WILFRED o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-29 published
DARE, Ruth Eleanor (née ROTTERS)
Ruth Eleanor DARE (née ROTTERS,) born Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 1918, died November 28th, 2003 at age 85, at Columbia Forest Long Term Care Centre, Waterloo. She suffered a hemorrhaging stroke in June 2002 after enjoying her 60th wedding anniversary with all her children and grandchildren in attendance. She was a member of St. Peters Lutheran Church, Kitchener, Westmount Curling Club, Probus Club, a long term member of the Kitchener-Waterloo Young Women's Christian Association, a founding member of the Kitchener-Waterloo-Gyrette Club, a long term volunteer member of the Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery and the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony, and worked for the Canadian Blind Institute. She was also an ardent swimmer and canoeist during her Muskoka summers.
Ruth was the much loved mother of Carolyn WILFRED (Harmon) of Christchurch, New Zealand, Graham (Sandra) of Kitchener, and Bryan (Malkin) of Waterloo. In addition she is survived by her loving husband Carl and her grandchildren Tanya LEVERETTE, Carla WOOLNOUGH (Scott), Sydney, Jacob, Kaitlin, Alexa, Katherine and Laurence DARE.
A memorial service to celebrate her life will be held at St. Peter's Lutheran Church, 49 Queen Street North, Kitchener at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, December 2nd. Flowers are gratefully declined but a donation in Ruth's memory to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
We know that like a candle
Her lovely light must shine
To brighten up another place
More perfect - more divine
And in the realm of Heaven
Where she shines so warm and bright
Our loved one lives forever
In God's Eternal Light.

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WILHSHIRE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
Lois Irene (MUCKLOW) WHITE/WHYTE
In loving memory of Lois Irene (MUCKLOW) WHITE/WHYTE who passed away at Mindemoya Hospital on Thursday, May 8, 2003 at the age of 59 years.
Dear wife of Reginald WHITE/WHYTE, of Mindemoya. Predeceased by son Reginald. Predeceased by parents James and Irene MUCKLOW of North Bay. Loving sister to James and Ines MUCKLOW of Kirkland Lake, sister-in-law to Mary and Eric SEARLE of Huntsville, Beulah AYLES of Newfoundland, Doris WILHSHIRE and Weslley of Newfoundland, Millicent WILLIAMS of Denver, Colorado. Predeceased by brothers-in-law, Bill, Jack, Philip and Frank all of Newfoundland. Will be sadly missed by nieces and nephews. Visitation and Funeral Service were held on Saturday, May 10, 2003 at the Mindemoya Missionary Church. Cremation to follow. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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WILKES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-29 published
OLSEN, Eric Guthrie
After a long battle with cancer, Eric died in Toronto on July 26, 2003. He was predeceased by his loving first wife, Marjorie and his son Michael. He will be missed by his sisters Margaret ORAM and Brenda OLSEN in England, and his loving children Barbara WILKES (Andy), Geoffrey OLSEN, Brenda KROEKER (Henry), and Robert OLSEN, and by his grandchildren - David and Julia WILKES, Jesse and Sheena OLSEN, and Christine WILSON. Eric was born in Yorkshire, England in 1927, immigrating to Canada with Marjorie in 1951. After years with Dominion Bridge, Eric founded Amhurst Drafting Company Ltd. in 1959 with the support and ongoing participation of Marjorie. The company was known in the steel industry for its excellent work, high ethical standards, skilled employees and excellence in training. After nearly 30 successful years, the company was closed. A special thanks goes to Dr. M. SHERMAN and his team at Toronto General Hospital for the clinical trial of the new cancer drug that gave us another three years with Dad. And also to Dr. John RIEGER of the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care for the support that made it possible to Dad to stay home with family. Visitation for the hour before the service will be held at St. James-the-Less Cemetery Chapel, 635 Parliament Street, Today Tuesday, July 29, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m with service following at 3: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations ''In memory of Eric Olsen'' to the Canadian Cancer Society would be greatly appreciated.

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WILKIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-15 published
MANULA, William (Bill)
Died unexpectedly, yet peacefully March 10, 2003. Bill will be sadly missed by his dearest Friends; Ron WILKIE, Rosemary JEFFREY, Niece Lynda (Peter and family), Nephews; Gordie (Cindy and family) and Robbie (Lori and family). Bill is predeceased by loving mother Alma and sister Helen. Memorial Service Tuesday, March 18, 2003 @ 1: 30 p.m., Glebe Road United Church, 20 Glebe Road, Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Kidney Foundation or Toronto General Hospital.
Genuine kindness is never forgotten

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WILKIN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
WILKIN
-In loving memory of a mother, grandmother, great grandmother and great great grandmother,
Ruby, who passed away May 12, 2002...Mother's Day.
Twinkling eyes, that special smile,
A love for life and laughter.
Within our hearts a precious place you will hold forever after
We cannot bring the old times back, your hands we cannot touch.
But we are thankful for the memories of the one we loved so much
-Lovingly remembered by Lois and Family.

