgeons during two trips to Southeast Asia as a volunteer with Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc. Medico and led a group of hand surgeons to study techniques in micro-surgery in China during the late 1970s.
At the medical meetings Dr. MURRAY often attended, he impressed Dr. McFARLANE with his ability to discuss surgery. "He had a very common-sense approach to a surgical problem, and when everyone had something to say about a problem, he would get up and clarify it very nicely, "Dr. McFARLANE said.
A founder of MANUS Canada, a society of hand surgeons, once a president of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Dr. MURRAY was honoured by the U.S. society at "Murray Day" in 1990 with tributes from past presidents.
Stricken with Alzheimer's disease toward the end of his life, Dr. MURRAY died in Collingwood, Ontario, on April 4. He leaves his wife of 57 years, Shirley, and his children, John, Bill, Claire and Hugh.

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BINKLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-19 published
Principal was 'a girl's best friend'
The head of Toronto's elite girls' school raised women's issues long before the rise of feminism
By Allison LAWLOR Thursday, June 19, 2003 - Page R9
Catherine STEELE, a dedicated educator who influenced thousands of young women during her 20 years as head of Havergal College, has died at age 93.
When Miss STEELE was appointed principal of the private school for girls in North Toronto in 1952, she became its first Canadian principal. The earlier principals were British, "typical of private-school education," Miss STEELE once said. She held the position until 1972, but remained closely connected to the school long after her retirement.
Miss STEELE had a lifelong relationship with the school, being herself a Havergal "old girl." She attended from 1923 to 1928, and taught history there in the 1940s.
"She was just a remarkable woman. A woman that truly lived her values," said Susan DITCHBURN, Havergal's current principal. "She understood that schools like ours couldn't just stand still."
Considered ahead of her time, Miss STEELE was talking about women's issues during the 1930s and 1940s, long before feminism was popular. She encouraged her young female students to use their talents, and to try to make a difference in the world. She told them to be ready to take on leadership roles, at a time when men held most of the top positions.
"I believe," Miss STEELE once said, "that when we realize we are world citizens, we shall be on the road to winning the peace."
Inside the walls of Havergal, Miss STEELE was admired and feared by the girls. "She wouldn't tolerate nonsense," said her long-time friend and colleague Marcelle DEFREITAS. Yet behind the imposing presence was a quick and mischievous sense of humour. One morning, as she took her usual place at the lectern in the school's assembly hall for morning prayer, she looked down and found a dead mouse that some of the girls had left for her. She quietly picked up the mouse and scanned the room for the biology teacher. "I think this is for you," she said.
After learning that the students had given her the nickname "Stainless STEELE," she posted on her office door a magazine picture of a young girl with a mouthful of shiny new braces. The caption below the picture read: "Stainless [ STEELE] is a girl's best friend."
Catherine Irene STEELE was born in Toronto on March 31, 1910. She was the only daughter of Irene Wilson STEELE and Robert Clarke STEELE, who built up a successful seed business. She grew up with her three brothers in the affluent Forest Hill neighbourhood and was sent to Havergal in 1923.
Miss STEELE went on to study at the University of Toronto and the Ontario College of Education. After graduating in the 1930s, she spent a summer travelling and then she went to teach at a private girls' school in England.
Back in Canada, she returned to Havergal, this time as a history teacher. She taught for several years there as well as at St. Clement's, another girls' school in the city. In between, she decided to further her education. After saving up enough money, she headed to New York, where she completed her master's degree at Columbia University.
At the onset of the Second World War, England was desperately short of teachers, and Miss STEELE answered the call. She boarded a ship and headed to London, where she taught in the East End during the Blitz.
She returned to Toronto after the war and found herself without work. Prospective employers often told her that, at age 35, she was just too old. Eventually she found a job at Ryerson Rehabilitation Centre, where she taught veterans.
"I never taught more eager pupils," Miss STEELE said.
Wanting to help a man who had been blinded during the war, Miss STEELE read him the entire history course. He passed.
From there, Miss STEELE went to the Royal Ontario Museum, where she headed the education department. One of her fondest memories was loading museum objects into a truck and travelling north to remote communities to bring the museum objects to children unable to visit Toronto.
While at the Royal Ontario Museum, she got a call from Havergal asking her to return, this time as principal. During her 20 years as the school's principal, Miss STEELE was a fixture.
"She was a presence that was always there," said Harriet BINKLEY, who graduated in 1972. "She lived and breathed the school."
Described as a careful, frugal woman, Miss STEELE lived on the school's campus in simple quarters. One of her rituals every night was to walk around the school making sure all the lights were turned off.
As principal, Miss STEELE made efforts to attract girls from different countries and ethnic and religious backgrounds, broadening the school beyond its Anglican roots. She also tackled inadequate staff salaries and pensions, and encouraged teachers to take leaves and pursue their education.
Miss STEELE "lived a life of service," said Reverend Kevin FLYNN, minister at the Church of St. Stephen-in-the-Fields in downtown Toronto. She encouraged others to do the same. At Havergal, she urged the girls to become involved in community organizations. She also had them evaluate the annual reports of different charities to determine which group had the greatest percentage of funds going directly to programs.
Outside Havergal, Miss STEELE sat on several boards, including the Elizabeth Fry Society. She also spent many hours at the Church of St. Stephen-in-the-Fields, helping with the church's programs for the poor and homeless.
It was not uncommon to see Miss STEELE's station wagon loaded with used clothes and furniture for delivery, Reverend FLYNN said.
In honour of her lifelong work, Miss STEELE was given two honorary degrees from the University of Toronto and York University.
Miss STEELE never married nor had any children of her own. "She was too busy," Ms. DEFREITAS said.
Miss STEELE died in a Toronto hospital on April 18. She leaves her brother, Clarke Wilson STEELE.

