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"BEN" 2003 Obituary


BEN  BENATTAR  BENDER  BENEDICT  BENNER  BENNESS  BENNETT  BENOIT  BENT  BENTLEY  BENTUM  BENZ 

BEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
TEPER, Morris
On Wednesday, March 5, 2003 at his home. Morris TEPER, beloved husband of the late Esther TEPER. Loving father and father-in-law of Luba and Johnny GREENSPAN, Helena BEN- DAVID, Irv TEPER and Karen HACKER. Dear brother of Zvi TEPER. Devoted grandfather of Joy and Nathaniel, Kyle, Koryn, Shelly, Jonathan, Maya, Robin, Sean, and Mattie. Devoted great-grandfather of Jordan ELY. At Beth Tzedec Synagogue, 1700 Bathurst Street for service on Thursday, March 6, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m. Interment Driltzer Young Men's Society Section of Dawes Road Cemetery. Shiva 3 Newgate Road. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Morris TEPER Memorial Fund, c/o the Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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BENATTAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-08 published
BOSWELL, Patrick Arthur
Died peacefully in Victoria, British Columbia, after a long illness, on July 7, 2003. son of the late W. H. and Nan BOSWELL (née CRONYN.) He is survived by his wife Stephanie BOSWELL (née HAAS,) his sister Ann and her husband Henry BENATTAR, and his nephews Peter BOSWELL, Tony and Patrick BENATTAR, and his nieces Edie and Sue (VIBERT) and Samantha BENATTAR. He was predeceased by his brother Bill BOSWELL. Born in Toronto in 1924, he attended Ridley College School and served overseas in the Royal Canadian Air Force After 25 years, Pat left his position at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto and moved to Banff, Alberta where he managed the Alpine Club of Canada. Skiing and mountain climbing were his great loves. He and Stephanie became owners, editors and managers of the Banff Crag and Canyon. They retired in 1988, moving to Sidney, British Columbia and finally to Victoria. He will be sadly missed for his humour, kindness, generosity and affinity with words. No funeral services by request. Private cremation. Flowers are gratefully declined.

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BENDER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-04 published
Ottilie BENDER
By Lawrence SCANLAN And Ulrike BENDER Tuesday, February 4, 2003, Page A20
Aunt, bookkeeper, artist, landlady, gardener. Born August 27, 1920, in Bessarabien, Romania. Died March 20, 2002, in Toronto, of liver cancer, aged 81.
Ottilie BENDER was slim and elegant, tall in every way, as slow and graceful as the giraffe. Skin pale, almost translucent. High cheekbones, eyes blue and strong. Otti was the child of a successful German farmer in old Romania. A peasant girl, but one with standing. Confidence coursed in her; her stated opinion had the look and feel of fact.
Direct too, Tante (Aunt) Otti once critiqued a book of mine: "You didn't say much but, by golly, you said it well." The "by golly" came with physical punctuation: her slapping both knees with her hands. She picked up the phrase when she came here from Germany in 1952. That, and "Vell, anyvay" -- the latter phrase uttered at dinner to shift gears and speak of other matters.
When she arrived, she worked in a hospital cafeteria but spent years at night school studying English, then typing and bookkeeping, before landing work with an art and framing business. She came here in defiance of her father and showed her signature strength of will. The first BENDER to cross the ocean.
Tante Otti was a woman ahead of her time. She knew that women in her era were valued as obedient housewives and capable mothers and not as strong-minded individuals. "I never would have developed as a person if I had married," she once said.
She would eventually save enough money to become landlord and superintendent at her west-end Toronto apartment complex. Her tiny digs teemed with her own art landscapes, still lifes, a portrait of John F. Kennedy. She loved beauty. An art teacher once praised her imagination and sense of colour. Later, she would move to a plain house in old Mimico, Ontario, one with a basement apartment and a paying tenant. Form mattered; function more.
Ottilie BENDER believed that you helped those less well-off -- not by handouts, but by encouraging them to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. But, like all interesting people, she contradicted herself.
Her tenant drifted from job to job, fell behind in his rent. She never tossed him out, for he was her project. She tried to instill in him her own work ethic, her faith in diligence, her practical spirit. She gave him the benefit of the doubt, for "you have to see the good in everyone."
I find it ironic that Otti's liver failed her. This woman who abhorred strong drink all her life, who drank "ein Schluck" of wine at Christmas dinner, who watered down tea. Restraint defined her.
Although otherwise in good health, she was plagued for years by poor circulation, and would attend Christmas dinner at her brother's place -- their thermostat always set to tropical -- wearing a cardigan, heavy slacks and, over her shoes, plastic bags against the cold.
I admired and will remember Otti's self-reliance: how at peace she was with who she was, her steely pride, that peasant stoicism. The BENDER family has lost its chief historian, its best letter-writer, its clan gatherer, its most capable patroness.
The ducks and geese on the bay close by have lost a companion, too. "Walking makes me feel free the way I felt when I was young in Romania," she once said. On the shoreline she met Friends who likewise found joy in the breezes off the lake, in tossing bread to grateful birds in the setting sun. The geraniums in pots along her windowsills will miss her, the tall conifers she planted as seedlings, the flowers in her lavish garden. There will be no fat tomatoes this summer. I will miss engaging her, a process that was as lively when she was 81 as it was almost three decades ago. She was, by golly, a great lady.
Lawrence is married to Ulrike, Ottilie's niece.

