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"BER" 2003 Obituary


BERCOVITCH  BERETTA  BERG  BERGIN  BERKELEY  BERMINGHAM  BERNEY  BERNIER  BERNSTEIN  BERRY  BERUBE 

BERCOVITCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-07 published
BERCOVITCH, Patricia (Pat) nee: COWAN
After a 2½ year unwavering, brave and courageous battle with colon cancer, Pat died peacefully with dignity at her home on July 05, 2003. Beloved wife of Morley, survived by mother-in-law Sadie CANHAM, dear sister of Mary CHARIOT (Larry,) brother Ted COWAN (Lucy,) brother Jim COWAN (Sheila,) predeceased by sister Barbara McGURK (Bob.) She will be missed by numerous loving nieces and nephews, along with their children, many aunts, uncles, cousins and caring Friends. Trained as a nurse and a teacher, she worked in many capacities in her field, then came to Wasaga Beach as the owner of the 'old' IGA, touching the hearts of many people along the way. Pat was most at home when boating on Georgian Bay. She will be remembered as a loyal friend, loving sister and a devoted wife. Thanks to Dr. James LANE for the compassionate care he gave Pat. Service at the Steeles Memorial Chapel, 390 Steeles Avenue West (between Bathurst and Yonge), Toronto, on Monday, July 07, 2003 at 11 a.m. Shiva at 65 Knox Road East, Wasaga Beach. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Pat Bercovitch Foundation at the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital would be greatly appreciated.

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BERETTA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-12 published
Craig Andrew O'HAGAN
By Vince BERETTA, Friday, December 12, 2003 - Page A28
Son, brother, twin, friend, athlete, adventure-seeker, angler, photographer, naturalist, engineer. Born December 13, 1972 in Brampton, Ontario Died October 17 in London, Ontario, of Burkitt's lymphoma, aged 30.
One of a handful of truly earth-connected souls, Craig took a leave of absence from his position as a mechanical engineer at FAG Bearings in Stratford, Ontario, to fill himself with the ultimate example of what made him an unforgettable person; his defining "thumbprint" adventure of a lifetime.This would not be Craig's typical accomplishment. Not the run-of-the-mill northern experience, seeking leadership skills with Outward Bound or a dog-sled adventure or a backcountry ski experience or the thrill of a white-water kayak or the serenity of a multiple-portage canoe trip. Nor would it be challenging the elite ranks of competitors at a Nordic ski, triathlon, or mountain bike race.
This was different -- a yearlong solo sojourn peregrinating around the world. He set out just before the New Year 2003 with his ski equipment, his excitable eyes, a heart-warmed smile, and a calm demeanour -- all of which made it easy for him to connect with other soul-driven people.
He began in England, Ireland and then Scotland, found his way to the mountains of central Europe, and then Sweden, Finland and Norway to seek more of his favourite season -- winter -- and to cross-country ski.
By March he found himself in the dangerous "no-go," Golden Triangle region of northern Thailand near the Laos and Myanmar borders. There he stayed with a family, assisting them to build a bamboo house with nothing more than a hammer and a machete.
That was so Craig -- he would always take the time to remove himself from the beaten path to touch the local culture by living with the rural people of the land.
By May he had changed continents and landed a job at a million-acre cattle ranch in Drysdale Station, demarcated by a building or two in the middle of Australia. There he worked as a ranch hand learning to fix whatever was broken with what ever they had, and herd cattle by Jeep, often driving hundreds of dusty, bumpy kilometres a day.
Craig was in his element when surrounded by nature and interacting with people and the planet. He captured this in his near-professional photography and various e-mails to his parents Mike and Mary, his brother Jeff, his twin sister Kelly and a large contingent of fortunate Craig-following Friends and relatives.
In the middle of June Craig fell ill and by July he would be airlifted to a Darwin, Australia, hospital where doctors discovered a rare and aggressive cancer; this would become Craig's next challenge.
He was flown home to fight with great optimism and never once asked "Why me?" Craig approached this like the rest of his life he let his heart lead him and he never attached himself to an outcome. This allowed him to instinctively know what mattered, and when it mattered, and he never faltered in his outlook.
Tragically, Craig lost his battle. At his standing-room-only funeral his ex-wife Becky delivered his eulogy. This fact speaks volumes, not only about Becky but about Craig, too. In a world of choices and mistakes both of them had the strength and maturity to face their heart's truth and chose to serve each other apart as Friends -- and, like Craig, there was no ego in that. With Becky, Craig pondered this thought: "What will be my thumbprint in life?"
Well, Craig, it was your silent lead to trust that the heart finishes first if we are courageous enough to listen to it.
Vince BERETTA is a friend of Craig.

