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"ALL" 2003 Obituary


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ALLAN o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2003-11-14 published
FROST, Clayton " Nifty" John
Slipped away quietly on Friday, October 31st, 2003, Clayton (Nifty) John FROST of Peterborough, Ontario at 94 years of age. Sadly missed by Daughter Diane and husband Robert QUILLMAN of Wasaga Beach, son Don FROST and wife Vikky of Lakefield; Daughter Cathy FROST and companion Lane SMITH of Ajax and Granddaughter Catherine ALLAN and husband Brad and 3 great grand_sons, Lucus, Derek and Mackenzie ALLAN all of Barrie.
"Today Nifty walks the streets of Heaven"
Page 18

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ALLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
ALLAN, Stewart (Stew) Rae
Born in 1926 in Eramosa Township, brother of Helen DUFFIELD, Stew had a great life. He married Reta RICHMOND of Guelph and headed to Markham to start a career and a family. Stew spent 35 years at the Massey Ferguson Engineering Test Track. A long time member of the Markham Unionville Lions, Stew was the recipient of the Melvin Jones Fellow Award. The ''Monday Nighters'' card games were a tradition that span four decades and served as a model of camaraderie. When Stew retired from Massey, he started his second career as an entrepreneur of surplus equipment. Stew's pride and joy was his family. Always a big supporter and builder of their confidence with just the right words, Rae, Katharine (Kate), Gregg and Bruce, were the special ones in his life. With Sarah, the first grandchild, Stew became known as Pa, a name and role he cherished with the rest of the grandchildren (Eric, Ann-Marie, Ian, Mark and Bryce) and with Ruth, Andy, Wendy, and Lori. Stew the unique person -- always with a positive attitude. He touched and inspired many people. Stew would want to say Thanks to all the people that made his life so special and rewarding. Visitation will be at the Dixon-Garland Funeral Home, 166 Main Street, North (Hwy. 48) Markham on Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The service will be Thursday at 1: 30 p.m. at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, 143 Main Street, North, Markham. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Cancer Society.

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ALLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
ALLAN, Gavina Y. (née BROWN)
Survived by her husband William, brother Donald Grant BROWN (Katherine,) sister Olga Marion COUSINS (William,) nephews and nieces Ian BROWN (Wendy), Kevin BROWN (Katherine), Randolph COUSINS (Anne), Anne GOODCHILD (Wayne,) grand nephews and nieces Graham, Colin, Andrew and Shawn BROWN, Russell and Kerry COUSINS and Monica and Justine GOODCHILD. Private family arrangements have been made. In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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ALLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-29 published
Sheila Anne HAMILTON Sept. 18, 1930 - Feb. 26, 2003
Sheila Anne HAMILTON died unexpectedly in her daughter's Ocala, Florida home following surgery on a broken leg. She lived until the 1970s in Hamilton and Ancaster, Ontario, where her family owned Royal Oak Dairy. She is survived and greatly missed by her son Scott McKEE of Courtenay, British Columbia, her daughter Jane HAMILTON and Jane's spouse Joy MASUHARA, both of Vancouver, her granddaughters Sarah HAMILTON of Japan and Meghann HAMILTON of Vancouver, and her daughter Sally McKEE and grand_son Corey THOMAS of Ocala, Florida, along with her brother, Donald HAMILTON and his wife Pat HAMILTON of Burlington, Ontario, several cousins, her late sister Jane's husband, Fred WRIGHT and their five children, especially Liza ALLAN. She was an Registered Nurse Anesthetist and Licensed Practical Nurse as well as a master seamstress with her own business selling children's heirloom clothing. She was keenly interested in interior design and was a master chef along with a skilled gardener who most loved red roses. She had an infectious sense of humour and a true zest for living. Services were private. Cremation was followed by the scattering of her ashes at sea off Key Largo. Donations in lieu of flowers may be made to the Humane Society.