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BENEDICT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-15 published
Global advocate for workers' rights
His activism in Canada spanned three decades, but labour leader also brought his message of education and social justice to Europe, Russia and Latin America
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, October 15, 2003 - Page R7
When Dan BENEDICT set out to work in the machine shop of an aircraft-engine factory in Lynn, Massachusetts., in the 1930s, his goal was to connect with the workers there. For the fresh university graduate, the move was a political statement and the beginning of what would become a lifetime spent advocating for workers' rights, education and greater social justice both in Canada and around the world.
"He was driven by his commitment to justice," said his son, Stephen BENEDICT, who is a member of Canadian Auto Workers Local 112 and director of the Canadian Labour Congress's international department. "He was almost single-minded about that. It was almost the only thing he cared about."
Last month at a Labour Day event in Ottawa, Daniel BENEDICT, a retired Canadian Auto Workers staff representative, was honoured for his pioneering efforts in the labour movement. That day he continued his advocacy work by giving an impassioned speech about future generations.
Afterward, a group of kids gathered around, eager to teach him the latest cool handshakes, Stephen BENEDICT said. "He was always more interested in talking about the future than the past," he said. "He would want to be remembered as someone who cared about the future."
On September 16, just four days before his 86th birthday, the outspoken advocate died in an Ottawa hospital. He had been diagnosed with both colon and liver cancer.
Mr. BENEDICT's lifelong work was recognized in October, 1998, when he was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada. Part of his citation reads: "He has devoted a lifetime to the labour movement. He has advised prominent international trade-union leaders in Canada, the United States and Europe, and represented labour on various panels and commissions sponsored by the United Nations' International Labour Organization."
But for the Canadian Auto Workers, his crowning achievement was the Paid Education Leave Program, which he developed and implemented in the late 1970s. (The union was then the United Auto Workers-Canada). The program is still considered the largest adult-education program for working people in Canada, according to the Canadian Auto Workers, and one that is admired by trade unions worldwide.
The program, which now offers courses one-to-four weeks in duration and covering topics such as collective bargaining, human rights and workplace reorganization, highlighted Mr. BENEDICT's belief that education is needed to allow workers to build skills that would then help them to create a more just society.
"He had an incredible respect for workers' intellect," said Bob WHITE/WHYTE, former president of the Canadian Auto Workers and the Canadian Labour Congress. "He was a great educationalist."
Born on September 20, 1917, in New York, Daniel BENEDICT was the only child of Blanche BENEDICT and Joseph KAISER, who worked as a salesman. Not long after he was born, his mother died of the Spanish flu and he was left to be raised largely by his grandmother (and he later took his mother's maiden name).
By the age of 14 he had enrolled in university, and later joked that his grandmother had sent him there while he was still in short pants. While in university, Mr. BENEDICT's social activism was awakened, and after graduation he went off to work in a Massachusetts factory that produced military aircraft engines.
On the plant floor, he was vocal and rallied for workers' rights. But when the war broke out, he left the factory and enlisted in the U.S. Air Force. He was sent overseas as a flight engineer and spent much of his four years of military service in Europe. It was on the Mediterranean island of Corsica at a ball held for the liberating troops that Mr. BENEDICT met his future wife, Micheline. In 1947, the couple married in Corsica, despite the pleadings of her father, who didn't want his daughter near any Americans.
Following the war, Mr. BENEDICT returned to Europe after being decommissioned, and spent four years working with Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc., the international humanitarian organization, helping Europeans recover from the devastating effects of the war.
He returned to the United States to work with labour leader Walter REUTHER at the Congress of Industrial Organizations, and then worked in Mexico with the regional organization of the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions.
Mr. BENEDICT's career also took him to Brazil, where he worked for the International Metalworkers Federation, covering Latin America. He took part in worker education in the region and instructed union leaders on industrial relations. During the 1950s and 1960s, he also helped local unions devise strategies to deal with repressive military regimes in their countries.
Mr. White said.
He later became assistant general secretary of the International Metalworkers' Federation, and moved his family to Geneva, where he became a familiar figure as a labour representative on various panels and commissions sponsored by the United Nations' International Labour Organization.
"Dan was an outstanding international trade unionist," who was held in high regard both at home and around the world, Mr. WHITE/WHYTE said.
In the late 1970s, Dan BENEDICT moved to Canada and joined what was then the United Auto Workers-Canada, the forerunner to the Canadian Auto Workers. He soon became a Canadian citizen, and was a passionate defender of the country.
A love of linguistics and a desire to communicate with others translated into Mr. BENEDICT learning nearly a dozen languages, including French, Spanish and German, as well as some Finnish and Hungarian. Most recently, he was learning Russian and Mongolian.
After the fall of the Soviet Union, Mr. BENEDICT travelled to Russia, Belarus and Ukraine to help build independent trade unions. He had also been in Mongolia working with a union representing sheep herders.
A BENEDICT family story traces Mr. BENEDICT's gift for languages back to his childhood bout of jaundice. At the time, he wasn't allowed to read because he was told it would weaken his eyes so instead he was left to entertain himself with a stamp collection. Among his collection were some Russian stamps with which he taught himself the Cyrillic alphabet.
After retiring from the United Auto Workers-Canada in 1982, Mr. BENEDICT continued to travel the world and teach wherever the opportunity arose. Having earned a doctoral degree in economics from France's Grenoble University, he taught for a time in the sociology and political-science departments at York University in Toronto, and was affiliated with the industrial-relations departments at McMaster, Laval and Concordia universities.
As a senior citizen, he advocated for seniors' groups on a wide range of issues, from soaring drug costs to nursing-care cutbacks, and served as chair of the Ontario Coalition of Senior Citizens' Organizations. He frequently spoke at rallies and conferences and could often be found at peace marches or protests.
"He had a tremendous amount of energy," said Morris JESION, the coalition's executive director.
While in his early 80s, Mr. BENEDICT was still working on a history of auto workers in Canada. The endeavour resulted in reams of research material and a 3,000-page manuscript. The wealth of material is tucked away in stacks of boxes in the garage of his Ottawa home.
Mr. BENEDICT leaves his wife, Micheline, their two daughters, Marie-Blanche and Francesca, son Stephen and four grandchildren.