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BERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
HOAG, Howard Arthur
Died Sunday, June 15, 2003, at home in Toronto, surrounded by Friends. Howard will be greatly missed by his beloved bride Louise RICH and her daughter Odette HUTCHINGS, as well as by his innumerable Friends and his family, in particular his sister Sharon. Howard loved life. His humour, wit, intelligence and broad smile charmed everyone he met. Diagnosed with liver cancer in December, Howard lived the last six months with incredible courage, determination and optimism. The devotion and concern of his wide group of Friends, including those from the Toronto Racquet Club and the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club has been remarkable. The annual Robbie Burns Supper will not be the same without him. Many thanks to Dr. SIU at Princess Margaret, Drs SINGH, HUSSEIN, STEINBERG, Rosa BERG and the Palliative Care Team at Mt. Sinai and Trinity Hospice. Special thanks to Howard's friend Fred REID- WILKINSON for being there. A service to celebrate Howard's life will be held 4: 00 p.m., Saturday, June 21, East Common Room, Hart House, University of Toronto, with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Howard's name to Trinity Home Hospice, Suite 1102 - 25 King St. West, Toronto M5L 1G7.

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BERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
BERG, V.L. (Royal Canadian Air Force 1937-1964 Group Captain)

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BERGIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-11 published
CRUSOE, Sister St. Claude (Anne,) I.B.V.M.
Died peacefully at Loretto Infirmary on Wednesday, September 10, 2003, in her 70th year as a member of the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Loretto Sisters), daughter of the late John CRUSOE and Adelaide GUNSHONER. Predeceased by her brother Rev. Clement John CRUSOE, S.J. Survived by her brother James, sister-in-law Margaret and family. Numerous cousins, including Sister Charlotte BERGIN, I.B.V.M. sister St. Claude taught at Loretto College School and Loretto Abbey, Toronto, as highly successful commercial teacher; served as General Councillor and General Secretary for many years and did Social Work with St. Vincent de Paul Society and Grace Hospital. Friends may call at Loretto Abbey, 101 Mason Blvd., on Thursday from 2: 00-4:00 p.m. and 7:00-9:00 p.m. Prayers will be at 7: 30 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial at Loretto Abbey Chapel on Friday, September 12 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment at Mount Hope Cemetery following the Massachusetts.

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BERKELEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-15 published
ADAM/ADAMS, Robert ''Bob'' Watson
Born January 22, 1921 in Windsor, Ontario, Bob died February 10, 2003 at the age of 82, from complications arising from heart disease and cancer. Bob started Adams Rent-All in 1967, with his first store on Avenue Road. The business grew to include six stores in the Toronto area. He retired in 1989 upon selling the business. An active member of the Rental Association of Canada until his death, he served as president in 1973 and 1974. The son of Dr. Frederick ADAM/ADAMS and Essie (née WATSON,) Bob was a Flight Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Air Force. In November 1943, his Wellington aircraft was shot down while bombing a ship in Naxos harbour, Greece, and for the next six weeks he and his crew evaded enemy capture before returning to Allied territory. In 1965, he became a member of the newly formed Royal Air Forces Escaping Society (Canadian Branch). Its 140 members were Canadian airmen who, after being shot down over Europe, escaped or evaded capture with the help of the underground. The Society's purpose was to honour and assist the individuals who guided airmen to safety, and who often suffered from imprisonment and torture as a result. Bob was president of the Society's Canadian Branch in 1995 and 1996. Bob is survived by his loving wife and best friend, Joan (née BERKELEY;) his children John, Patricia, and Mary; his sons-in-law, Lawrence SOLOMON and Steve DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS; and his granddaughters Essie and Catharine. He will be missed dearly by them, and by his many Friends. Bob is predeceased by his brothers, Frederick Coulson and John Charles, both Royal Canadian Air Force pilots, who were killed in action in 1941 and 1945. A celebration of Bob ADAM/ADAMS' life will be held on February 23, at 2900 Yonge Street. All who knew him and his family are welcome to drop by, anytime from 1: 00 pm until 5:00 pm. If desired, donations can be made to Toronto's West Park Healthcare Centre in Bob's memory.

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BERMINGHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-09 published
BERMINGHAM, Mary Louise (Lou) (née DONALD) -- Died peacefully at her home on Monday, December 8, 2003, in her 75th year, after a lengthy illness, surrounded by her family and assured of their love for her. Predeceased by Bill, her loving husband of 50 years. Reunited with her parents George and Beatrice DONALD. Survived by her children Tim and his wife Candace, Susan (JASPER) and her husband Terry, Patrick and his wife Amy, and Anne, all of whom will so deeply miss her smiles, her warmth and her unfailing cheerfulness. Also survived by her adoring grandchildren Sarah, Christopher, Katie, Hudson, Cabot, Will, Georgia, Carmichael and Alistair. They will always hold her in their hearts as the perfect Granny to them all. Lou will also be greatly missed by her sisters, Joan SINCLAIR and Allison GILBERT, and by her brother, Alex DONALD. Lou embodied the spirit of Christmas all the year and gave her many Friends strength and comfort in their lives. Her gardens and her home were always beautiful and welcoming. The family welcomes all who would like to share their memories of Lou to Otterburn on Thursday, December 11, 2003, from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. A memorial service will be held at Saint John's Church in Ancaster at 11 o'clock a.m. on Friday, December 12, 2003 (Halson & Wilson Streets). In lieu of flowers, donations to Saint John's Anglican Church or to a charity of your choice would be gratefully received.

