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"BAL" 2003 Obituary


BAL  BALACHANDRA  BALAN  BALDWIN  BALL  BALLARD 

BAL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
BAL, Mary Evelyn (née ROBERTSON)
Wife of the late Kenan Y. BAL. Died June 17, 2003 in her 96th year at her residence in New York. Born in Stratford, Ontario to Robert Spelman ROBERTSON and Laura Gertrude (SEGSWORTH) ROBERTSON, Mary attended Havergal College on Jarvis Street in Toronto. After graduating from the University of Toronto she obtained her PhD in Food Chemistry from Columbia University in New York in 1942. She will be remembered with affection by her nieces and nephews. Interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto, Tuesday, June 24th at 3 p.m.

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BALACHANDRA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-20 published
GLADDY, Dr. Percy Vaughan, B.Sc., M.D., (F.R.C.SC)
On September 16, 2003, in his home on the shores of Lake Huron with his family, Percy died, at the age of 76, after a life filled with integrity, hard work, dedication and achievement. He leaves his dear wife, Alexia, and beloved children, Geoffrey, Sarah (Jonathan), Jennifer and Rebecca, and cherished grand_sons Alexander and Daniel. He was predeceased by his parents, Arthur and Nellie, and brother, Leo. Born and raised in Sarnia, Ontario, Percy was a graduate of Queen's University (Meds '50), with postgraduate training in Canada and the U.S. in Obstetrics and Gynecology. A lifelong student of medicine, Percy practiced medicine for over 45 years in Sarnia where he served his community and positively touched the lives of many mothers and their families. He was instrumental in setting up the first Emergency Physicians' Service at St. Joseph's Hospital which provided 24-hour emergency care for the residents of Sarnia-Lambton. He also set up the first mother-baby wellness clinic in Walpole Island to provide pre- and post-natal care. For service to the First Nation community, he was given the honorary name Mshkikiiwnini (Indian Doctor). A skilled physician, he will be remembered for his strong moral code, humour, warmth, availability and concern for others. In his career and personal life, Percy was guided by his Christian faith, especially during the last difficult days of his illness and he remained true to himself determined, strong and willing to do the work to survive. He had great love for his family and was the proud father of four Queen's graduates. His example and principles will remain to inspire his children and all who knew him. He received excellent medical care and his family wishes to express their appreciation to Dr. D. PAYNE, Dr. F. SHEPHERD, Dr. G. DARLING, Dr. D. BROWN and Jennifer HORNBY, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, and Dr. V. BALACHANDRA and Dr. R. GARRETT, Sarnia. Percy's family is grateful for the support and care extended to them by their many relatives, Friends, and especially Helen PARADIS. Cremation has taken place with arrangements entrusted to McKenzie and Blundy Funeral Home and Cremation Centre (519-344-3131). A memorial service to celebrate Percy's life will be held at 11: 00 a.m. on Saturday, September 27, 2003, at Grace United Church, 990 Cathcart Blvd., Sarnia. In lieu of flowers, Percy's family kindly requests that expressions of sympathy be directed to the Lambton Education Foundation (Dr. P.V. Gladdy Scholarship), 200 Wellington Street, P.O. Box 2019, Sarnia, Ontario N7T 7L2 or to the Lambton Hospitals Foundation (Building Fund
Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology), 89 Norman Street, Sarnia, Ontario N7T 6S3. Messages of condolence and memories may be left at www.mckenzieblundy.com
A tree will be planted in memory of Percy GLADDY in the McKenzie & Blundy Memorial Forest. Dedication service Sunday, September 19th, 2004 at 2: 00 p.m. at the Wawanosh Wetlands Conservation Area.

