McLEA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
Marion Isabel Patricia MacLEA (née ROBERTSON)
Peacefully on February 24, 2003 at Belmont House in her 91st year. Born in Toronto on July 1, 1912. Predeceased by her devoted husband, Wid, in December 1975. Much loved mother of Pat KING (Doug,) Linda THEODOROU (Nick) and Bob MacLEA. Survived by her beloved sister Ruby COWLING. Wonderful grandmother to Andrew, Edward, Peter, Tania, Malcolm (deceased), Michael and Jenna. She led an active and full life. There were annual trips to Greece and several to the Far East, England and New York to be with her family. She grew up in Riverdale and moved to the Beach as a young adult where she met Wid. A long time member of Kew Beach United Church Women's Group, lawn bowler at Balmy Beach and active social and community member. After a stroke in 1995 she was slowed down. She was alert and contented until a week before her death. Many thanks to the wonderful staff, volunteers and Friends at Belmont House. Friends will be received at Kew Beach United Church (Wineva and Queen Street) on Thursday, March 6, 2003 from 1: 00 p.m. until service time at 2: 00 p.m. A reception will be held in the church parlour following the service. In lieu of flowers, please send a donation to Belmont House, 55 Belmont Street, Toronto, Ontario M5R 1R1, or a charity of choice. Arrangements in the care of Sherrin Funeral Home (416-698-2861).

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McLEAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-30 published
Maxine Verna HOFFMAN
In loving memory of Maxine Verna HOFFMAN who passed away peacefully at Wikwemikong Nursing Home on Saturday, April 26, 2003 at the age of 86 years.
Beloved mother of Gary and Marie HOFFMAN of South Baymouth. Cherished grandmother of Paula HOFFMAN (Dan) and Larry (Suzanne) HOFFMAN. Loved great grandmother of Kyle and Rachel. Will be missed by brothers and sisters, Ivy and Hugh KELLY, both predeceased. Pearl and Dave McLEAN, both predeceased, Gordon (predeceased) and Margaret HEMBRUFF, Freda and Robert (predeceased) SANDERS of Scarborough, Ken and Elaine (predeceased) HEMBRUFF of Beaumondville, Willard and Barb HEMBRUFF of Minden, Welland and Elizabeth HEMBRUFF of Scarborough, Dorothy and Wayne (predeceased) SMITH of Queensville and Ron and Marie HEMBRUFF of Toronto. Dear aunt of many nieces and nephews and great nieces and nephews.
A gathering of family and Friends for a grave side service will be held at 1: 00 p.m. Sunday, May 4, 2003 in Hilly Grove Cemetery. There will be no wake or funeral service. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home

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McLEAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-15 published
Ambrose Ernest McLEAN " Roger"
In loving memory of Ambrose Ernest "Roger" McLEAN who passed away on Tuesday, October 7, 2003 at the age of 46 years.
Beloved son of Ursula McLEAN of Sault Ste. Marie. Predeceased by father Delbert. Loved nephew of Ruth MIGWANS. Will be missed by brothers and sisters Diane (Harvey DEBASSIGE) of Tehkummah, Tim (Kathy) of Ottawa, Kevin (Claudine) of St. Joseph's Island. Cindy (Steve THOMAS) of Sault Ste. Marie. Half brother of Rudy CORBIERE, Delbert McLEAN, George CORBIERE, Sharon CORBIERE. Predeceased by Rose, Rick and Germaine. Special uncle of David, Rick and Mandy. Fondly remembered by many family members in Nova Scotia. Burial M'Chigeeng Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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McLEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-10 published
Dorothy Juanita JOHNSON
By Ken JOHNSON Friday, January 10, 2003, Page A14
Wife, mother, scientist, independent woman. Born March 25, 1922, in Toronto. Died November 5, 2002, at home in Toronto of ovarian cancer, aged 80.
Dorrie (née McLEAN) JOHNSON was a truly independent woman. In an age that did not encourage higher education for women, she obtained a PhD in physiology at the University of Toronto in 1947, did post-doctoral work at Stanford and taught a year at Vassar in New York State. In 1949, Dorrie moved to Deep River, Ontario, where she met and married my physicist father, Art JOHNSON. In an age that also did not encourage natural childbirth, she had four births between 1953 and 1960, without the use of drugs or other interventions. And in an age that did encourage stay-at-home moms, my mother continued to do the work she loved, raising her family and teaching part-time in the biochemistry lab at the University of Toronto; later teaching world nutrition at York University and finally doing heart and stroke research at Hospital for Sick Children, well past retirement age.
She had a lifelong passion for nature, first-hand knowledge and simple living. As a kid, she longed for a pet snake, but reluctantly nixed the idea when her girlfriends objected. She loved being at the family farm near Orillia, Ontario, and could milk a cow and run a plow behind a patient horse.
In her 70s she was an Elderhostel regular, thrilled to slog (with a dozen others) along the coast of Scotland to study geology and ecology from a British professor. At 79, she went camping on Georgian Bay with her grandchildren. Dorrie had a love for paddling: at the age of 27, she bought her own 16-foot Peterborough cedar-strip; at age 80, this summer on Lake Joseph, she went for her last paddle.
My mother suffered her whole life from terminal modesty. Not until her death did I discover that her name appears in gold letters on the wall of Bishop Strachan School, in recognition of top marks in her senior high-school years. I also learned that she had been chosen to sail to England for the coronation of King George 6th in 1937, and that she had been the recipient of a Governor-General's medal.
Dorrie was practical and straightforward to a fault. When I arrived one day with a beard, she immediately stated: "Ken, you have a beard. I don't like it." As the cancer was overtaking her body, I commented that she seemed to be dealing with her illness and imminent death better than the rest of us. In a completely matter-of-fact way she simply replied that she had had more time to think about it than the rest of us.
Dorrie had a fine intellect and a forthright attitude to real-life problems. She perceived her life as 80 good years and one bad season. She did not want to suffer through a long demise -- she insisted on no heroics to prolong her life. She had explored euthanasia in the Netherlands but was disappointed to discover one had to be Dutch to qualify. We had the honour of caring for her at home and being there when she died, at home.
Garrison KEILLOR once said "They say such wonderful things at funerals, it makes me sad to think I'm going to miss my own by just a few days." I decided to tell mother what I was planning to say at her memorial. She was still conscious but too tired to respond, and it felt like she might only have a day or two left. At 2 a.m., with two of my sisters by her bed, I began to speak. I was two lines from finishing the final quotation, from Stephen LEVINE's book Who Dies,? when my mother took her last breath: "There seems to be much less suffering for those who live life in the wholeness that includes death. . . . I see few whose participation in life has prepared them for death."
I think my mother lived that life and found her peace.
Ken JOHNSON is Dorothy's son.