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BENNER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-11 published
Murray J. BENNER
By Frank BENNER Tuesday, November 11, 2003 - Page A26
Son, brother, enthusiast, optimist, dreamer, clown, humorist, homesteading pioneer, First World War soldier. Born July 31, 1893 in Bayham, Ontario Died September 4, 1918, Villers-Cagnicourt, France, aged 25.
This letter was written by Frank BENNER. At this stage he was a practising physician in Winnipeg. He wrote this letter home to Mary, his mother, on receiving the telegram from his brother Ward saying that their brother Murray had been killed in action overseas.
"This is going to be a hard letter for me to write. Ward's telegram was delivered at my office about half past three yesterday afternoon and for some reason I felt what was in it before I opened it. Although we were in a way always prepared to receive such news when it did come yesterday it completely upset me in a way that I did not think possible.
"Poor Murray! It hardly seems possible that a cheerful, energetic, buoyant brave boy can be gone. His nature seemed to be such as to almost overcome the shadow of death. We all know that he has faced death and dodged him for a year, that he never feared to meet death when his time came. I am sure he died as he lived, cheerfully, and taking it all as part of the day's events. While we are feeling so badly over it, it is some consolation to think of the nobility of it all, killed in battle in defence of his country, in defence of a great cause, defending right and liberty against oppression, tyranny and wrong. There is surely a 'majesty' in such a death. Murray would wish nothing grander, nor could we wish anything grander for him.
"I would rather get a dozen such messages as I received yesterday (if such were possible) than to know he was wounded like a few I have seen. Men who will suffer intense physical pain the rest of their lives but the mental pain they suffer will eventually drive them mad or drive them to seek the death they missed in battle. Other cases are those who eventually die of wounds, after suffering for weeks or months. I have seen all and I know and I thank God that Murray has not suffered that.
"Murray has given his life; you have given a son. The first is not hard but the second is heartbreaking. I am not in any way trying to minimize Murray's sacrifice but for a year I faced with thousands of others the possibility of death and really one gets so that it has no great terrors. We expected it at any time and were rather surprised that it didn't come. None of us wanted it to come but had it happened I cannot think that my sacrifice would have been so great as yours. From Murray's letters I judge he felt the same way.
"We will always mourn his death as the loss of a loving son and brother but we will always feel proud of him, his life and his death. Canada needed such men as Murray, men who dared the unbroken country and faced its loneliness and its privations, gave their labour and cheer there that it might become a place for a future generation of Canadians. In his memory Murray has left us a great deal and I hope that when my time comes I may leave as much. I fear I shan't fall so nobly.
"It is useless for me to attempt writing more. I know you will all bear up as bravely and as nobly as he would wish, and as bravely and proudly as we have the right. I feel that I should be with you in person as well as in thought. Will anxiously await further details but can't expect anything for four to six weeks. Best love to all, Frank
Frank BENNER was Murray's brother and he served as a physician in Giza, Egypt, with the British Red Cross Hospital during the First World War. The letter is one of about 400 letters written by family members between 1899 and 1918. It was submitted by Murray and Frank's great-niece, Susan GOLD, of Burlington, Ontario

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BENNESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Katherine (Kae) PLAUNT
Died peacefully at York Extendicare, Sudbury, on May 9, 2003 in her 90th year, with her children at her side. Cherished daughter of the late Mildred and W.B. PLAUNT. Predeceased by her loving husband, Dr. R. MacKay THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON in 1981. Dearly remembered by her children: Andy (Mandy TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Toronto, Kathie THOMAS (Richard,) Judy MAKI (Tom) and Robin (Mary Lou McKINLEY) of Sudbury. Adored Nana to Allen DAY (Erin CAMERON), Andy DAY (Carla GIUSTO), Kathy, Jodi, Alex, Nikki, Fraser, Michael, Jamie, Scott and great-grandmother to Alexander. Beloved sister of Marian MAHAFFY (Guy, predeceased,) Bill PLAUNT, predeceased (Agnes,) Helen VOLLANS (Maurice, predeceased,) Donald PLAUNT, predeceased, Royal Canadian Air Force, World War 2 and Jean BENNESS, predeceased (Barry, predeceased.) Loving sister-in-law to George WRIGHT of Hanover, Ruth LAWS of Almonte, Murray THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Ottawa and Muriel VALENTIN of Stuttgart, Germany. Auntie Kae will be fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews and their families in the PLAUNT and THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON clans.
Born in Renfrew on April 29, 1914, she moved to Sudbury in 1924 where her father established his lumber business. She attended Central Public and Sudbury High School, Branksome Hall and graduated from the School of Nursing, University of Toronto, in 1937. After working in Toronto in public health, she returned to Sudbury the following year where she met and married Mac.
Kae loved to golf and curl, and took an avid interest in her family's history. She was very talented in the traditional arts, enjoying knitting, quilting and cooking. As an active community volunteer, she belonged to the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire where she was Regent and to the Salvation Army as an organizer for the annual fund raising drive and board member. She loved to travel with her husband and Friends, but her favourite place in the world was Lake Pogamasing where her parents established a family camp in 1941 and where she spent every summer with her family. She loved to entertain her Friends and her children's Friends, especially at Pog. We were blessed to have a mother and grandmother who stressed the importance of family, community and responsibility. She loved to bring people together and do things for them, to share her interests and her talents, she was kind and considerate to all she met, and along with Dad taught us how to dance and have fun.
Special thanks from the family to Dr. Reg KUSNIERCZYK and his staff, the Walford staff and Dr. ROCH and staff on the fifth floor of York Extendicare for their devoted and caring attention to Mother.
In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to Young Men's Christian Association Sudbury.
Memorial service in the R.J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury, Tuesday, May 13th, 2003 at 11: 30 a.m. Cremation followed by interment at Lake Pogamasing. Friends may call 6-9 p.m. Monday, or gather in the chapel after 11 a.m. Tuesday.

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BENNETT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-19 published
Andres KRAMER 1908-2003
Andres KRAMER (Andy to all his Friends,) came to Canada at the age of 18. Andy was born in Sonderburg, Denmark, December 14, 1908. Settled in Toronto, was employed by the Robt. Swipson Co. as a radio technician also doing house calls in the evenings. He met Walter BENNETT, soon to become his brother-in-law. Andy married Marguerite Jane BENNETT (Daisey to all her Friends,) in 1934 at South Baymouth, where Daisy was born. Wedding took place at Huron Lodge. They went to Denmark on their honeymoon, taking their car with them.
About ten years later they moved to New York, where Andy was employed by the BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation). The time they spent there was very enjoyable. Later they returned to Toronto. Andy attended the University of Toronto and graduated with honours as an electrical engineer. They returned to the USA and settled in Stanford County where Andy was employed by Audio Magnetics manufacturing recording tape. Their vacations were always returning to Manitoulin Island. Later they moved back to Toronto where Andy founded Kramer Magnetics 1963, manufacturing various types of recording tape. He engineered and built all the equipment personally. Eric STILLWAUGH, his great nephew was one of his first employees and remained with him until Kramer Magnetics was sold in 1971 after about 10 years of operation. They moved to South Baymouth, built a home and retired, only to start another home on South Bay waterfront, along with a hangar where he proceeded to build a home-built Mustang float plane. Andy had previously obtained his pilot's licence. The government inspector said it was the best plane he ever checked out. Daisey, Andy's wife passed away in May 1986. In 1994, he sold his house in South Baymouth and settled in a retirement home in Goderich. Andy eventually due to eye failure was not able to drive his car. However, his two nieces Joyce McDONALD and Lena SAUDERS taxied him when necessary. Andy passed away peacefully at Huronview Rest Home in Clinton, Ontario after spending eight years in Goderich Place. He is survived by Erling ANDERSON and Jutta KRAMER, Joyce McDONALD, Lena SANDERS, Helen McQUAT, Georgina STILLWAUGH, Kenneth BENNETT, and many nieces and nephews. He also had two nephews, Gerald LEHMAN and Haus KRAMER, both deceased. Andy also had one sister, Missa KRAMER (deceased.)

