All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"BEL" 2003 Obituary


BELAFONTE  BELANGER  BELK  BELL  BELLAMY  BELLEHUMEUR  BELLEROSE 

BELAFONTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

  B... Names     BE... Names     BEL... Names     Welcome Home

BELAFONTE - All Categories in OGSPI

BELANGER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
R. J. Leland COULTIS
In loving memory of R. J. Leland COULTIS who passed away Saturday morning, May 3rd, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital-Memorial Site at the age of 66 years.
Beloved husband of Gladys (WALLI) COULTIS of Sudbury. Loving father of Richard and Philip both of Copper Cliff and Norma BELANGER of Sudbury. Cherished grandfather of Kaitlyn and Justin. Dear son of Phillip and Jessie COULTIS predeceased. Dear brother of Laureen BAILEY (husband Arden predeceased) of Sudbury, Loretta PYETTE (husband Eugene) of Tehkummah, Georgina MacKENZIE (husband Jim) of Little Current and George predeceased. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews.
At Leland's request there will be no visitation or service.
Cremation with interment of the cremains in the family plot at Waters Cemetery.
Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

  B... Names     BE... Names     BEL... Names     Welcome Home

BELANGER - All Categories in OGSPI

BELK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
PETERS, George
Formerly of London, Ontario, and longtime resident of Aylmer, Quebec, passed away on April 30th, 2003. His first wife, Patricia BELK, passed away in 1989. His second wife, Françoise (''Toto'') BACH- KOLLING, died in 2000. He is survived by his sister Dorothy McLAREN of London, Ontario, his stepdaughter Felicia HOUTMAN, by Gordene STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, and by his nieces and nephews. A gathering of Friends and family will take place at the Beauchamp Funeral Home, 47 Denise Friend Street, Aylmer, on Sunday, May 4th beginning at 2 o'clock. For more information, please call (819) 770-1300.

  B... Names     BE... Names     BEL... Names     Welcome Home

BELK - All Categories in OGSPI

BELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
James Athey BECKETT
At Chelsey Park Nursing Home, London on Sunday, January 19, 2003 James Athey Beckett of London, formerly of Kitchener and born in Sunrise Kentucky, in his 88th year. Beloved husband of Ruth (MILLSON) BECKETT. Dear father of Ruth Ann BASTERT and Nancy BELL of Sheguiandah, Manitoulin Island, Mary Lou BECKETT and Chuck EBERLEY of Ottawa, Sandy Lee BECKETT of London. Dear grandfather of Peggy, Shawn, Ian and Wendy, Matthew and Aaron. Also survived by nine great-grandchildren. Predeceased by brothers John and Bud and a sister Suzanna. Friends called at the C. Haskett and son Funeral Home, 223 Main Street, Lucan on Monday, January 20 where the funeral service was held on Tuesday, January 21 with Reverend Fred McKINNON officiating. Cremation with interment St. James Cemetery, Clandeboye. Condolences may be forwarded through www.haskettfh.com

  B... Names     BE... Names     BEL... Names     Welcome Home

BELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Floyd Douglas BELL
In loving memory of Floyd Douglas BELL who passed away Saturday evening, June 7, 2003 at the Extendicare York Nursing' Home Sudbury.
Beloved husband of 52 years, of Jessie (HONESS) BELL of Val Caron. Loving father of Donna (husband Ches WITTY,) Marian (husband Bruce ELOFSON), Jeff (wife Debbie), Joanne (husband Bob LAPP) and Lila (friend Glen BATEMAN.) Cherished grandfather of Derek, Trevor, Dylan, Evan, Leanne, Scott, Bradley and great grand_son Kaleb "Muscles." Dear son of Sarah and Peter BELL both predeceased. Dear brother of Daisy, Roger, Terry and predeceased by Ervin. Sadly missed by his faithful canine companion Trooper. Born in Burpee, he worked as a miner at the INCO Stobie and Frood Mines for 37 years. He enjoyed the outdoors, hunting, fishing and gardening. He had a wonderful attitude and sense of humor, he brought sunshine into our world. A special thank you to the staff and residence at Extendicare York for their care and compassion. A service of remembrance will be held at Mills Township Cemetery, Manitoulin Island, Thursday, June 12, 2003. (Time to be confirmed) Cremation at the Park Lawn Crematorium. Arrangement entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