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ALLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Moms always liked him best
The Happy Gang's popular lead singer had a good reason for saying hello to his mom whenever the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio classic was on air
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, July 12, 2003 - Page F10
The double knock on the door occurred every afternoon at 1.
"Who's there?"
"It's the Happy Gang."
"Well, come on in!"
Then Eddie ALLEN, Bert PEARL, Bobby GIMBY and the rest of the cast of Canada's most popular radio program would break into "Keep happy with the Happy Gang."
Mr. ALLAN, the show's main singer, accordion player and sometimes emcee, died last week, leaving Robert FARNON as the gang's sole surviving member.
Every day as many as two million Canadians tuned in The Happy Gang, which led the national ratings for most of its run on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation from 1937 to 1959. Until television came along in 1952, Mr. ALLEN and his cast mates were among the most famous people in the country.
The show was the creation of Mr. PEARL, who'd come to Toronto from Winnipeg (his real name was Bert SHAPIRA) to study medicine. To pay for his education, he started playing piano on radio with a band that included violinist Blain MATHE, organist Kay STOKES and Mr. FARNON, a trumpet player who would go on to be the most successful of them all.
The band morphed into the Happy Gang and Mr. PEARL was the driving force behind it. Eddie ALLEN was hired as the fifth member of the troupe and stayed with the program until it went off the air.
He was born Edward George ALLEN on December 24, 1920, in Toronto, and came from a family of musicians. His father, Bill ALLEN, played the trombone and was in a military band in France during the First World War. When Eddie was 10, his father asked him what instrument he wanted to play. The boy thought about it for a while and made up his mind after seeing a huge piano accordion in a music-store window.
"It was bigger than I was," Mr. ALLEN remembered, "but dad bought it anyway."
In a couple of years, he was entertaining at small events with his accordion, making $5 or $10 a week. Better than a paper route. He also won some local singing contests. When he was 17, he started singing and playing three nights a week on a radio program called The Serenader. Bert PEARL heard it and called him in.
"I auditioned him with Bert PEARL, and we liked him right away," Mr. FARNON says from his home on Guernsey in the Channel Islands. "He looked about 12 years old and could barely see over the top of his accordion. He was terribly shy, no self-confidence like the rest of us. He was very popular with the ladies, a very good-looking little chap."
What impressed most was his voice. "There really wasn't a singer in the Happy Gang until he came along. I really liked his voice."
Mr. FARNON remembers an incident from a Happy Gang rehearsal. "Eddie was about to sing a song called, I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen, and I came up behind him and said, 'If you bring the gasoline.' He laughed so much he couldn't sing it when we went on the air."
The Happy Gang was old Canada, when the country was more rural and white skinned. It is impossible to imagine the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation mounting something so corny and wholesome. How corny was it? The host, Mr. PEARL, was known as "that slap-happy chappy, the Happy Gang's own pappy."
He also knew that sentiment sold. Mr. ALLEN would sing The Lord's Prayer on the program, two or three times a year, such as Good Friday, and during the war he sang it as an inspiration for mothers and their boys overseas.
By that time, the show's "appeal was enormous," wrote Ross MacLEAN, the late Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer and media critic who began listening as a child. "During the war years... its influence on the nation was profound. Its almost daily performance of There'll Always Be An England helped maintain home-front resolve and stirred at least this school kid into a frenzy of tinfoil collection, war certificate sales and the knitting of various items for the navy."
Among the cast, Mr. ALLEN was the kid. He was slight, about 5-foot-6, and looked as though he were too young to shave. A newspaper reported that while he was on his honeymoon in 1942, a hotel clerk in Hamilton didn't believe he was old enough to be married and refused to rent him a room. Even some of his fans were quoted by writer Trent FRAYNE as saying, "Oh my goodness, don't tell me that little boy's married."
On air, he always sang old-fashioned ballads. "Every mother would love the stuff he sang," said Lyman POTTS, a retired broadcaster who crossed paths with some of the gang. He recalled that one of the songs Mr. ALLEN performed on a Happy Gang recording was I'm a Lonely Little Petunia in an Onion Patch. It was popular on the program, maybe because it was the perfect example of the Happy Gang's sort of cornball humour.
Another example is the line Mr. ALLEN used almost every day in the early years of the program. Mr. PEARL had told him not to let fame go to his head -- "Don't ever get the idea that you're too big to say hello to your mother." So, for his first six years, Mr. ALLEN's opening words were "Hello mom."
During the war, they dropped the shtick for fear of hurting the feelings of mothers with sons in uniform. It sparked a letter-writing campaign. "Don't let Eddie stop saying 'Hello mom,' " Liberty Magazine reported in May, 1945. "He reminds me of my own boy overseas. I wonder if he could think of all of us mothers when he says hello."
Over the years, the show appeared 195 times, always live (tape had yet to come into use when it began), in the course of an annual 39-week season, most of the time with the same cast. Its time slot was moved when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation began running a 1 p.m. newscast, but the shift to 1: 15 EST didn't hurt the ratings. At first, it was produced in a studio on Davenport Road in Toronto and later in front of an audience of 700 to 800 on McGill Street near College and Yonge.
The program's mainstay was not talk or jokes but music, and the signature double knock on the door was an old-fashioned radio sound effect provided by Blain MATHE, who would move up to the mike and rap twice on the back of his violin.
Working together so closely did create some personality conflicts. There were practical jokes, usually aimed at the most uptight cast member: Mr. PEARL, a control freak who loved to plan the program in detail and had his own small office at the McGill Street studio.
One day, Mr. ALLEN and the other Happy Gang members set all the clocks forward by a few minutes. "We're late," they announced to Mr. PEARL, who raced into studio. After the opening, a couple of performers started to whine: "I don't want to do this."
Thinking they were actually on air, Mr. PEARL was shocked -- and didn't feel much better when he learned it was all a joke. It might have been one of the reasons he suffered a nervous breakdown (called "nervous exhaustion" for public consumption) and left the show in 1950 after 18 years and moved to the United States.
Eddie ALLEN took his place as emcee, but the incident rated an article in Maclean's by June CALLWOOD, the country's top magazine writer at the time, entitled: The Not So Happy Gang.
By then Mr. FARNON was long gone. During the war, he had joined the Canadian Army Show's band, and later led the Canadian band with the Allied Expeditionary Force, just as Glen MILLER led its U.S. ensemble. After the war he became a top arranger, working on Frank Sinatra albums and scores for such movies as Horatio Hornblower starring Gregory Peck.
Sinatra, however, was a little too flash for Eddie ALLEN, who preferred Bing Crosby. He was a sharp dresser, but his style was understated, almost always a conservative suit and muted shirt in a business where the shirt easily could have been orange.
His love of clothes gave him something to do when he left show business. Eddie ALLEN owned a men's clothing store in the west end of Toronto after he left the program. He later retired and moved to London, Ontario