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BALAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-21 published
MOSS, Earle Roderick
Internationally acclaimed pianist and teacher, bon vivant, gourmet cook, world traveler died at Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound on Wednesday, March 19, 2003 after a long, painful but dignified struggle with age-related disabilities. He was 82 years of age. Dearly beloved brother of Eric (Bonnie) of Perth, Ontario and Sylvia (Frances) of Owen Sound, Ontario. Predeceased by brother Cyril Lloyd, mother Marian Agnes KENNARD, father Cyril Albert and step-mother Frances Astley McDOUGAL. Sadly missed by niece Catherine MOSS and great-niece Jesse MOSS- BALAN, nieces Joy (Raul) POBRE-MOSS, Ruayan and Gay POBRE- MOSS, nephew David MOSS- CORNETT and by many Friends and students. Baptized in the Anglican Church of St. Barnabas (Chester) in Toronto, the city of his birth, Earle in later years converted to Roman Catholicism, taking the name Thomas, after Saint Thomas, the doubting Disciple of Christ. Funeral Massachusetts will be celebrated at Saint Mary's Catholic Church in Owen Sound on Saturday, March 22, 2003 at 11 o'clock with celebrant Father Paul WALSH. At a date to be announced later, a Memorial Mass will be held at Regis College, 15 Saint Mary Street, Toronto. Donations in memory of Earle to Regis College, Toronto, Saint Mary's Church, Owen Sound or Saint Thomas Anglican Church, Owen Sound or the charity of your choice would be appreciated and may be made through the Tannahill Funeral Home (519-376-3710) 1178 4th Ave. West, Owen Sound N4K 4W5. Messages of condolence are welcome at www.tannahill.com

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BALDWIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-04 published
First World War veteran dies in Toronto at age 105
By Gloria GALLOWAY Tuesday, February 4, 2003, Page A4
The sparse ranks of Canada's living First World War veterans have been further diminished by the death of Iden Herbert BALDWIN, who emerged from the conflict with a medal for his heroic capture of a German machine-gun post.
Mr. BALDWIN died Friday in Toronto at the age of 105.
When interviewed by a reporter just before Remembrance Day last year as part of The Globe and Mail's tribute to Canada's oldest veterans, he recalled the day an enemy shell blew him into the air.
The blast threw him into the newly formed crater, and a mound of earth buried him alive. Fortunately, his helmet had fallen over his nose, creating a small air pocket that kept him conscious until "some fellow's fingers moved some dirt away from my mouth and I was able to breathe."
His death reduces to 12 the number of living First World War veterans located by The Globe. When stories about their lives ran in mid-November, there were 16.
Until the end, the war remained a major event in his life, Michael BARRACK, his step-grand_son, said after the funeral yesterday.
"It would bring back vivid, vivid memories, you could tell, right until the day he died."
In recent days, fatigue often confined Mr. BALDWIN to a hospital bed set up in the dining room of the midtown home he shared with his second wife, Anna, but he remained lucid and full of humour.
"On his 105th birthday last November, I said to him 'You look great today, Uncle Herb,' Mr. BARRACK said. "And he looked at me and said: 'I look great every day.' "
In 1999, France honoured Mr. BALDWIN and 110 other survivors as Knights of the Order of the Legion of Honour, "and he was counting heads then," Mr. BARRACK said.
Mr. BALDWIN was born in Kent, in southern England, in November of 1897 and emigrated to Canada in 1911. He settled in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, where he found work as a plumber's helper.
At 17, he enlisted in the army and was quickly sent to France. He asked to be sent to the front lines in place of a friend who was a family man. He saw action in several battles, including the infamous Vimy Ridge, where he was injured.
When the war ended in 1918, he served another two years, in Germany, then returned to Prince Albert to be a plumber.
Mr. BALDWIN moved to Toronto in 1922, and got a job distributing essential oils. He remained single until 1954, when he was 57. After the death of his first wife, Elaine, he married Anna, a family friend.