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BENNETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-30 published
Laurie BENNETT (née McDERMOTT)
It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Laurie BENNETT (née McDERMOTT) on Monday, April 28, 2003. Laurie, who was a loving and dedicated mother and grandmother, died at home with her family. As a professional, she was the Founder and a former Executive Director of Hospice of Peel. Laurie spent the last twenty-five years of her career dedicating her life to helping those around her and to developing and promoting the invaluable hospice services in Mississauga as well as in Ontario and across Canada. Starting in 1977, she was instrumental in starting the palliative care service at Mississauga Hospital (now Trillium Health Care Centre). In 1985, when the government and hospitals began to limit services to the terminally ill, Laurie and a few colleagues started an organization that could serve all terminally ill patients in the community - the Hospice of Peel. Laurie was loving mother to Lynne, Bruce and his wife Susan BLACK, Brenda and her husband Bob LEARMONTH; proud grandmother of Shannon, Cody, Tyler, Myles, Carolann, Christine and Jamie; dear sister to Ted and Gary McDERMOTT; and loving aunt to Sean, Michele, Kevin and his wife Jessica (both who went out of their way to help the family during Laurie's last few months), Steve, Jackie and Scott and dear friend to too many to mention. Laurie is predeceased by her brother Jack (affectionately known as the 'Great J.B.'). She was loved by all who were close to her and will be tremendously missed. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter 'Peel' Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10North of Queen Elizabeth Way) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Thursday. Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Friday, May 2, 2003 at 11 o'clock. Private family interment Saint John's Dixie Cemetery. For those who wish, it is Laurie's and the family's request that any donations be made to Hospice of Peel, 855 Matheson Blvd. East, Unit #1, Mississauga, Ontario L4W 4L6

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BENNETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
Died This Day -- Norman (Red) RYAN, 1936
Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Career criminal born in Toronto in July, 1895; in First World War, joined Canadian Army; deserted to commit numerous robberies in Ontario, Quebec and the United States; captured and made spectacular escape from Kingston Penitentiary; in 1923, recaptured in United States and deported; sentenced to life imprisonment in Kingston became model prisoner, the "darling" of prison reformer Agnes McPHAIL and premier R.B. BENNETT; in July, 1935, won parole for 10 months, toured as spokesman for prison reform while secretly re-establishing underworld contacts; killed in shootout with police while robbing Sarnia, Ontario, liquor store of $394.

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BENNETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-12 published
Three cheers for a funny fellow
Like his hapless Canadian hero, he often found himself in hilarious situations
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, June 12, 2003 - Page R9
Once in the middle of an interview at the Toronto airport, writer Donald JACK left to fetch a document from his car. Notorious for a sense of direction so poor he found it difficult to navigate through a city park, let alone the airport's massive parking lot, Mr. JACK took so long to find his vehicle that by the time he returned the interviewers had gone.
Like Bartholomew Bandy, the hapless hero of The Bandy Papers, Mr. JACK's eight-volume comic-novel series describing an Ottawa Valley boy's adventures during both world wars and between, the author often found himself in hilarious situations, made the more so by his telling.
A three-time winner of the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour, Mr. JACK died last week at his home in England. He was Listeners were reduced to tears of laughter by his tales of construction disasters while having a villa built in Spain; a house sale falling through on closing day; and an aging bright yellow car named Buttercup, whose sun roof shattered soon after it was searched for drugs at the Spanish-French border, showering Mr. JACK with glass, insects and rust.
Once, while being toured with his daughter around the offices of his publisher, McClelland and Stewart, Mr. JACK entered the boardroom and shouted with surprise. There on the carpet lay a large amount of dog excrement left by an employee's pet. In his Bandy-like way, the writer very nearly stepped into it.
"If you could choose one author out of the entire world who during a visit to his publisher would stumble across this, it would be Donald JACK," said Douglas GIBSON, president and publisher of McClelland and Stewart, who knew the writer for more than 30 years.
"Things would go wrong for Don, very seldom caused by himself," said Munroe SCOTT, a close friend of more than 45 years. "He would narrate all this stuff either in person or in a letter and make it all hilarious, because he always saw, in retrospect at any rate, the funny side of things. You'd be doubled up with laughter."
Despite Mr. JACK's incident-prone nature, it would be a mistake to see Mr. JACK as a buffoon, said Mr. SCOTT, also a writer. "He was enormously well read, erudite and could handle the language with aplomb at many levels. He could make me feel like a Philistine."
Said author Austin CLARKE, who was Mr. JACK's neighbour for five years during the 1960s. "He was a quiet, reserved, retiring kind of man. You would never have known he was a writer."
Mr. JACK's Leacock medals came for three volumes of The Bandy Papers: Three Cheers for Me, in 1963, That's Me in the Middle, in 1974 and Me Bandy, You Cissie, in 1980. Published between 1963 and 1996, they still enjoy a loyal following, including a Web site which draws mail from around the world. Six of the eight volumes were recently reissued by McClelland and Stewart.
Drawn from Mr. JACK's fascination with the First World War, the rural people he met in the Ottawa Valley and his time in the Royal Air Force, The Bandy Papers feature the blundering Bartholomew Wolfe Bandy, who in the first volume, Three Cheers for Me, inadvertently becomes a hero, despite capturing his own colonel by mistake.
Ensuing volumes follow Mr. Bandy's adventures through to the Second World War. Although devastatingly funny, they also describe war's horrors and the realities of the home front, and lampoon war's leaders.
Mr. Bandy encounters and influences historical figures, such as then British minister of defence Winston Churchill, and generously offers him use of the altered Bandy phrase "blood, sweat, toil and tears."
While best known for The Bandy Papers, Mr. JACK wrote countless documentary film scripts, stage, television and radio plays, as well as two non-fiction books: the history of a Toronto radio station, Sinc, Betty and the Morning Man, and another about medicine in Canada, Rogues, Rebels and Geniuses.
His third play, The Canvas Barricade, won first prize in the Stratford Shakespearean Playwriting Competition in 1960. Produced in 1961, it was the first, and remains the only, original Canadian play performed on the main stage of the Stratford Festival.
Mr. JACK, however, did not see much of its opening. He left the auditorium for the lobby. "During the performance, we'd be aware of a crack of light from a door opening slightly and a white face would stare through, then vanish for a while, before another door would open a crack, and the same apparition would fleetingly appear," Mr. Scott said.
Born on December 6, 1924 in Radcliffe, Lancashire, England, Donald Lamont JACK was one of four children of a British doctor and a nurse from Prince Edward Island. After attending Bury Grammar School in Lancashire and Marr College in Scotland, he gained enough qualifications to attend London University.
While stationed in Germany with the Royal Air Force in the last year of the Second World War, Mr. JACK attempted short-story writing, but thought he lacked talent. After his mother asked him, "Isn't it about time you left home?" Mr. JACK immigrated to Canada in 1951.
Interspersed with jobs as a member of a surveying crew in Alberta and a bank teller in Toronto, Mr. JACK studied at the Canadian Theatre School in Toronto run by Sterndale BENNETT. There he wrote two plays, one of which drew praise from theatre critic Nathan COHEN and a job offer from a film Company. Mr. COHEN later wrote Mr. Scott, decrying Canadian theatre's "shameful treatment" of Mr. JACK, which largely ignored him.
A theatrical background enhanced Mr. JACK's writing, according to Mr. Gibson. "His dialogue was terrific and his scene-setting was excellent."
After leaving the school, with the encouragement of his wife, Nancy, whom he married in 1952, Mr. JACK worked in the script department of Crawley Films in Ottawa. Two years later in 1955, the company's head, Budge CRAWLEY, let him go because he thought Mr. JACK would never make a good writer.
A dry first year of freelancing followed, until in 1957 Mr. JACK sold the play version of his novelette Breakthrough, published in Maclean's, to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television. It became the first Canadian television play to be simultaneously telecast to the United States.
He never looked back. By 1972, A Collection of Canadian Plays, Vol. 1, which included Exit Muttering by Mr. JACK, noted he had written 40 television plays, 35 documentary film scripts, several radio plays and four stage plays. The works included Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Armed Forces training films for the National Film Board and often demanded a great deal of research.
Mr. JACK wrote with military discipline, beginning at 9 a.m., taking tea at 11 a.m., lunch at 1 p.m., tea again at 3 p.m. and finishing at 5 p.m. "All my life, I swear, that routine never altered," said one of his daughters, Lulu HILTON.
Persisting in writing drafts in pen and ink long before adopting the typewriter and, much later, a word processor, Mr. JACK often developed storylines while walking. A 1959 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation press release explains Mr. JACK's dedication: "My self-discipline is to keep reminding myself of how lucky I am to be able to be the only thing I ever really wanted to be -- a writer."
During the early 1980s, Mr. JACK and his wife returned to England to be near their daughters who had emigrated there, and their grandchildren. Mr. JACK missed Canada's open spaces and its classless society, and visited often.
At the time of his death, he was working on the ninth volume of The Bandy Papers. He died on or about June 2 of a massive stroke at his home in Telford, Shropshire, England. He leaves his two daughters, Maren and Lulu, six grandchildren and one great-grandchild, a brother and a sister. His wife Nancy died in 1991.

