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"BAT" 2003 Obituary


BATE  BATEMAN  BATES  BATMAN  BATTEN  BATTIGELLI  BATTY 

BATE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-04 published
YOUNG, Don
Beloved husband of Jennifer, died on Wednesday, October 1, after a brief illness. Don had been in poor health for some time. Don was born on October 24, 1914 in Saint Thomas, Ontario. He spent two years of his early childhood in the wilds of Montana, avoiding rattlesnakes, and listening to coyotes howl. During his early adult life he had a short career playing the guitar for The Royal Canucks, a dance band in London, Ontario. He received his post secondary education at the Universities of Western Ontario, and Toronto. After serving in the Royal Canadian Air Force in World War 2, Don began his teaching career, working in Dutton, Haldim and County, Forest Hill, and in the Ministry of Education, where he held several senior positions. Throughout his life Don was especially interested in natural science, birding in particular, and enthusiastically shared these interests with Friends and associates. He was a member of several science clubs, including the Brodie Club. Don loved the challenge of learning both practical and intellectual subjects, and became skillful at photography, fly fishing, furniture making as well as achieving considerable fluency in French, German and Spanish. His love of adventure took him to five continents where, among other things, he rode on the back of both an elephant, and an ostrich. He and Jennifer traveled widely pursuing their interest in the visual arts. Don leaves behind his wife Jennifer, brother-in-law David LENNOX and wife Virginia, and their sons, Chris and his wife Leola, and Andrew ROACH of Barrie, his sister-in law Tina LENNOX, her two sons, Jason and Joshua and their families, and his cousin Edna BATE and her family of Brantford. During his long and happy life Don won many cherished Friends, who will miss his loyalty, and wisdom. During his declining health, Don exhibited grace and fortitude, always the gentleman. His last three years were made easier due to the fine care he received at Carefree Lodge, for which Debbie ARAUJO and her fine staff deserve special praise. The family will receive Friends at the Kane Funeral Home at 6150 Yonge Street, Toronto, on Sunday, October 5, from 2-4, followed by a reception. According to Don¹s wishes, there will be no funeral. If desired, donations may be made in Don¹s memory to Birdstudies Canada, P.O. Box 150, Port Rowan, Ontario, N0E 1M0, or a charity of your choice.