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ALLARD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Betty Jane VANHORN (née HOWARD)
In loving memory of Betty Jane VANHORN (née Howard,) October 28, 1935 to October 26, 2003. Suddenly at Mindemoya Hospital on Sunday, October 26, 2003 at the age of 67 years.
Dear wife of John VANHORN of Tehkummah. Loving mother of Hector (Marilyn) of Ice Lake, Jacqueline (Ted) of Cambridge, Becky (Marvin) of Manitowaning, predeceased by Barry (1981), Gilbert (1979). Special grandmother of Tammy, D.J., Tobi (Andy), B.J., Ariana, Tyler, Benjamin, Mikala and two great grandchildren Angelica and Logan John. Will be remembered by siblings, Eleanor (Len) BOND, Tina (Roy) MANDIGO, Dorothy ALLARD, Reta (Charlie) PARKINSON, Lawrence HOWARD, Marie (John) CARRADONNA, Len (Ilene) HOWARD, Tom (Florence) HOWARD. Visitation was held on Tuesday, October 28, 2003.
Funeral Service at 2: 00 pm Wednesday, October 29, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Burial in Elmview Cemetery.

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ALLARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-27 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Peter Mills B.A. L.L.B. Deputy Small Claims Court Judge After a uniquely courageous battle against metastatic prostate cancer, Peter Mills THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, 58 years old, died Friday, March 21, 2003, at Oakville Trafalgar Hospital. Beloved husband and best friend for 25 years to Marlene (née ALLARD.) Fondly remembered by his Aunt Lois Enid MORTON. Predeceased by his parents Dr. George A. and Helen Connie THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Loving brother-in-law, uncle, godfather and friend. Peter graduated from Upper Canada College in 1963, received his undergraduate degree in political science from Western University, his law degree at Osgoode Hall Law School, Toronto, and was admitted to the Bar in 1971. Peter practiced family and criminal law for many years in Toronto. He became a deputy judge in 1980 working in North York and Richmond Hill. In his last years he was advice counsel at the University Ave Courts. Peter will be long acknowledged for his integrity, his peaceful quiet manner and strength in his professional and private lives. Peter was admired and respected by his peers and co- workers. He will be missed by all those who had the good fortune to call him friend. Peter enjoyed traveling and lately, cruising became his passion. Arrangements entrusted to Ward Funeral Home, Oakville. Cremation followed. A celebration of his life for all his Friends and co-workers will take place Sunday, May 4, 1: 00 ­ 6:00, at 2158 Elmhurst Avenue, Oakville. R.S.V.P. 905-842-4463, e-mail ptert@sympatico.ca. Donations may be made to Camp Oochigeas, Kids With Cancer, 60 St. Clair Avenue East, Suite 404, Toronto, Ontario M4T 1N5 or Camp Amici, 150 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 204, Toronto M4P 1E8, in Peter's memory.

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ALLEMS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-05 published
Leota Pauline McIVOR
In loving memory of Leota Pauline McIVOR who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Health Centre on Tuesday, February 25, 2003 at the age of 76 years.
Predeceased by beloved husband William "Bill" McIVOR (May 27, 1981.) Cherished mother of Dan and wife Kirt (Kirsten). Loved grandmother of Denise and special great grandmother of Karissa. Remembered by brother and sisters: Blossom ALLEMS, Max McGOVERN and Mary Ann CHILDERHOSE. Predeceased by Dell, Grant, Maurice McGOVERN, Helen DURDLE and Vida McGOVERN. Funeral Service was held on Thursday, February 27, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Burial at Mountainview Cemetery in the spring.