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BERNEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
Jack McCLURE
By Carol BERNEY Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page A22
Painter, tennis player, friend, Perth County Conspirator. Born July 26, 1936, in Troy, New York Died February 13 in Stratford, Ontario, of heart failure, aged 66.
Jack McCLURE never made much money. He lived a simple life, say his Friends, who describe him as a "secular monk." After serving in the U.S. Coast Guard in Miami in the early 60s, Jack attended the University of Miami, played tennis, and hung out at The Flick coffee house, where he met actor/musician Cedric SMITH. In the late sixties Jack accompanied Cedric to Canada, and ended up working in the kitchen of the Black Swan coffee house in Stratford and living at "Puddlewalk, " the communal farm home of the Perth County Conspiracy, a swirling, ever-changing family of draft dodgers, artists, actors, musicians, and local hippies.
Jack was a passionate scholar and creative thinker. Obsessed with Marshall McLUHAN, Jack thought he saw a flaw in McLUHAN's theory, and actually went to Toronto to meet McLUHAN. Unfortunately, McLUHAN brushed him off and Jack came home crushed. For a short while, Jack lived at the (in)famous Rochdale College in Toronto. Jack said he lived on the 14th floor, and would look down and see cop cars converging on the building, but the residents had rigged the elevators to run so slowly that there was always plenty of time to clean up before the police arrived, and people rarely got busted. The other people on his floor were very nice, serious artists and intellectuals, but there were some wilder characters on some of the lower floors, and riding the elevator could be quite an adventure.
Back in Stratford, Jack lived in a caboose on a friend's farm for awhile, and then moved into town to share an apartment with another friend, Harry FINLAY. Jack then worked at the Gentle Rain natural foods store for, essentially, the rest of his life. He also sold paintings to his Friends, and gave tennis lessons. Among his patrons and students was musician Loreena McKENNITT, who said Jack was a very good teacher. His paintings were mostly in a realistically impressionist style, with tiny touches of absurdity and/or social protest. He would add a discarded Coke can to an otherwise idyllic river scene, or paint a nuclear-waste hazard sign on the side of a railroad car or at the back of a cave. One of his paintings was a portrait of Albert Einstein, while another, titled Church of the Muses, depicted Einstein playing the violin, with James Joyce playing piano and Bertrand Russell reciting.
In the last few years, Jack became close Friends with Michelle DENNIS, a co-worker at the Gentle Rain. On the back of a painting Jack gave to Michelle's family he called her two young daughters his "surrogate grandchildren."
This past summer, Jack was diagnosed with lung cancer. He underwent chemotherapy and radiation therapy and was in remission when he suffered a fatal heart attack during a badminton game. Jack left instructions to be cremated, with no service. However, as his long-term friend and employer Eric EBERHART remarked, that didn't mean we couldn't have a party. So the Sunday after Jack's death, many of his Friends and co-workers gathered at his house. We brought food, drink, photographs, and his paintings, and we had an impromptu showing of Jack's work to pay homage to his life and his spirit. His paintings are being archived, and in the spring there may be a showing at one of the Stratford galleries.
In Jack's room, on his work bench, was a quotation from Einstein: "The years of anxious searching in the dark, the intense longing, the alternations of confidence and exhaustion and then -- the final emergence into the light -- only someone who has so struggled and endured could understand." This describes the Jack we knew and loved.
Carol BERNEY is a friend of Jack McCLURE.