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BATEMAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Floyd Douglas BELL
In loving memory of Floyd Douglas BELL who passed away Saturday evening, June 7, 2003 at the Extendicare York Nursing' Home Sudbury.
Beloved husband of 52 years, of Jessie (HONESS) BELL of Val Caron. Loving father of Donna (husband Ches WITTY,) Marian (husband Bruce ELOFSON), Jeff (wife Debbie), Joanne (husband Bob LAPP) and Lila (friend Glen BATEMAN.) Cherished grandfather of Derek, Trevor, Dylan, Evan, Leanne, Scott, Bradley and great grand_son Kaleb "Muscles." Dear son of Sarah and Peter BELL both predeceased. Dear brother of Daisy, Roger, Terry and predeceased by Ervin. Sadly missed by his faithful canine companion Trooper. Born in Burpee, he worked as a miner at the INCO Stobie and Frood Mines for 37 years. He enjoyed the outdoors, hunting, fishing and gardening. He had a wonderful attitude and sense of humor, he brought sunshine into our world. A special thank you to the staff and residence at Extendicare York for their care and compassion. A service of remembrance will be held at Mills Township Cemetery, Manitoulin Island, Thursday, June 12, 2003. (Time to be confirmed) Cremation at the Park Lawn Crematorium. Arrangement entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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BATEMAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
John BATEMAN McQUAY
In loving memory of John BATEMAN McQUAY, October 11, 1921 to December 12, 2003.
John Bateman McQUAY, a resident of Mindemoya, died peacefully on Friday, December 12, 2003, in Mindemoya Hospital, at the age of 82 years.
He was born in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba, son of the late Doctor Russell and Gladys (SAUNDERS) McQUAY. The family moved to Mindemoya in 1934, where Russell set up a medical practice. Following his father's footsteps, John graduated as a medical doctor from the Faculty of Medicine at Queen's University in 1944. He married Mary TURNBULL in the same year, and interned in Kingston. In 1947 they moved to Mindemoya, where he joined his father's medical practice. He quickly became known and loved as "Doctor Jack". After his father became disabled in 1949, Doctor Jack served as the only doctor in the area until 1970, when other doctors began to arrive. He continued faithfully serving the community in full-time practice until 1991, easing into retirement over the next decade. Doctor Jack loved his vocation as family practitioner, and was dedicated to his patients. He worked long hours, making hospital rounds in the morning, seeing patients in the afternoon and sometimes in the evening, and calmly handling emergencies at any hour of the day or night. For many years he held a weekly clinic in West Bay. He often visited patients in their homes, and in the days before ambulance service, even brought patients to the hospital himself. He was a skilled physician who performed many kinds of surgery, but his greatest enjoyment was delivering babies, and he estimated he delivered over 2000 babies in his career. He also served as coroner for Manitoulin and the North Shore for 20 years. In 1991 the College of Family Physicians of Canada presented him with a Special Recognition Award for his outstanding service.
Doctor Jack will also be remembered for his dedication to his community. As Chair of the Board of Central Manitoulin High School, he worked to establish the Manitoulin Secondary School, serving all of the Island. As founding member of the Manitoulin Centennial Board, he helped set up the Manor in Little Current. He served as President of the Mindemoya Area Chamber of Commerce in the 1960s. He was a founding member of the Central Manitoulin Lions Club, and later received the Lions' Melvin Jones Fellow award for dedicated humanitarian services. He was a modest person, but he greatly appreciated this recognition. He was also a founding member of the Mindemoya Curling Club. In 1994, the Carnarvon Township named him as Citizen of the Year, and in September 2003, in ill health, he was particularly pleased when Central Manitoulin Township presented him with its Senior of the Year award. He and his wife Mary were members of St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church. For relaxation, Jack and Mary very much enjoyed curling, playing bridge, and golfing. He loved playing the piano, and his other hobbies included photography, stamp collecting, gardening, swimming and sailing on Lake Mindemoya, and rug hooking. Doctor Jack was devoted to his family, who will remember his encouragement and loving support. Dearly loved and loving husband of Mary McQUAY (predeceased.) Loved father of Marilyn (husband Martin CHILTON) of Kingston, Paul (wife Marion CARROLL) of Fort McMurray, Alta, Janice McQUAY of Mindemoya and Betty McQUAY of Toronto. Also survived by Athena McQUAY of Edmonton. Proud grandfather of Peter McQUAY, Jane HOEKSTRA (husband Terry), Stephen McQUAY and Jim CHILTON and great grandchildren Ethan, Sydney and Liam. Dear brother of Mary Alice THACKER of Ottawa, Ann GAGE (husband James) of Hartford, Conn., Thomas McQUAY, wife Barbara of Mindemoya. Predeceased by sister Margaret KYDD and her husband Gordon, and brother-in-law Doug THACKER. Also survived by many nieces and nephews.
Friends called the St. Francis of Assisi Church, Mindemoya on Tuesday, December 16. The funeral service will be conducted at the church on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 at 2 p.m. with Reverend Canon Bain Peever officiating. Culgin Funeral Home

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BATES o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
BATES
-In loving memory of a dear husband, father, grandfather and great grandfather, Chester John who passed away September 13, 1995.
I sat beside your bedside
My heart was crushed and sore.
I ached to try to help you
Until I could do no more.
In tears I watched you sinking and fading away,
Though my heart was breaking, I knew
you could not stay
So many times we have needed you
So many times we've cried
If love alone could have saved you,
You never would have died.
Sweet memories will remain always.
The Bates family.