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ALLEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-07 published
Florence (ALLEN) HOBBS.
By R. Gerald HOBBS Tuesday, January 7, 2003, Page A16
Christian feminist, minister, wife, mother. Born October 14, 1911, near Flesherton, Ontario Died June 28, 2002, in Belleville, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 90.
Florence ALLEN, eldest daughter in a large farm family, was of Afro-American descent, her great-grandfather John ALLEN having left Philadelphia for King Township, York County in 1820. Florence's grandfather, James HENRY, subsequently took a homestead in the stony fields of Grey County. Florence was raised to be proud of that heritage, and she communicated that pride to her children and grandchildren.
Florence had begun nursing studies at Women's College Hospital in Toronto when she experienced an evangelical conversion, and felt a call to prepare for ministry in the Pilgrim Holiness (now the Wesleyan) Church. Ordained, she served churches in Wiarton and Oshawa, Ontario In September, 1940, she married a fellow student from Bible College, the Reverend Frank HOBBS. They had nine children, a career in itself. But she also determined not to forget her pastoral ministry, and was active in organizing groups for women and children in several of the congregations served by her minister husband.
Florence was raised in the traditions of farm populism. Her father, Richard, initiated her politically in the campaign that elected the United Farmers of Ontario government in 1919. When, at the age of 14, her oldest son expressed the intention of becoming a lawyer, she discouraged his ambition with the statement: "Oh, son, a Christian cannot be a lawyer. Lawyers tell lies!" In her later years she would undoubtedly have nuanced the judgment, but the passion for justice and integrity never wavered.
Current affairs were often discussed at the family table. "Come, children," Florence would say, "I've been too busy today to read the paper. Who can tell me what is happening in the world?" Elections were always an interesting time for the family. Frank was a lifelong Liberal, and made no secret of his support. When the children asked Florence how she had voted, she would reply: "It is the privilege of the secret ballot, that a woman does not have to reveal her vote to anyone." Given her strict religious convictions and our father's teasing about her vote cancelling his vote, we children assumed she was a Tory. In 1971, another son was arrested and jailed overnight for breaking a court injunction against picketing in support of immigrant women garment workers. Upon his release, Frank warned him that he would now unfortunately have a police record. Florence simply said: "I'm proud of you, son." She confessed she had been voting Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation (later New Democratic Party) all those years.
Florence raised her children to detest racism of all sorts, and to be feminists before most of us had heard of the term. She stood, unflinchingly, for the values of her generation of Christian feminists. Women's suffrage had been won, but the battle against gambling and the social abuse of alcohol held her attention. She organized a chapter of the Women's Christian Temperance Union in Massey, Ontario, and members of her growing family were strongly encouraged to take the pledge of total abstinence!
Although her stern moralism was tempered with compassion, she was not always an easy person to live with. As her husband and family knew well, once she had a clear conviction of what was right in any situation, compromise was out of the question. That strength, however, enabled her to carry her husband through his last years before his death in 1995. So it seems right that, with mind still clear, the night before she died she was granted a vision that Frank had come to accompany her "across the river." All nine of Florence's children survive her.
R. Gerald HOBBS is Florence's son.

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ALLEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
CHANDRAN, Beverley Anne
On Friday, March 7, 2003, in her 50th year, Beverley was called to, once again, be one with the Creator of Creation. She went with a blazing smile of glory in her soul, while giving her unselfish, unstoppable gratitude in peace, tranquility, and a twinkle in her eye. At home in Erin, Ontario with her loved ones. In their 29th year of marriage, ever beloved part of Clarence; eternally loving mother of sons Justin (23) and his wife Jennifer; Liam (21) and Keddy (19.) Only daughter of Ambrose and Theresa CARROLL and sister of Gary (Marlene), D'Arcy (Pam) and Paul (Harriet). Only daughter-in-law of Geoff and Lena CHANDRAN and sister-in-law of Brinda McLAUGHLIN (John.) Permanent thanks to dearest and giving Friends, old and new. And special thanks to: Dr. Alan FRIEDMAN and staff, Dr. Henry FRIEDMAN of Duke University Medical Center; Dr. Stephen TREMONT and staff of Rex Hospital Cancer Clinic Dr. Julian ROSENMAN and staff of University of North Carolina Radiation Oncology Clinic; Dr. Lew STOCKS and staff, Dr. Mike DELISSIO and staff, Dr. Robert ALLEN and staff, Dr. Donald BROWN, all of Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina, U.S.A. Dr. Peter COLE of Orangeville, Ontario, and the nursing staff of Robertson and Brown of Kitchener, Ontario. Visitation and a Celebration of Beverley's life will take place at her home: #4998, 10th Sideroad of Erin, Ontario (north of Ballinafad Road, south of 5th Sideroad). Visitation for family and Friends will be held on Sunday, March 9, 2003, from 2 pm to 8 pm. On Monday, March 10, 2003, there will be a private family Funeral Mass, after which, Friends and family are invited to participate in a Celebration of Beverley's life from 3 pm. to 8 pm. In lieu of flowers, the family respectfully requests donations be made to the American Cancer Society (P.O. Box 102454, Atlanta, Georgia 303068-2454) or The Canadian Cancer Society (Wellington County Unit, 214 Speedvale Avenue, W. Unit 4A, Guelph, Ontario N1H 1C4) Arrangements entrusted to Butcher Family Funeral Home, 5399 Main Street, South, Erin, Ontario, Canada. For more information call 519-833-2231.

