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"BAI" 2003 Obituary


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BAILEY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Albert George WEBB
In loving memory of Albert George WEBB, April 9, 1921 to December 24, 2002.
Albert WEBB, a resident of Providence Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital, on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 at the age of 81 years. He was born in Durham, and had lived on Manitoulin for the past 6 years. Previous to that, Al had lived in Elliott Lake and Armstrong. He had a great love of the north country, which led him to his job as a bush pilot He truly loved his work, and spent many enjoyable years pursuing his love of the north and of flying. Al was a veteran of WW2, having served overseas.
Survived by his beloved partner Val TAILOR/TAYLOR of Providence Bay, and her family. Will be sadly missed by Ruby CANNARD, the Mike SPRACK family, Linda and Al BAILEY, Harvey and Diane DEBASSIGE, Lloyd JACKSON and Marshall RICHARD of Elliott Lake, Ryan HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Jim HARASYM. Survived by many Friends in the Armstrong, Elliott Lake and Manitoulin area. Also survived by sons Warren and Chris, and one brother in the Hamilton area.
At Al's request, there will be no funeral service. Cremation will take place.
Val TAILOR/TAYLOR would like to thank the doctors and nurses at Mindemoya Hospital for the wonderful care and concern given to Al and herself, during this time. Words cannot express the appreciation. Culgin Funeral Home

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BAILEY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-05 published
Elsie Dorothea GIBBS
November 20, 1909 - January 28, 2003
Elsie GIBBS, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge since 1996, died at the Lodge on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 at the age of 93 years.
She was born in Gore Bay, daughter of the late John and Minnie (TOMLINSON) GIBBS. Elsie had worked as a bookkeeper for James PURVIS and son for about 20 years. She was very active in the Lyons Memorial United Church, having acted as treasurer for 38 years.
Elsie's home was always considered home for her sisters and brothers and their families. She kept her home as long as she could, until she had to move to the Lodge. She truly loved her family, and enjoyed writing to the ones who were at a distance, and visiting and going out with the ones who were close.
Elsie was predeceased by two sisters Olive GIBBS and Florence BAILEY, and brothers Clifford, Harvey, Lyman and Arthur. She is survived by numerous nieces and nephews, grand nieces and nephews and great grand nieces and nephews.
Friends may called the Culgin Funeral Home after 7: 00 pm on Friday. The funeral service was conducted in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel on Saturday, February 1, 2003 at 1: 30 pm with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. Spring interment in Gordon Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home, Gore Bay.

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BAILEY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
Lillian Milinda VINEY
In loving memory of Lillian Milinda VINEY, who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Health Centre on Friday, April 11, 2003 at the age of 82 years.
Beloved wife of Charles VINEY. Dear mother of Shirley VINEY of Little Current, George VINEY of Manitowaning, Sandra and husband Bruce POPE of Manitowaning, Lyla VINEY of Orillia. Loved grandmother of Stephanie and Mark MacDONALD (fiancée Holly,) Andrew and Katherine POPE, Kimberley, Laura and Marianne MENARD. Special great grandmother of Jonathan and Jessica ORR, Justin, Destanie (BAILEY) and Liliana MacDONALD. Remembered by brother and sisters Violet HUBBARD- McALLISTER (predeceased,) Harry JAGGARD (wife Gladys predeceased,) Bessie LOCKYER (husband James predeceased,) Florence LENSON (husband Walter predeceased,) Madeleine CHARLTON (husband John predeceased), predeceased by sisters Beulah and Iris and parents Guy and Evalena JAGGARD. Sister-in-law of Harry VINEY, Ruth McCULLIGH (predeceased,) Lauretta McGILLIS (predeceased,) Grace HUNTER (predeceased,) Joyce and husband Howard HOLMES, Glenn and wife Margaret VINEY, predeceased by Joe, Bob and Edith. Will be missed by numerous nephews and nieces. Visitation was held Sunday, April 13, 2003. Funeral service was held Monday, April 14, 2003. Both at Knox United Church, Manitowaning. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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BAILEY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
R. J. Leland COULTIS
In loving memory of R. J. Leland COULTIS who passed away Saturday morning, May 3rd, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital-Memorial Site at the age of 66 years.
Beloved husband of Gladys (WALLI) COULTIS of Sudbury. Loving father of Richard and Philip both of Copper Cliff and Norma BELANGER of Sudbury. Cherished grandfather of Kaitlyn and Justin. Dear son of Phillip and Jessie COULTIS predeceased. Dear brother of Laureen BAILEY (husband Arden predeceased) of Sudbury, Loretta PYETTE (husband Eugene) of Tehkummah, Georgina MacKENZIE (husband Jim) of Little Current and George predeceased. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews.
At Leland's request there will be no visitation or service.
Cremation with interment of the cremains in the family plot at Waters Cemetery.
Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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BAILEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-24 published
Norman Harold McCLELLAND
By Robert McCLELLAND Friday, January 24, 2003, Page A20
Hockey player, business entrepreneur, family man. Born June 21, 1913, in Toronto. Died January 2 in Toronto, from complications of Alzheimer's disease, aged 89.
It's fitting that Norman McCLELLAND was born on June 21, the summer solstice, as he lived every day as though it were the longest of the year. Norman spent his childhood in Cache Bay, Ontario, a tiny lumber village on Lake Nipissing. Norman was proud of his small-town roots. It was there he developed his respect for the outdoors and his simple, honest outlook toward life.
Norman taught himself how to play hockey. He would wake up early in the morning, scurry down to Lake Nipissing with his second-hand skates and stick and clear the ice himself with a shovel. In Grade 9, Norman left his close-knit family in Cache Bay to attend high school in Toronto and eventually play Junior A hockey. He met his lifelong partner, Margaret CHOWN, soon after his arrival. Last November, they celebrated their 62nd wedding anniversary.
From 1933-1937, Norman studied science and education at the University of Toronto. He also played for the Varsity Blues hockey team and was the squad's captain in 1935-36. Norman managed to pull in good grades while playing in a semi-pro league to pay for his tuition and coach the women's hockey team. Not a big man, (he was 5 foot 6 and, at his heaviest, 155 pounds) Norman was known for his speed -- he once beat Montreal Canadiens star scorer Toe BLAKE in a race for $5. During a tournament, scouts from the Boston Bruins approached Norman's long-term friend and coach, Ace BAILEY, asking him if his protégé wanted to turn professional. Norman never pursued the offer as salaries back then were only a small fraction of what they are today.
For a while after university, Norman taught high-school math and physics. When the Second World War came, Norman joined the navy. Margaret, by then his wife, often joked that he only enlisted so he could play on the naval hockey team, which boasted several National Hockey League players on its roster. Yet Norman took his work seriously. He spent three years in a special branch of the navy, opting to stay on after the war to help returning soldiers find civilian jobs or attend school.
When he left the navy, Norman worked for a while with Imperial Optical where he sold waste receptacles. Metal for the containers was scarce following the war and Norman soon took advantage of this niche in the market. With no engineering experience, he started his own company, Erno Manufacturing, making metal household and business products. With his strong work ethic and straightforward and friendly business demeanor, Erno burgeoned from the back of a garage to a building the size of a city block.
During this time, Norman also helped Margaret raise three boys. He coached baseball and hockey from peewee to major-junior teams. Among his charges were four-time Stanley Cup winner Peter MAHOVLICH and Mike KILKENNY, who went on to pitch for the Detroit Tigers.
In 1968, Norman bought Margaret the birthday present of her dreams: a cottage on Lake Joseph in Muskoka. After he retired, Norman and Margaret spent up to six months of the year there, revelling in the lifestyle: canoeing at dusk and fishing at dawn. Norman also took up watercolour painting and golf -- at 75, he shot his age at a nearby 18-hole course.
Norman spent his last decade suffering from the advanced stages of Alzheimer's. The disease stole Norman from the world, but his spirit will never be forgotten. Within 10 minutes of meeting someone he became a trusted and, often, a lifelong friend. He played the piano, read extensively and enjoyed political debates with his family over dinner and Margaret's apple pie. He loved life, and no disease could take that memory of him away.
Robert McCLELLAND is Norman's son.