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BALDWIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
YOUNG, Ira
Of West Vancouver, British Columbia and Malibu Beach, California died January 29th 2003 at his home in Malibu with family at his side.
Ira spent his life in pursuit of many passions. He was deeply loved and will be greatly missed by the many people he touched.
Born in 1926 in Edmonton, Alberta, Ira earned his B.Sc. at the University of Alberta and an M.A. in Clinical Psychology. He was an instructor in Psychology at Hobart and William Smith in Geneva, New York before starting a career in real estate. Ira founded the Western Realty Management group of companies in Edmonton in 1953 and embarked on a journey to create some of the most notable and ground breaking land development projects in Canada. He earned a reputation as one of Canada's leading private developers and builders. His vision evolved from suburban subdivision projects to apartments, office buildings, industrial building projects and shopping centers, spanning from western to eastern Canada, Los Angeles and Hawaii. Most notable was his award winning Coquitlam Center outside of Vancouver, British Columbia. 1980 Merit Award winner of the International Council of Shopping Centers and Governor General's Award for Architecture, the first two-level center in western Canada, this project was recognized for innovations in energy efficiency and the dedicated spaces and design elements furnished by local artists. It also became the catalyst for the massive development of the immediate area and realized the Town Center scheme originally proposed to the local district by Ira YOUNG's company.
It was at this time that his love and support for the arts began to eclipse his prominence in the real estate business. Starting as an avid collector of Eskimo art, Ira and his wife Lori developed a collection of art including major works of legendary American Artists; the likes of Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein and perhaps the most important collection of Cy Twombly in North America. All the while they actively supported and befriended many emerging Canadian and American artists, displaying their works alongside the rest of their collection. Their collections have been shown in Vancouver, London, Montreal, Los Angeles and Halifax with over 90 pieces donated to the Vancouver Art Gallery. A member of The Vancouver Art Gallery's Board of Trustees since 1996, he was also active on the Gallery's Program, Acquisitions and Master Planning Committees, always arguing for world class standards through international and local perspectives.
In the 1980's Ira and Lori's interest in automotive racing led to the acquisition of Malibu Grand Prix in Canoga Park, California. A family entertainment company featuring 35 amusement parks across the United States showcasing ¾ scale Indy Type race cars, Ira threw his heart and soul into the venture eventually expanding into Canada, France, Portugal and Japan. True to form, he went all out and created a race team to compete in the International Motor Sports Association GTU class of racing in North America. Surprising to many, but not to him, his team won their first race out, their first season out, and earned Mazda the Manufacturers title. Ira backed this venture in more ways than one. He drove in both the Daytona 24 hour and Sebring 12 hour endurance races. Also true to form, he recognized promise and gave opportunities to then unknown drivers like Jack BALDWIN, Tommy KENDALL and crew chief Clayton CUNNINGHAM. His commitment to racing was rewarded with a team with four consecutive years as International Motor Sports Association GTU Champion and a car that now sits in an automotive museum as the most winning automobile in auto racing history.
Ira YOUNG, a real estate developer with a vision, an outspoken advocate of the arts, and a race car driver at heart, will be forever missed by wife Lori YOUNG, son Jason YOUNG of New York, son Clinton YOUNG and daughter-in-law Randi, daughters Jennifer and Susan YOUNG of Toronto, step-son Christopher WENSLEY and daughter-in-law Tatiana of West Vancouver, step-daughter Blair and son-in-law Paul DONALD of Edmonton and step-son Adam WENSLEY and daughter-in-law Laura of Upland, California and grand children Samantha, Jamie, Axel, Morgan, Miya, Dylan and Alejandro.
A celebration of his life with family and Friends will be held at the Capilano Golf and Country Club on Saturday, March 1st, 2003, 420 Southborough Drive, West Vancouver, British Columbia at 2: 00 pm.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made 'In memory of Ira YOUNG' to the Vancouver Art Gallery, 750 Hornby Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6Z 2H7 or to a charity of your choice.

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BALDWIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-06 published
BEES, Pauline
of North York, Ontario. Died November 3rd, in her 79th year.
Pauline was possessed with a joy for living and a wonderful sense of humour. She courageously maintained this trait into her late-life struggle and subsequent death from cancer.
She has imparted her sense of optimism onto her surviving family, son George, daughter-in-law Chris, and grand_son Jaycen of Framingham, Massachusetts.; daughter Barbara, son-in-law Graham BALDWIN, and granddaughter Katie of Toronto; son Paul and grandchildren Anna and Jack of St. Paul, Minnesota.; and son mark of Boston, Massachusetts.
Originally from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Pauline moved to Canada with her husband Bob in 1958, making homes in Woodstock and Willowdale, Ontario. Pauline considered herself to be a true Canadian, relocating permanently from Cape Coral, Florida to Willowdale after her husband's untimely death in 1986.
Pauline found Toronto to be the perfect place to be close to her daughter Barbara and family. Its proximity to Woodstock gave her access to her old and dear Friends with whom she shared many fond and happy memories.
A natural caregiver, Pauline gave back to her community through her volunteer work at North York General Hospital. Pauline lived her life through, and for her children. She derived her most pleasurable moments in time spent with immediate family and Friends.
We will remember Pauline at her finest, with her kindness, wit, and unique perspective on the world around us, but most of all her ability to laugh and makeus laugh every day at life's little ironies and precious moments.
If desired in lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy can be made in her honour to either Bridgepoint Palliative Care or North York General Hospital Volunteer Association.
A celebration of her life will take place on Friday, November 7th at 1: 00 pm at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, North York).