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ALLEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-12 published
COATSWORTH, Helen Campbell (GILLIES) (1907-2003)
We regret to announce the death of our mother and friend. She died under protest on Friday, March 7, 2003, at the Sun Parlour Home, Leamington. She stoically survived the loss of her husband, Grover (1983), grand_son, Murray (1990), and son, Alfred (2001). She will be sadly missed by her daughters, Bev GILLESPIE (John) of Wheatley, and Ginny ALLEN (John) of Newmarket; her daughter-in-law, Bonney COATSWORTH of Guelph; and fondly remembered by her grandchildren, Jeff COATSWORTH (Sue,) Margot and Robert GILLESPIE, Duncan, Graham, and Michael ALLEN; and great granddaughters, Elizabeth and Katherine COATSWORTH. Helen was predeceased by her brother, J.D. GILLIES, and is survived by her sisters, Katharine McEACHERN and Janet GOUGH. She valued a special relationship with her many nieces and nephews. Helen contributed to her community as a farmer, historian, journalist, teacher and was awarded for her community service with county, provincial, and federal awards. With the wonderful help of her neighbours, she was able to remain on the COATSWORTH farm for 69 years. Her spirit lives on. A memorial service will be held at Talbot Street United Church on Saturday, March 22, 2003, at 2: 00 pm.

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ALLEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-03 published
ADAM/ADAMS, June Mary (née ALLEN)
Died peacefully at Trillium Centre Hospital, Mississauga, on Saturday, May 31, 2003 in her 81st year. Beloved wife of John William for almost 55 years. Dearly loved mother of John (Susan) of Sunderland, Ontario, Susan (John) of Toronto, and Bill (Heather) of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Much loved Grandma to Ian (Janet) of Collingwood, Jennifer and Katherine of Dartmouth, devoted Nanny to Stacey and Kyle, Toronto. Great-Grandma to Dylan and Eric. A Service of Remembrance will be held at Turner and Porter, Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West, Toronto (416) 231-2283 on Wednesday, June 4th at 12: 00 noon. In June's memory, the family would appreciate donations to the Lung Association, 150 Laird Drive, Toronto, Ontario M4G 3V8.

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ALLEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Mark ALLEN, late of the Town of Markham, in the Regional Municipality of York, Province of Ontario, who died on or about the 6th day of March, 2003, must be filed with the personal representative (the "Estate Trustee"), named below, on or before the 15th day of August, 2003, after which date the estate wil be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustee then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 30th day of June, 2003.
Estate Trustee: Patricia Joyce HUGHES
by her solicitors:
Smith and Werker
Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries
Attention: John Osgoode SMITH
4950 Yonge Street, Suite 1800
Toronto, Ontario
M2N 6K1
Telephone: 416-224-0200
Fax: 416-224-0758
Page B11