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BAILEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-02 published
FERGUSON, Angus Harold
died March 31, 2003, at Cambridge Memorial Hospital peacefully, and surrounded by his family. He leaves his wife Alice (BAILEY) of 61 years in April 2003, and five children - Ian (Connie), Waterloo; Sharon (Horst) WOHLGEMUT, Kingston; Hugh, Guelph Grant (Karen), Cambridge; and Janet BABCOCK, Toronto. He will be sincerely missed by 11 grandchildren. Angus was born in Killean, Puslinch Township, Ontario, on March 13, 1918, the eldest of three boys, to Marshall and Nellie (Amy) FERGUSON. He was predeceased by his parents and brother Donald (1975) and is survived by his brother, Ian (Millie) of London. He attended Killean Public School, Galt Collegiate Institute, and farmed until 1942 when, for health reasons, he and his wife moved to Toronto. In 1949 he returned to Galt and shortly thereafter became operator then owner of the Credit Bureau of Galt, later Cambridge, where he along with his wife continued in business until the '80's when the business was sold to his son Hugh. During those years he served as Director of the Associated Credit Bureau of Ontario, then Canada, and U.S.A. Associations and later as President of Ontario and Canada. He served on several committees of the City of Galt and Cambridge over the years. He was a member of the Galt Lions Club since 1952, as President and Director as well as bulletin editor for over 20 years. His main interest in the Lions Club was eye-sight conservation for which he received the Helen Keller award, and was the first in the Galt Club to be honoured with the Melvin Jones Award. He was also, involved in Heart and Stroke from its' beginning in the Galt unit and was its' first Treasurer. Angus was a member of Knox's Galt Presbyterian Church for over 50 years, and served on the Board of Managers as secretary for 17 years, was a longtime elder, and worked on many committees - special among them to him was as a member of the Scout and Group committee where he served for many years. Above all else, Angus was an ardent fisherman and hunter, and always enjoyed being able to say he had ''dipped his line in most areas of Canada from Coast to Coast''. His other main interest was the Clans and Scottish Societies of Canada and North America and most particularly - the Ferguson Clan - serving 25 years as Regional Director of Ontario and as President of Clan Ferguson of Canada and North America. He had been a Clan member in Scotland since 1948. He was a participant in the Multicultural movement for Cambridge from the inception and was able to get the first grant for it through his association with a member of a Toronto member of Clan Ferguson Society of Canada. Ill health followed him through his lifetime. He was a very early recipient of open heart surgery in 1959. He held a deep interest in the progress made in his area and felt it a great honor to be asked to be a part of the Heart and Stroke Foundation when it first started a chapter in his area. Friends will be received at Coutts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 96 St. Andrews, Street, Cambridge (www.funeralscanada.com) on Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. and Friday at the church from 1: 30 p.m. until the service time of 2: 30 p.m. Funeral Services will then be conducted at Knox's Galt Presbyterian Church, Queen's Square, Cambridge on Friday, April 4, 2003, at 2: 30 p.m. with Rev. Wayne DAWES officiating. Interment Killean Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Knox's Galt Presbyterian Church (Major Repair Fund) or the Regional Heart and Stroke Foundation would be gratefully received.