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BALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
Robert Marven SYER
Born February 19, 1912 at Thamesville, Ontario, died May 15, 2003 at Oakville, Ontario, late of Oakville (Bronte) and lastly of Burlington Ontario; predeceased by parents Frank Morgan SYER (1923) and Maud Lillian SYER (née) (1969,) and by brother Ralph Evans SYER (1932;) survived by his wife of 63 years, Frances Teresa SYER (née,) and seven children: Robert Marven (Marg HEEMSKERK) of Toronto, David Dirk (Mimi CHAMPAGNE) of Shelburne Nova Scotia, Susan Frances (Brian RIKLEY) of Hudson Québec, Michael Stanley of Oakville, Timothy William (Marilyn MacGREGOR) of Milton Ontario, Deborah Anne (Barry BALL) of Brampton Ontario and Dani Elizabeth (Brian FINNEY) of Orlando Florida; and by fifteen grandchildren: Sheri Lynne SYER (Michael PINNOCK) of San Jose California, Wendy Frances SYER (Kevin OUGH) of Peterborough Ontario and Julia Helen SYER (Pat PELLEGRINI) of Ajax Ontario; David Dirk SYER (Doris HOO) of Whitby Ontario and Judith Gail SUSLA (Joe SUSLA) of Oakville Brian Joseph Rikley (Eva GJERSTAD) and Toni Lauren RIKLEY (Dave KRINDLE) of Hudson; Cassidy Anne SYER (Danny PIETRONIRO) of Montréal, Michael Timothy SYER of Victoria, British Columbia and Robert Christopher SYER of London Ontario; Thomas William SYER and Douglas Donald SYER of Milton; and Hayley Elizabeth FINNEY, Brian James FINNEY and Kyle James FINNEY of Orlando; and by nine great-grandchildren: Skylar Syer OUGH of Peterborough and Julian Robert Domenico PELLEGRINI of Ajax; Robert Marven SYER, James Michael SYER and David Dirk SYER of Whitby and Erin Nicole SUSLA of Oakville; and Austin Tyler RIKLEY- KRINDLE, David Shane RIKLEY- KRINDLE and Joseph Cody RIKLEY- KRINDLE of Hudson; also, by nephew Richard Frank SYER of Lake Placid Florida, grand-nephew Michael Charles SYER of Ann Arbor Michigan and by brother-in-law Dr. Patrick Gaynor LYNES of Brampton and his family. An Anglican graveside service was held at St. Jude's Cemetery in Oakville on May 22, 2003. Expressions of respect may be sent to the family at 2455 Milltower Court Mississauga, Ontario L5N 5Z6 or by eMail to RMS@The RMSGroup.net gifts may be made to a charity of choice. A child is sleeping: An old man gone. ­ James Joyce