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BENNETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-29 published
BENNETT, Bruce Thompson
Died peacefully in the presence of his wife Margit and daughter Kristina on Saturday, August 23rd, 2003 at the Bennett Health Care Centre, Georgetown. Beloved husband of Margit (WOGNSBECK) and loving father of Kristina BENNETT- STEWARD/STEWART/STUART (Alan) and son David (Kathie) and dear grandfather of Ian and Robbie. Born in Saskatoon to Harry and Hetty BENNETT, predeceased by brother Harry, he is survived by his sister-in-law Elva and nieces and nephews in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Cremation has taken place. Bruce began his career as a concert pianist and music teacher in Saskatoon and retained his love of music throughout his life. An eye injury excluded Bruce from military service in the war years and he therefore worked in Washington with the Australian War Supply Organization. After the war he joined E.P. Taylor (Argus Corp. Ltd.) of Toronto and later Canadian Breweries Ltd. (Toronto) as an international director and travelled the world for several years promoting their interests abroad. Bruce finished his career with Markborough Properties Limited and retired in 1985. Friends are invited to join the family for a celebration of Bruce's life at the Ward Funeral Home, 109 Reynolds Street, Oakville, on Friday, September 5th, at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the Victorian Order of Nurses, Halton Branch, Oakville, or The Bennett Health Care Centre, Georgetown, would be appreciated.