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McLEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
MacLEAN, Anne R. (née PARKER)
Peacefully, on Wednesday, March 5, 2003, at The Houses of Providence, Toronto, in her 83rd year. Beloved wife of the late Michael Daniel MacLEAN. Beloved mother of Robert and Janet MacLEAN, and grandmother of David LEMIEUX. Dear sister of Betty KIRKPATRICK and sister-in-law of Eleanor MacLEAN and Isabel MacLEAN. Anne lived life fully and touched all of us deeply. A special thank you to all of her wonderful caregivers at The Houses of Providence. Friends may call on Thursday from 6-9 p.m. at the G.H. Hogle Funeral Home, 63 Mimico Avenue, Etobicoke. Funeral Mass at St. Leo's Catholic Church, 2777 Royal York Road, Etobicoke, on Friday at 10 a.m. Interment Mount Peace Cemetery.

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McLEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-12 published
MILLS, N. Elspeth
Died in Ottawa after a long bout with cancer, on Saturday, March 8, 2003, age 83 years. Dearly loved wife for 60 years of Lennox MILLS. Sadly missed by sons Victor and David, daughter Katharine, brother Ian MacLEAN, and grand_sons Tim and Duncan JOHNSON and Blair and Brian MILLS. A private service was held following cremation. Interment Metis Beach, Quebec.

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McLEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-21 published
A character in life and work
Toronto-born actor played supporting roles in hundreds of films and television shows, including the cult-hit sitcom Mary Hartman
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, May 21, 2003 - Page R5
As a genial, six-foot, balding performer who wore a trademark mustache and glasses, Graham JARVIS was not the leading-man type. The Toronto-born actor from a privileged background, who died last month in California at 72, courted but never achieved stardom and instead gained a kind of small-roles fame by appearing in hundreds of supporting parts in film and television productions.
Mr. JARVIS took character parts in films as diverse as Alice's Restaurant, Cold Turkey, Middle Age Crazy, Silkwood and Misery, and a similar assortment of television shows including Star Trek, ER, Murder She Wrote, Gunsmoke, The X-Files and Six Feet Under.
His first role was as an understudy in a mid-1950s Broadway production of Tennessee Williams's Orpheus Descending, and his last was as the grandfather in an episode of the television series Seventh Heaven, which aired four days after his death in April.
He is perhaps best known for his portrayal of Charlie Haggers, the devoted husband of a country singer in the 1970s television sitcom Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman. "Nobody outside the business knows my name, but it doesn't bother me," he told an interviewer in 1982. "Fans still know me as Charlie, years after we went off the air. Fans went nuts over that character for some reason and I love the guy myself."
A scion of the historic Toronto family for whom JARVIS Street is named, Graham Powely JARVIS was also the grand_son of John LABATT Jr., who built up the famous Labatt brewery. A strain of theatrical talent obviously runs in the Labatt blood: His cousins include two legendary theatre personalities -- nonagenarian actor Hume CRONYN and Broadway producer Robert WHITEHEAD, who died last year.
It was Mr. WHITEHEAD who helped Mr. JARVIS attain the gig in Orpheus Descending and an audition at the Barter Theatre in Abbingdon, Va., where he trained for three seasons. Mr. CRONYN also helped him land a Broadway role, Mr. JARVIS said in 1982, adding that he rarely liked to mention the celebrated theatrical connections within his own family.
"This is the first time I've let this information out because I've tried not to trade on it," he said. "But I guess I've been around long enough now not to worry about it."
His father, an investment banker who was instrumental in founding what is today known as Scotia McLeod and was later president of Labatt, moved the family to New York when Graham was 5. He was sent to Bishop Ridley College, a prep school in St. Catharines, Ontario, and later to Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. A confused dropout at 23, he found work on the midnight shift in a penny arcade on 42nd Street in Manhattan. Then a friend invited him to watch an off-Broadway troupe in rehearsal and a light went on in his head. "I can do that!" he told himself, and he never looked back.
"Graham was such a great character actor because he could just go into character," said his niece, Sandra JARVIS of Toronto. "He was just brilliant that way. You'd be having a conversation with him and he'd just don a role, and it would take you a second to realize that Graham was now acting. Anyone who knew him well could just see this glow in his eyes -- this glint that told you he knew he was having fun with you."
"He loved acting," said his friend, actor Wil ALBERT. " When he was acting he was like a little boy going to the candy store."
Mr. JARVIS was a graduate of the American Theatre Wing acting school as well as of the Barter Theatre. He was an original member of the Lincoln Center Repertory Theater and a veteran of many Broadway and off-Broadway productions.
His first film role (in Bye Bye Braverman, 1968) enticed him to move to Hollywood, and he soon landed the part of the narrator in the stage production of The Rocky Horror Show at the Roxy Theatre on Sunset Boulevard.
Television producer Norman LEAR spotted him there and eventually recommended him for Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman. Mr. JARVIS also appeared in the show's sequel, Forever Fernwood. Another memorable role was of John Erlichman in Blind Ambition, a well-received 1979 television miniseries about the Watergate political scandal.
Relishing the idea of free airfare to Toronto where he had family and Friends, Mr. JARVIS took occasional work from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer Ross McLEAN once told of auditioning him as a talk-show host, but felt his bald dome would need to be covered. Mr. JARVIS owned a hairpiece but had left it in California.
"Makeup pulled 20-odd rugs out of storage," Mr. McLEAN wrote. "Everything he tried on looked absurdly out of place." Ultimately, Mr. JARVIS arranged for his L.A. agent to go to his house, find the hairpiece and rush it to Toronto.
"The rug made it on time," Mr. McLEAN noted, adding that "I have rarely seen a less convincing thatch of regrouped Hong Kong hair." In short, Graham JARVIS looked best -- and did the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation audition -- as himself.
In a 1980s television series called Making the Grade, Mr. JARVIS played a buck-passing inner-city high-school principal who didn't care that a student couldn't read. In real life, however, he worked as a volunteer to teach literacy skills to young offenders.
"It was really fascinating to hear him talk about it," said his wife, JoAnna. "He felt they couldn't read because they couldn't speak -- they were speaking a street patois. He went back to college to get his teaching certificate so he could do this on a regular basis." Active in civic politics, he pushed for handgun control and helped voters get to the polls on election day. He also sang in his church choir and worked in its Sunday school.
"I think the consensus among almost everyone who knew Graham is that he was a very warm, enjoyable man," said actor Jerry HARDIN, a friend for almost 50 years.
"You came away feeling he was a good human being if you had any contact with him. He was very empathetic. He had compassion for people's difficulties and problems, and he would help them if he could."
Friends and family also recall his storytelling skills and his joy at giving visitors detailed historic tours of New York and later Hollywood. By all accounts, he was a humble man.
"He didn't think he was nearly as successful as he was," said Barbara WARREN, a niece. "He was always extremely surprised and delighted when people would stop him on the street and ask him for his autograph.
"He loved to deliver the lines and get the shock on your face," Ms. WARREN said. "You never saw him poise himself, he just walked right in as if he was that person."
Mr. JARVIS died at his home in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles on April 16. Besides his wife, JoAnna, he leaves sons Matthew and Alex in California and sister Kitty Blair in Toronto.

