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"BAK" 2003 Obituary


BAKEAS  BAKER 

BAKEAS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-01 published
Ex-pilot aided foreigners who hid soldiers
By Kelly HAGGART Saturday, March 1, 2003 - Page F11
Robert ADAM/ADAMS, past president of a society set up to honour and assist individuals who risked their lives helping Allied airmen evade capture during the Second World War, died in Toronto this month of cancer. He was 82.
Mr. ADAM/ADAMS was a 22-year-old Canadian pilot on loan to Britain's Royal Air Force when his plane was shot down after bombing a German ship in southern Greece. Stout-hearted people on two small islands in the Aegean, risking torture or execution for their actions, sheltered the six-man crew for a month until they were rescued.
After the war, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS founded a chain of tool-rental stores in the Toronto area called ADAM/ADAMS Rent-All, which he sold when he retired in 1989.
In 1965, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS joined the newly formed Canadian branch of the Royal Air Forces Escaping Society. The group vowed to assist the citizens who had helped Allied airmen who fell into their midst escape or evade capture; thanks to their courage, almost 3,000 men had made it back to safety.
"The object of the society is to remember, " the group's literature says, "and to aid our helpers who may still be suffering the results of imprisonment and torture at the hands of the enemy, and to maintain the very strong Friendships that developed during those years."
(Ernest BEVIN, Britain's foreign secretary in 1945-51, told the first chairman of the group's British chapter: "Your society does a damned sight more good in Europe than all my ambassadors rolled together.")
John DIX, a fellow member of the Escaping Society's Canadian branch, said that, "in most cases, we only knew our helpers a week or less -- we were just passing through. But the nature of the relationship and the tension of the times were such that they became lifelong Friends. We never forgot them, we had them over to Canada every year, we kept in touch. We owed them a debt of honour."
Flight Lieutenant ADAM/ADAMS and his crew of four Britons and an Australian left their base in Benghazi, Libya, on the night of November 6, 1943, scouting for targets to bomb. They spotted a German ship anchored off Naxos, an island in the Cyclades group south of Athens.
After dropping 16 bombs, one of the plane's two engines was hit by German flak. "Luckily, it kept going for 10 minutes, which gave us time to make a getaway, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS told his daughter, Patricia ADAM/ADAMS. " Then it conked out and we had to slowly descend."
He ditched his disabled Wellington bomber flawlessly into the sea. The crew escaped through hatches, and a dinghy and a parachute popped out of the aircraft before it sank within 30 seconds of hitting the water. The men paddled ashore to the island of Sifnos, half a kilometre away.
"After complaining about our cigarettes being wet, we slept in the parachute under an olive tree, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS recalled. "In the morning, we were discovered by a girl riding by on a donkey. She went to fetch her father [George KARAVOS], and he went and got someone who could understand English and who decided we weren't German."
The initial suspicion was mutual. When Mr. KARAVOS took the men to his home and offered them water, they were afraid to drink it, until the farmer reassured them by taking a first sip.
The six men were hidden first in a mountaintop monastery on Sifnos, and then in a cave used as a goat pen on the neighbouring island of Serifos. Their presence was kept from local children, in case they unwittingly tipped off the German patrol that visited the islands several times a week from the nearby occupied island of Milos.
"During the war, 180 people on Sifnos died because they didn't have enough to eat, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS said. "But the locals made a big fuss over us, bringing food and cigarettes."
The men spent 10 days in the monastery, with a stream of hungry people climbing the steep path to bring them bread and cheese, oranges, figs, retsina and handfuls of precious, rationed cigarettes.
Then the Sifnos chief of police, Demetrius BAKEAS, who was determined the men should not be captured, arranged for them to go to Serifos, because "there are people there who can help you."
A fisherman took them under cover of darkness to Serifos. There, housed in the goat pen, they found five British commandos spying on German troop movements. Conditions were primitive in that cave for the next 20 days, but the spies had a wireless and were able to arrange the air crew's rescue. A Royal Navy gunboat disguised as a Greek fishing vessel picked them up and, moving by night, took them to safety in Cyprus.
All six men survived the war, and later learned they had succeeded in sinking that ship in Naxos harbour.
Mr. ADAM/ADAMS kept in touch with his helpers after the war, with his letters translated for him by a Greek neighbour in Toronto.