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BALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-18 published
Black pride of Canadian track and field
First Canadian-born black athlete to win an Olympic medal was member of relay team at 1932 Los Angeles Games but could find work only as a railway porter
By James CHRISTIE, Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - Page R9
Ray LEWIS's event in Olympic track and field was officially the 400-metre sprint, a flat race. His enduring place in Canadian sport history, however, was earned for hurdling a barrier.
Mr. LEWIS, who died in his native Hamilton at age 94 on the weekend, was the first Canadian born black athlete to stand upon the Olympic medals podium. He won a bronze medal as a member of the Canadian 4 x 400-metre relay at the Los Angeles Games in 1932.
At a time where racial discrimination was the way of the world, Mr. LEWIS didn't get to live a hero's life. Viewed today as a pathfinder for talented black athletes, in the 1930s Mr. LEWIS had to all but quit his athletics training because of the demands of his job as a railway porter with the Canadian Pacific Railways. He spent 22 years on the trains making 250 trips from Toronto to Vancouver. To try and stay fit, Mr. LEWIS would train by running alongside the rails when the train stopped on the prairies.
"He deserved so much more than he ever received," said Donovan BAILEY, who won two gold medals at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics in the 100 metres and 4 x 100-metre relay. "I benefited from his going before.
"I had the honour and good fortune of having lunch with Ray LEWIS and talking with him. I couldn't imagine what it was like in his day. It was so different. Ultimately, he's one who inspired me."
Raymond Gray LEWIS was a Hamiltonian, cradle to grave. James WORRALL, honorary member of the International Olympic Committee and Canada's Olympic flag bearer in 1936, recalled the family roots in the area went back to the 1840s when his great grandparents escaped slavery in the United States and settled near Otterville, Ontario
The youngest child of Cornelius LEWIS and Emma GREEN, Ray LEWIS was born October 8, 1910, at 30 Clyde St. He began running races for fun at age 9 when he entered as contest at a local picnic. He began formal training in track and field at Central Collegiate where the autocratic John Richard (Cap) CORNELIUS was his coach. In 1929, he established a Canadian high-school track-and-field record of four championships in one day, taking the dashes at 100, 200, and 440 yards as they were measured then, and anchoring the one-mile relay. In 1928 and 1929, Mr. LEWIS was part of the Central relay team that won the United States national schoolboy title.
He briefly attended Marquette University in Milwaukee but returned to Canada during the Depression and joined the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Besides his Olympic medal performance with teammates Phil EDWARDS, Alex WILSON and Jimmy BALL, Mr. LEWIS was also a Canadian champion several times and competed in the inaugural British Empire Games in 1930 in Hamilton and the 1934 Empire Games in London. where he won a silver medal in the mile relay. Mr. EDWARDS was actually the first black athlete to win an Olympic medal for Canada in 1932, getting the 800-metre honour about a half-hour before the relay with Mr. LEWIS. Mr. EDWARDS, however, was native of British Guyana, while Ray LEWIS was a local.
Mr. LEWIS, who in 2001 was awarded the Order of Canada, had a life-long attachment to the Empire Games, later renamed the Commonwealth Games. He was an adviser to the bidders who recently sought the 2010 Games for Hamilton and vowed that if the Games were coming back, he'd be there to greet them at the official opening at age 100. The Hamilton bid lost out last week to one from New Delhi, India. He lit the torch during the opening ceremonies at the International Children's Games in Hamilton July 1, 2000.
Mr. LEWIS wrote an autobiography entitled Shadow Running in which he detailed his life "as porter and Olympian." He was featured in a 2002 TVOntario documentary series on racism, Journey to Justice. "It [racism] felt worse here, because it wasn't supposed to happen here," he recalled in the video.
Whereas white athletes had an opportunity for coaching jobs after their careers, Mr. LEWIS did not. His position as a porter was one of the few jobs open to men of his race.
"The first time I met him, the Canadian team was on its way to Fort William, Ontario, for the Canadian championships in 1933. They travelled by Pullman and Ray was the porter. He couldn't get the time off to compete. But he did make the 1934 Empire Games team and was presented to the Prince of Wales, something that was a point of honour for him. He felt it was something to rub into all those people who had kept him off teams and out of places because he was black," Mr. WORRALL said.
Mr. LEWIS married Vivienne JONES in 1941, and they adopted two children, sons Larry and Tony.