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BENNETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
Father figure to the Canadian stage
British-trained Stratford character actor never craved starring roles
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, October 16, 2003 - Page R11
For Mervyn " Butch" BLAKE, entering a theatre was a magical experience, something he never tired of during an acting career that spanned close to three-quarters of a century. Mr. BLAKE, one of the most loved members of the Stratford Festival Company, died on October 9 at a Toronto nursing home after a long illness. He was 95.
"Theatre seems to give me life," Mr. BLAKE said in 1994. "I just feel marvellous when I enter the theatre... it's one of the things which keeps me going."
Over his long stage life that included 42 consecutive seasons with the Stratford Festival of Canada, Mr. BLAKE "had the distinction of playing in every single play of Shakespeare's," said Richard MONETTE, Stratford's artistic director.
"He had a great life in the theatre," Mr. MONETTE said.
Adored by both audiences and fellow actors, the veteran actor was known across Canada for his enormous talent and generosity of spirit. When he wasn't working at Stratford, he acted on the country's major stages and in television and film.
For seven seasons, he toured with the Canadian Players, bringing professional theatre to smaller towns. And in 1987, he won a Dora Mavor Moore Award for best performance in a featured role in a production of Saturday, Sunday, Monday at what was then called CentreStage (now CanStage).
"Everyone loved Butch without exception," said John NEVILLE, a former Stratford's artistic director.
Mervyn BLAKE was born on November 30, 1907, in Dehra Dun, India, where his father was a railway executive.
His father wanted him to become an engineer but after falling in love with the theatre, Mr. BLAKE was able to persuade his father to allow him to study at London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. In 1932, he graduated and soon made his professional stage debut at the Embassy Theatre in London
During the Second World War, he served in the British Army as a driver. It was during the war years that he is said to have got his nickname Butch. A witness to the horrors of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, Mr. BLAKE was present at the liberation of the camp by British troops. It was an experience that haunted him for the rest of his life.
At the war's end, he returned to England and to the stage. He married actress Christine BENNETT and spent the years between 1952 and 1955 at the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon. There he worked with many of the great British actors such as Sir Laurence OLIVIER, Sir Michael REDGRAVE and Dame Peggy ASHCROFT.
Despite his success on the British stage, he decided to join the Stratford Festival of Canada, then in its fifth season. With his family in tow, Mr. BLAKE moved to Canada and in 1957 appeared in a production of Hamlet with Christopher PLUMMER in the title role.
"He wasn't a leading actor," said actor and director Douglas CAMPBELL. "He was a supporting player. As a supporting player you couldn't get better."
Mr. BLAKE always saw himself as a character actor who never cared that much about starring roles, said Audrey ASHLEY, a former Ottawa Citizen theatre critic and author of Mr. BLAKE's 1999 biography With Love from Butch.
"He was one of those actors you never had to worry about," Ms. ASHLEY said. "You knew Butch was always going to do a good job."
Known for his unfailing good nature and even temper, he enjoyed re-telling gaffes he had made on stage. Mr. MONETTE remembers one performance where Mr. BLAKE appeared on stage as the Sea Captain in Twelfth Night. The character Viola asks him, "What country, Friends, is this?" And instead of responding "This is Illyria, lady." Out of his mouth popped, "This is Orillia."
To the younger actors at Stratford, Mr. BLAKE was a father figure. "He was very fond of the young actors and would take them under his wing," Ms. ASHLEY said.
Stephen RUSSELL remembers arriving at Stratford for his first season in the mid-1970s. He was placed in the same dressing room as Mr. BLAKE, an experience he still holds close to his heart.
"He was one of the most generous human beings," Mr. RUSSELL said.
One of the areas Mr. BLAKE was most helpful in was teaching fellow actors how to apply stage makeup. He loved makeup and on his dressing-room table he had an old rabbit's foot that he would use to apply his face powder, Mr. RUSSELL said.
Aging didn't stop him from applying his own elaborate makeup. Playing the role of old Adam in As You Like It required him to go through the same makeup ritual when he was 70 years old as it did when he performed the role years earlier as a much younger man.
Aside from the stage, one of Mr. BLAKE's passions was cricket. During his first season in Stratford, he played on the festival's team and was responsible for starting a friendly, annual cricket match against the Shaw Festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake.
Each season, members of the two acting companies would come together for a civilized afternoon of cricket and tea. The Stratford team still goes by the name of Blake's Blokes.
In honour of his talent and dedication to the theatre, Mr. BLAKE was appointed a member of the Order of Canada in May, 1995.
"When he entered, the stage just lit up," Mr. RUSSELL said.
Mr. BLAKE leaves his wife Christine BENNETT; children Andrew and Bridget; and stepson Tim DAVISSON.
Details of a memorial service to be held in Stratford, Ontario, have yet to be announced.

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BENNETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
BLOCK, Matthew Alexander
Tragically died of injuries sustained when struck by a car on Hallowe'en evening. Matthew passed away peacefully with his family by his side at the McMaster Medical Centre on Saturday, November 1, 2003. He was 12 years old.
Matthew BLOCK (Cambridge, Ontario) is the cherished son of Kelly (née FLOOD) and Robert BROOK, dear brother of Stephen, Kevin, Andrew, Caitlin and Jenny, friend of Brent, and precious grand_son of Ellen and Denis CASE, Dennis and Patricia FLOOD, Stanley and Evelyn BROOK. He will also be sadly missed by his great aunts and uncles.
Loved nephew of Sheryl FLOOD and Douglas RITCHIE, Christopher CASE, Leslie (née CASE) and Rodney GIEBLER, Debbie and Jerry and Dave and Denise; and cousins Nicole and Alexander. Special friend of Keith, Lena, Zeo and Matthew BENNETT; Ted and Joe GIBBONS Doreen BROWN and Lloyd STEWARD/STEWART/STUART; and all of his many Friends and their families.
Matthew was a student at St. Joseph's School in Cambridge, and he enjoyed playing left wing with Hespler Minor Hockey. Matthew was also an aspiring chef who shared his passion for cooking with all who knew him.
We wish to thank all those who have given us their love and support, and we offer our heartfelt gratitude to the staff at Cambridge Memorial Hospital, McMaster Medical Centre, and specifically Dr. Holly SMITH, Nancy FRAM, and Chaplin Steve. We were comforted to know that Matthew gave the gift of life to seven families through organ donation.
Our dear Matthew will be greatly missed by all who knew him. It was a great joy and honour to have shared 12 years with him.
Friends will be received on Tuesday and Wednesday from 6: 00-9:00 p.m. at Littles Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 223 Main Street East, Cambridge www.funeralscanada.com Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Clements R.C. Church, 745 Duke Street, Cambridge on Thursday, November 6th at 10: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. In memory of Matthew, donations would be appreciated to ''Kids Can Play'' and to the school that he loved, St. Joseph's in Preston, for any educational needs.

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BENNETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-07 published
Died This Day -- James Alexander LOUGHEED, 1925
Friday, November 7, 2003 - Page R13
Lawyer and politician born at Brampton, Canada West, in 1854 practised law in Toronto and Calgary; entered partnership with R.B. BENNETT; 1889, named to Senate; 1906, made Conservative leader; 1911, appointed to Privy Council; minister without portfolio in BORDEN government; 1928, name given to mountain west of Calgary.

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BENOIT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Ruby WILLSON
In loving memory of Ruby WILLSON, May 15, 1937 to April 30, 2003.
Ruby WILLSON, a resident of Ice Lake, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 at the age of 65 years. She was born in Kagawong, daughter of the late Nelson and Lillian (TRUDEAU) PIERCE.
Ruby was an "Adventuress" and enjoyed life to its fullest. She had worked as a hostess at Harbour Island as well as being a navigator on sail boats, and had sailed many places, including the open seas. She enjoyed many things, such as needlework, baking, reading and especially loved to entertain and host people. Her favourite place was Harbour Island. A loving wife, mother and grandmother, she will be sadly missed, but many happy memories will be cherished. Dearly loved wife and best friend of Chuc WILLSON. Loving and loved mother of Dennis BECKETT and Deanna BENOIT both of Kagawong, Rob BECKETT of Pefferlaw and Juanda GEORGE of Espanola. Proud grandmother of James, Charles, Kevin, Crestienne, Aaron, Brandon and Sheldon. Also survived by Lake WILSON and his daughter Jasmine. Dear sister of Sandra JAMES. Predeceased by husbands Robert BECKETT, Carl REINGUETTE and John PETRIE and brother Reynold PIERCE.
A private family funeral service will be conducted at the Culgin Funeral Home, followed by cremation. A public memorial service will be conducted at Lyons Memorial United Church on Thursday, May 15, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. If so desired, donations may be made to Strawberry Point Christian Camp or the Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270.