"I remember being taken to Greek community functions, " Patricia ADAM/ADAMS recalled. "And every Christmas Dad would send a parcel to the school on Sifnos, with paper and pencils, and little dime-store gifts for the children. Putting that package together every year was very emotional."
"Bob was a very great guy, with a great sense of humour, " said Roy BROWN, secretary of the Escaping Society. Mr. ADAM/ADAMS was treasurer of the society at his death, and served as president in 1995-96.
"We have about 100 members now across the country, who are in their 80s and beyond, Mr. BROWN said. "Most of our helpers are in the same or worse shape, so we're not bringing them over as we did up until five or six years ago. But we still help out when we see a helper in need."
Robert Watson ADAM/ADAMS was born on January 22, 1921, in Windsor, Ontario, where his father, Dr. Frederick ADAM/ADAMS, was the medical officer of health for more than 20 years. If he had returned to base that night after the raid on Naxos harbour, he would have received the cable informing him of his father's death back home.
After graduating from Windsor's Kennedy Collegiate in 1939, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS worked in a bank before enlisting in June, 1941. A few weeks later his older brother, Coulson, was killed during training in England, shot down by a German night fighter that had sneaked across the Channel. His other brother, John, was also a bomber pilot killed in action, shot down during a raid on Hanover, Germany, just a few months before the war in Europe ended.
Robert ADAM/ADAMS's story was featured in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television documentary in 1966, when a Telescope camera crew followed him and his wife, Joan, back to Sifnos, where they received a hero's welcome.
"Those Greeks had nothing to gain and everything to lose, " Mr. ADAM/ADAMS told the show's associate producer, George Ronald. "They were starving, and yet they gave us everything. They were superb.... I don't think they know just how kind and generous and how brave they were."
Mr. BAKEAS, who had moved to Athens after retiring from the police force, returned to Sifnos for the emotional reunion held 23 years after he helped save Mr. ADAM/ADAMS's life. Earlier, he had written to "my dear friend" in Canada: "It is not possible for me to forget the danger which connected us in those terrible war days. We shall be always waiting you."
In addition to his wife, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS leaves his children John, Patricia and Mary, sons-in-law Lawrence SOLOMON and Steve DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS, and granddaughters Essie and Catharine.
Robert Watson ADAM/ADAMS, chain-store founder and past president of the Canadian branch of the Royal Air Force Escaping Society born in Windsor, Ontario, on January 22, 1921; died in Toronto on February 10, 2003.

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BAKER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-09 published
Robert (Bob) BAKER
Died in St. Catharines, March 13, 2003 at the age of 81 years
Bob was predeceased by his wife Marie {JEWELL}
Loving father of Garry, Len, Ken, Barb, Fred, Doris and Michael and 21 grandchildren. Bob made his home in Gore Bay for many years.

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BAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-11 published
ANGEVINE, Winston Charles
On Tuesday, February 4, 2003, at the age of 80, Winston ANGEVINE died peacefully, at home, surrounded by his loving family. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Miriam ''Trudy''; his daughters Maureen, Margaret, Valerie (Kevin PATRIQUIN,) and Daphne (Ken BAKER;) his grandchildren Ellen, Amanda, Neal, Caroline, Meredith, Evan, Hilary, and Jennifer; and his sisters Adeline, Shirley, Pansie and Violet. Winston was a veteran of the Royal Canadian Air Force; a graduate of Mount Allison University, Nova Scotia Technical College (now Dalhousie University) and McGill University and a professional engineer. He loved life, his family, and his rose garden. He touched many lives, and will be greatly missed. A private cremation has been held. If desired, donations in his name may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or a charity of your choice.

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BAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
'He kept a little flame of geometry alive'
Superstar University of Toronto mathematician considered himself an artist, but his seminal work inevitably found practical applications
By Siobhan ROBERTS Saturday, April 12, 2003 - Page F11
Widely considered the greatest classical geometer of his time and the man who saved his discipline from near extinction, Harold Scott MacDonald COXETER, who died on March 31 at 96, said of himself, with characteristic modesty, "I am like any other artist. It just so happens that what fills my mind is shapes and numbers."
Prof. COXETER's work focused on hyperdimensional shapes, specifically the symmetry of regular figures and polytopes. Polytopes are geometric shapes of any number of dimensions that cannot be constructed in the real world and can be visualized only when the eye of the beholder possesses the necessary insight; they are most often described mathematically and sometimes can be represented with hypnotically intricate fine-line drawings.