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BAILEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
Toronto's musical Mr. Chips
Headmaster of private Crescent School took over a rundown building and fixed its wiring, plumbing and even its furnace until a newer structure could be found
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, July 10, 2003 - Page R5
He was the first Canadian-born principal of a Toronto boys' school that for its first 50 years had hired only British headmasters. Bill BURRIDGE, who has died at the age of 79, remained at Toronto's Crescent School until 1986.
The boys at the school both respected him and feared him. The father of one former head boy remembers "Mr. BURRIDGE" as a man who could "cut through the BS. The boys knew they couldn't get away with anything with him. But he was a wonderful teacher."
Mr. BURRIDGE was an unlikely Mr. Chips. If you looked back at his early school career, no one would have picked him for the job as a headmaster at a private school.
William BURRIDGE was a working class boy who was born in Toronto on August 16, 1923. His father, an English immigrant, was a painter for Imperial Oil. Young Bill went to Western Technical-Commercial School to become an electrician.
But like many of his generation, the Second World War wrought changes in his life.
He went into the Royal Canadian Air Force as an electrician. One of his first postings was to Dorval Airport in Montreal, a military field during the war, where one of his fellow electricians, Phil JONES, remembered they worked on odd planes for the Royal Canadian Air Force, odd because they were not the standard aircraft flown by Bomber Command. They were American planes, twin-engined B-25 bombers and the long range four engine B-24 Liberators.
One big B-24 was unique. It was named Commando and its bomb racks had been stripped out to make it into a passenger plane, with two private bunks for Winston Churchill, the wartime British Prime Minister and his doctor. The plane was parked at Dorval a lot of the time, from where it could easily head out to Bermuda, West Africa or to Cairo, or across the Atlantic to Britain. The aircraft was serviced by Royal Canadian Air Force electricians, including Mr. BURRIDGE. The posting provided interesting stories for him to tell in later life.
Mr. BURRIDGE and the other electricians were sent to different bases, including one just outside Vancouver. While there they used to pick up extra money on their leave by hitchhiking across the border to Seattle to work as drivers and warehousemen at a fruit-packing plant. The war meant a shortage of men and the Canadian airmen were given weekend work, no questions asked.
A professional musician on the double bass since the age of 17, through the war Mr. BURRIDGE played in pickup bands and an Royal Canadian Air Force band, along with Mr. Jones and others.
When Mr. BURRIDGE came home from the war he kept playing. During the late forties he played at dances at the Young Men's Christian Association and at clubs such as the Rex. In the fifties he played in the Benny Lewis Orchestra at places such as the Casa Loma and the Palace Pier, then a dance hall, now a family of condos on Lake Ontario. He played with the jazz great Moe KAUFMAN and did some session work with the jazz singers Peggy LEE and Pearl BAILEY.
Mr. BURRIDGE also played during the summers at resorts in the Muskokas. To get there he had to book an extra seat on the lake steamer Segwun for his big bass.
A short time after the war Mr. BURRIDGE decided to take advantage of the free education earned by his wartime service. He went to the University of Toronto and graduated in 1950 in arts and sciences. He worked as a salesman for General Foods for a year and then started teaching school, first in Coppercliff in northern Ontario and then in Scarborough near Toronto.
By the late fifties he was a principal in Whitby, just outside Toronto. But a car accident on the way to school influenced his view of things. His car slipped on ice and broadsided a telephone pole. Although unhurt, the crash made him ready for a change. One day he was on jury duty at a courtroom in downtown Toronto and spotted an ad in the Globe and Mail for a grade 5 teacher at Crescent School. He applied and got the job.
Crescent School was then on the old Massey estate on Dawes Road at Victoria Park. When he started there were only nine teachers, 100 students and the school went from kindergarten to grade 8.
Mr. BURRIDGE introduced music to the curriculum and became a popular teacher. When the headmaster was ill he took over on a part-time basis, becoming headmaster on his predecessor's death in 1966.
At the time, Crescent School was a mess. The building was falling apart and the headmaster was called on to fix the electrical work, the plumbing and even the furnace. He helped in the search for a new building and in 1972 the school moved to the old Garfield Weston Estate at Bayview Avenue and Post Road.
Over the years Crescent School changed and dropped the lower grades and expanded as far as the last grade of high school. Mr. BURRIDGE remained headmaster until 1971 and stayed on teaching and as assistant director of the Lower School until his retirement in 1986.
In private, Mr. BURRIDGE was also a Mr. Fixit. He helped keep up some family rental properties and often workered on his old Buicks or his house in suburban Ajax, Ontario, on a lot of almost half an acre. His other hobby was keeping bees.
Bill BURRIDGE leaves his wife Faith, to whom he was married for 54 years, and his three children, Reid, Rob and Hope.