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McLEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-05 published
EADIE, Laura ''Ruth'' (née CUNNINGHAM)
Died peacefully, on Thursday, July 3rd, 2003, at Trillium Health Centre in Mississauga. Born January 19th, 1922. Predeceased by her first husband Lt. Eric SUTHERLAND, she then became the wonderful and devoted wife to her beloved husband ''Al'' (Allan W.) EADIE. Brilliant and loving mother of Sandra Jean STURDY and her husband Giles. Dearly loved grandmother ''Nan'' of Anna MacLEAN and her husband Malcolm, Catherine HACKNEY and Robert and Michael STURDY (all residing in England.) Much loved ''Greatnan'' of Oscar MacLEAN. Ruth was a woman hugely loved and respected by a multitude of wonderful Friends and a woman of many talents
porcelain painter, artist, calligrapher, golfer and long term Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire member. A Funeral Service will be held at Humber Valley United Church, 76 Anglesey Blvd. in Etobicoke, on Tuesday, July 8th, 2003 at 2 o'clock. Private family interment. Floral tributes to Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel. Remembrances to Famous People Players, 33 Lisgar Street, Toronto, Ontario M6J 3T3.

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McLEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-11 published
BLACK, George Alexander, Associate, Royal Conservatory of Music of Toronto, B.A., M.A., PhD (French)
Died July 1, 2003 in Paris, France. A professor, liturgist, hymnist and church musician of international renown,
George taught French Language and Literature, Latin, Church Music and Liturgies at Huron College, London, Ontario retiring in 1995. After a long and distinguished joint tenure in the Departments of French and Theology, he ended his academic career in the Chair of Liturgy and Church Music. The Faculty of Theology conferred on him the extraordinary honour of Doctor of Divinity (honoris causa) - only the second election to that degree of a lay person in College history.
He served on the Doctrine and Worship Committee for the National Anglican Church of Canada and was instrumental in the development of the Book of Alternative Services for the Anglican church. He also chaired the Hymn Book Task Force which published Common Praise in 1998. Both National and Diocesan Synods have made George a member of their Merit orders. George also served as President of the Hymn Society in United States and Canada.
He served as Assistant Organist at Saint Thomas Church, Toronto, Organist and Choir Director St. Edmund the Martyr, Toronto; All Hallows, Toronto; Saint Mary the Virgin, Toronto; St. James (Westminster), London; Director of Chapel Music, Huron College, London and Coordinator of Music, ChristChurch, London. He also conducted the London Singers and the George Black Singers.
Musical compositions commissioned include John Cook Missa Brevis, Barrie Cabena, Te Deum, Derek Healey, Summer, Philip Ross and Rae Davis, South Pole, Barrie Cabena, Psalm 141. Published music includes Music for Sunday Psalms (Anglican Book Centre) and Holding in Trust: Hymns of the Hymn Society (Hope Publishing).
He is survived by his wife Margaret McLEAN, son Hugh and his wife Carole, daughter Clare and her husband David BOWLEY and grandchildren Nathan, Lauren, Kate and Liz. Predeased by Adrienne Salmond BLACK. Cremation held July 8, 2003 at Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, Paris France. A memorial service will be held July 19, 2003, 11.00 a.m. at the Church of the Redeemer, Avenue Road and Bloor Street, Toronto, Ontario with private internment at Park Lawn Cemetery. Remembrances may be made to the libraries of Trinity College, 6 Hoskin Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1H8 and Huron College, 1349 Western Road, London, Ontario N6G 1H3.