"I like things that can be seen," Prof. COXETER once remarked. "You have to imagine a different world where these queer things have some kind of shape."
Known as Donald (shortened from MacDonald,) Prof. COXETER had such a passion for his work and unrivalled elegance in constructing and writing proofs that he motivated countless mathematicians to pick up the antiquated discipline of geometry long after it had been deemed passť.
John Horton CONWAY, the Von Neumann professor of mathematics at Princeton University, never studied under Prof. COXETER, but he considers himself an honorary student because of the COXETERian nature of his work.
"With math, what you're doing is trying to prove something and that can get very complicated and ugly. COXETER always manages to do it clearly and concisely," Prof. CONWAY said. "He kept a little flame of geometry alive by doing such beautiful works himself.
"I'm reminded of a quotation from Walter Pater's book The Renaissance. He was describing art and poetry, but he talks of a small, gem-like flame: 'To burn always with this hard, gem-like flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life.' "
Prof. COXETER's oeuvre included more than 250 papers and 12 books. His Introduction to Geometry, published in 1961, is now considered a classic -- it is still in print and this year is back on the curriculum at McGill University. His Regular Polytopes is considered by some as the modern-day addendum to Euclid's Elements. In 1957, he published Generators and Relations for Discrete Groups, written jointly with his PhD student and lifelong friend Willy MOSER. It is currently in its seventh edition.
Prof. COXETER's self-image as an artist was validated by his Friendship with and influence on Dutch artist M. C. ESCHER, who, when working on his Circle Limit 3 drawings, used to say, "I'm Coxetering today."
They met at the International Mathematical Congress in Amsterdam in 1954 and then corresponded about their mutual interest in repeating patterns and representations of infinity. In a letter to his son, Mr. ESCHER noted that a diagram sent to him by Prof. COXETER that inspired his Circle Limit 3 prints "gave me quite a shock."
He added that " COXETER's hocus-pocus text is no use to me at all.... I understand nothing, absolutely nothing of it."
While Mr. ESCHER claimed total ignorance of math, Prof. COXETER wrote numerous papers on the Dutchman's "intuitive geometry."
Though Prof. COXETER did geometry for its own sake, his work inevitably found practical application. Buckminster FULLER encountered his work in the construction of his geodesic domes. He later dedicated a book to Prof. COXETER: "By virtue of his extraordinary life's work in mathematics, Prof. COXETER is the geometer of our bestirring twentieth century. [He is] the spontaneously acclaimed terrestrial curator of the historical inventory of the science of pattern analysis."
Prof. COXETER's work with icosohedral symmetries served as a template of sorts in the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the Carbon 60 molecule. It has also proved relevant to other specialized areas of science such as telecommunications, data mining, topology and quasi-crystals.
In 1968, Prof. COXETER added to his list of converts an anonymous society of French mathematicians, the Bourbakis, who actively and internationally sought to eradicate classical geometry from the curriculum of math education.
"Death to Triangles, Down with Euclid!" was the Bourbaki war cry. Prof. COXETER's rebuttal: "Everyone is entitled to their opinion. But the Bourbakis were sadly mistaken."
One member of the society, Pierre CARTIER, met Prof. COXETER in Montreal and became enamoured of his work. Soon, he had persuaded his fellow Bourbakis to include Prof. COXETER's approach in their annual publication. "An entire volume of Bourbaki was thoroughly inspired by the work of COXETER," said Prof. CARTIER, a professor at Denis Diderot University in Paris.
In the 1968 volume, Prof. COXETER's name was writ large into the lexicon of mathematics with the inauguration of the terms "COXETER number," " COXETER group" and "COXETER graph."
These concepts describe symmetrical properties of shapes in multiple dimensions and helped to bridge the old-fashioned classical geometry with the more au courant and applied algebraic side of the discipline. These concepts continue to pervade geometrical discourse, several decades after being discovered by Prof. COXETER.
Prof. COXETER became a serious mathematician at the relatively late age of 14, though family folklore has it that, as a toddler, he liked to stare at the columns of numbers in the financial pages of his father's newspaper.
He was born into a Quaker family in Kensington, just west of London, on February 9, 1907. His mother, Lucy GEE, was a landscape artist and portrait painter, and his father, Harold, was a manufacturer of surgical instruments, though his great love was sculpting.
They had originally named their son MacDonald Scott COXETER, but a godparent suggested that the boy's father's name should be added at the front. Another relative then pointed out that H.M.S. COXETER made him sound like a ship of the royal fleet so the names were switched around.