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BAILEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-12 published
NESBITT, Robert Samuel
Born 26 April 1913, died peacefully 11 September 2003, of complications following a broken hip, in his ninety-first year. Beloved husband of Jean (née BOOTH) and loving father of Catherine (Bob LECKEY,) Shelagh (Doug WHITFIELD) and Robbie (deceased.) Proud grandfather of Bill (Shelly,) Rob and Aaron (Lynne DESPRES) WHITFIELD and of Amelia BAILEY (Mark) and Robert LECKEY (Josý NAVAS) and great-grandfather of Amy and Ashley WHITFIELD and of Corbin BAILEY. Predeceased by sisters Joyce (Clarence LOCKWOOD,) Patricia (Ben THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON) and, in childhood, Eleanor and brother George. Bob's life was marked by his dedication to his family, Friends, neigbours, church and community. The family will receive Friends at the Walas Funeral Home, 130 Main Street, Brighton on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service will be held from St. Paul's Anglican Church, Brighton on Monday, September 15th at 1 o'clock. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery Cemetery, Brighton. As an expression of sympathy, donations to St. Paul's Anglican Church, Belleville Hospital or The Red Cross, care of Box 96, Brighton, Ontario K0K 1H0, would be appreciated by the family.

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BAILEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
LAMONT, Jean Annette (ROBINS)
Jean died peacefully, on Tuesday, October 14, 2003 in Toronto, with her children Doug and Anne at her side; in her 84th year. Predeceased by her loving husband and friend of 53 years, Bruce Maitland LAMONT, a former senior international executive with Royal Bank of Canada. Survived by son, James Douglas and his wife Kathy, stepchildren Melissa and August and step-great granddaughter, Elizabeth; and daughter Anne and husband Christopher JAMES and their daughter, Kathleen. Cherished sister of Joan BAILEY and her children, Robin (Marie,) Joanne (Ken HOLT,) John (Clare) and Janet (Heino CLAESSENS) and their families. Remembered by sisters-in-law Pauline FLYNN (Hank) and Meribeth LAMONT and their families and the extended LAMONT clan. Special thanks to cousin Joanne HOLT for all her support and help over the last few years. Thank you to the staff and Mom's new Friends at the Kingsway Retirement Residence, Etobicoke for their Friendship and support in making the Kingsway her home away from home. A graduate of MacDonald Hall, Guelph University (1940) and Toronto Western Hospital School of Nursing (1943) she was always proud of her accomplishment as one of Canada's first female nursing flight attendants with Trans Canada Airways. Mom was an avid bridge player and golfer, a social dynamo who cherished her wide circle of Friends. A celebration of her life will be held on Saturday, October 18, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 89 Dunn Street (at Lakeshore Road), Oakville. If desired, in lieu of flowers, donations in Jean's memory to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.
Mom, a Grand Slam and a hole-in-one to you. Love always.

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BAILEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-18 published
Black pride of Canadian track and field
First Canadian-born black athlete to win an Olympic medal was member of relay team at 1932 Los Angeles Games but could find work only as a railway porter
By James CHRISTIE, Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - Page R9
Ray LEWIS's event in Olympic track and field was officially the 400-metre sprint, a flat race. His enduring place in Canadian sport history, however, was earned for hurdling a barrier.
Mr. LEWIS, who died in his native Hamilton at age 94 on the weekend, was the first Canadian born black athlete to stand upon the Olympic medals podium. He won a bronze medal as a member of the Canadian 4 x 400-metre relay at the Los Angeles Games in 1932.
At a time where racial discrimination was the way of the world, Mr. LEWIS didn't get to live a hero's life. Viewed today as a pathfinder for talented black athletes, in the 1930s Mr. LEWIS had to all but quit his athletics training because of the demands of his job as a railway porter with the Canadian Pacific Railways. He spent 22 years on the trains making 250 trips from Toronto to Vancouver. To try and stay fit, Mr. LEWIS would train by running alongside the rails when the train stopped on the prairies.
"He deserved so much more than he ever received," said Donovan BAILEY, who won two gold medals at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics in the 100 metres and 4 x 100-metre relay. "I benefited from his going before.
"I had the honour and good fortune of having lunch with Ray LEWIS and talking with him. I couldn't imagine what it was like in his day. It was so different. Ultimately, he's one who inspired me."
Raymond Gray LEWIS was a Hamiltonian, cradle to grave. James WORRALL, honorary member of the International Olympic Committee and Canada's Olympic flag bearer in 1936, recalled the family roots in the area went back to the 1840s when his great grandparents escaped slavery in the United States and settled near Otterville, Ontario
The youngest child of Cornelius LEWIS and Emma GREEN, Ray LEWIS was born October 8, 1910, at 30 Clyde St. He began running races for fun at age 9 when he entered as contest at a local picnic. He began formal training in track and field at Central Collegiate where the autocratic John Richard (Cap) CORNELIUS was his coach. In 1929, he established a Canadian high-school track-and-field record of four championships in one day, taking the dashes at 100, 200, and 440 yards as they were measured then, and anchoring the one-mile relay. In 1928 and 1929, Mr. LEWIS was part of the Central relay team that won the United States national schoolboy title.
He briefly attended Marquette University in Milwaukee but returned to Canada during the Depression and joined the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Besides his Olympic medal performance with teammates Phil EDWARDS, Alex WILSON and Jimmy BALL, Mr. LEWIS was also a Canadian champion several times and competed in the inaugural British Empire Games in 1930 in Hamilton and the 1934 Empire Games in London. where he won a silver medal in the mile relay. Mr. EDWARDS was actually the first black athlete to win an Olympic medal for Canada in 1932, getting the 800-metre honour about a half-hour before the relay with Mr. LEWIS. Mr. EDWARDS, however, was native of British Guyana, while Ray LEWIS was a local.
Mr. LEWIS, who in 2001 was awarded the Order of Canada, had a life-long attachment to the Empire Games, later renamed the Commonwealth Games. He was an adviser to the bidders who recently sought the 2010 Games for Hamilton and vowed that if the Games were coming back, he'd be there to greet them at the official opening at age 100. The Hamilton bid lost out last week to one from New Delhi, India. He lit the torch during the opening ceremonies at the International Children's Games in Hamilton July 1, 2000.
Mr. LEWIS wrote an autobiography entitled Shadow Running in which he detailed his life "as porter and Olympian." He was featured in a 2002 TVOntario documentary series on racism, Journey to Justice. "It [racism] felt worse here, because it wasn't supposed to happen here," he recalled in the video.
Whereas white athletes had an opportunity for coaching jobs after their careers, Mr. LEWIS did not. His position as a porter was one of the few jobs open to men of his race.
"The first time I met him, the Canadian team was on its way to Fort William, Ontario, for the Canadian championships in 1933. They travelled by Pullman and Ray was the porter. He couldn't get the time off to compete. But he did make the 1934 Empire Games team and was presented to the Prince of Wales, something that was a point of honour for him. He felt it was something to rub into all those people who had kept him off teams and out of places because he was black," Mr. WORRALL said.
Mr. LEWIS married Vivienne JONES in 1941, and they adopted two children, sons Larry and Tony.