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BATMAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-05 published
Frances Marie BATMAN
Frances and Ralph owned and operated BATMAN's Tent and Trailer Park in Sheguiandah for years. Peacefully at Manitoulin Lodge in Gore Bay on Thursday, January 30, 2003 age 72 years. Cherished wife of Ralph BATMAN. Loving mother of Dennis of Sudbury, Paul and wife Jackie of Sheguiandah, William and wife Cheryl of Sault Sainte Marie. Special grandmother of Rebekkah, Matthew, Phillip, Kyle (April) and Cory (Stacey) and great grand_son Andrew. Will be remembered by brother Doug FERGUSON and sisters Patricia and husband Harold CLARKE, Ruth DUNLOP, and Wilhelmine BATMAN.
Visitation was 2-4 and 7-9 pm, Friday at Island Funeral Home. Funeral Service 2: 00 pm Saturday, February 1, 2003 at Little Current United Church. Burial Elm View Cemetery in the spring.

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BATMAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-30 published
George Lawrence Henry SKIPPEN
In loving memory of George Lawrence Henry SKIPPEN who passed away peacefully at his home on Monday, April 21, 2003 at the age of 77 years.
Born October 19, 1925. Predeceased by his beloved wife Eva (nee BATMAN.) Loving father of Brad and Julie of Spring Bay and Brent of Lions Head. Will be missed by grandchildren Amy Skippen, Jason, Tyler and Zachary McDERMID. Predeceased by his only brother Norm SKIPPEN. Dear brother-in-law of Gertrude and Rodney AELICK of Little Current and Greg BATMAN of Sheguiandah. Uncle of many nieces and nephews.
Visitation was held on Wednesday, April 23, 2003. The funeral service was held on Thursday, April 24, 2003, both at Island Funeral Home. Burial in Elmview Cemetery.

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BATMAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-22 published
BATMAN
-In memory of a dear sister, Francis, who passed away January 30, 2003.
Each time I see your picture
You seem to smile and say
Don't cry I'm only sleeping
We'll all meet again someday.
When I am sad and lonely
And when everything goes wrong
I hear you softly whisper
Cheer up and carry on.
But if I would have one wish today
And know it would come true
I would telephone to Heaven
And ask to speak to you.
Especially at Christmas.
-Lovingly remembered and always missed, your sisters Ruth, Pat, Wilhelmine and brother Doug.