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BENT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-13 published
BENT, Vera Clara (née SEARS)
With her family at her side, Vera died peacefully at the North York Seniors Health Centre, Friday, October 10, 2003 in her 99th year. Beloved wife of the late Norman Arthur BENT. Devoted mother of Maurice BENT and Margie Penhallow. Loving mother-in-law of Pat BENT. Beloved sister of Margaret and Mable and the late Harry, Art, Ernie, Dorothy and Annie. Dearest Nana of Jacqueline KENNEDY (John,) Stephen BENT (Tara,) Warren BENT (Jody,) Andrea BENT and Tim PENHALLOW. Proud great grandmother of Madison, Lauren, Cameron, Charlotte and Graydon. Special thanks to Carol and to the staff of the 4th Floor at North York Seniors Health Centre for all their loving care and compassion. A private family service will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), on Wednesday, October 15. Interment Pine Hills Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to North York General Hospital Building Fund, 4001 Leslie Street, Toronto, M2K 1E1.

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BENT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-10 published
My father will always be my father
I won't forget the humorous running commentary he offered while we watched horror movies. He did this so I would have the courage to sit through the scary scenes.
By Nancy BENT, Monday, November 10, 2003 - Page A16
If I could go back and speak again at my father's funeral, I would express the private thoughts that have consumed me for the past nine months along with the public formalities I extended at the time of his death. The latter part would serve as a courtesy to the others who had come to pay respects to the man they knew. The first and most important component would allow me to use an open forum to proclaim my ambiguous feelings for the man who had more of an impact on my life than I would have ever let him believe.
I found a middle ground to release my thoughts in the safest place I thought possible -- a journal. I began on March 6 of this year -- just over a month after my father was found dead in his bachelor apartment. He was 59 years old. I was 26.
It is natural for me to seek solace in a solitary act. I'm a born loner who often prefers daydreaming to an outing with a friend. Despite this, I am inhibited by the activity of writing in a journal. As one of four children, the concept of privacy is something I have difficulty grasping -- even in my adult years.
In the confusing and troubling weeks after my father's death I felt a tremendous need to purge my erratic feelings, get them on to paper. I was unable to do this in the unnatural environment that materialized around my immediate family members and separated us from others in our close proximity. Sympathy came in the form of its common expression -- with the best intentions -- and those who were closest to us blended in with the crowd of respectful visitors.
I was afflicted by everyone else's truth. My older sister -- who had managed to develop a close relationship with our father as an adult -- delivered his eulogy. Her speech was beautiful. She astutely commemorated my father through humorous stories outlining his eccentric style and shared detailed accounts of his good deeds. I started to cry almost immediately after she started speaking because, as she referred to them, I remembered all of these qualities. These were the memories I enjoyed. Presented with compassion, my sister's speech was a hagiography of the father I always wanted.
I was lucky to catch a glimpse of this man during an anomalously open conversation he and I shared shortly before he died. My father finally spoke about issues he would normally avoid, including his drinking and depression. He never expressed remorse for our broken family to me and he was steadfast in his accusations of others' wrongdoings. Despite this, he seemed to have accepted some responsibility for where he ended up in life. I felt this was a baby-step to confronting greater issues: I wanted him to acknowledge what I believe was his neglect in the early years of my childhood. Even more so, I wanted him to regret the ongoing feud during my adolescence when I felt I was a moving target for his drunken rage. These were the years when my father became a stranger to me.
I endured many arguments with my family -- including my father about our family troubles. Despite my role as the outspoken, rebellious middle-child, I would not bring this animosity to a public forum. This became even more difficult after my father's death. I understood my family's need to cherish the only father and husband they knew. Along with them, I felt the pressure to present the side of my father that his Friends and family came to mourn. I accepted these responsibilities but knew that I would not be able to mourn my father without remembering him as a whole person.
After paying my public respects for more than four weeks, I found the ability to translate my feelings, along with numerous memories, into words. I was plagued with writer's block but still felt compelled to turn to my journal. I began on page one and later I heard myself cry as I read the shocking and sad memories I had recorded. It was as though I were hearing the stories for the first time.
Writing about my father helped me recognize that my relationship with him was not one long sad story. It was sporadically interspersed with tender moments sponsored by an interesting and caring man with loving intentions.
I cannot depict him without illustrating his role as the drill-sergeant of wit. This was a role he fulfilled by catching me off guard with a playful slight to test my retaliation skills.
There were many times that I was able to please him with my responses especially as they improved. He would comment "Good but too slow" if I missed a beat. I will not forget the humorous running commentary he offered while we watched horror movies on home video. He would do this so that I would have the courage to sit through the scary scenes.
And most of all, when it is pouring hard rain outside, splashing into deep puddles, I will not forget where I got the idea to run around barefoot with my arms spread open and enjoy the shower.
The most important thing I gained from my journal is the realization that despite the conflicting portraits of my father one thing won't change -- he was my father.
Nancy BENT lives in Toronto.

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BENTLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
BENTLEY, Peter
Passed away unexpectedly on February 25, 2003 at the age of 53. Beloved husband and best friend to Joyce, loving son of Kathleen and the late Frederick. Dear brother to Stephen and his wife Catherine, Anne and husband Tony and brother-in-law to Barbara and husband Kelly. Dearly loved and proud uncle to Shona and James, Katrina and Emma, Laurence, Daniel, George, Maria and Marcus. Godfather to Shannon and Sydney and special 'Uncle Peter' to many. Long time Executive Chef at the Royal Bank of Canada. Peter was highly respected by his colleagues in the Food Service Industry, both in Canada and in Britain where Peter was born. Through-out his life, Peter's outgoing and friendly personality allowed him to make many wonderful Friendships through-out the world. Peter will be forever loved and sadly missed by his family in England and the United States, by his extended family in Canada and by his countless Friends all over the world. A memorial service will be held at Saint Margaret-in-the-Pines, 4130 Lawrence Avenue East on Wednesday, March 5 at 2 p.m. The family will receive Friends at the Giffen-Mack Funeral Home, 4115 Lawrence Avenue East, West Hill (just west of Kingston Road) (416) 281-6800, on Monday from 7-9 p.m. and Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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BENTUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-02 published
DAVIS, Curtiss Gridley
Born August 31, 1916 in Rochester, New York died after a long and courageous battle, on July 31, 2003 at the Guelph General Hospital. He was a resident for the past year at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph. Predeceased by his first wife Grace TURNER. Lovingly remembered and missed by his wife Audrey LIVERNOIS. Dearly loved father of Natasha VAN BENTUM (Henri) and Bruce Gridley DAVIS (Janet WRIGHT,) of Vancouver. Stepfather of John LIVERNOIS of Guelph, and Laurie STATHER of Belleville; dear brother of Joyce LOVETT (Bob) of Kitchener and Jim DAVIS (Mary) of Maple grandfather of Rachel DAVIS, Celine and Jacob RICHMOND, Nicole STATHER, Michael STATHER (Tabitha), Ryan STATHER, and Ali and Becky LIVERNOIS; and great grandfather of four. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. During World War 2, he served with the Toronto Scottish Regiment in England and Europe. He will be remembered for his thirst for knowledge and as a gifted writer and reader. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, August 6, 2003, at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 20 Quebec Street, Guelph, with the Reverend Thomas KAY officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Knox Church, or to the charity of your choice. (Arrangements entrusted to Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (416) 822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com).