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BAILEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-22 published
DUGGAN, Devina (BAILEY)
Died unexpectedly, but after a brave battle with a long illness, on November 14, 2003 at St Joseph's Hospital, London, Ontario. Survived by her daughter Alexa and son James, and his daughter Alysha. Also survived by her brothers James, George, and Norman, and their families, and the family of her late brother Fred, all of Winnipeg. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that gifts of remembrance be made to the estate, dispersed to charity as per Devina's wishes. Memorial will be held at 2 pm on Sunday, November 30, 2003 at the Parlour on King, 546 King St (at William), London. All Welcome.
Mom, we miss you.
You were our mother,
and our good friend.

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BAIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
The Globe was his church'
The editor-in-chief was mentor to journalists, defender of social policies, respected by those criticized in print, and described as a man with a 'warm human touch'
By Michael VALPY Thursday, April 10, 2003 - Page R11
In his two decades as editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, former senator Richard (Dic) James DOYLE wielded a journalistic influence in Canadian public life matched only by that of George BROWN, the newspaper's founder.
He died yesterday in Toronto, one month past his 80th birthday. His wife of 50 years, Florence, passed away on March 20.
Senator DOYLE -- editor from 1963 to 1983 -- gave the newspaper a boldly independent voice, loosening up its then lock-step support for the Progressive Conservative Party.
Under his direction, the newspaper would praise a government one day and lambaste it the next. He was a passionate defender of civil liberties, intensely engaged in the development of Canada's social policies throughout the 1960s and 1970s and as much concerned with the powerless in Canadian society as the powerful.
"In the time I've been editor," he once said, "we've not supported any party in office. I think we make whomever we support uncomfortable. We're the kind of friend you could do without."
He once said he felt more intellectually comfortable with Pierre TRUDEAU than all the prime ministers he knew, and one of his favourite editorial cartoons was one he suggested after overhearing his daughter Judith talking to a friend in her bedroom. It showed two teenage girls sitting on a bed under a poster of Mr. TRUDEAU. One girl says to the other: "He's not 50 like your father's 50."
His views, although stamped on the editorial page, were never imposed on his reporters. He was concerned with a story's news value -- not the fallout -- and he expected his staff to act with the same concern.
He wanted The Globe to be a writer's newspaper and gave his writers autonomy, even when their views went against his own philosophies. He had a special place in his heart for columnists who expressed contradictory opinions.
The young writers invited to attend the buffet lunches he gave regularly for prime ministers, premiers and cabinet ministers, bank presidents and giants of the arts were treated to superb tutorials in the life of their nation that left an indelible mark on their minds.
Warm, funny, theatrical and gregarious, he was a mentor and model for many of Canada's best-known journalists -- among them, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Michael ENRIGHT and Don NEWMAN, former Globe and Maclean's managing editor Geoffrey STEVENS, his successor as Globe editor Norman WEBSTER, and former foreign correspondent, dance critic and now master of the University of Toronto's Massey College, John FRASER.
"He was absolutely fearless," Mr. STEVENS said yesterday. "He did tough stuff. He did important stuff. And he refused to bow to pressure from business, from politicians and for that matter from journalists. I didn't always agree with him, but I always, always respected what he said."
Mr. FRASER said: "He was an editor who made young journalists' dreams come true. Like many who came under his spell at The Globe and Mail, I will go to my grave grateful for the horizons he opened up to me."
George BAIN, for years The Globe's Ottawa columnist, recalled the only time Senator DOYLE actually complained about something Mr. BAIN had written was when he filed an end-piece to a royal tour and suggested that the institution wasn't appropriate to the Canadian circumstances.
"Dic, as a devoted monarchist, was moved to say, 'Did you have to?' The fact is I felt I did -- and he, despite strong feelings, didn't say, 'You can't.' "
When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY appointed him to the Senate in 1985, he decided to sit as a Conservative out of courtesy.
Mr. MULRONEY described him yesterday as "a marvellous man, rigorous, thoughtful, with a disciplined approach to life and a very warm human touch to everything he did.
"When he cut people up, including me, there was no malice to it, no ad hominem attack, he was never bitter or partisan in any way.'The full impact of Senator DOYLE's presence as editor was probably first felt by The Globe's readers on March 20, 1964, when a front-page editorial appeared under the heading, Bill of Wrongs.
It was prompted by legislation proposed by Ontario's Conservative attorney-general, Frederick CASS, which empowered the Ontario Police Commission to summon any person for questioning in secret deprive him of legal advice; and keep him in prison indefinitely if he refused to answer.
"For the public good," the editorial stated, the Ontario Government "proposes to trample upon the Magna Carta, Habeas Corpus, the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Rule of Law.
"Are we in... the Canada of 1964 -- or in the Germany of 1934?
"This legislation is supposed to be directed against organized crime. In fact, it is directed against every man and woman in the province."
Soon after, Mr. CASS resigned.