  B... Names     BE... Names     BEL... Names     Welcome Home

BELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-16 published
Bluesman made his mark
Canadian harpist's brush with greatness was frustrated by his battle with the bottle
By Bruce Farley MOWAT Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, January 16, 2003, Page R9
He will be remembered for creating some of the high water marks in the history of popular music in Canada. Blues harpist Richard NEWELL, also known as King Biscuit Boy, has died. He was found dead at his house in Hamilton on January 5.
Richard NEWELL's story is the stuff of legend, but not legendary. The Oxford Canadian Dictionary defines legend as "a traditional story sometimes popularly regarded as historical, but unauthenticated."
Nearly all the career anecdotes surrounding King Biscuit Boy have been verified. Yes, he really was recruited for the Allman Brothers in 1969, for Janis JOPLIN's Full Tilt Boogie Band in 1970 and for a mid-seventies session with Aretha FRANKLIN. The stellar Houston blues guitarist, Albert COLLINS was recording a version of Mr. NEWELL's Mean Old Lady, before he died in 1994.
Mr. NEWELL, though, would rarely volunteer to offer up such information, unless you prodded him for it. He didn't think it was important.
He was born the son of Lily and Walter (Dick) NEWELL, an Royal Air Force airman stationed in Canada during the Second World War. Richard NEWELL developed an early interest in music, from the country of Hank WILLIAMS Sr. to the jump blues of Louis JORDAN, to the frenetic sounds of such original rock 'n' rollers as Little Richard. At age 12, he purchased his first harmonica after discovering the blues via late-night AM radio.
Mr. NEWELL spent seven years rehearsing his ever-expanding collection of blues 45s, which he purchased on regular hitchhiking forays to Buffalo. Few of his Friends at the time were even aware that he played harmonica and guitar.
In 1963, Ronnie COPPLE's sock-hop rock 'n' roll group, the Barons, recruited Mr. NEWELL as its lead singer. Mr. NEWELL had heard a recording of their instrumental original, Bottleneck, and came by with an record by the prototypical American electric blues slide guitarist, Elmore JAMES.
Within weeks of his joining, the group was transfigured into the flat-out, deep blues band, The Chessmen Featuring son Richard. The sound was guitar driven and harmonica-heavy, certainly not the type of thing you'd find at the average mid-sixties Southern Ontario teen dance. The band made it to Europe the following summer, playing successful shows at U.S. Army bases to predominantly black audiences.
Back in Canada, Mr. NEWELL would go on to become the lead singer of Richie Knight and The Mid Knights in 1966. He also made his debut professional recording at this time, as a session harmonica player on a recording by country singer, Dallas HARMS, best known for writing such hits as Paper Rosie for American country singer Gene WATSON.
When ex-Mid Knight and future Full Tilt Boogie band member Rick BELL was recruited for the Ronnie HAWKINS band in 1968, Mr. NEWELL's name came up. After one audition, he was hired on the spot and rechristened with the royal King Biscuit Boy moniker, a title he was never totally comfortable with.
Back in his native Arkansas, HAWKINS had rehearsed in the basement of the old KFFA radio station where blues harpist, Sonny Boy Williamson 2nd (Rice MILLER,) did his King Biscuit Flour Hour broadcasts. To HAWKINS, Mr. NEWELL must have sounded like a letter from home.
When JOPLIN scooped BELL and guitarist John TILL from HAWKINS's band early in 1970, Mr. NEWELL and drummer Larry ATAMANUIK were left with the task of re-assembling the band. That group would become the first King Biscuit Boy-led outfit, Crowbar. In a fit of pique, HAWKINS had inadvertently given the band its name in an exchange of parting shots at the Grange Tavern in Hamilton. "You guys are so dumb," he yelled, "you could fuck up the moving parts of a crowbar."