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McLEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Moms always liked him best
The Happy Gang's popular lead singer had a good reason for saying hello to his mom whenever the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio classic was on air
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, July 12, 2003 - Page F10
The double knock on the door occurred every afternoon at 1.
"Who's there?"
"It's the Happy Gang."
"Well, come on in!"
Then Eddie ALLEN, Bert PEARL, Bobby GIMBY and the rest of the cast of Canada's most popular radio program would break into "Keep happy with the Happy Gang."
Mr. ALLAN, the show's main singer, accordion player and sometimes emcee, died last week, leaving Robert FARNON as the gang's sole surviving member.
Every day as many as two million Canadians tuned in The Happy Gang, which led the national ratings for most of its run on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation from 1937 to 1959. Until television came along in 1952, Mr. ALLEN and his cast mates were among the most famous people in the country.
The show was the creation of Mr. PEARL, who'd come to Toronto from Winnipeg (his real name was Bert SHAPIRA) to study medicine. To pay for his education, he started playing piano on radio with a band that included violinist Blain MATHE, organist Kay STOKES and Mr. FARNON, a trumpet player who would go on to be the most successful of them all.
The band morphed into the Happy Gang and Mr. PEARL was the driving force behind it. Eddie ALLEN was hired as the fifth member of the troupe and stayed with the program until it went off the air.
He was born Edward George ALLEN on December 24, 1920, in Toronto, and came from a family of musicians. His father, Bill ALLEN, played the trombone and was in a military band in France during the First World War. When Eddie was 10, his father asked him what instrument he wanted to play. The boy thought about it for a while and made up his mind after seeing a huge piano accordion in a music-store window.
"It was bigger than I was," Mr. ALLEN remembered, "but dad bought it anyway."
In a couple of years, he was entertaining at small events with his accordion, making $5 or $10 a week. Better than a paper route. He also won some local singing contests. When he was 17, he started singing and playing three nights a week on a radio program called The Serenader. Bert PEARL heard it and called him in.
"I auditioned him with Bert PEARL, and we liked him right away," Mr. FARNON says from his home on Guernsey in the Channel Islands. "He looked about 12 years old and could barely see over the top of his accordion. He was terribly shy, no self-confidence like the rest of us. He was very popular with the ladies, a very good-looking little chap."
What impressed most was his voice. "There really wasn't a singer in the Happy Gang until he came along. I really liked his voice."
Mr. FARNON remembers an incident from a Happy Gang rehearsal. "Eddie was about to sing a song called, I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen, and I came up behind him and said, 'If you bring the gasoline.' He laughed so much he couldn't sing it when we went on the air."
The Happy Gang was old Canada, when the country was more rural and white skinned. It is impossible to imagine the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation mounting something so corny and wholesome. How corny was it? The host, Mr. PEARL, was known as "that slap-happy chappy, the Happy Gang's own pappy."
He also knew that sentiment sold. Mr. ALLEN would sing The Lord's Prayer on the program, two or three times a year, such as Good Friday, and during the war he sang it as an inspiration for mothers and their boys overseas.
By that time, the show's "appeal was enormous," wrote Ross MacLEAN, the late Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer and media critic who began listening as a child. "During the war years... its influence on the nation was profound. Its almost daily performance of There'll Always Be An England helped maintain home-front resolve and stirred at least this school kid into a frenzy of tinfoil collection, war certificate sales and the knitting of various items for the navy."
Among the cast, Mr. ALLEN was the kid. He was slight, about 5-foot-6, and looked as though he were too young to shave. A newspaper reported that while he was on his honeymoon in 1942, a hotel clerk in Hamilton didn't believe he was old enough to be married and refused to rent him a room. Even some of his fans were quoted by writer Trent FRAYNE as saying, "Oh my goodness, don't tell me that little boy's married."
On air, he always sang old-fashioned ballads. "Every mother would love the stuff he sang," said Lyman POTTS, a retired broadcaster who crossed paths with some of the gang. He recalled that one of the songs Mr. ALLEN performed on a Happy Gang recording was I'm a Lonely Little Petunia in an Onion Patch. It was popular on the program, maybe because it was the perfect example of the Happy Gang's sort of cornball humour.
Another example is the line Mr. ALLEN used almost every day in the early years of the program. Mr. PEARL had told him not to let fame go to his head -- "Don't ever get the idea that you're too big to say hello to your mother." So, for his first six years, Mr. ALLEN's opening words were "Hello mom."
During the war, they dropped the shtick for fear of hurting the feelings of mothers with sons in uniform. It sparked a letter-writing campaign. "Don't let Eddie stop saying 'Hello mom,' " Liberty Magazine reported in May, 1945. "He reminds me of my own boy overseas. I wonder if he could think of all of us mothers when he says hello."
Over the years, the show appeared 195 times, always live (tape had yet to come into use when it began), in the course of an annual 39-week season, most of the time with the same cast. Its time slot was moved when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation began running a 1 p.m. newscast, but the shift to 1: 15 EST didn't hurt the ratings. At first, it was produced in a studio on Davenport Road in Toronto and later in front of an audience of 700 to 800 on McGill Street near College and Yonge.
The program's mainstay was not talk or jokes but music, and the signature double knock on the door was an old-fashioned radio sound effect provided by Blain MATHE, who would move up to the mike and rap twice on the back of his violin.
Working together so closely did create some personality conflicts. There were practical jokes, usually aimed at the most uptight cast member: Mr. PEARL, a control freak who loved to plan the program in detail and had his own small office at the McGill Street studio.
One day, Mr. ALLEN and the other Happy Gang members set all the clocks forward by a few minutes. "We're late," they announced to Mr. PEARL, who raced into studio. After the opening, a couple of performers started to whine: "I don't want to do this."
Thinking they were actually on air, Mr. PEARL was shocked -- and didn't feel much better when he learned it was all a joke. It might have been one of the reasons he suffered a nervous breakdown (called "nervous exhaustion" for public consumption) and left the show in 1950 after 18 years and moved to the United States.
Eddie ALLEN took his place as emcee, but the incident rated an article in Maclean's by June CALLWOOD, the country's top magazine writer at the time, entitled: The Not So Happy Gang.
By then Mr. FARNON was long gone. During the war, he had joined the Canadian Army Show's band, and later led the Canadian band with the Allied Expeditionary Force, just as Glen MILLER led its U.S. ensemble. After the war he became a top arranger, working on Frank Sinatra albums and scores for such movies as Horatio Hornblower starring Gregory Peck.
Sinatra, however, was a little too flash for Eddie ALLEN, who preferred Bing Crosby. He was a sharp dresser, but his style was understated, almost always a conservative suit and muted shirt in a business where the shirt easily could have been orange.
His love of clothes gave him something to do when he left show business. Eddie ALLEN owned a men's clothing store in the west end of Toronto after he left the program. He later retired and moved to London, Ontario