Senator DOYLE's skills as a writer were particularly evident on an election night when the paper would present an editorial on the results between editions. Alastair LAWRIE, now retired as an editorial writer, recalled that once the results were known, Senator DOYLE would stand in silent thought for maybe a minute and a half and then start to dictate. In a matter of a few minutes, he would complete a reasoned editorial that scarcely required the addition of a comma.
Senator DOYLE preferred to work in anonymity, only accepting honorary degrees and later the seat in the Senate near the end of his newspaper career.
He sat on no boards, belonged to no important clubs, almost never appeared on television or radio, didn't sign petitions and seldom gave speeches. When he met a politician, there were usually witnesses.
He didn't hold a driver's licence and for years arrived at the old Globe office on King Street by streetcar. When The Globe moved to its present office on Front Street, Senator DOYLE took a taxi.
Retired Ottawa Citizen publisher Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and a close friend of Senator DOYLE, suspected "he didn't trust his Irish temper [to drive] and that was probably to the common good."
Mr. DAVEY said Senator DOYLE's low public profile "was part of his own protection against conflicts on his own part. The Globe was his church. Journalism was his religion.
"I think that Dic, in the context of his time, probably had a greater influence on Canadian journalism than any other single individual," Mr. DAVEY said.
"It was Dic's execution that made the Report on Business what it became and is. He was the moving force from within The Globe often unseen -- in the whole question of conflicts of interest as they affected journalists.
"He was really the wellspring of that kind of thinking and, of course, what The Globe did affected very directly what a lot of other organizations did."
Born in Toronto on March 10, 1923, Dic DOYLE seemed destined to get ink on his hands. He said in 1985 that he had decided on a newspaper career at age 7 and joined the Chatham Daily News as a sports reporter after he graduated from Chatham Collegiate Institute. He was promoted to sports editor, city editor and then news editor.
During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and served with the 115 (Bomber) Squadron (Royal Air Force) at Ely, near Cambridge in England. He was discharged at the end of the war with the rank of flying officer.
He was 23 and felt that life was passing him by, so rather than attending university, as other returning air-force officers were doing, he returned to the Chatham paper. It was a decision he said he later regretted.
He came to The Globe in 1951, initially as a copy editor, the only job available. His first byline appeared in The Globe in December of 1952 over a story about milk bottles.
In the same year, he also wrote a book called The Royal Story, a labour of love that proved to be a standard treatment of the monarchy, and which he was the first to acknowledge, replowed already well-tilled soil.
(The Royal family had a special status at The Globe under Senator DOYLE. One former senior editor, the legendary Martin LYNCH, told of being taken off the front-page layout after he replaced a picture of Princess Margaret, which appeared in early editions, with a photograph of a prize-winning pig.
When The Globe decided to publish a weekly supplement in 1957, Senator DOYLE became its first editor, with a staff that had no experience in the weekly field. The paper was laid out on the carpet of the managing editor's office after he had gone home.
It shrunk over the years because, Mr. DOYLE said, it was ahead of its time. It died in 1971.
From there, in 1959, he became managing editor of the newspaper and then editor in 1963. He stepped aside in 1983 to take on the role of editor emeritus and to write a column -- an experience, he said two years later, that left him chastened. "The guy [columnist] out there has his problems."
Former Globe publisher A. Roy MEGARRY, said, "In my opinion, no one -- including the seven publishers that Dic has served with during his time at the paper -- had made a more positive and lasting impression on The Globe than he has."
Likely among the greatest tributes paid to him as an editor came from the Kent Commission established by the federal government in 1980 to investigate the ownership of Canada's daily newspapers after the Ottawa Journal and the Winnipeg Tribune folded in virtually simultaneous moves by the Thomson and Southam chains.
In its report, the commission credited Senator DOYLE with "adhering to an ideal of press freedom that often tends to get lost in the management of newspapers....
"To a great extent, the editor-in-chief of The Globe belongs to a breed which unfortunately is on its way to extinction.
"The Globe and Mail testifies to the influence that continues to be exerted by a newspaper with a clearly defined idea of its role and substantial editorial resources. It is read by almost three-quarters of the country's most important decision-makers in all parts of Canada and at all levels of government. More than 90 per cent of media executives read it regularly and it tends to set the pace for other news organizations."
The Globe and Mail was bought by Thomson Newspapers in 1980. Senator DOYLE made no secret of the fact that he would have preferred having the newspaper bought by R. Howard Webster, who owned it before it became part of the Financial Post chain. However, in 1985 he said that Thomson was the best alternative among the others in the field.
When Prime Minister MULRONEY named him to the Senate, he became the first active Globe journalist to receive such an appointment since George BROWN in 1873. As an editor and a columnist, Senator DOYLE had often preached Senate reform and had opposed patronage appointments.
His acceptance prompted a flow of letters to the editor that favoured and disapproved of the appointment in about equal measure.Senator DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. Funeral arrangements have not been announced.