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BATTEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-20 published
John Edward Burns (Ted) HOWELL
By Frank GARDINER Thursday, November 20, 2003 - Page A26
Father, husband, Sunday School teacher, fisherman, sports enthusiast, Crown Attorney. Born June 26, 1934, in Goderich, Ontario Died August 11, in Omemee, Ontario, of cancer, age 69.
Ted HOWELL, through all of his life, was a little man with a big heart and a giant intellect.
During his early years growing up in Goderich, Ted displayed an early love of academic excellence mixed with a fun sense of competitiveness in all endeavours from table tennis and hockey, to debating contests sponsored by the local Lion's Club.
As part of his 1950 high-school election campaign for treasurer, Ted and his loyal cohorts dressed up as members of the Mafia. Ted in his zoot suit, trench coat and oversized fedora imitated a smaller version of Chicago gangster Al Capone with a campaign slogan: "Vote for me. I need the money." Ted won.
Ted loved a physical challenge. Few could beat him at his favourite sport of table tennis. Many fell prey to his quick eye and cunning strategies and years later Ted won several table tennis championships with the Scarborough Kings Table Tennis Club.
Another field of Ted's early expertise was lawn croquet. On the large lawn of their home, the HOWELL family had a grand lawn croquet court. Ted, as usual, took this game very seriously and had little patience with anyone who did not do the same. Ted was an expert at the double-ball knock out.
These traits also made him a memorable boys' Sunday School teacher at North Street United Church where he creatively handled -- some might say "civilized" -- some lads bigger than himself, all tough, key members of the "Church Street gang." With his leadership, he earned their life-long respect.
Ted graduated at the top of his high-school class and went off to University of Toronto and then on to Osgoode Law School where he earned an award for outstanding contribution to school life.
He was called to the bar in 1960.
Jack BATTEN's book titled Lawyers quotes Ted: 'But from the time I started reading Erle Stanley Gardner as a kid, around grade seven, I wanted to be a courtroom lawyer.' HOWELL won a public speaking award in high school, and an essay he wrote about Canada's role in the United Nations took him on an all-expenses-paid weekend to Ottawa, where he proudly shook hands with Prime Minister Louis SSAINTURENT. HOWELL was a diligent student and he was headed for law.
"Ted HOWELL is, in almost every respect, a perfect servant of the Crown. He is an admirably correct man. There is no stuffiness in his make-up but he sends out the message that he values propriety and turns off at bad manners. He conducts himself according to such old verities."
Visiting a summer camp, Ted met the woman who was to become his wife and soul-mate for 40 special years. Ted and Theresa (TIFF) were married in 1963. This was Ted's greatest project and he is the proud father of Thomas (and his wife Andrea METRICK) and Michael. Ted was the grandfather of Ashley HOWELL.
Ted HOWELL's many legal accomplishments and Friendships over 40 years embraced eminent legal associates and Friends as well as Goderich pals. He was a proud Goderich character. He was a long-time resident of Scarborough, Ontario, as well as his family's cottage and country home in Omemee, Ontario
Ted is missed and remembered.
Frank GARDINER is a one-time Sunday school pupil of Ted HOWELL.