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BINNS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-04 published
Walter SCEVIOUR
By Linda Sceviour BINNS Monday, August 4, 2003 - Page A14
True Newfoundlander, seaman, crossing guard, professional Santa, father. Born February 14, 1926, in Petley, Newfoundland. Died February 24 in Toronto, of Alzheimer's disease, aged 77.
"In the cold Canadian waters, north from the coast of Maine, there's an island called Newfoundland, swept by snow, wind and rain. I wish I had the power to change the course of time, to live again in Newfoundland, the home of childhood time."
The lyrics of this song I know by heart, as they were taught to me by Walter SCEVIOUR. Walter had the softest heart, the bluest eyes, a strong wiry grip, and a quick step. It's appropriate that he was born on Valentine's Day; this was a man who deeply loved people and life.
Forever proud to be a Newfoundlander, Walter had a tough start. His mother died when he was a baby. The youngest of four children, he was sent to live with an aunt in British Harbour, once a thriving fishing island. He never had any formal education and started working at age 13 when his aunt died. He talked very little of those early years, but always wistfully of The Island.
The photo on his Canadian Seaman's card made Walter look like Stanley Kowalski of A Streetcar Named Desire. He rode a motorcycle, smoked Player's Plain, wore Old Spice cologne and drank Red Cap ale. He had a tattoo on his right forearm that said "Death before Dishonour".
His Newfie buddies called him Thumb Tack because he was a rabble-rouser, a practical joker with blazing Paul Newman eyes. Walter worked at the Gander airport, servicing planes until he came to Toronto in 1949 where he met Phyllis JOHNSON at a Newfoundland square dance. Walter and Phyllis celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in December.
Walter was a hard worker. He worked as a pressman until he began his second and happiest career as a school crossing guard for 12 years. The children called him "Wally" and their pictures, thank-you cards, and Valentines tell of how he had brightened their day. He played Santa Claus at the local mall and helped at church. The Red Cross recognized him as a loyal blood donor.
He had a great singing voice. The Green, Green Grass Of Home was his favourite song. And no one could do the Newfie jig to Muscles in the Corner better than Walter. He taught me to sing, dance, enjoy western movies, and play cards. "That's the baby," he'd say when he won (which was often) -- gleefully placing the winning card on the table. Walter was also a practical joker. On Halloween, his neighbours got use to seeing a trick-or-treater taller than the rest.
A true hockey fan with seasons' tickets for the Toronto Maple Leafs, Walter escorted many family and Friends to hockey games. He could get players' autographs like no one else. My autograph book proves it.
Generous and kind-hearted to a fault, he sent an entire cooked roast beef dinner to his daughter's house by cab when she came home with his first grandchild. Walter was a real softie for sure; a man who ended each phone call with two kisses and "I love you." He'd always tell us how proud he was of us. What this humble man likely never realized was how proud we were of him.
Walter is survived by his wife, Phyllis, their two daughters, Linda and Brenda, and grandchildren Danielle, Kyle, Remy, Amy, Haley and Kelly.
At his funeral service, the lyrics of Walter's favourite song were played for him: "Yes, they'll all come to see me in the shade of that old oak tree/ As they lay me 'neath the green, green grass of home."
Linda Sceviour BINNS is Walter's daughter.

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