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BAIRD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
BABICK MacDONALD, Mary
Passed away on March 6, 2003, at the age of 67 at Saint Mary's Hospital. Beloved wife of Lee Wm. MacDONALD. Sister of Donald BABICK (Jacqueline.) Aunt of Nancy (Mark BRENNAN) and Todd (Erin DYER.) She will also be sadly missed by Brad-Lee MacDONALD, Lee (3rd) MacDONALD and David MacDONALD and their families as well as by her sister-in-law Ruth BAIRD and her great-nephews Joshua and Isaac. Visitation at the Mount Royal Funeral Complex, 1297 Chemin de la Foret, Outremont (514) 279-6540 on Saturday, March 8, 2003, and Sunday, March 9, 2003, from 2 to 5 pm and 7 to 9 pm and two hours prior to service on Monday, March 10, 2003. Funeral service to be held in the chapel of the complex at 1 pm. Donations in her memory may be made to Saint Mary's Hospital Centre, 3830 Lacombe, Montreal, H3T 1M5 in care of Dr. J.F. PRCHAL, Chief of Oncology. Your condolences to the family may be forwarded to www.everlastinglifestories.com

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BAIRD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-29 published
Kenneth Fawcett COLLINS
By Alan RAYBURN Thursday, May 29, 2003 - Page A26
Husband, father, grandfather, veteran, volunteer, family historian. Born November 23, 1916, in Haverhill, Massachusetts. Died February 19, in Ottawa, of cancer, aged 86.
Ken COLLINS was born close to the New Hampshire border, into a family with very deep New England roots. His father Bernard (Bern) traced his roots back to the 1600s in that area, while his mother, Eleanor (Elly) McPHERSON, came from Grand Valley in Dufferin County, Ontario Elly's mother, Elizabeth Adaline FAWCETT, was the source of Ken's second name. Bern and Elly emigrated from the United States to Montreal in 1926, and then, in 1930, moved to North Bay, Ontario
In 1941, Ken graduated from Queen's University in Kingston with a degree in chemical engineering and worked in the Welland Chemical Works in Niagara Falls for two years. He then joined the Canadian army's Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, and rose to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. Ken's pride as a commandant of "Reemee" was revealed in his car licence plate: CREME.
Ken served overseas from 1943 to 1946, and was a Normandy veteran. After the war, he held various staff and regimental appointments, mostly in Ottawa. Upon retiring from the army in 1967, Ken was engaged by Carleton University to administer the department of planning and construction until 1982.
During his Queen's graduation week, Ken married Evalyn ROBLIN, who had been raised west of Kingston in Adolphustown Township, Lennox and Addington County. After he discovered that local historians had been mistaken about which of two ancestral Roblin roots were Evalyn's, he vigorously launched into a search of his own family roots. Over a period of some 60 years he accumulated 24 thick binders on family connections. He was able to trace back 18 generations, with King Edward 4th among his ancestors in the 1400s.
Ken and Evalyn had three children, Marianne, Bruce (a fireman who was killed in a fire in 1972), and Elizabeth; also, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Family was very important to Ken; he was very proud of his offspring.
For almost a quarter of a century, Ken was a Friday evening volunteer at the Family History Centre of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on Ottawa's Prince of Wales Drive. There he guided both experienced and novice family historians to find their ancestral records.
Recognizing the value of working with others involved in genealogy (right up there in North American hobby popularity, right after stamp collecting), Ken joined the Ontario Genealogical Society and its Ottawa Branch in 1972. After serving as the chair of the branch in the mid-1970s, he rose through the ranks to become the president of the Ontario Genealogical Society from 1977 to Ken was a prime mover of recording gravestone inscriptions in Ontario's cemeteries. As the Ontario Genealogical Society cemetery inscription coordinator from 1974 to 1992, he saw the number of recorded cemeteries rise from 1,800 to more than 5,000. A spinoff from the cemetery recordings is the much-used Ontario Cemetery Finding Aid on the Internet, which publishes the indexes of the cemetery recordings.
Ken was a member of Rideau Park United Church in the Alta Vista area of Ottawa, and had worked there for 36 years with the Boy Scouts. When his grand_son, John BAIRD (now an Ontario cabinet minister) became a teenager, he guided him to become a Queen's Scout.
Ken COLLINS was a great mentor, friend and gentleman: his contributions to family history studies, cemetery recordings and Scouting will long serve many Ottawa and Ontario generations to come.
Alan RAYBURN is a friend of Ken COLLINS; Edward KIPP contributed to the article.

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BAIRD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-10 published
DIMM, Joan B.
Of Jupiter, Florida and Short Hills, New Jersey, age 75, died Monday, June 2, 2003 in Jupiter.
Mrs. DIMM, the daughter of Jean BAIRD and G. Roper GOUINLOCK, was born in Toronto, Canada. She graduated from Bishop Strachan School in Toronto, and attended the University of Toronto. Following her marriage to Ross L. DIMM, Jr., she settled in New Jersey.
Surviving are sons, Robert of Atlanta, Georgia, T. Edward of Blue Bell, Pennsylvania, a daughter, Patricia DIMM of Chicago, Illinois and five grandchildren.
A memorial service will be held at Christ Church in Short Hills, New Jersey at 11 a.m. on July 12, 2003. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be sent to the American Heart Association.