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BATTIGELLI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-25 published
'Death has never fazed me'
Joyful teenager taught children and parents how to live with cancer
By Michael VALPY Saturday, January 25, 2003, Page F11
Cory MAESTRELLO didn't just have cancer, he was a philosopher of cancer. This week he left life celebrated, something he would have considered appropriate for every young person inflicted with his disease.
He was a month short of his 18th birthday. He believed cancer was a gift that had enriched his life.
He died remembered for his infectious enthusiasm, his joy, his grin, his insights into living with a terminal illness, the love he showed to other sufferers, his toughness and his inclination to do impromptu Riverdance imitations in hospital elevators.
On Tuesday afternoon, lying in a hospital bed in Sudbury, Ontario, with pneumonia, he told his father Art: "I'm going to beat this." He was dead a few hours later.
His Sudbury high school, St. Benedict Catholic Secondary School, cancelled exams, declared a "Cory Day" and allowed its students to go home.
The lead singer of a student band in which he had once played composed a song for him. Students from high schools across the city turned up to sign a Cory poster in St. Benedict's chapel.
CJOH-Television, the Canadian Television Network outlet in Ottawa, broadcast a 3½-minute tribute to him on its 6 o'clock news, part of a documentary-in-the-making of his life that now will never be completed. The station's vice-president of news and public affairs, Max KEEPING, was to attend Cory's funeral mass today.
Many members of the Ottawa Senators hockey team planned to attend a memorial service for him at Ottawa's Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario.
Parents of other children with cancer being treated at the hospital were devastated by the news that he had died, said palliative care nurse Marilyn CASSIDY. " There have been so many families calling."
Cory had befriended and counselled them. He had taught them, parents and children, how to live with cancer and the process of dying.
Interviewed last November for a Globe and Mail Focus article on how to live life at the edge of death, he said: "Death has never fazed me. The only thing that's fazed me is not getting the chance to live this life . . . and I've lived more in two years [with cancer] than most people will live in their entire life, and I appreciate that."
Cory MAESTRELLO, the son of a retired mine worker, revelled in living for his last two years.
"I feel there's a path out there for me," he said. "Be it by God or whatever the higher power is, I always feel there's a path set out for me."
He visited with dying children in the hospital, even after doctors told him that he himself was beyond treatment. He spoke at dead children's memorial services.
He approached Mr. KEEPING last year and asked if he could appear on CJOH's annual fundraising telethon for the hospital. Mr. KEEPING agreed.
Cory was on air for an hour, talking about what it was like to have cancer and showing photographs of Serge, his closest friend at the hospital, who had died. Mr. KEEPING called his presence "compelling."
Cory said excitedly afterward: "Working on the telethon was a blast. The words that I said helped people. It's given me the tools to help people. I don't care if I die tomorrow."
He talked to his Globe and Mail interviewer about the joy he felt with life. "Your very best day is probably my worst day," he said.
He talked about the importance of each day. "I always let everyone know I love them," he said, "just in case I don't get the chance to. I've got to say everything that I need to say today. I may not be here tomorrow to say it."
Said Ms. CASSIDY: " You sometimes found yourself asking if he was too good to be true. He was the real thing, big-time. He was a very special kid" -- a hero to other youngsters with cancer, she said, who faced his own adversity with inner strength and inner ability.
Cory and Max KEEPING became Friends after the CJOH telethon. The station executive took him to Senators' games and introduced him to the players. People introduced to Cory rarely, if ever, forgot him.
He had a delightful, buzzy energy, with an intelligence that measured off the Richter scale, said Nic BATTIGELLI, one of Cory's St. Benedict teachers who gave a eulogy for him at his funeral.
He was charming, and attractive to girls -- frequently girls older than himself. Mr. BATTIGELLI recalled him taking a beautiful Grade 13 student to an event while he was still in Grade 9.
Mr. KEEPING recalled taking Cory to a party for his 30th anniversary as a television broadcaster just before Christmas (Cory was living at the children's hospital's Ronald McDonald House; he went home to Sudbury at Christmas and never returned).
At 2 a.m., Mr. KEEPING suggested to Cory that it was maybe time to to leave. Cory replied that there were still two people at the party, and as long as someone was partying, he wanted to party.
Mr. KEEPING said: "I feel so good that even in six months this kid could teach me how important today is . . . that what's important is what you do with today. He turned on a light and, I know I shouldn't say this, but the light's gone out. It's sad for me. But how enriched I've been -- and I said that on air."
Mr. BATTIGELLI and Cory had developed a bond even before the boy was diagnosed with cancer. Cory wanted to become a teacher, and told Mr. BATTIGELLI shortly after he met him: "You're the teacher I want to be."
Mr. BATTIGELLI said Cory, as a 14-year-old Grade 9 student, asked to join an anti-violence peer-meditation program the teacher ran at the school, and later asked to accompany Mr. BATTIGELLI on a similar conflict resolution project he had started in a nearby first nations community. He said Cory was superb at it.
"He just was a kid who was not a kid," Mr. BATTIGELLI said. "I think God has truly picked up an angel. God sends us signposts. I think he will be my guardian angel for the rest of my teaching career."
St. Benedict principal Teresa STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, when she cancelled exams this week, said: "This is a time for Cory."