As the bandleader, singer, harmonica player and guitarist on Official Music, Mr. NEWELL was responsible for building a razor-sharp and singularly intense sound. The rehearsals for these sessions were apparently tension-laden affairs, but the payoff came when the album muscled its way on to the Canadian charts, (without the benefit of Canadian-content regulations), the fastest-selling domestic release to date.
Mr. NEWELL and the band would part ways after King Biscuit Boy and Crowbar had scored on the singles chart with the traditional piece, Corrina, Corrina. In 1971, Crowbar (without King Biscuit Boy) earned a place on the bestseller charts with a song that was to become a perennial Canuck rock anthem. Oh, What a Feeling was the first domestic single to take advantage of the newly legislated Canadian-content rules for broadcasting.
Fate intervened throughout the following years to rob Mr. NEWELL of his career momentum. The backing band he assembled to promote Good 'Uns, the 1971 followup to Official Music, was beginning to work on a third album, when the funding for it ran out.
With the momentum lost, that unit disintegrated, with guitarist Earl JOHNSON leaving to form the hard-rock outfit, Moxy.
In 1974, sessions produced by Allen TOUSSAINT, the architect of many a New Orleans Rhythm and Blues classic, would culminate in the Epic label release of a self-titled recording. Mr. NEWELL would tour the United States the following year with The Meters (featuring future members of the Neville Brothers) as his backup band. When the Epic label cleaned house later that year, though, he was one of the acts dropped.
In 1972, Mr. NEWELL wed Jacqueline WILLETTS but found that married life did not curb his increasingly frequent drinking binges. The couple divorced in 1979. Alcoholism was also the source of most of his professional woes for the better part of his life, as key shows were either cancelled, or worse, rendered into shambles. Musicians who worked with him tended to admire him, but found it incredibly frustrating that such an enormous talent was being squandered.
At several junctures in his career, Mr. NEWELL managed to quit drinking. Of the three albums he recorded and released in the eighties and nineties, two were the direct dividends of his abstinence. Those recordings earned him Juno nominations, in 1988 for Richard NEWELL aka King Biscuit Boy,and in 1996 for Urban Blues Re: NEWELL. The latter is still in print on Holger Peterson's Stony Plain label. Official Music, along with Good'Uns and Badly Bent, a best-of compilation, are available on the Unidisc label (http://www.unidisc.com). The rest of the King Biscuit Boy catalogue, including the 1980 Mouth of Steel album, is out of print.
In 2000, Mr. NEWELL's mother died and he left regular stage work, preferring the seclusion of his home in the central Mountain neighbourhood of Hamilton. His last recordings include a version of Blue Christmas, available on the Hamilton Hometown Christmas Compact Disk compilation assembled by saxophonist and long-time friend, Sonny DEL RIO. An original composition, Two Hound Blues, along with material recorded by DEL RIO and Mr. NEWELL in the late seventies (the Biscuit With Gravy sessions) is planned for release this year.
Mr. NEWELL, who leaves his father Dick, brother Walter (Randy,) and son Richard James Oddie, made his last public performance in a cameo appearance with The Little Red Blues Gang on September 12, 2002, at Mermaids Lounge in Hamilton. The 60 or so audience members present were treated to a version of his hit, Corrina, Corrina, which is strange, because he never particularly cared for that song.
Richard Alfred NEWELL, musician; born March 9, 1944, in Hamilton died in Hamilton, January 5, 2003.