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BAIRD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-09 published
Activist established blue box program
Radical became known for putting pressure on government, corporations
By Martin MITTELSTAEDT Wednesday, July 9, 2003 - Page R7
Toronto -- One of Canada's most influential environmental activists, Gary GALLON, died Thursday in Montreal after a long battle with cancer.
Although Mr. GALLON may not have been a household name, Canadians almost everywhere will recognize one of his major achievements, the setting up of the country's first blue box recycling program in Ontario during the late 1980s.
He also had a hand during the 1970s in establishing Greenpeace, and maintained a lifelong passion for environmental causes evident in his series of twice-monthly newsletters, called the GALLON Environmental Letter.
"I've always been bothered by excess consumption and wanton destruction of habitat. Human ethics must allow space for other creatures," he said recently.
Born in the United States in 1945, Mr. GALLON moved to Canada in the late 1960s to avoid the draft during the Vietnam war. He settled in Vancouver and began working by writing newsletters promoting mining stocks listed on the Vancouver Stock Exchange.
After work, he turned to his true passion, the environment, joining the nighttime meetings of the Society for the Promotion of Environmental Conservation, a group that at the time opposed the use of the British Columbia coast for supertanker routes.
"He became concerned that what he was doing [by selling stocks] was causing environmental damage," said David OVED, a Toronto environmental consultant who worked with him in the Ontario government.
Mr. GALLON's biggest impact on the country's conservation movement occurred when he was senior policy adviser for Jim BRADLEY, Ontario's Liberal environment minister from 1985-90, one of Mr. BRADLEY's surprise hires.
It was a risky move for the new Liberal government to employ one of Canada's leading environmental radicals for such a post.
Mr. GALLON instantly became known as one of " BRADLEY's brats," the moniker given the group of dedicated environmentalists assembled by Mr. BRADLEY within the Ontario government who helped originate such programs as the blue box and the province's acid rain reduction program.
In the mid-1980s, municipal recycling had been an experimental effort in a few communities.
Mr. GALLON worked to establish the blue box across the province. Mr. OVED said Mr. GALLON could often influence opponents within the government through his use of the inventive turn of phase or image.
In one particularly bitter debate, cabinet was discussing preservation of Ontario's Temagami forest region, an area containing some of Canada's last remaining stands of towering old growth red and white pines.
Mr. OVED said some politicians were questioning why environmentalists in Toronto and elsewhere in Southern Ontario were arguing to preserve a forest in the north that they might never see.
Mr. GALLON said forest preservation was part of the ideal that Canadians held of the society they would like to be part of.
"Gary's comment was 'People here may never see those forests, but they value green spaces in their minds,' Mr. OVED said.
Mr. OVED said the turn of phase impressed then-premier David PETERSON, who began to affectionately call Mr. GALLON and Mr. BRADLEY's other environmental activists "space cadets."
Some of the biggest run-ins that Mr. GALLON had during the 1980s were with Inco, one of Ontario's major emitter of chemicals that cause acid rain.
At one testy meeting, Mr. GALLON, dressed in a pink shirt, had exchanges with Inco's former chairman, Chuck BAIRD, who was later so annoyed at being pressed on the company's pollutants, that an Inco official called Mr. BRADLEY to complain.
"I got a call the next day asking who where those young radicals in pink polo shirts asking those impertinent questions," Mr. BRADLEY said.
Television broadcaster and Greenpeace founder Robert HUNTER said that Mr. GALLON related to him that the Inco chairman "had never run into such serious sass from mere political minions."
Of his experience in government, Mr. GALLON once said "you have less room to rail but more power to get things done."
Mr. GALLON suffered from colon cancer, which had spread to his lungs and liver.
Despite the pain of the disease and its treatments, he kept up his hobby of competitive swimming, winning in his age group in a Quebec swim meet last year, according to Mr. OVED.
Last month, the Royal Canadian Geographic Society's magazine gave Mr. GALLON its national environmental award for lifetime achievement.
Mr. GALLON was picked in 1977 to be executive director of the Nairobi-based Environment Liaison Centre International, where he met his wife-to-be, another prominent Canadian environmental activist, Janine FERRETTI.
Ms. FERRETTI was executive director of the North American Free Trade Agreement Commission for Environmental Cooperation and now holds a senior position with the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington. Mr. GALLON is survived by his two children, Kalifi and Jenika.

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BAIRD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-31 published
WHITEHOUSE, Gladys Yolande Laviolette
Died peacefully at Toronto Western Hospital on Tuesday, July 29, 2003, in her 100th year, one of eight daughters of the late Joseph B. LAVIOLETTE and May Emma SMITH, predeceased in 1961 by her husband, Robert Victor WHITEHOUSE, beloved sister of Dorothy BAIRD of Norwood, Ontario, and Gwyneth NEHER of Peace River, Alberta, and brother-in-law, George NEHER of Newmarket, Ontario, loving aunt of Debbie NEHER, Ginnie NEHER, Gwendy NEHER and Charles NEHER. Longtime member of the congregation and, with her late husband, a most generous benefactor of the Church of the Transfiguration (Anglican), 111 Manor Road East, Toronto. Funeral at the church on Friday, August 1, 2003 at eleven o'clock. Visitation at the church for one hour prior to the service. Cremation. Ashes to be interred beside her husband in the Laviolette family plot in Notre Dame du Neige Cemetery, Montreal. Arrangements entrusted to Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home.

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