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BERNIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
JOHNSTON, Thirza Elaine B.Sc. (Hons.,) B.Ed., M.Ed. (Teacher with the Toronto District School Board, Scarborough)
Unexpectedly, Thirza (née TOTTEN) passed away on Wednesday, February 26, 2003. Predeceased by her husband, Bruce, she is lovingly remembered by her children, Robert, Anne and her husband Greig BLACK, Mary and her husband Neil ABBOTT, and Julie and her husband Michael BERNIER. Thirza cherished her role as grandmother. A private family service was held. If desired, donations may be made in Thirza's memory to The Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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BERNIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-25 published
GIBSON, James Alexander, C.M., M.A., M.Litt., (D.Phil.Oxon,) LL.D President Emeritus, Brock University
After a long and useful life, clear-headed to the end, died in Ottawa on October 23, 2003. Born in Ottawa in 1912, elder son of John Wesley GIBSON and Belle Crawford McGEE; school and college in Victoria, Rhodes Scholar from British Columbia in 1931; Foreign Service Officer, Department of External Affairs (1938-47); served with the Prime Minister on missions to Washington, Quebec Conferences, San Francisco, London and Paris.
Original member of Faculty of Carleton College, (1942); from 1952, first Dean of Arts and Science, Carleton University; later Dean of Arts and Deputy to the President; in 1963, named Founding President of Brock University.
A founding member of the Canadian Association of Rhodes Scholars, he held various offices and served as editor of the newsletter for 19 years. For over 60 years, he was a member of the Canadian Historical Association and of the Canadian Institute for International Affairs, as well as national and regional voluntary organizations.
He is survived by his daughters, Julia MATTHEWS and Eleanor S. JOLY (Gerald,) and his son Peter James; grandchildren Alison MATTHEWS- DAVID (Jean Marc), Colin MATTHEWS (Nathalia), Micheline, Nina (Jean-Marc BERNIER) and Gerald JOLY, Anna GIBSON (Robert) and Hilary TERHUNE (Peter;) two great-grandchildren. His wife Caroline died in 1995; also surviving are his brother William and his sister Isobel SEARLS in Victoria.
Memorial services will be held in Ottawa (December) and in St. Catharines at Brock University on November 7th, at 3 p.m. If desired, memorial remembrances may be made to the James A. Gibson Library, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1.

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BERNSTEIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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BERNSTEIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-23 published
WIESMAN, Brahm
Died peacefully and with dignity July 20, 2003. He leaves his wife Madge, brother-in-law Alan BERNSTEIN of Montreal, nephew Robert and his wife Judy of Ottawa, niece Janet MENDELSON and her husband Stephen and their family of Nepean, Ontario, nephew Mark MADRAS and his wife Eva of Toronto, niece Karen MADRAS- STOPA and her husband Ed and family of East Greenwich, Rhode Island, brother-in-law David McCULLOCH and his wife Janet of Glasgow, Scotland, brother-in-law George McCULLOCH and his wife Ina and family of Glasgow, niece Helen FARMER and her husband Stewart and family of Glasgow, and nephew Gordon McCULLOCK and his wife Linda and family of Glossop, England. Born on June 13, 1926, Brahm lived his rich life with the greatest consideration and care for others. He studied architecture and community planning at McGill University in preparation for what was to become a distinguished career in the field of city planning. After taking on senior management positions in the Cities of Edmonton, Victoria, and Vancouver, he was asked to join the faculty of University of British Columbia's School of Community and Regional Planning in 1967. He went on to serve as Director of the School for 12 years. In that position, he was much loved as a colleague and teacher, and provided internationally admired leadership to the planning profession. In retirement, Brahm continued to actively promote good planning by advising universities in Asia on planning curricula, consulting to cities in China, and speaking out forcefully as a citizen on Vancouver area issues. A service will be held, 11 a.m. on Wednesday, July 23, at Schara Tzedeck Cemetery in New Westminster, 2345 Marine Drive. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to ''Prostate Cancer Research at Vancouver General Hospital'', Vancouver General Hospital and University of British Columbia Hospitals Foundation, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, V5Z 1M9.

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BERNSTEIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-08 published
Israel ASPER: A timeline
Wednesday, October 8, 2003 - Page B6
1930s
Born Israel Harold ASPER in 1932 in Minnedosa, Manitoba, the son of musicians Leon and Cecilla.
Even in his youth, Mr. ASPER was a newspaper junkie. As a Grade 10 student he started a newspaper on his own.
1940s
After the Second World War the ASPERs built a small chain of theatres in rural Manitoba and Winnipeg. Izzy was an usher at one of the theatres.
Married Ruth (Babs) BERNSTEIN, who he met in high school in Winnipeg. Like the ASPERs, the BERNSTEINs were immigrants from Eastern Europe.
1950s
Attended the University of Manitoba. Called to the Bar of Manitoba in 1957.
son David, born in 1958, is now CanWest Global executive vice-president.
1960s
Daughter Gail, born in 1960 is now CanWest Global's corporate secretary.
son Leonard, born in 1964, is president and chief executive officer of CanWest Global.
1970s
Member of Legislative Assembly and Leader of the Liberal party in Manitoba from 1970-1975.
Began his broadcasting career when he bought North Dakota's KCND in 1974, moved it to Winnipeg and changed the call letters to CKND.
Buys 45 per cent of troubled Global Ontario network in 1974.
1980s
In 1988 he gains licences for new television stations in Regina and Saskatoon.
Buys television stations in Vancouver and Halifax-Saint John.
In 1988, Mr. ASPER and associates buy out partners in the Ontario Global system.
In 1989, CanWest takes over 100 per cent of Global and becomes CanWest Global Communications.
1990s
CanWest lists on the New York Stock Exchange in 1991.
In 2000, Mr. ASPER moves into print with $3.2-billion purchase of Southam newspaper group from Hollinger Inc.
2000s
The newspaper deal sparked heavy criticism as Mr. ASPER was accused of editorial interference at the papers.
Last year, CanWest fired Ottawa Citizen publisher Russell MILLS after the paper published an editorial critical of Prime Minister Jean CHRETIEN.
Jazz was always Mr. ASPER's passion - his brother gave him a Rhapsody in Blue recording as a bar mitzvah present. In 2002, CanWest opened a Winnipeg jazz FM station.
Died yesterday at St. Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg at 71.