  B... Names     BE... Names     BEL... Names     Welcome Home

BELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-09 published
Died This Day -- Charles SISE, 1918
Wednesday, April 9, 2003 - Page R5
Business executive born at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on Sept 27, 1834; in 1880, hired by Alexander Graham BELL to incorporate Bell Telephone Company of Canada; from 1890 to 1915, served as president of Bell Canada; built unified eastern service; founded Northern Electric, forerunner of Norther Telecom,

  B... Names     BE... Names     BEL... Names     Welcome Home

BELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-11 published
Reid BELL
By Harry ROSEN Friday, July 11, 2003 - Page A20
Art director, company founder, husband, father, handyman, gardener. Born March 22, 1931, in Newmarket, Ontario Died Feb 26, of cancer, aged 71.
Reid BELL was a very special person; our relationship started in 1961 when Reid was an art director at Young and Rubicam and, working with the creative director, came up with the "Ask Harry" ads for my Harry Rosen store. Today, 42 years later, that campaign still influences our advertising.
Reid studied at the Ontario College of Art and then worked with McCann Erickson, Maclaren, and Young and Rubicam agencies. When Doyle Dane Bernbach opened in Toronto, Reid was appointed their first creative director. To learn their way of doing things, he went to New York. After a year, he returned to the Doyle Dane Bernbach Toronto office. However, Reid really wanted his own agency where he could set his own standards, choose his own clients and work with them personally.
In the late 1960s, Reid opened his own agency, Reid Bell Associates Advertising. I was happy to give him space for an office in the tailor shop of our store on Richmond Street -- sometimes ads were created on the ironing board. A few years later, Reid moved into his own quarters up the road.
Our business relationship lasted more than 35 years. Reid contributed an enormous amount to the success of Harry Rosen, and to other companies such as the Toronto Dominion Centre, Sutton Place Hotel and its Stop 33 lounge, Daks Shoes, the Fairweather and Calderone stores, Cambridge Clothes, Cadillac Apartments, and Millmar Magnesium Buckets.
I was a novice when it came to marketing but Reid and his associates were excellent teachers. The qualities that were evident in Reid were that he was extremely ethical and would not compromise his standards. He worked tirelessly to make certain every ad worked hard at entertaining the reader as well as selling the product.
He was trusting, loyal and always there when needed. For example, we had a fire at the store and as I surveyed the mess, the first person I thought to call was Reid. After listening to me, he immediately went to work on an ad to replace the current one and kept the momentum going through the whole clean-up period. In fact, we never claimed business interruption insurance because we never closed the doors - we actually made money.
At his memorial service a long-time associate said: "Reid was an important person in the ad business and the only reason his name was not famous is that he wouldn't play the big-agency, big-egos, award-grabbing game. But he was among the select few of real greats."
Another associate put it this way: "Stubborn. Collector of old toys. Lover of good food. Hater of Awards. Adviser. Loather of stuffed shirts. Serious commuter. Incomparable ethics. Fan of old movies. Driven. Painstaking horticulturalist. Very poor sufferer of fools. Mentor. Proud father. Loving, loyal husband."
When he retired in 1999, we kept in close touch. So did other clients who valued his input so much they insisted on having lunch with him every month.
More than being a remarkable advertising and business counsellor, Reid was a Mr. Fixit perfectionist at home, a keen gardener and loving husband for Barbara, caring father for Sandra, Jennifer and Jeffrey and a most valued friend to me and countless others.
He was born in Newmarket and lived there all his life. He never wanted to move and disliked travelling -- apart from 50 years of commuting to Toronto.
Through his recent illness (fighting a remorseless cancer for more than a year), he demonstrated an indomitable spirit that was the essence of Reid.
Harry ROSEN is a close friend of Reid BELL.

  B... Names     BE... Names     BEL... Names     Welcome Home

BELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
FOSTER, Douglas Mortimer
Died peacefully at the South Muskoka Memorial Hospital in Bracebridge, on Saturday, November 22nd, 2003 at the age of 88. Beloved husband of Mary Jean (née LYALL.) Predeceased by his first wife Marnie (née KERR.) Lovingly remembered by his children Lynn ARMSTRONG (Brock,) Wendy SHELLEY (Steven,) Doug FOSTER (Nancy,) Lesley FOSTER (Leslie HENDY), his stepchildren Susan BELL, Sharon JONES, Donald BELL and Lyall BELL. Loving grandfather of Craig, Carolyn, Stuart, Adam, Katelynn, Samantha, Marcella, Natalie, Alexandra, Sachi and Hunter. A private memorial service was held at the Reynolds Funeral Home ''Turner Chapel'' in Bracebridge 877-806-2257. Donations in memory of Doug to the South Muskoka Hospital Foundation would be gratefully appreciated by the family.

  B... Names     BE... Names     BEL... Names     Welcome Home

BELL - All Categories in OGSPI

BELLAMY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-03 published
BELLAMY, Aline Marie Blanche (née BUCKLEY)
After a very brief illness, died on March 29, 2003, in Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec. Born May 27, 1927 in Trois-Rivières. After her marriage in 1947, Aline and her former husband, Arthur BELLAMY, settled in Rouyn-Noranda where they raised their two children, The Honourable Madam Justice Denise BELLAMY (Ian CUMMINGS) now resident in Toronto, Ontario, and Raymond BELLAMY (Suzan) now living in Cumberland, Ontario. She is survived by her granddaughter, Jennifer BELLAMY and by her sisters, Jeannine McDONNELL (Bill) of Revelstoke, British Columbia, and Brigitte BUCKLEY of Trois-Rivières. Her sister, Claire, predeceased her in 1998. She is also survived by her brother-in-law, Léo-Paul PELLERIN, her nephews, Paul, Pierre (Nicole) and Jean PELLERIN (Trois-Rivières and Cap-de-la-Madeleine) and by her niece, Linda NOËL (Trois-Rivières.) As was her wish, no service will be held and flowers are gratefully declined. Alternatively, a donation to The Osteoporosis Society of Canada (1-800-463-6842) 33 Laird Drive, Toronto, Ontario M4G 3S9 would have been greatly appreciated by Aline and is welcomed by her family.