When Prof. COXETER was 12, he created his own language -- "Amellaibian" a cross between Latin and French, and filled a 126-page notebook with information on the imaginary world where it was spoken.
But more than anything he fancied himself a composer, writing several piano concertos, a string quartet and a fugue. His mother took her son and his musical compositions to Gustav HOLST. His advice: "Educate him first."
He was then sent to boarding school, where he met John Flinders PETRIE, son of Egyptologist Sir Flinders PETRIE. The two were passing time at the infirmary contemplating why there were only five Platonic solids -- the cube, tetrahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron. They then began visualizing what these shapes might look like in the fourth dimension. At the age of 15, Prof. COXETER won a school prize for an English essay on how to project these geometric shapes into higher dimensions -- he called it "Dimensional Analogy."
Prof. COXETER's father took his son along with his essay to meet friend and fellow pacifist Bertrand RUSSELL. Mr. RUSSELL recommended Prof. COXETER to mathematician E.H. NEVILLE, a scout, of sorts, for mathematics prodigies. He was impressed by Prof. COXETER's work but appalled by some inexcusable gaps in his mathematical knowledge. Prof. NEVILLE arranged for private tutelage in pursuit of a scholarship at Cambridge. During this period, Prof. COXETER was forbidden from thinking in the fourth dimension, except on Sundays.
He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1926 and was among five students handpicked by Ludwig WITTGENSTEIN for his philosophy of mathematics class. During his first year at Cambridge, at the age of 19, he discovered a new regular polyhedron that had six hexagonal faces at each vertex.
After graduating with first-class honours in 1929, he received his doctorate under H. F. BAKER in 1931, winning the coveted Smith's Prize for his thesis.
Prof. COXETER did fellowship stints back and forth between Princeton and Cambridge for the next few years, focusing on the mathematics of kaleidoscopes -- he had mirrors specially cut and hinged together and carried them in velvet pouches sewn by his mother. By 1933, he had enumerated the n-dimensional kaleidoscopes -- that is, kaleidoscopes operating up to any number of dimensions.
The concepts that became known as COXETER groups are the complex algebraic equations he developed to express how many images may be seen of any object in a kaleidoscope (he once used a paper triangle with the word "nonsense" printed on it to track reflections).
In 1936, Prof. COXETER was offered an assistant professorship at the University of Toronto. He made the move shortly after the sudden death of his father and following his marriage to Rien BROUWER. She was from the Netherlnds and he met her while she was on holiday in London.
As a professor, Prof. COXETER was known to flout set curriculum. Ed BARBEAU, now a professor at the U of T, recalled that at the start of his classes, Prof. COXETER would spread out a manuscript on the desks at the front of the room. During his lecture, he would often pause for minutes at a time to make notes when a student offered something that might be relevant to his work in progress. When the work was later published, students were pleasantly surprised to find that their suggestions had been duly credited.
Prof. COXETER was also known to show up to class carrying a pineapple, or a giant sunflower from his garden, demonstrating the existence of geometric principles in nature. And he was notorious for leaping over details, expecting students to fill in the rest.
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's resident intellectual, Lister SINCLAIR, was one of Prof. COXETER's earliest students. He once recounted that Prof. COXETER would "write an expression on the board and you could see it talking to him. It was like Michelangelo walking around a block of marble and seeing what's in there."
Asia Ivic WEISS, a professor at York University, Prof. COXETER's last PhD student and the only woman so honoured, describes an incident that perfectly exemplifies Prof. COXETER's math myopia. Going into labour with her first child, she called him to cancel their weekly meeting. Prof. COXETER, who never acknowledged her pregnancy, said not to worry, he would send over a stack of research to keep her busy when she got home from the hospital.
Despite several offers from other universities, Prof. COXETER stayed at University of Toronto throughout his career.
Like his father, he was a pacifist. In 1997, he was among those who marched a petition to the university president's office to protest against an honorary degree being conferred on George BUSH Sr. Prof. COXETER recalled with disdain Robert PRITCHARD's telling him, "Donald, I have more important things to worry about."
After his official retirement in 1977, Prof. COXETER continued as a professor emeritus, making weekly visits to his office. These subsided only in the past several months. On the weekend before his death, he finished revisions on his final paper, which he had delivered the previous summer in Budapest.