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BERNSTEIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
FOGELL, David 1923-2003
Born December 22, 1923 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died October 27, 2003 at home with his family in Vancouver, British Columbia. He was predeceased by his parents Melach and Surka, brother, Ben and sisters Dora and Netty. Dave is mourned by his wife, Estelle, children, Melanie and her husband Ken GOLDSTEIN, Wayne and Mark. He will be greatly missed by his grandchildren Carie and her husband Stuart, Daniel, Sarah, Kylie; Sammy, Benji and their mother Dorothy ULLMAN as well as great-grand_son, Kade. He will never be forgotten by his many relatives and Friends. Dave was an incredibly charismatic and an intensely joyful human being. He felt deeply and loved unquestioningly. Those who were fortunate enough to be part of his life will be forever enriched by having known him. Dave approached everything in his life with meticulous attention. He had very humble beginnings yet he always remembered those who helped him throughout his life. He had a rare passion for living extending to everything and everyone. His seemingly endless energy led to numerous accomplishments and successes. He will be remembered most for his ability to make those around him feel loved. The funeral is Wednesday, October 29, 2003 at the Beth Israel Cemetary, 1721 Willingdon, Burnaby, at 12 noon. The pallbearers are Sammy and Benji FOGELL, Daniel GOLDSTEIN, Lanny GOULD, Howard DINER and Joel ALTMAN. Honourary pallbearers are Zivey FELDMAN and Harry GELFANT. The family would like to thank caregivers Denyse TREPANIER and Bryan WALKER as well as Dr. Larry COLLINS and Dr. Victoria BERNSTEIN. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Fund or the Jewish Family Service Agency.