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McLEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-29 published
McLEAN, Joan Elizabeth
Joan Elizabeth McLEAN, daughter of Vera and the late Jack GILMOUR, first of three girls, was born on February 28, 1933 in Russell, Manitoba. She died quietly, in her sleep, at the Credit Valley Hospital, on Saturday, July 26, 2003. Joan McLEAN, better known as, ''Miss Joan'' to her loved ones, received her training as a registered nurse at the Winnipeg General Hospital School of Nursing and was a flight attendant for Trans Canada Airlines prior to marriage and relocation to Ontario. Joan loved traveling, gardening, antiques, animals, art of all kinds, bagpipe music, throwing parties and just being close to family and Friends. She leaves behind her beloved husband, of 46 years, Donald; her mother Vera; her sister Violet and her husband Michael HALICKI sons John, Ross and Thomas; daughters-in-law Sandy and Suzanne grandchildren Katie, James, Daniel, Alex, Donald, Evelyn, Christina and Sean; sister-in-law Carol and her husband Doug GOWAN; her nieces and nephews David, Donald, Michael, Paul, Cathy, Lora and Blake, her devoted caregiver and friend, Ida DUBÉ and a host of relatives and Friends. Joan was predeceased by her dear sister Eleanor in 2000. Joan was a truly remarkable and generous person who will be remembered with great love and affection. As per Joan's wishes, there will be no Funeral Service. Instead, a celebration of her life will be held at her home in Mississauga, a date and time will be announced. Memorial contributions to the Palliative Care Unit of the Credit Valley Hospital Foundation (2200 Eglinton Avenue West, Mississauga, Ontario, L5M 2N1 905-813-2200) are appreciated.

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McLEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-11 published
STANBURY, Amadita Diana Oland Halifax (née OLAND)
Died peacefully at her family home on August 9, 2003 after a long and courageous battle with breast cancer. Born a twin on Easter Sunday, 1918 in Guildford, England, she was the only daughter of the late Colonel Sidney C. OLAND and Herlinda deBedia OLAND. Following World War 1, she lived in Havana, Cuba, Halifax and later in Hollywood, where both her parents were in motion pictures.
Upon her return to Nova Scotia, she attended the Convent of the Sacred Heart and then Mount Saint Vincent Academy and has enjoyed her affiliations with both schools ever since. She was also educated abroad in Lausanne, Paris and London. One of her passions was riding horses, where she excelled and won various awards both in Halifax. Still remembered as a significant social event, her marriage to Norman STANBURY in July 1938 took place on the first sunny day following six weeks of rain. On its front page, above a wedding photo, the Halifax Herald ran a huge banner ''Happy the Bride the Sun Shines On''. The sun continued to shine for over 50 years of marriage.
She joined the Junior League and loved her work in the Well Baby Clinic, During her lifetime of dedication to raising her family, she was active in her support of the Arts including the Canadian Opera Company, the London Theatre Company, the Kiwanis Music Festival and numerous local theatre companies including Neptune Theatre She was knowledgeable about and gained great pleasure from her study of antiques.
As a alumna of Mount Saint Vincent, she was Chair of their Project One-Futures for Women fund raising campaign and was among the first to receive the University Alumnae Award of Distinction.
She is survived by her six children - Penelope (Barry RUSSELL,) Michael, and Lindita (Charles WALKER) all of Halifax; Bruce and Christopher (Asifa BHATIA) of Vancouver, Norman, Toronto; also eight grandchildren-Charles (Loraine TOBIA,) Paul (Dawna BEARISTO) and Dick RUSSELL, Susannah and Katherine STANBURY, Roland STANBURY and Diana and Charles WALKER; three great-grandchildren and two and two step great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her twin brother, Bruce S. OLAND, Halifax , and many cousins, nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her husband, Norman, and two brothers, Victor deBedia and Don Jamie.
Visitation will be at Snows Funeral Home from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated by Reverend Gordon MacLEAN at Canadian Martyrs Church, 5900 Inglis Street, Halifax at 11: 00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 13. A private family burial service will be held later at Santa Maria del Pilar Chapel, Sackville, Nova Scotia. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Nova Scotia Division of the Canadian Breast Cancer Society or the charity of your choice. On line condolences snow@funeralscanada.com

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McLEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-04 published
VERCHERE, Lilian Frances Anne "Fanta" (formerly MacLEAN, née TAIT/TAITE/TATE)
Died peacefully on August 29, 2003, at the age of 96. Predeceased by her brother Ian TAIT/TAITE/TATE, her nephew Wallace TAIT, first husband Daniel MacLEAN and second husband Hon. David R. VERCHERE. She is survived by her grand-nieces Fanta TAIT/TAITE/TATE and Andrea TAIT, and grand-nephews Ian TAIT/TAITE/TATE and Christopher TAIT. Fanta served with the Women's Royal Canadian Naval Services for 12 proud years. She was a sparkling conversationalist, loved by family and Friends of all ages. She will be remembered for her grace and enduring elegance. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, September 10, 2003 at 3 p.m. at St. Paul's Church, 1130 Jervis Street, Vancouver. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Arthritis Society would be appreciated.