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BENTUM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
DAVIS, Curtiss Gridley
Born August 31, 1916 in Rochester, New York died after a long and courageous battle, on July 31, 2003 at the Guelph General Hospital. He was a resident for the past year at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph. Predeceased by his first wife Grace TURNER. Lovingly remembered and missed by his wife Audrey LIVERNOIS. Dearly loved father of Natasha VAN BENTUM (Henri) and Bruce Gridley DAVIS (Janet WRIGHT,) of Vancouver. Stepfather of John LIVERNOIS of Guelph, and Laurie STATHER of Belleville; dear brother of Joyce LOVETT (Bob) of Kitchener and Jim DAVIS (Mary) of Maple grandfather of Rachel Davis, Celine and Jacob RICHMOND, Nicole STATHER, Michael STATHER (Tabitha), Ryan STATHER, and Ali and Becky LIVERNOIS; and great grandfather of four. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. During World War 2, he served with the Toronto Scottish Regiment in England and Europe. He will be remembered for his thirst for knowledge and as a gifted writer and reader. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, August 6, 2003, at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 20 Quebec Street, Guelph, with the Reverend Thomas KAY officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Knox Church, or to the charity of your choice. (Arrangements entrusted to Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (416) 822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com).

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BENZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-16 published
MURPHY, C. Francis, Q.C.
Frank MURPHY died August 13, 2003 at St. Paul's Hospital from complications following pneumonia. He is survived by his loving wife, Jean, and his children, Caroline, Elizabeth, Adrienne (Peter HOLMGREN,) John (Leslie LEE,) Frances and Sarah, and his grandchildren, Anna HOLMGREN, Jacqueline MURPHY and Robert MURPHY. Frank and Robert were special companions. Frank is survived as well by his brothers Bud, Cal and Louis, his sister Josie BENZ, and many nephews and nieces. He was predeceased by his parents and his sisters, Mary COSTELLO and Pat MURPHY. Frank was devoted to his family and deeply committed to his community. Frank was born in 1929 in Calgary and lived most of his life in Vancouver. He loved Vancouver for its beauty and the opportunities it presented. He graduated from high school at Vancouver College in 1945, and graduated from the University of British Columbia with a Bachelor of Laws in 1950. He articled at and then practised with Campney, Owen, Murphy and Owen from 1951 to 1958. He then joined Farris, Stultz, Bull and Farris, which evolved into the firm Farris, Vaughan, Wills and Murphy. He was the managing partner there from 1978 until his retirement in 1992. He remained as associate counsel until his death. He was appointed Queen's Counsel in 1984. Frank practised primarily in areas of corporate and commercial law. He particularly enjoyed his involvement in the Greater Vancouver Regional District. He sat on many corporate boards, including British Columbia Gas Inc., Mitsui Company of Canada Ltd., Northwest Life Assurance Company, Pacific Petroleum Ltd., Westcoast Transmission, Kelly Douglas, Alberta Distillers, and Loomis (Mayne Nickless). Frank was on the board of many non-profit organizations, including the Vancouver Art Gallery, Canadian Red Cross Society, Convent of the Sacred Heart, Holy Family Hospital and St. Paul's Hospital. Frank was for many years on the board of the Catholic Children's Aid Society, serving as president from 1973 until 1980. It was an association of which he was particularly proud. Frank was active in the Canadian Bar Association and was president of the Commercial Law Section for two years. He was heavily involved in the International Bar Association and from 1972 to 1982 he was the Canadian representative to its Council. Frank's work with this organization gave Jean and him great opportunities to travel. Frank was a student of the world, interested and knowledgeable about history and world affairs. Each of his children has fond memories of trips, both at home and abroad, taken with their father. From 1995 to 2000, Frank served on the International Joint Commission, a binational Canada-United States organization. This experience gave him further opportunity to travel, including to many smaller communities in both the United States and Canada, which were experiences he enjoyed just as he did his trips to those destinations that are more traditionally favoured. In keeping with his great interest in his community, Frank was involved in politics and government affairs. He was of a liberal mind and was a member of the Liberal Party of Canada. He participated at all levels of the political process side by side with Jean and Friends, more frequently at the federal level and in particular in the riding of Vancouver-Quadra. Frank's greatest love was his family. He was a loyal and supportive son, brother, husband, father and grandfather. Frank's house at Point Roberts, certainly his favourite place on this earth, is a site of especially treasured memories. Frank was keenly involved with his children's activities. He inspired his children and others with his curiosity, his physical and intellectual energy and his commitment to principle. He lived life fully and fearlessly. He met his final illnesses and challenges in the same manner. He died within the rites of his church and with the love of his family. He is greatly missed. The MURPHY family is greatly appreciative of the care and support Frank and his family received from the staff at the I.C.U., in particular from his final nurse, David BOOTH. The Mass of Christian Burial for Frank will take place at 11: 00 a.m. on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 at Sts. Peter and Paul's Church, 1430 West 38th Avenue, with a reception to follow at noon at Shaughnessy Golf and Country Club, 4300 Southwest Marine Drive. The interment will follow the reception. Prayers will take place at Sts. Peter and Paul on Monday, August 18, 2003 at 7: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the St. Paul's Hospital Foundation at Ste 164, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver British Columbia, V6Z 1Y6, Charitable Registration No. 11925 7939 RR0001.

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