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BERRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
The day the music didn't die
Beloved Toronto trumpeter credited with helping preserve a unique form of New Orleans jazz
By Sarah LAMBERT Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- The tightly knit world of New Orleans traditional jazz has lost one of its greats with the death, last month, of Cliff (Kid) BASTIEN, leader of Toronto's treasured Happy Pals.
The trumpeter is credited as having nothing less than single-handedly kept alive the unique, raw, New Orleans style of jazz, through his leadership and mentorship of hundreds of musicians.
Saddened fans and musicians filed into the city's Grossman's Tavern all week last month to pay tribute to Mr. BASTIEN at the long-time home of the Happy Pals, where the walls are lined with photos of his fans and musicians. It was a send-off worthy of New Orleans, birthplace of the kind of jazz Mr. BASTIEN played with his seven-piece bands, the Camelia Jazz Band and later the Happy Pals, during the 30 or so years he played at the Toronto landmark.
"He was never late. Never, never ever, said Christine LOUIE, whose family inherited Mr. BASTIEN's Saturday-afternoon gig when Al GROSSMAN sold the bar in 1975.
So it was with sinking hearts on February 8 that his loyal audience and band members watched the minute hand tick past 4 o'clock, waiting for him to arrive, brass trumpet in hand.
When he was found later that afternoon still sitting in his armchair, apparently looking up a new song in his hymn book, the Happy Pals played on and raised a glass in tribute to their leader who died as he lived, surrounded by music. He was 65 years old.
Noonie SHEARS, a long-time friend and leader of the traditional impromptu parade that would inevitably snake through Grossman's as Saturday afternoon wound down, said she thought Mr. BASTIEN was looking up I'll Fly Away, the old gospel song recently dusted off in the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou?
The band played it for the first time at Mr. BASTIEN's official memorial at Grossman's the Saturday following his death.
Born in 1937 in London's East End, Mr. BASTIEN emigrated to Canada in 1962 after a stint in New Orleans. It was there that he heard trumpeter (Kid) Thomas VALENTINE play and, experiencing a kind of epiphany, Mr. BASTIEN followed him from club to club and studied his style. It ultimately inspired a lifelong ambition to keep alive New Orleans-style traditional jazz.
A purist who drew a distinction between his chosen genre of music and the more popularized Dixieland Jazz, Mr. BASTIEN once said: "Had I never heard that music, I wouldn't have become a musician. I wouldn't play anything else."
I Like Bananas, Caledonia, All of Me and Louisiana Vie en Rose were just a few of his standards. But, as Happy Pals' trombonist Roberta TEVLIN explained, Mr. BASTIEN wasn't content to simply recycle the old chestnuts.
"Cliff kept adding songs. I've probably played 1,000 different tunes with him. He was particularly notorious for finding songs outside the standard jazz list, said Ms. TEVLIN, who joined the band 20 years ago, along with her saxophonist husband, Patrick.
Bob Dylan, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Western Swing numbers, Nigerian folk songs and Dean Martin could all tumble out during a set, said drummer Chuck CLARKE.
Mr. BASTIEN's Friends and peers point out that he was known for three primary qualities: His love of music, his scorn for fame or publicity and his mentoring of local musicians.
During the memorial at Grossman's, Downchild Blues Band headman Donny WALSH arrived from Florida to sit in with his harmonica, as he had done regularly with Mr. BASTIEN in the 1970s. Juno-nominated bluesman Michael PICKETT was there, as well as jazz singer Laura HUBERT, formerly of the Leslie Spit Treeo, pianist Peter HILL, The Nationals and many more.
From the worldwide New Orleans jazz community, among those who came to pay their respects were saxophonist Jean-Pierre ALESSI of France, trumpeter Roger (Kid Dutch) UITHOVEN of Orlando, Florida, clarinetist Kjeld BRANDT from Denmark and Toronto's Brian TOWERS, Jan SHAW and Joe VAN ROSSEM.
"I cannot imagine the Toronto traditional jazz scene without Cliff BASTIEN and his raw, emotional New Orleans-style jazz, Mr. TOWERS wrote in a notice posted on the Internet shortly after he learned of the death of his friend.
"He was probably the most popular and influential figure on the Toronto traditional jazz scene. He taught many others to play their instruments in the style and introduced thousands to the joys of New Orleans traditional jazz.
"We went to Grossman's after our own gig and Jan and I played some hymns with the Happy Pals. A sadder and more emotional scene I have rarely seen."
Toronto musician Joanne MacKELL, leader of the Paradise Rangers, wonders how things might have been if she had not met Mr. BASTIEN when she was just starting out.
"Though I was young and inexperienced, Kid would always invite me up to sing, Ms. MacKELL said, recalling how the band took her under its wing when she discovered them in the early 1970s.
"Kid didn't care about money or popular opinion. He filled Grossman's Tavern every Saturday for some 30 years because he played great music with honesty and integrity and he inspired me to try and do the same."
Until just last year, Mr. BASTIEN, who feared flying, avoided the lure of the road, taking only an annual sojourn to New Orleans for the French Quarter Festival. Finally, in the fall of 2002, he accepted an invitation to tour Scandinavia with the Danish/Swedish band New Orleans Delight, playing with George BERRY on tenor sax. A new Compact Disk is due to be released this spring.
His official recordings are few, numbering about a dozen, as Mr. BASTIEN preferred to play to an audience. Though, as Ms. TEVLIN pointed out: "There are bootleg tapes all over the place."
His legacy, the band says, is keeping the New Orleans style of jazz alive.
"Kid Thomas VALENTINE was one of the greats, and when he was gone, Kid BASTIEN carried on. Kid BASTIEN was one of the greats, and now Kid's gone. So who's going to carry the music on now? We will, said saxophonist Mr. TEVLIN on behalf of the Happy Pals, who intend to continue the Saturday-afternoon tradition at Grossman's.
In another side to his life, Mr. BASTIEN was an accomplished commercial artist whose hand-crafted signs, woodwork and acid-etched glass can be seen in many local pubs, including Toronto's Wheat Sheaf Tavern. His work can be found across Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia and California, as well as in Europe.
Mr. BASTIEN's wish was to be buried in New Orleans.