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ALLEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Moms always liked him best
The Happy Gang's popular lead singer had a good reason for saying hello to his mom whenever the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio classic was on air
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, July 12, 2003 - Page F10
The double knock on the door occurred every afternoon at 1.
"Who's there?"
"It's the Happy Gang."
"Well, come on in!"
Then Eddie ALLEN, Bert PEARL, Bobby GIMBY and the rest of the cast of Canada's most popular radio program would break into "Keep happy with the Happy Gang."
Mr. ALLAN, the show's main singer, accordion player and sometimes emcee, died last week, leaving Robert FARNON as the gang's sole surviving member.
Every day as many as two million Canadians tuned in The Happy Gang, which led the national ratings for most of its run on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation from 1937 to 1959. Until television came along in 1952, Mr. ALLEN and his cast mates were among the most famous people in the country.
The show was the creation of Mr. PEARL, who'd come to Toronto from Winnipeg (his real name was Bert SHAPIRA) to study medicine. To pay for his education, he started playing piano on radio with a band that included violinist Blain MATHE, organist Kay STOKES and Mr. FARNON, a trumpet player who would go on to be the most successful of them all.
The band morphed into the Happy Gang and Mr. PEARL was the driving force behind it. Eddie ALLEN was hired as the fifth member of the troupe and stayed with the program until it went off the air.
He was born Edward George ALLEN on December 24, 1920, in Toronto, and came from a family of musicians. His father, Bill ALLEN, played the trombone and was in a military band in France during the First World War. When Eddie was 10, his father asked him what instrument he wanted to play. The boy thought about it for a while and made up his mind after seeing a huge piano accordion in a music-store window.
"It was bigger than I was," Mr. ALLEN remembered, "but dad bought it anyway."
In a couple of years, he was entertaining at small events with his accordion, making $5 or $10 a week. Better than a paper route. He also won some local singing contests. When he was 17, he started singing and playing three nights a week on a radio program called The Serenader. Bert PEARL heard it and called him in.
"I auditioned him with Bert PEARL, and we liked him right away," Mr. FARNON says from his home on Guernsey in the Channel Islands. "He looked about 12 years old and could barely see over the top of his accordion. He was terribly shy, no self-confidence like the rest of us. He was very popular with the ladies, a very good-looking little chap."
What impressed most was his voice. "There really wasn't a singer in the Happy Gang until he came along. I really liked his voice."
Mr. FARNON remembers an incident from a Happy Gang rehearsal. "Eddie was about to sing a song called, I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen, and I came up behind him and said, 'If you bring the gasoline.' He laughed so much he couldn't sing it when we went on the air."
The Happy Gang was old Canada, when the country was more rural and white skinned. It is impossible to imagine the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation mounting something so corny and wholesome. How corny was it? The host, Mr. PEARL, was known as "that slap-happy chappy, the Happy Gang's own pappy."
He also knew that sentiment sold. Mr. ALLEN would sing The Lord's Prayer on the program, two or three times a year, such as Good Friday, and during the war he sang it as an inspiration for mothers and their boys overseas.
By that time, the show's "appeal was enormous," wrote Ross MacLEAN, the late Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer and media critic who began listening as a child. "During the war years... its influence on the nation was profound. Its almost daily performance of There'll Always Be An England helped maintain home-front resolve and stirred at least this school kid into a frenzy of tinfoil collection, war certificate sales and the knitting of various items for the navy."
Among the cast, Mr. ALLEN was the kid. He was slight, about 5-foot-6, and looked as though he were too young to shave. A newspaper reported that while he was on his honeymoon in 1942, a hotel clerk in Hamilton didn't believe he was old enough to be married and refused to rent him a room. Even some of his fans were quoted by writer Trent FRAYNE as saying, "Oh my goodness, don't tell me that little boy's married."
On air, he always sang old-fashioned ballads. "Every mother would love the stuff he sang," said Lyman POTTS, a retired broadcaster who crossed paths with some of the gang. He recalled that one of the songs Mr. ALLEN performed on a Happy Gang recording was I'm a Lonely Little Petunia in an Onion Patch. It was popular on the program, maybe because it was the perfect example of the Happy Gang's sort of cornball humour.
Another example is the line Mr. ALLEN used almost every day in the early years of the program. Mr. PEARL had told him not to let fame go to his head -- "Don't ever get the idea that you're too big to say hello to your mother." So, for his first six years, Mr. ALLEN's opening words were "Hello mom."
During the war, they dropped the shtick for fear of hurting the feelings of mothers with sons in uniform. It sparked a letter-writing campaign. "Don't let Eddie stop saying 'Hello mom,' " Liberty Magazine reported in May, 1945. "He reminds me of my own boy overseas. I wonder if he could think of all of us mothers when he says hello."
Over the years, the show appeared 195 times, always live (tape had yet to come into use when it began), in the course of an annual 39-week season, most of the time with the same cast. Its time slot was moved when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation began running a 1 p.m. newscast, but the shift to 1: 15 EST didn't hurt the ratings. At first, it was produced in a studio on Davenport Road in Toronto and later in front of an audience of 700 to 800 on McGill Street near College and Yonge.
The program's mainstay was not talk or jokes but music, and the signature double knock on the door was an old-fashioned radio sound effect provided by Blain MATHE, who would move up to the mike and rap twice on the back of his violin.
Working together so closely did create some personality conflicts. There were practical jokes, usually aimed at the most uptight cast member: Mr. PEARL, a control freak who loved to plan the program in detail and had his own small office at the McGill Street studio.
One day, Mr. ALLEN and the other Happy Gang members set all the clocks forward by a few minutes. "We're late," they announced to Mr. PEARL, who raced into studio. After the opening, a couple of performers started to whine: "I don't want to do this."
Thinking they were actually on air, Mr. PEARL was shocked -- and didn't feel much better when he learned it was all a joke. It might have been one of the reasons he suffered a nervous breakdown (called "nervous exhaustion" for public consumption) and left the show in 1950 after 18 years and moved to the United States.
Eddie ALLEN took his place as emcee, but the incident rated an article in Maclean's by June CALLWOOD, the country's top magazine writer at the time, entitled: The Not So Happy Gang.
By then Mr. FARNON was long gone. During the war, he had joined the Canadian Army Show's band, and later led the Canadian band with the Allied Expeditionary Force, just as Glen MILLER led its U.S. ensemble. After the war he became a top arranger, working on Frank Sinatra albums and scores for such movies as Horatio Hornblower starring Gregory Peck.
Sinatra, however, was a little too flash for Eddie ALLEN, who preferred Bing Crosby. He was a sharp dresser, but his style was understated, almost always a conservative suit and muted shirt in a business where the shirt easily could have been orange.
His love of clothes gave him something to do when he left show business. Eddie ALLEN owned a men's clothing store in the west end of Toronto after he left the program. He later retired and moved to London, Ontario

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ALLEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-01 published
COX, Elford Bradley ''E.B.''
Died peacefully, in his 90th year, on Tuesday, July 29th, 2003, at Toronto General Hospital, with loving family by his side. He is survived by his wife Elizabeth ''Bet'' (CAMPBELL,) daughters Sally SPROULE (Dale) and Kathy SUTTON (Steve,) grandchildren Jason HARLOW (Cindy KRYSAK) and Jennifer HARLOW and great-granddaughters Elizabeth and Terran HARLOW, as well as nieces Donna and Frances. He was predeceased by his brother Arthur Berwyn COX. He will be remembered with love also by his many Friends, particularly Dean ALLEN of Toronto. A family service will be held August 9th. A memorial service to celebrate E.B.'s life and work as one of Canada's foremost sculptors is being planned for September. Expressions of sympathy in the form of donations to favourite charities will be appreciated.