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McLEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-06 published
MacLEAN, James Hector
Born in Cochrane, Ontario, February 12, 1917 to James and Rose Ellen. Husband of Margaret DONALDSON. Died September 3rd, 2003, suddenly at home. Father of James Duart MacLEAN and Heather Margaret HARRIS. Brother to Mabel Kathleen MacLEAN. Grandfather to Erin, Mark, Nicholas and Andrew. Loved all, loved by all. Cremation has taken place in concordance with Hec's wishes. In his memory, charitable donations may be made to the Friends of Algonquin Park by visiting www.algonquinpark.on.ca

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McLEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
MacLEAN, Dr. Bruce Livingstone 1926 - 2003
Dr. Bruce MacLEAN died gently at the Foothills Hospital in Calgary, on Friday, November 21, 2003 at the age of 77 years. Bruce was loved and will be missed by his wife Jocelyn (Joy COYLES,) son Jock (Vancouver), son Douglas (Kasia) (Calgary), daughter Catherine CAGNIART (Francis) (Paris,) daughter Elizabeth (Beth) (Calgary) and was predeceased by daughter Janet (Saskatoon). Grandfather to Philip and Gabriella (Calgary), Cedric, Alexis and Nicolas (Paris), Matthew and Rachel (Calgary). Bruce is also survived by his brother Dr. John A. MacLEAN (Toronto) and sister-in-law Margaret MacLEAN (Ottawa.) Bruce was predeceased by his sisters, Jessie, Elizabeth (Betty TILLEY), Jean and his brother Roderick (Rod). Bruce was a family doctor in Owen Sound, Ontario for twenty-five years. In 1977 he moved to Edmonton to work with the Workers' Compensation Board and concluded his working life there. In 1997, Bruce and Joy moved to Calgary. In his life, Bruce was a backyard ice rink maker, a sailor (lightning class), a curler (on good days), a golfer (short but straight), a bridge player (white hot), a cross word puzzler (expert) and a great lover of classical music. On Friday, November 28, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. a Service to honour Bruce's life will be held at McInnis and Holloway'S 'Fish Creek Chapel' (14441 Bannister Road S.E. Calgary, Alberta T2X 3J3) Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Alberta would be appreciated (1825 Park Road S.E., Calgary, Alberta T2G 3Y6). In living memory of Dr. Bruce MacLEAN, a tree will be planted at Fish Creek Provincial Park by McInnis and Holloway Funeral Homes.

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McCLEARY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
O'CONNOR, Patricia Heatherington
On February 20th, 2003 at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, in her 72nd year. Predeceased by parents S.A.B. '' Mac'' and Eva McCLEARY. Will be sadly missed by children Kathleen ''Katie'' THOMAS (Crista,) John ''Sandy'' (Pam) and Patrick (Kathy) and by their father T.G. ''Jerry'' O'CONNOR. Survived by grandchildren Allison, Dustin and Trevor; Corey, Cody and Kasey. Also survived by sister Mary (Myles ALLISON,) Joan (Tim HEIBERG) and Margaret (Peter MORGAN,) by nieces Jeanne, Kathinca and Janikka, nephews Jonathan and Timothy. Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (2 lights west of Yonge Street), on Tuesday, 5-8 p.m. Service in the Chapel on Wednesday, 1: 00 p.m. Interment in the family plot, St. Jude's Cemetery, Oakville. In lieu of flowers, a memorial contribution may be made to the Salvation Army either by telephone 1-888-321-3433 or by mail, 2 Overlea Blvd., Toronto, M4H 1P4

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McCLEARY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-17 published
McCLEARY, John Raymond Walker
Passed away peacefully at Ottawa General Hospital on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 in his 41st. year. Beloved husband and best friend of Lisa, and Super Dad to Matthew and Kelsey. John was involved in an experimental stem cell program for the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis. He died from complications after the successful transplant procedure. John is survived by his parents David and Nancy McCLEARY of Orangeville, his sister Cathy and her husband Ross STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, his mother and father-in-law Clarence and Eva MURPHY of Orillia, and by his sister-in-law Sherry and her husband Dan TEETER, brother-in-law Bill MURPHY and his wife Sherry. Uncle John was always very proud of, Sarah and Jake STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Morgan and Ryan TEETER, Sarah, Megan and Lori MURPHY and will be sadly missed. John was very special to his most cherished friend and ''brother'' Dave DENNING, and his wife Lisa and their children Alex, Larissa and Brent.
''John, We Will Cherish Our Memories Forever, And We Will Always Admire Your Courage.''
''We Love You As Big As The Universe.''
Friends may call at the Dods and McNair Funeral Home and Chapel, 21 First St. Orangeville on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be from St. Timothy Catholic Church, 42 Dawson Road, Orangeville on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Forest Lawn Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy donations to the Ontario M.S. Society or Hospice Dufferin would be appreciated. A tree will be planted in memory of John in the Dods and McNair Memorial Forest at the Island Lake Conservation Area, Orangeville. A dedication service will be held on Sunday September 7, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m.

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McLEES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
DECKER, Viva (Vi) Arlene (née McLEES)
Died peacefully at Laurier Manor, in Ottawa, on July 5, 2003, at age 84. Predeceased by her husband Bob. Survived by her daughters, Helen, Elaine and Ciarla (Jacques); grandchildren, Caitlin (Todd), Kyler (Laney), Ryan, Simon and Jesse; great-grandchildren, Tal and Eli. The family thanks Betty MORRELL and the staff of Laurier Manor for their kindness. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. Interment Bath, New York.