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WILKINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-09 published
Mary Catharine JONES (née STALEY) Died 3 August 2003
Peacefully, in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, at home surrounded by her loving family.
She gave unending, unconditional love and encouragement to her children and their spouses: Sharon GLOVER (Douglas WILKINS) of Salt Spring Island, British Columbia; Christopher JONES (Susan) of Dartmouth; and also to her deeply beloved grandchildren: Jason (Alessandra) of L'Aquila, Italy; Nicholas (Erin); and Jennifer of Dartmouth.
Mum was predeceased by her loving and beloved husband Owen in She is survived by her dearest sister Barbara MANNING of Ottawa.
She leaves us a rich legacy: love, courage, common sense, acceptance and a zest for life that was never-ending. She is deeply cherished by all of us who loved her, and she will be held in our hearts and minds forever.

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WILKINSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-20 published
Lottie Mae McDONALD
In loving memory of Lottie Mae McDONALD, July 29, 1922 to August 14, 2003.
Lottie Mae McDONALD, a resident of Meadowview Apartments, Mindemoya, passed away at her residence on Thursday, August 14, 2003 at the age of 81 years. She was born in Gordon Township daughter of the late William and Sarah (STRAIN) SCOTT. Lottie Mae had been very active in her community, having been a member of the Horticultural Society, The Agricultural Society and a School Board Trustee for 18 years. She had many hobbies, including gardening, knitting, sewing, and quilting. Well known and respected in her community, she will be sadly missed by all who knew her. A loving mother, grandmother, sister and friend, many fond memories will be cherished. She was predeceased by her husband Jack McDONALD in 1984. Loving and loved mother of John and his wife Anita of Sioux Lookout, Peter and his wife Nancy of Kenora, Carey of Orillia, Penny and husband Milford of Barrie, Paul and his wife Christine of Sudbury and Adam and his wife Kathy of Mindemoya. Proud grandmother of Bonnie, Jason, Jacqueline, Sean, Jane, Casey, Scott, Lindsay, Ben, Kaitlyn and T.J. Dear sister of Beatrice BEANGE, Ted SCOTT (predeceased,) Margie BLACKBURN, Maria McDERMID, John SCOTT and Fred SCOTT. Friends called the Salem Missionary Church, Spring Bay, on Friday, August 15, 2003. The funeral service was conducted at the Church on Saturday, August 16, 2003 with pastor Al WILKINSON officiating. Interment in Providence Bay Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home.