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ALLEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-26 published
CHAMBERS, Dorothy Gail (née ALLEN) September 24, 2003
It is with great sadness that the family announces the death of Dorothy Gail CHAMBERS, in her 56th year. Beloved mother of Rebecca and Jesse; loyal, loving and supportive wife to Jim for over 32 years. Gail's loving presence will be missed by her brothers Glen and Gene and sister and brother-in-law Maureen and John and her extended family and Friends, too numerous to name. Gail lived fully engaged and with great humour, love and compassion with cancer for over 13 years. This was not a battle -- it was a co-existence with a disease that focused her energies on the things that were important to her, family, Friends, and a profound respect for the scared and the sacred and the spiritual, which she found in the natural world, particularly at her cottage in Muskoka. Gail will be sorely missed by the many Friends and relatives she touched in her life. Particular thanks must be given to the St. Elizabeth Visiting Nurses' Association home care who treated her with love and respect. Special thanks to Dr. Rob BUCKMAN who risked the very human trait of mixing health care with compassion and Friendship, also Dr. Molyn LESZCZ whose compassionate counselling helped her through the rough part of her difficult journey. Heartfelt thanks to Dr. Angela MAZZA- WHELAN who was present when Gail died in the loving embrace of her family. Thanks also to Doctors WARR and TOZER for their care. Also the unsung heroes of the health care system - the nurses. Cremation has taken place. A Celebration of Gail's life will take place on Saturday, September 27th at 2: 00 p.m. at Olivet United Church followed by a reception. Olivet United Church, 40 Empress Avenue at Prince George Street, Hamilton. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals would be appreciated by the family.

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ALLEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
SEAGRAM, Campbell L.E. (Cam)
July 12, 1935 - December 28, 2003. Died peacefully, after a brief period of declining health, at Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre. son of the late Beryl and Campbell A. SEAGRAM. He leaves his beloved wife Janet ALLEN; sons Campbell W., Philip A., Andrew B. (Linda HAWKINS) and Mark A. (Amy;) and his grandchildren Austin, Georgia and Mac. Loved brother of Robert P. SEAGRAM and Shirley BREITHAUPT. A private service will be held.

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ALLES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-19 published
The voice of Ontario horse racing
For three decades, the announcer added detail and drama to his calls at Woodbine, Fort Erie and Greenwood tracks
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, December 19, 2003 - Page R13
When the great Secretariat burst out of the starting gate at Toronto's Woodbine Race Track on that dark and miserable day in late October, 1973, in what would be his final race, Daryl WELLS was behind the microphone calling the race for fans.
"In a blaze of glory, ladies and gentlemen, he's all yours," Mr. WELLS cried as the Triple Crown-winner won the Canadian International by 12 lengths.
Daryl WELLS Jr. was there that day in the announcer's booth to hear what would be his father's most famous call and share his excitement of seeing the last career race of the horse, considered by many to be the greatest thoroughbred of all time.
"I thought it was the greatest thing that ever happened," said Daryl WELLS Jr., who carried on the tradition and now calls races at Ontario's Fort Erie track.
Mr. WELLS, the voice of Ontario thoroughbred racing for more 30 years, from just after the new Woodbine Race Track opened in the spring of 1956 to the summer of 1986, died last Friday of heart disease in Niagara Falls, Ontario He was 81.
For three decades, Mr. WELLS was at the Ontario Jockey Club microphone, describing the thoroughbred races at Woodbine, Fort Erie and Greenwood, entertaining fans with his calls that were both accurate and exciting. When the gates opened, fans could often be heard imitating his familiar, trademark call: "They're off."
Whether it was a small, weekday afternoon race or the prestigious Queen's Plate, Mr. WELLS made every call dramatic and detailed. "Every horse got his call," said his long-time friend Gary ALLES.
Behind the microphone, Mr. WELLS was a pro who also had a mischievous streak that could sometimes be seen in the announcer's booth. Mr. ALLES remembers one day sitting next to his friend while he was calling a race at Woodbine. A second after telling fans where their horses were in the race, he switched off his microphone and asked Mr. ALLES which horse he had betted on that day. Back to the microphone, he gave fans a quick update before turning off the microphone again. This time with the microphone off, he started giving Mr. ALLES the call he really wanted to hear that his horse looked poised to win. But before Mr. ALLES could get too excited the microphone was back on again and Mr. WELLS was giving fans the true account of the race.
"He had a mischievousness that emanated from his eyes," Mr. ALLES said.
Daryl Frederick WELLS was born on December 10, 1922, in Victoria. As a young boy, he would tag along when his parents went to the races. "That's what got him interested," said his wife, Marian WELLS.
By the age of 15, he had entered the broadcasting world as a disc jockey, after a local radio station allowed him to play a few records. "It [his career] took off from there," Daryl WELLS Jr. said.
Several years later, he headed east and got a job in the sports department of radio station CHML in Hamilton, where he worked in the 1940s and 1950s and later as a sports director for CHCH-TV. During the Second World War, he served for a time in Britain with the Canadian Army.
Ed BRADLEY, a former general manager of Greenwood, Mohawk and Garden City Raceways, can remember his first introduction to Mr. WELLS in 1955. Working then as an announcer at Long Branch track in Toronto's west end, Mr. BRADLEY recalls one day seeing a man standing around outside his announcer's booth watching while he worked.
The next day he saw the same man again. Mr. BRADLEY was curious about this mysterious man but thought nothing of him again until the following spring when the track opened in Fort Erie. He was in the announcing booth when his manager came to him to tell him he had a new guy for him to break in.
"The guy walked in and it was Daryl WELLS," Mr. BRADLEY said.
They got down to work and, right away, Mr. BRADLEY recognized Mr. WELLS's voice from his broadcasting work. After three days of training, Mr. WELLS was ready to call a race on his own.
"He turned out to be a real pro," Mr. BRADLEY said, adding that Mr. WELLS was very descriptive in his calls and got to know what the jockeys were doing during a race.
During a time when horse racing was among the country's favourite sports, and fans would regularly stream out of work to head to the bar to watch a race, Mr. WELLS was its voice, said Wally WOOD, a former long-time racing columnist. "He was the poster boy for the sport," Mr. Wood said. "He was willing to do anything to promote racing....
"He was very good for racing," Mr. WOOD added.
A true showman, Mr. WELLS not only had the voice, but he looked as though he had just stepped out of an Armani commercial. "Daryl was show business and he dressed like it," Mr. ALLES said.
After 30 years as a well-loved fixture in the announcing booth, Mr. WELLS left Woodbine in July of 1986 amid controversy. His employers suspended him after the Ontario Racing Commission fined him for his part in a 1983 wager that returned a $237,598 payoff. "Touting" (volunteering an opinion on the outcome of a race for profit) was the official description and is strictly against the rules. While it was never a case of Mr. WELLS affecting the outcome of a race, he was suspended and his career as a horse-race announcer was over.
"He missed the excitement of the track," Ms. WELLS said, adding that it was the people he missed most of all. After he left Woodbine, he seldom went to the track except on special occasions.
"He always wanted to be surrounded by people," said Ms. WELLS, who never knew when she would come home to find her husband throwing an impromptu party.
Mr. WELLS, who had been living in Lewiston, New York since the late 1980s, died on December 12 at the Greater Niagara General Hospital in Niagara Falls. He leaves his wife; children Dana, Daryl Jr. and Wendy; sister Velda SCOBIE; and stepchildren Michael, Kelly and Jeffrey.