In his last five years, he survived a heart attack, a broken hip (he sprung himself from the hospital early to drive to a geometry conference in Wisconsin) and, most recently, prostate cancer.
Considering his 96 years of vegetarianism and a strict exercise regime, he felt betrayed by his body. "I feel like the man of Thermopylae who doesn't do anything properly," he commented recently after an awkward evening out, quoting nonsense poet Edward LEAR.
Prof. COXETER died in his home, with three long last breaths, just before bed on the last day of March.
His brain is now undergoing study at McMaster University, along with that of Albert EINSTEIN. Neuroscientist Sandra WITELSON is tryng to determine whether his brain's extraordinary capacities are associated with its structure.
Prof. COXETER met with her at the beginning of March and learned that the atypical elements of Einstein's brain, compared with an average brain, were symmetrical on both right and left sides.
Prof. WITELSON said she wondered whether there might be similar findings with Prof. COXETER's brain. "Isn't that nice," he said. "I suppose that would indicate all my interest in symmetry was well founded."
Prof. COXETER leaves his daughter Susan and son Edgar. His wife died in 1999.
Siobhan ROBERTS is a Toronto writer whose biography of Donald COXETER will be published by Penguin in 2005.

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BAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-02 published
BAKER, Don
Born Middleton, England, November 29, 1931. Died St. Lucia, West Indies, December 23, 2002. Don arrived in Montreal in 1958 and moved to Toronto in the early sixties. An avid sailor, he was a longtime member of the National Yacht Club in Toronto. Don worked for many years in the advertising and travel industries before settling in St. Lucia in 1992. Behind a sometimes crusty exterior was a very kind, gentle and nice guy who will be remembered and missed by many.

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BAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-24 published
In Memoriam, Graham BAKER
The lawyers and staff of Robins Appleby and Taub LLP mourn the passing of our good friend and valued client, Graham BAKER, on July 13, 2003.
We extend our deepest sympathy to his wife Pat, his daughter Jacqueline, his stepchildren Jennifer and Sean and all his family and confreres.
Graham, as president of The Barclay - Grayson Development Corporation, was a highly respected developer, raconteur and friend. He will be missed by all who knew him.
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BAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-08 published
'There are too many ruined boys'
By Erin ANDERSSEN, Saturday, November 8, 2003 - Page F6
Parry Sound, Ontario -- Clara WHITE/WHYTE began her voyage into war by losing her purse on the way to the train. It was September 15, 1915. Her diary names it "a bright sunshiny day" and notes the crowd's "rousing send off." The soldiers and nurses, Ms. WHITE/WHYTE among them, left Toronto for a Montreal military ship and a voyage, beyond Wales and icebergs, to a continent of falling bombs and death.
She landed in London first, with time on her hands, as she wrote in her red, leather-bound diary, to shop, sip tea and tour the galleries.
Clara WHITE/WHYTE was not one to sit idly by. At times, her account of the First World War -- enlivened by daily weather reports, notes on the cost of things (60 cents then for a pie) and the "peculiar" fashion of the day -- reads more like a Grand Tour than a Great War. She wanders the Zoological Gardens in London, dines at the Grand Hotel du Louvre in Boulogne and climbs the 1,224 steps of the cathedral in Rouen, making it to the top even when "the other girls gave up the ascent."
Nursing the sick and wounded in camps at Rouen and Solonika, Ms. WHITE/WHYTE surely would have seen the cost of war, but her diary focuses instead on the bits of life she could find in the midst of it.
"There are," she writes in one letter home, "too many ruined boys around now." But she barely details in her diary what has ruined them. She tells in spare sentences of working in the German measles tent or waiting for the typhoid patients to arrive; she makes antiseptic note of bombs overhead. Two stitches in her own cheek merit a single line and no explanation.
Maybe you didn't talk of such things then, her great-niece, Phyllis GERHART, speculated. And perhaps this is what Ms. WHITE/WHYTE wanted to remember: the cherry-strawberry supper in her tent on Dominion Day, "the boys" caroling on Christmas Eve, tea with the other nurses to plan for a "grand masquerade to celebrate the closing of 1915" -- even as bombs fell nearby, injuring some men and killing a shepherd and six sheep.
Her descendants don't know much about her, beyond the small diary. It sat for decades in a dresser drawer in the bedroom of her niece, Laura BAKER, and was eventually passed to her daughter, Ms. GERHART, who lives now in Parry Sound.