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WILKINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-03 published
Virtuoso possessed 'nerves of steel'
Ontario trumpeter and music professor renowned for his recordings and his mentoring
By Sol CHROM Friday, January 3, 2003, Page R11
He could make his trumpet sing like an angel, but he was not above taking a hacksaw to it. When Erik SCHULTZ died of cancer last month at the age of 50, Canadian music lost a virtuoso player, a teacher and mentor, a prolific recording and performing artist, and a man renowned among colleagues as a consummate professional.
A member of the music faculty at the University of Western Ontario, Prof. SCHULTZ also made several concert tours of Europe and founded an independent recording label for Canadian musicians. He held positions with Canadian orchestras in Calgary, Hamilton, London, Ontario, Toronto, and Windsor, Ontario He also established an international reputation with an extensive repertoire of recordings of his own, specializing in music of the Baroque period.
Prof. SCHULTZ's musicianship and professionalism were noted by numerous colleagues, both in academia and in the performing arts. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation broadcaster Keith HORNER, who worked on several recordings and radio programs with him, recalled his "bright, clear, ringing tone." Mr. HORNER praised Prof. SCHULTZ for his expertise with the piccolo trumpet, which he described as a very difficult instrument to master.
"It requires nerves of steel," he said. "With Erik, you didn't hear the work in it. He made it sound effortless -- and that was all smoke and mirrors, because it takes a great deal of physical effort."
Prof. SCHULTZ may have been known best for a series of albums he recorded with organist Jan OVERDUIN. The recordings were made in Kitchener, Ontario, and in Germany, and were issued both on vinyl and on compact disc. The two musicians first teamed up in Europe, where they were both touring in the mid-1980s, setting the stage for a collaboration that lasted until Prof. SCHULTZ's death.
In an interview from Waterloo, Ontario, Prof. OVERDUIN recalled his colleague as an enthusiastic participant in all kinds of musical events, both amateur and professional. "He would just transform the whole experience," Prof. OVERDUIN said. "There were times when I just stood in awe -- he'd be communicating with the audience on a level that was just beyond us."
Prof. OVERDUIN also cited his friend's commitment to musicianship, often displayed under rather trying circumstances. On one European tour, a delayed flight to Portugal saw them arrive in Lisbon with very little time to prepare for a concert. The difficulty was heightened by the fact that both musicians had gotten quite sick and had to find a doctor in Lisbon who could prescribe antibiotics.
And many performances in Europe, Prof. OVERDUIN said, were staged in old churches wherein the temperature or tuning of the organ posed their own special challenges. Since the organs couldn't be moved or modified, Prof. SCHULTZ would have to make adjustments to the pitch of his trumpet. Frequently this would require him to carry extra mouthpieces or lengths of tubing, but even that wasn't always enough.
"One day he had to get a hacksaw and physically saw out a piece of the trumpet," Prof. OVERDUIN recalled. "These were historic organs -- I would have a wonderful time, but it could be difficult too. [Sometimes] they would have weird historical temperaments, but he would adjust immediately."
Prof. SCHULTZ's commitment to music extended beyond his own career, however. In 1993, he and his father started IBS Recordings, a label for independent Canadian artists, eventually releasing more than three dozen titles. Flutist Fiona WILKINSON, one of Prof. SCHULTZ's colleagues at University of Western Ontario, recorded for the label as a member of the Aeolian Winds, and praised him for his generosity. Having established his own international recording career with the German label EBS, she said, he used IBS to support and nurture the initial careers of Canadian musicians. "He would interview and audition artists and take on projects that he felt deserved to be known."
"He positioned it as a discovery label," Mr. HORNER said. "He was ambitious -- he was looking for a recording studio so that he could have some control over sound quality."
Prof. WILKINSON also praised Prof. SCHULTZ for his collegiality. He raised the bar for the people he worked with, she said, acting as a role model for students and colleagues. "He had incredibly high standards. Everything he touched had to meet them."
But Prof. WILKINSON also remembered Prof. SCHULTZ for his sense of humour, and the real-world experience he brought to his teaching and academic work. "He knew what it was like to be 'out there,' " she said, "and he brought that back to the students."
Even with his illness, Prof. SCHULTZ never lost his enthusiasm for performing.
"He lost his voice, and couldn't talk on the phone, but he could still play," Prof. OVERDUIN recalled, noting that Prof. SCHULTZ still played at convocations last June. "It hurts me to think we'll never play again."
Erik SCHULTZ leaves his wife Kelly, his children Daniel, David and Nicole, and two sisters.
Erik SCHULTZ, musician and teacher; born in Hamilton, Ontario, August 29, 1952; died in London, Ontario, December 1, 2002.

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WILKINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
HOAG, Howard Arthur
Died Sunday, June 15, 2003, at home in Toronto, surrounded by Friends. Howard will be greatly missed by his beloved bride Louise RICH and her daughter Odette HUTCHINGS, as well as by his innumerable Friends and his family, in particular his sister Sharon. Howard loved life. His humour, wit, intelligence and broad smile charmed everyone he met. Diagnosed with liver cancer in December, Howard lived the last six months with incredible courage, determination and optimism. The devotion and concern of his wide group of Friends, including those from the Toronto Racquet Club and the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club has been remarkable. The annual Robbie Burns Supper will not be the same without him. Many thanks to Dr. SIU at Princess Margaret, Drs SINGH, HUSSEIN, STEINBERG, Rosa BERG and the Palliative Care Team at Mt. Sinai and Trinity Hospice. Special thanks to Howard's friend Fred REID- WILKINSON for being there. A service to celebrate Howard's life will be held 4: 00 p.m., Saturday, June 21, East Common Room, Hart House, University of Toronto, with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Howard's name to Trinity Home Hospice, Suite 1102 - 25 King St. West, Toronto M5L 1G7.

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WILKINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-26 published
MOWAT, Ruth Edith (née WILKINSON)
Died peacefully on June 21, 2003 at the age of 96. Widow of the late Robert Bennett MOWAT. Beloved mother of Judy, Bruce (Gail,) Chip (Arlene) and Hugh (Lee). Proud grandmother of John David, Andrew, Robert and Jennifer; Bethan and Neil; Tara and Jason. Delighted great-grandmother of Tori, Ember, Riley, Paige and William. Funeral service will be held at the Church of St. Andrew and St. Paul, 3415 Redpath Street (corner of Sherbrooke), Montreal, Quebec on Friday, June 27, 2003 at noon. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Church of St. Andrew and St. Paul or the Montreal Assocation for the Blind Foundation would be appreciated.