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ALLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
FERGUSON, Cecil George
With a deep sense of loss, we announce the death of Cecil FERGUSON who died peacefully in the presence of his family on Monday, June 23, 2003 in his 87th year. Remembered with gratitude by Maureen Olivia FERGUSON, cherished father of Moira and beloved ''Papa'' to Elizabeth. Predeceased by his parents Elizabeth Maude ALLIN and John Howard FERGUSON, brothers James and Donald FERGUSON. Survived by his sister Laura FERGUSON of Metcalfe, Ontario and brother Harold FERGUSON of Osgoode, Ontario and many nieces and nephews. Family and Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (2 stoplights west of Yonge Street), on Friday, July 4 from 7-9 p.m. A Service of Thanksgiving for Cec's life will be held at Blythwood Road Baptist Church, 80 Blythwood Road, Toronto, on Saturday, July 5, 2003 at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to Big Brothers of Metro Toronto or Save the Children Canada would be greatly appreciated.

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ALLINGEON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-27 published
BOWLBY, Gertrude Eleanor (née HOGG)
Died peacefully at home, in her 85th year on Wednesday, November 26, 2003. Loving wife of the late Robert ALLINGEON. Mother of John (Jan), Mary (Dick), and Anne. Grandmother of Debbie, Doug (Amy), Simon, Amelia, Wyatt and Adam. Special Grandma of Christine. Heartfelt thanks to Marieta MAICONG, Rosalina GONZALES, Fina and Rupe-lyn OSORIO for their kindness and devoted caregiving to Mother. If desired, donations to the Big Sisters Association of Metropolitan Toronto (Youthlink) 34 Huntley Street, Toronto M4Y 2L1 would be greatly appreciated. The legacy of caring and compassion for others that she leaves will live on through the example she set. Arrangements to follow.

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ALLISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
O'CONNOR, Patricia Heatherington
On February 20th, 2003 at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, in her 72nd year. Predeceased by parents S.A.B. '' Mac'' and Eva McCLEARY. Will be sadly missed by children Kathleen ''Katie'' THOMAS (Crista,) John ''Sandy'' (Pam) and Patrick (Kathy) and by their father T.G. ''Jerry'' O'CONNOR. Survived by grandchildren Allison, Dustin and Trevor; Corey, Cody and Kasey. Also survived by sister Mary (Myles ALLISON,) Joan (Tim HEIBERG) and Margaret (Peter MORGAN,) by nieces Jeanne, Kathinca and Janikka, nephews Jonathan and Timothy. Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (2 lights west of Yonge Street), on Tuesday, 5-8 p.m. Service in the Chapel on Wednesday, 1: 00 p.m. Interment in the family plot, St. Jude's Cemetery, Oakville. In lieu of flowers, a memorial contribution may be made to the Salvation Army either by telephone 1-888-321-3433 or by mail, 2 Overlea Blvd., Toronto, M4H 1P4

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