Ms. WHITE/WHYTE's mother is believed to have died when she was young, and her father to have been connected to the silk trade. The family lived in Toronto, near the Danforth, and Clara and her sister, Alice, were raised in a proper, middle-class Victorian household.
The sisters were close, but took separate paths: Alice helped at home and eventually married and had a family, while Clara escaped to school and nursing.
On April 7, 1915, she volunteered to go to war. According to military records at the National Archives, she was 41. She was paid $50 a month.
In a faded picture from that time, Ms. WHITE/WHYTE stares back with a half-smile, standing near woods in her nurse's uniform, the belt cinched tight around her thin waist, dark bangs poking out beneath her veil.
The impression left by her diary is of an energetic woman, keen for an adventure. At the masquerade party on New Year's Eve, 1915, she reports that she took first prize, dressed as John Bull (the British version of Uncle Sam). She makes note of having a hearty laugh at the sight of a Frenchman hoisting his wife up on a cart by her backside.
Many of her days were spent walking into the village to do laundry, and writing letters; at home, they received postcards, rose bulbs and a box of soldier's buttons. She took pictures too, touristy shots collected into an old album her relatives still own, of the ship that took her across the ocean, of the camp in France and of the scenery.
In one picture, she is sitting on stone steps, the only woman with a dozen soldiers. One of her wartime possessions was a bullet with a cross carved into its tip. The story behind it has been lost, though Ms. GERHART likes to imagine it was a gift from a grateful patient.
Ms. WHITE/WHYTE's last entry is dated May 8, 1916. But the military records say she was still in Europe in 1918, when she contracted influenza. She didn't sail home until the summer of 1919. A year later, with the war over, she was discharged from service. She never married.
Her fate is the subject of some confusion: Ms. GERHART had always understood that her great aunt died of influenza, after contracting the illness while nursing patients. But a handwritten note on one of the folders in the archives says she passed away in 1930. The diary of an independent woman, spirited in the midst of hardship, is the only trace she left behind.
Erin ANDERSSEN is a reporter in The Globe and Mail's Ottawa bureau.

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BAKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-24 published
GAUL, Kevin Joseph
A native son of Australia who embraced Canada as his home at the age of 23, died in Toronto on November 20, 2003, surrounded by his wife, Madeleine, and his children Alison and Philip. Kevin's life was centred in his family, his Friends, his church and his community. His support to his community was life-long. It ranged from his service in the Reserve Army in the Royal Canadian Ordinance Corps component of the Toronto Service Battalion and his leadership of the Metro Toronto Housing Authority to his countless hours of charitable work, in roles such as Director and President of the Credit Counseling Service of Toronto, and a key facilitator of the Employment Resources Group, an outreach project of the Anglican Church. In addition, he consulted on housing and education extensively throughout the Caribbean, an area that was dear to his heart. Twenty- five years ago, when Kevin's illness was first diagnosed, he was expected to live only a few years. However, his love of life and commitment to the people, causes, and things he loved gave him the strength to exceed all expectations. Until almost the end, few understood the severity of his illness, so strong and relentless was his pursuit of life. Dr. Michael BAKER was with Kevin from the initial diagnosis until the last minutes of his life. The family gives their heartfelt thanks for the last 25 years to Michael and his team, and to the Transfusion team at the Princess Margaret Hospital. They also thank Dr. Marcella MESENSKY, our family physician and friend, the Toronto East General Hospital, 2 special paramedics and a compassionate Emergency team at Mount Sinai. Predeceased by his parents, John and Theresa Clair GAUL, Kevin leaves a part of himself in the hearts and minds of all who knew him, especially his beloved family, Madeleine, Alison and Philip, his brothers Tony, Greg (Carol), Brian (Anne) GAUL, his sister-in-law, Judy (Mike) MARLOW, and his uncles, aunts, nieces, nephews, and cousins and Friends here, in Australia, the United Kingdom Fenelon Falls and Coboconk. Visitation will be at Heritage Funeral Centre, 50 Overlea Blvd. (416-423-1000) on Thursday, November 27th from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service on Friday November 28th at 11: 00 a.m. at St. Columba and All Hallows Anglican Church, 2723 St. Clair Ave East. In lieu of flowers, donations may sent to the Princess Margaret Hospital Leukemia Research Fund or to St. Columba and All Hallows Anglican Church, Toronto.
''And now we see as through a glass darkly, but then we shall see face to face.''

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