  B... Names     BE... Names     BEL... Names     Welcome Home

BELLAMY - All Categories in OGSPI

BELLEHUMEUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
Crash kills promising teen
By Jonathan FOWLIE, Thursday, December 18, 2003 - Page A18
An 18-year-old man was killed and another seriously injured when their white Toyota Celica slammed into a hydro pole yesterday afternoon on Kingston Road near Danforth Avenue.
Allen BELLEHUMEUR died immediately, and was identified by his distraught parents who arrived at the scene shortly after the crash.
His close friend, Chris THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, was in the passenger seat and was rushed to intensive care at St. Michael's Hospital. He was in critical condition last night after suffering internal head injuries.
Mr. BELLEHUMEUR graduated from nearby Birchmount Park Collegiate last year, where Mr. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON was still attending classes.
Darryl MOREY, a physical-education teacher at the school, described Mr. BELLEHUMEUR as a driven student who was always pushing to improve himself. "I know academically he did very well. He fought for everything he could get. He hated getting a 70 [per cent]."
Mr. MOREY, who has been teaching for 16 years, said Mr. BELLEHUMEUR also loved hockey and was a "huge Leaf fan" who often wore the team's jersey.
Mr. BELLEHUMEUR was engaged to his long-time girl friend, the daughter of a teacher at Birchmount Park and a student at the school, Mr. MOREY said. The young man's parents run a variety store on Danforth Avenue, Mr. MOREY said, where the teenager used to work.
The school held an emergency staff meeting yesterday at which a crisis counsellor delivered the news of the crash, the teacher said. Students will be given the news today.
Police said yesterday afternoon that Mr. BELLEHUMEUR had been "changing lanes erratically" when his car jumped a small median on the ramp where Danforth Avenue feeds onto Kingston Road.
After the car cleared the median, it swerved across two lanes before knocking over a hydro pole, Sergeant Rob GREGORY of traffic services said last night.
Skid marks showed the path the car took over the median and directly into the hydro post, which broke in many places as a result of the collision. After hitting the post, the car bounced back onto the road and came to rest on its roof.
No one else was hurt and no other cars were involved in the collision. Sgt. GREGORY said that the teens had definitely not been drinking but that "speed certainly will be a factor we will be looking at."

  B... Names     BE... Names     BEL... Names     Welcome Home

BELLEHUMEUR - All Categories in OGSPI

BELLEROSE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Marilyn Joanne (Mandy) BELLEROSE
In loving memory Marilyn Joanne (Mandy) BELLEROSE, September 30, 1941 to December 15, 2003.
Mandy BELLEROSE, a resident of Providence Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Monday, December 15, 2003 at the age of 62 years.
She was born in Carnarvon Township, daughter of the late Albert and Anne (McFARLANE) DAVIS. Mandy had worked with the developmentally handicapped for over 15 years. She enjoyed bingo, going to the casinos, crosswords and knitting. Her greatest love and the most pleasure she had in her life was her family. Although she will be sadly missed, many fond memories will be cherished by her entire family and Friends.
Dearly loved wife of Donald BELLEROSE, loving and loved mother of Kelly SMITH and his wife Marie of Hensall, Debbie WHITE/WHYTE and her husband David of Brampton and Ray SMITH of Providence Bay and step-children Dawn of Sault Ste. Marie, Michael and his wife Terry of Sudbury and Darrin and partner Shawna of Sault Ste Marie. Proud grandmother of Kasaundra, Tiffany, Kristi, Melissa and Bryan. Dear sister of John DAVIS, and his wife Cindy of Spring Bay. Fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews, and many cousins and Friends. Predeceased by infant daughter Mary Ann HEBERT and brother Joseph Morlyn DAVIS.
Friends may call at the Lady of Canada Catholic Church, Mindemoya after 7 p.m. on Wednesday, December 17, 2003. The funeral service will be conducted at the church on Thursday, December 18, at 3: 00 p.m. with Father Robert Foliot officiating. Interment in Providence Bay Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home.

  B... Names     BE... Names     BEL... Names     Welcome Home

BELLEROSE - All Categories in OGSPI