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BERRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-28 published
BERRY, Virginia Gingerick M.A., PhD., D.Litt., Member of the Order of Canada
Died in Victoria, British Columbia on Saturday, March 22. Born in 1915 in North Manchester, Indiana to Fred and Julia GINGERICK, Virginia did her B.A. at Mount Holyoke College, Massachusetts., and took her M.A. (1938) and PhD (1941) in Medieval Studies at the University of Chicago. After teaching at Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri, Virginia moved to Winnipeg in 1943 on her marriage to Edmund BERRY of the Classics Department of the University of Manitoba. She taught at Saint John's College (1943-44), from which she received an Honorary Fellowship in 1986. While raising her two daughters, Virginia began a lifelong involvement in the Winnipeg Art Gallery. She was an early member and later President of the Women's Committee, a member of the Building Committee for the new Gallery, and a Board member for many years, including a term as Vice- President. In 1986 she was made a Member of the Order of Canada for her work in the arts community. She was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of Winnipeg in 1987. As Guest Curator at the Winnipeg Art Gallery she wrote two book-length exhibition catalogues, A Boundless Horizon and Vistas of Promise, on the history of Manitoba art. This year she completed a manuscript on the role of women in Manitoba art, 1880 to 1920. In the fifties, Virginia sat on the Boards of Balmoral Hall School and the Middlechurch Home. She was a member of the Altar Guild of All Saints Anglican Church for more than 50 years. Virginia loved historical research, antiques, art and travel. She and Edmund travelled often to England, spent part of each winter with Friends in Spain, and more recently wintered in Victoria. She was slow to criticize and quick to encourage. Her quiet strength and warm support endeared her to many. She will be remembered for her grace and dignity, and her kindness. She is survived by her husband of 59 years, Edmund, daughters Julia MELNYK (George) of Calgary, Margaret LIN (Philip) of Victoria, and grand_sons Adam MELNYK and Brian and Michael LIN. A memorial service at All Saints Church in Winnipeg is planned for 4: 00 p.m. April 26, 2003. Donations in Virginia's memory may be made to the Winnipeg Art Gallery, 300 Memorial Blvd. R3C 1W2 or All Saints Church, 175 Colony Street, Winnipeg, R3C 1W2.

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BERRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-03 published
MEANY, Patrick Donal Anthony
Patrick was born on June 10, 1923 in Stoney Mountain, Manitoba. He died at age 80 at Trillium Hospital in Mississauga on October 2, 2003, after a determined struggle with illness.
Patrick grew up in Ireland. As a youth he attended the same two-room school that had been attended by his father, grandfather and great-grandfather. He served as an officer (rank of Captain) in the Irish Army Permanent Defence Force from 1944 to 1956. He was a book editor and director of MacMillan Company of Canada Ltd., and ran his own scholarly book publishing and distribution business for over 30 years. He served as a trustee of the Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board for 24 years, beginning in 1971, and was chairman of the Board for five terms. He was president of the Ontario School Trustees' Council, Ontario Catholic School Trustees' Association and Director of the Canadian Catholic School Trustees' Association. He also served on the boards of the Institute of Catholic Education and the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. In addition, he served as chair of the Peel Drinking and Driving Committee and vice-chair of the Mississauga Traffic Safety Council, as well as many other public service committees and task forces.
Patrick will be greatly missed by his wife, Kathleen MEANY (nee QUIRKE;) his sister, Margaret; his children, Mary PICARD (Robert,) John MEANY, Anne BERRY (Lionel,) Daniel MEANY (Robin,) James MEANY, Paul MEANY (Diana) and William MEANY; and his grandchildren, Helen, David, Katharine, Cameron, Michael, Grace, Natalie and Elizabeth.
Visitations will be at Scott Funeral Home, 420 Dundas Street East (one block west of Cawthra), Mississauga 905-272-4040, on Saturday from 6 to 9 p.m.; and on Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. and from 7 to 9 p.m. A funeral mass will be held at Saint Dominic's Roman Catholic Church, 625 Atwater Avenue (at Cawthra), Mississauga, at 10 a.m. on Monday, October 6th. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to ShareLife, 155 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario M4T 1W2.