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McLEISH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-10 published
Acting up helped PoW survive camp
But working in the salt mines took its toll on Canadian soldier in First World War
By Gloria GALLOWAY, Monday, November 10, 2003 - Page A3
First World War soldiers were rarely taken prisoner.
Most of the Allied casualties died in the mud with a German sniper's bullet in their head, or riddled with shrapnel, or drowned in their own mucus after poison gas filled their lungs. Of the more than 600,000 Canadians who fought in the War To End All Wars, only 4,000 were captured.
Private William McLEISH was among the unfortunate few. He was captured in France in April of 1915 and spent the last 2½ years of the war at Rennbahn PoW camp near Munster, Germany.
Pte. McLEISH survived, while nearly 60,000 other Canadians perished, but it would be wrong to say he was lucky. The hardships he endured took away his ability to function in a postwar world. He could not provide for his family or enjoy the life he had fought to protect.
In Rennbahn, at the age of 22, Pte. McLEISH was put to work in the salt mines, a gruelling task overseen by civilian bosses who treated the PoWs like slaves.
But camp life was a world of bizarre contrasts and the unfortunate souls who found themselves the unwilling guests of the Germans did what they could to alleviate the cycle of toil and tedium. Thus the Rennbahn Empire, a stage troupe of prisoners, was formed.
Mr. McLEISH died in 1966 after spending his last decades in and out of mental hospitals, a victim of what is now called post-traumatic stress disorder. He left a box of mementos that his daughter, Glen FAYET, submitted to the Memory Project organized by The Globe and Mail and the Dominion Institute.
They include cast photos of the plays her father and other prisoners performed. The men took all parts, slipping into dresses, wigs and hats as required by the script. In the yellowing photos they pose with faces contorted into character.
Jonathan VANCE, a history professor at the University of Western Ontario and a leading expert on the lives of prisoners of war, says it wasn't uncommon for First World War PoWs to be permitted to put on plays.
"It kept them out of trouble, for one thing," he said. "For another thing, international laws provided for prisoners to take advantage of recreation opportunities, including intellectual opportunities. So most camps had not only theatres, but libraries and art classes and occupational therapy classes... orchestras in some cases."
A book of remembrance created by prisoners of Rennbahn thanks family and Friends for sending props, costumes and even grease paint into the camps.
"In the First World War, you could get in pretty well anything. You could get food hampers sent in from major London department stores," Dr. VANCE said.
The theatrical paraphernalia made it possible to stage performances at Rennbahn every Wednesday. The shows had titles like Roll on Blighty! and Le Danseur Inconnu. Listed on the playbills is one W. McLEISH.
"We didn't think that he had that type of outgoing personality," Pte. McLEISH's daughter, Ms. FAYET, said with a quiet laugh.
Her father had immigrated to Montreal from Scotland in 1911 when he was 18 and joined the army reserve soon after his arrival. He signed up when war was declared and was quickly shipped overseas.
While on leave in Britain, Pte. McLEISH visited an aunt in Edinburgh, where he met Margaret WATSON. Love quickly followed, and the Canadian in uniform remained in Ms. WATSON's thoughts after he returned to the front.
Then came word of his capture. Ms. WATSON wrote to the Red Cross, asking his whereabouts. He was in the camp near Munster, she heard. But "this man does not write very often," said the official response.
Many soldiers emerged from captivity "with job-related injuries that would prevent them from earning a living for the rest of their lives," Dr. VANCE said. "You have all kinds of stories about people losing hands and feet, getting arms mangled in machinery, getting bit of their bodies blown off in mine explosions."
This was William McLEISH's life for nearly three years. It must have been a very strange existence, Dr. VANCE said, to be working in such trying conditions for 12 to 14 hours then return to camp to take part in a music hall or a play.
Certainly the men would have derived some comfort from the performances. But the evening diversions weren't enough to keep Pte. McLEISH whole.
When he was freed after Germany surrendered, he found the Scottish lass and they wed. They settled in Canada and had a son and a daughter.
"He was quite well to begin with," Ms. FAYET said, "but then he had problems dealing with everyday life and eventually he could no longer go into the office to work."
He quit his job at the Grand Trunk Railway and his wife became the family's breadwinner.
"She took any job that she could in order to supplement the income. As I understand it, they received $25 a month for four people to live on from the government," Ms. FAYET said.
Her father's nerves were shot and he became a regular patient at the veterans' hospital in Ste. Anne de Bellevue. "People knew that there was such a thing as shell shock, but, in a lot of minds, that was a moral failing rather than a physical or psychological failing," Dr. VANCE said. "It wasn't really appreciated, the degree to which prolonged stress has physiological impacts on the brain."
But Mr. McLEISH's family knew the toll it had taken. Ms. FAYET said he never talked about the war, except occasionally to mention a practical joke someone had played or an amusing anecdote.
The horror of the war remained buried inside Mr. McLEISH until he died. Perhaps it was softened by a box of photographs and fading playbills that bear his name.