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BATTY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-06 published
From fashion to furniture
Photographer gave up the fast life in Manhattan to open a shop in the Ontario countryside
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, September 6, 2003 - Page F11
Malcolm BATTY was a top fashion photographer, taking pictures of the likes of Christie Brinkley and Andie MacDowell for big Manhattan department stores such as Saks Fifth Avenue. But for the past 15 years, he ran an art and furniture shop in the hamlet of Mono Centre, living in a farmhouse in the countryside nearby.
At the peak of his photography career in the early 1980s, Mr. BATTY, who has died at the age of 57, moved in a rarefied world of high fashion and show business in New York City. Not bad for a kid who had started his working life as a waiter in a coffee shop in Toronto's Yorkville district in the early 1960s.
A man as handsome as his models were beautiful, he was always cool, in an understated way. Even when he was in the furniture business, he had a low-key style, bringing his finished pieces into town in an old red Toyota Land Cruiser.
Mr. BATTY dropped out of photography, and the fast life in New York City, in part because he came to find the world of fashion so shallow. He moved back to Canada with his new wife, Jane FELLOWES, and started making furniture. The first pieces they sold were birdhouses made from things such as orange crates.
They sold their high-end birdhouses at the Pack Rat, which at the time was the only furniture shop along the strip of Yonge Street in Rosedale, an area now jammed with fashionable stores.
"We decided our birdhouses were not going to be the common hardware-store style," Mr. BATTY told an interviewer in 1994. "They would have themes: Muskoka lodges, Santa Fe roadhouses, Indian dhows, grain elevators. Very odd stuff. We took them down to Pack Rat and, lo and behold, they started to sell for $220 to $250 a piece."
Malcolm David BATTY was born of British parents in India, on November 29, 1945. His birthplace was Nasik, just outside Bombay near where his mother was a military nurse. His father was a riding instructor for the British army who left the family soon after Malcolm's birth.
When the British left India in 1947, Malcolm and his mother returned to England. He was brought up in Wales with his mother and grandparents. He went to an experimental school, but was never a brilliant student. He did learn one skill that came in handy in later life: building dry stone walls. His grandfather taught him how and he built a series of stone walls on his farm in Mono Township, using rocks from the foundation of an old barn.
Mr. BATTY decided to come to Canada when he was about 16. He had relatives in Brockville, Ontario, but soon made his way to Toronto. While working in the Peddler coffee shop, he started to paint. He had a studio above a sail-making shop on Front Street and just about made a living selling his paintings. He was talented enough, but he needed formal training. He received a grant to study in Paris.
While there, a friend gave him a 35-mm camera and he stopped painting, for a while anyway, and started taking pictures. He came back to Toronto, was successful and then moved to New York City. The full page ads in The New York Times were his specialty superstar models and spreads for the big Manhattan stores.
"It was the painting that made him a great photographer," said Alan VENABLES, a friend and the owner of the Pack Rat. "He was a photographer with a painter's eye. Not too many of those."
Like someone trying to quit smoking, Mr. BATTY tried to kick the Manhattan habit more than once. His favourite escape was in a camper van, travelling across the United States and ending up in Mexico, usually the Baja Peninsula.
When he came back to Canada in the mid-1980s, it was with Jane FELLOWES, a Canadian. They spent some time in Cyprus, where Mr. BATTY's mother had retired. While there, they kept busy training horses. Because his father had been a riding instructor, Mr. BATTY wanted to see if he had the same talents. It turned out that he had a natural touch with horses.
After their furniture business took off, Mr. BATTY and Ms. FELLOWES wanted to find a shop where they could work and sell some of the things they made. They found it in Mono Centre, almost an hour north of the Toronto international airport. They opened a shop called Tequila Cove, across the driveway from a restaurant and pub, the Mono Cliffs Inn.
By this time, they made more than birdhouses and had expanded to tables with hammered tin tops, stripped cedar furniture and seagulls carved from old white fencing. What they didn't sell in the shop was put in the back of the Land Cruiser and went to Toronto.
Mr. BATTY took up photography again, working for a quarterly magazine called In The Hills. A few years ago, he landed a big assignment as the still photographer for a film Called Spirit of Havana, a National Film Board Production. It was one of many trips to Cuba and he always took his cameras.
This started a collection of photography that is to be published this fall. The book is called Cuba, Grace Under Pressure, with the text by Toronto writer Rosemary SULLIVAN. There are 102 pictures, with the theme being Cuban culture, the aging musicians, poets and dancers of the revolutionary era. It talks about how ordinary Cubans survive day to day.
Mr. BATTY had also started to paint again in the past few years. And he loved music, in particular the blues. He owned a vintage electric guitar, a 1967 Fender Telecaster. He leaves his wife, Ms. FELLOWES, and his mother.

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