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BALLARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
Hockey coach who changed the game
'Captain Video' introduced new teaching tools in more than 25 years with the National Hockey League
By William HOUSTON Monday, June 23, 2003 - Page R5
The morning after Roger NEILSON was fired from his first of seven head coaching jobs in the National Hockey League, he returned to his office at Maple Leaf Gardens.
He viewed and edited the videotape of the Toronto Maple Leafs' loss to the Montreal Canadiens the night before. When a replacement didn't show up, he put the Leafs through a practice. Later, he was asked by a reporter why he was still hanging around.
"Somebody had to run the practice," he said. "Whoever comes in will have to look at the tapes."
The next day, Mr. NEILSON was reinstated when the club could not find a replacement, but Maple Leafs owner Harold BALLARD, always looking for publicity, wanted to make his return behind the bench a surprise. Mr. BALLARD tried to talk him into wearing a ski mask or bag over his head, and then dramatically throwing it off at the start of the game. Numbed by the three-day ordeal of not knowing his status in the organization, Mr. NEILSON almost agreed, but ultimately declined.
"He hated that story," said Jim GREGORY, who hired Mr. NEILSON to coach the Leafs in 1977 and was fired along with the coach at the end of the 1978-79 season. "I hated that story."
The incident reflected poorly on Mr. BALLARD, but in a smaller way it helped create the image of Mr. NEILSON we have today, that of a coach who put the team ahead of his ego, who was loyal to his players and dedicated to his job.
Mr. NEILSON, who died Saturday after a long battle with cancer, will be remembered not just as a man who loved hockey, but also as a skilled strategist and innovator. He stressed defensive play and systems, and also physical fitness. In Toronto, he was given the nickname "Captain Video," because he was among the first to use videotape to instruct his players and prepare for games.
When Mr. NEILSON, a soft-spoken man famous for his dry sense of humour, was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame last year, he was asked about the late, controversial Leafs owner.
"I'm sure he's looking up rather than down," he said, with a smile, before saying Mr. BALLARD did some "good things for hockey."
Mr. NEILSON was also named to the Order of Canada in January.
Roger Paul NEILSON was born in Toronto on June 16, 1934, and went as far as Junior B hockey as a player. While earning a degree at McMaster University in Hamilton, he started coaching kids baseball and hockey.
After graduating, he taught high school in Toronto and his passion by then was coaching. In hockey, he won Toronto and provincial titles at different levels. In 10 years, his Metro Toronto midget baseball teams won nine championships, once defeating a team that included pitcher Ken DRYDEN, who would later become a Hall of Fame goaltender with the Montreal Canadiens.
Mr. NEILSON scouted for the Peterborough Petes of the Ontario Major Junior Hockey League before moving to Peterborough in 1966 to coach the team. During his 10 years behind the bench, the Petes never finished below third place and won the league championship once.
By the time Mr. NEILSON moved to the National Hockey League to coach the Leafs in 1977, his reputation for creativity and also mischief was firmly established. In baseball, he used, at least once, a routine involving a peeled apple, in which the catcher threw what appeared to be the ball wildly over the third baseman, prompting the runner to race home. As the apple lay in the outfield, the catcher met the runner at home plate with the real baseball in his glove.
Always looking for a loophole in the rules, Mr. NEILSON's ploys instigated rule changes in hockey. On penalty shots against his team, he used Ron STACKHOUSE, a big defenceman, instead of a goalie. Mr. STACKHOUSE would charge out of the net and cause the shooter to flub his shot. The rule was subsequently changed to require the goalie to stay in his crease.
Over an National Hockey League career that lasted more than 25 years, Mr. NEILSON holds the record for most teams coached (seven.) He also held four assistant coaching positions. But he never won the Stanley Cup. He didn't coach great teams. He seemed to enjoy the challenge of taking an average group of players, making them into a solid, defensive unit, and seeing them succeed.
In his first year with the Leafs, he moulded a previously undisciplined group of players into a strong unit that upset the New York Islanders in the 1978 playoffs.
In 1982, Mr. NEILSON's playoff success with the Vancouver Canucks underscored his skill as a tactician and manipulator.
When Canuck head coach Harry NEALE was suspended late in the season, Mr. NEILSON, his assistant, took over. The Canucks weren't expected to advance past the first round of the playoffs. But backed by strong goaltending from Richard BRODEUR, they defeated the Calgary Flames and then the Los Angeles Kings to advance to the semi-finals against Chicago.
The Canucks won the first game, but with Chicago leading 4-1 late in the second game, Mr. NEILSON, unhappy with the officiating, waved a white towel from the bench, as if to surrender to the referee. He was fined for the demonstration, but the white towel became a symbol of home-fan solidarity. In the Stanley Cup final, the Canucks were swept by the powerhouse Islanders.
In addition to Toronto and Vancouver, Mr. NEILSON's journey through the National Hockey League consisted of head coaching jobs with the Buffalo Sabres, the Kings, New York Rangers, Florida Panthers and Philadelphia Flyers. He worked as a co-coach in Chicago, and as an assistant coach with the Sabres, St. Louis Blues and Ottawa Senators.
Ottawa, where he was hired in 2000, was his final destination. In the 2001-02 season, head coach Jacques MARTIN stepped down for the final two games of the regular season to allow Mr. NEILSON to coach his 1,000th regular-season game.
Frank ORR, who covered hockey for The Toronto Star for more than 30 years, said, in 2002, "Roger is one of the few people I've met in any line of work who never had a bad word to say about anybody."

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