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McLELLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
MacLELLAN, Robert Gordan Primrose April 6, 1919 - March 2, 2003
Robert G. P. MacLELLAN, of Calgary, Alberta retired General Counsel of the Husky Oil Company, died on Sunday, March 2, 2003 of pneumonia, at Rockyview General Hospital in Calgary. He was a month short of his 84th birthday. Born in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, on April 6, 1919, Robert was the only child of Dr. Robert Gordon MacLELLAN and Hazel Carré Primrose MacLELLAN. His father died in 1930, and his mother in 1937. An aunt helped his widowed mother raise him. Robert attended local schools and university in Halifax, Nova Scotia, graduating in law from Dalhousie University, Halifax, after World War 2. Robert enlisted in the Canadian Army in 1942 until 1946, as a Lieutenant in the British Columbia Dragoons (the 9th Canadian Armoured Regiment), serving in Italy, Belgium and Holland. He served as General Counsel of the Husky Oil Limited, the parent company with its two wholly-owned subsidiaries, Husky Oil Company, and Husky Oil Canadian Operations, for 35 years, based in Calgary, until he retired in the early l980's. Robert, (his Friends called him 'Bob'), enjoyed the Friendship of his colleagues at Husky Oil and after his retirement, he and others formed a dining club, the Husky Dining Club. It still operates at the Hospitality Inn.A bachelor, he enjoyed life at his Riverdale Avenue bungalow, where he had a large library. A fall and a stroke weakened him five years ago, and he entered Scottish Extendicare on 25th Avenue South West. Due to its imminent closure, Robert was moved to the Colonel Belcher nursing facility in February. Robert came from a distinguished Nova Scotian family. His paternal grandfather, for whom he and his father were named, Robert MacLELLAN, a distinguished educator, was Principal of Pictou Academy from 1889 to 1923. The elder MacLELLAN helped to prepare young minds for the challenges of the 20th century. Pictou Academy, through its principals and graduates had strong links to Dalhousie University. Robert's maternal grandfather was Senator Clarence PRIMROSE, also of Pictou. Robert is survived by several cousins, among them, Janet Maclellan TOOLE of Fredericton, New Brunswick, Judith Ann (MacLELLAN) GIBSON, of Saint John's, Newfoundland, and Ann MacLELLAN of Amherstview, Ontario. His family is greatly indebted to the care-giving services of 'Tip' Pornthip WONGTHONGLUA, whose intelligence, gentleness and devotion were always exceptional, during his stay at Scottish, Colonel Belcher and Rockyview Hospital. A committal service in Nova Scotia will take place in the summer. Friends who wish to pay their respects to Robert's memory and sign the memorial book may visit Mcinnis and Holloway's 'Fish Creek Chapel' (14441 Bannister Road S.E., Calgary, Alberta). To e-mail expressions of sympathy: condolences@mcinnisandholloway.com Subject Heading: Robert MacLELLAN. In living memory of Robert MacLELLAN, a tree will be planted at Fish Creek Provincial Park by Mcinnis & Holloway Funeral Homes, 'Fish Creek Chapel', 14441 Bannister Rd. S.E. Calgary, Alberta Tel: (403) 256-9575

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McLELLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-05 published
Lawrence (Larry) C. UTECK
By Graham FRASER Thursday, June 5, 2003 - Page A24
Director of athletics at Saint Mary's University, politician, Canadian Football League all-star. Born October 9, 1952, in Toronto. Died December 25, 2002, in Halifax, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, aged 50.
When Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON pinned the Order of Canada on Larry UTECK's lapel in Halifax last October, there was a spontaneous standing ovation. The man in the wheelchair, silenced and paralyzed by disease, had won the city's heart.
Growing up in Thornhill and Willowdale, Ontario, Larry was part Tom Sawyer, part Huck Finn: mischievous, competitive, and profoundly resistant to being told what to do. He knew the joy and the pain of being adored and betrayed.
He was a talented athlete, but an injured Achilles tendon ended his hopes of playing hockey seriously. He went to the Jesuit school Brébeuf Collegiate, but his prickly resistance to authority resulted in the principal telling his mother every year to find another school for him. Every year, she prevailed and Larry stayed.
He had a continuing affection for waifs and strays, the marginal and the eccentric. He loved football, and played with reckless intensity, but hated being defined as just an athlete.
Larry went to the University of Colorado on scholarship, but insisted on taking East Asian Studies, and was furious when he was told he couldn't study Chinese because it conflicted with football practice.
He attended Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, for a year before being drafted by the Toronto Argonauts -- but after his first season, travelled through still-war-torn Vietnam and Cambodia, taking extraordinary risks, collecting amazing stories and lifelong Friends.
Larry's career in the Canadian Football League was defined by his physical courage. He was a punishing tackler -- it was unnerving to see him straighten out his helmet afterwards, as if his neck had been unhooked -- and a self-destructively determined punt returner.
He paid the price. After five years in Toronto, he was traded to Montreal (where his interception and touchdown took the Alouettes to the Grey Cup in 1978), and then, as his body deteriorated, to British Columbia and finally to Ottawa.
After his football career ended, it took him a while to acknowledge how much he loved the game. In 1982, he was hired as an assistant coach at Saint Mary's University and moved to Halifax, where he fell in love first with the city, then with Sue MALONEY (whom he married in 1989), and their two children Luke and Cain.
He became head coach in 1983, taking the team to the Vanier Cup three times. He saw a world beyond the football field; he was as proud of David Sykes winning a Rhodes Scholarship as he was of the players who went on to play professionally.
In 1994, he ran for Halifax City Council and was elected, and in 1998 became deputy mayor. He was as hardworking and candid as a politician as he was as a coach. In December 1997, Russell McLELLAN, then Liberal premier of Nova Scotia, tried hard to persuade him to be a candidate. Tempted, Larry said: "I just can't."
He was already feeling the first symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; it was the beginning of a five-year decline and an extraordinary demonstration of grace, wit and courage. As he wrote his young daughter Cain, "I had a long, active, and productive life as a caterpillar. Now I am more quiet and restful, kind of like living in a cocoon. I don't know how or when or even why, but when this stage is over I will be a butterfly. Won't that be something, your Dad the butterfly."
At his instruction, the Bob Dylan song I Shall Be Released was played at his memorial service at the Basilica in Halifax, where 1,500 people came to say goodbye.
Graham is Larry UTECK's brother-in-law.

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McLE surnames continued to 03xle002.htm