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BERRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-27 published
William "Bill" BERRY
By Karyn PERCIVAL- BERRY, Monday, October 27, 2003 - Page A16
Husband, father, grandfather, healer. Born March 29, 1933, in Toronto. Died February 23 in Toronto, of cardiac arrest, aged Dad had an unconventional beginning, one of 13 children growing up in Aliston, Ontario He spent many summers working on his grandfather's farm. He learned to ride by unhooking the plow horses, mounting bareback and hanging on for dear life.
Outspoken even as a teenager, he was dismissed from high school when he refused to compromise his word to a school principal. Out in the work force, he drove freight trucks in Northern Ontario and Quebec for several years.
He later joined the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, qualifying as a paratrooper despite his fear of heights. He was also a highly qualified marksman, and rose to the rank of sergeant in the Korean War.
In fact, he rose to that rank twice, after a disagreement with a British officer who insisted on a forced march during the hottest part of the Japanese summer. Dad refused to subject his unit to this unreasonable command, which caused him to be demoted. He was later exonerated, and rank returned. He was later wounded in the left shoulder, and because of his injury he was sent home.
Dad later was employed as a railway fireman, stoking the steam engines typical of 1950s trains with coal. He rose to the level of engineer and kept his fondness for trains throughout his life. When diesels were introduced Dad decided it was time expand his horizons.
He returned to high school, completing three years of work in one year. After graduating, he entered pre-med at the University of Toronto, where he met and made many lifelong Friends, including classmate (and soon to be loving wife), Hillary.
Bill and Hill later had two children, David and Karyn, and Bill joined the staff at Centenary Hospital in eastern Toronto in 1971 and began practising nephrology. It was the start of a long and distinguished relationship with the patients and staff of that hospital, serving three terms as chief of staff and being an advocate for all who worked there. He was a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.
He worked hard for his family and took delight in surprising them with expressions of his feelings. When I was about 7, Dad came home from work, and beckoned me into his study. He behaved like a little kid, with a big secret. Pulling out a velvet box from behind his back, he opened it to show a beautiful necklace, the first "nice" jewellery he had been able to afford. He then seriously consulted his seven-year-old, asking: "Do you think Mummy will like this?" I assured him absolutely. He further humoured me by asking me to help wrap the gift. He was so proud to be able to finally give something special to Mom.
Dad's dream was to have a farm of his own, which was fulfilled when the family moved to Sunderland, Ontario, in 1980. True to his unassuming nature, two days after we moved, he quietly arranged delivery of two horses for us, while we were away at a Christmas party. Dad slyly had us go out to the barn to "show us something" and there they were. This was typical of his way, letting his actions speak for him.
Life wasn't always perfect on the farm. On two occasions Dad figured you could just duck under the rail fence while riding the tractor. Unfortunately, both times the tractor ended up in the pond -- requiring him to use his car as a tow truck. Bill loved the Sunderland farm, and the Muskoka cottage, his dogs and horses. Although quiet in his outward affections, his big heart and laugh will be missed by all who knew him.
Dad's passing came quickly and unexpectedly. We didn't have a chance to say goodbye.
Karyn is Bill BERRY's daughter.

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BERUBE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-26 published
Nicole BERUBE
By Rose DESHAW Tuesday, August 26, 2003 - Page A22
Writer, editor, photographer, French teacher. Born June 4, 1949, in Gaspé, Quebec Died June 17 in Kingston, Ontario, of cancer, age 54.
'They said I was Dead!" Nicole told me several years ago, outraged that a local paper had reported as "posthumous" her receipt of a special medal for outstanding volunteer work. This meant that she was not invited to the award ceremony. She phoned the paper after receiving several frantic messages from Friends but they declined to put in, as she phrased it, "an oopsie."
An editor herself for many years of the biweekly L'Informel, serving the French community in Kingston, Ontario, her vision for the paper grew daily. Wanting it completely professional, Nicole taught herself the most up-to-date graphics programs, acquired a scanner and digital camera, upgraded her photographic skills to artist level -- and put it all into the paper. She fought for a bigger budget that could cover an outside print run, and more pages in order to profile the work of French schoolchildren whom she saw as the future of the community.
Eighteen-hour days were common. Nicole never had enough time for all the travel, Friends, projects and writing she had planned. She co-authored, with her friend Viv EDWARDS in England, a bilingual children's book series, including the title Who Stole Granny? She promoted their work whenever there was opportunity. She also gave workshops as a teaching professional when she wasn't hard at work in the language department of the Royal Military College. The success of her young officer cadets was everything to her she was always pushing and cajoling them, inviting them over for extra sessions at her cosy little duplex that she'd decorated with posters and ornaments from her travels.
She mined popular culture for material that might make speaking the language irresistible to her students; dating behaviour, strange local customs, sports cars, food, until she became a walking encyclopedia of odd facts in French that might tempt a hitherto unresponsive cadet to try a little harder. How she suffered as they struggled. The week of their oral exams by phone was migraine time for her. "I have no other way to teach but involved," she said once.
Although usually colourfully dressed in an array of saucy T-shirts and a denim jacket that matched her big blue eyes, Nicole could dress in the manner of the Queen (minus the hat) when it was required. Living on her own as a single woman with a cat, she lavished attention on her nephew and niece, children of her younger sister and only living sibling out of four children.
She travelled back and forth on holidays to the small Quebec town of Gaspé where she had grown up, where her family had been clockmakers and jewellers for generations. Sent for her public education to the sisters at the convent, Nicole had a lonely childhood. It wasn't until enrolment at Laval University in Quebec City that she came into her own. Taking part in the student protests that followed the October Crisis, she told me once about hobbling away because she had lost a shoe as the police bore down on them. But by the time she reached Royal Military College, she had achieved the highest security clearance, no longer a radical (if indeed she had ever been) but a teacher whose first love was the young faces in her classes.
One of her delights was a cadet from Bosnia, struggling to learn both English and French at the same time. "She has a bright future," Nicole said in May, after the cadet had taken her out to dinner in gratitude for all the help and encouragement that had enabled her to successfully complete her exams. Nicole did not know that her own future was near its end. On June 10, she went into the hospital for routine tests and died unexpectedly from colon cancer seven days later.

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