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WILKINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-13 published
Jim NOBLE: 1924 - 2003
Toronto beat cop who went on to become a deputy chief was 'one of the most highly respected operatives in the history of Canadian justice'
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - Page R5
He was a gentleman cop who rose through the ranks of the Toronto police force to become deputy chief. Jim NOBLE, who devoted 37 years to Canadian law enforcement, has died at the age of 78.
Mr. NOBLE's career was marked by an almost continuous advancement through the ranks. As a divisional detective, he worked on a gamut of crimes that included "housebreaking, frauds, sex offenses, robberies -- a little bit of everything," he once explained.
Later promoted to the homicide squad, he investigated more than 100 murders. He was known for his painstaking legwork, his meticulous attention to detail and his uncanny ability to weave an assortment of disparate clues into what he once called "a nice rope of circumstantial evidence."
He eventually headed the homicide squad, where up-and-coming detectives like Julian FANTINO, the current police chief, worked under his command.
"He was one of the most highly respected homicide investigators that the Toronto Police Service ever had," Mr. FANTINO said. "I always found him to be of impeccable integrity and a man of very strong character and loyalty to the profession."
"He was one of the guys that knew all the answers,"said Walter TYRRELL, a retired deputy chief who also once worked in homicide under Mr. NOBLE's command. "If you needed advice, Jim was the guy you would go to."
Mr. NOBLE was promoted to inspector in 1973, staff superintendant in 1974 and deputy chief in 1977. He retired in 1984 with 61 letters of commendation in his file.
Besides homicide investigation, he was an expert on deportation and extradition and lectured on those subjects at police colleges.
An outspoken critic of what he saw as an overly-liberal legal system that put the rights of criminals above those of law-abiding citizens, he once penned an article titled "The Pampered Criminal." Convinced that the immigration department was equally soft on criminals, he helped spurred the government into tightening up the process by which criminals are deported.
"He was really upset with the system," said his former partner, Jack FOSTER, a retired staff sergeant from the detective branch. "He felt they were too soft on immigrants. We'd go to all the trouble of a deportation hearing, they'd escort a guy over to the United States, and within an hour he'd be back on our side again."
Born in Whiteabbey, near Belfast, Northern Ireland, in 1924, James Melvyn NOBLE came to Canada with his family at the age of four and grew up in a working-class neighbourhood on Toronto's Shaw Street. After grade 12 he entered the Royal Canadian Air Force and earned his pilot's wings, but, to his immense disappointment, he never served overseas. Leaving the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1946, he began looking for "something with a little bit of action, a little bit of excitement." When his father, a carpenter, suggested that he apply for a position with the police department, the 22-year-old laughed -- hard -- but agreed to talk to a friend of his father's who was a police inspector. After two lengthy discussions, Mr. NOBLE was ready to "give it a try."
For six months he pounded a beat in a police uniform. Then, paired with a partner in a patrol car, he worked a graveyard shift and became familiar with the "usual cases -- fights on the streets, drunks, domestics, robberies." Often, after an overnight shift, he would be obliged to make an appearance in court the next day.
Promoted to detective in 1957 and to the homicide squad in 1961, he once explained that he'd watch for certain telltale signs in an accused upon introducing himself as a police detective: "a darting of the eyes, the mouth becomes dry and there's a wetting of the lips, a throbbing of the artery in the neck. The person gets pale, he's trembling."
He was often amazed at how readily criminals, once apprehended, will confess their misdeeds. "There's almost a compulsion of people to confess, especially in murder cases," he once said. "It makes them feel that they have salved their conscience to some degree by telling about it."
In one of many infamous cases that he handled, NOBLE solved the murder of an 89-year-old female doctor, Rowena HUME, who was viciously beaten to death by a derelict who had stayed at a Salvation Army shelter and whom she had hired to do a few odd jobs. Two days after the murder, having followed a series of clues, Mr. NOBLE nabbed the suspect on a downtown street; the man blurted out a confession almost instantly. Mr. NOBLE was also part of the gruesome homicide investigation involving the notorious Evelyn DICK of Hamilton, Ontario
Mr. FOSTER, who was paired with Mr. NOBLE for about eight years, recalled that though he took his job very seriously, he also "had a good sense of humour -- he enjoyed a good laugh."
On one occasion, after a painstaking, six-month investigation into a complex case of insurance fraud, the duo were finally ready to collar the perpetrator, a well-known socialite named Irene.
"I remember Jim and me driving up Yonge Street to make the final arrest, and he was singing, 'Irene, Goodnight, Irene,' " Mr. FOSTER recalled. Irene, needless to say, was convicted.
For all of Mr. NOBLE's acumen as an investigator, however, not all of his professional faculties were in operation the day he and Mr. FOSTER visited a Yonge Street ladies' wear shop to check into a routine fraud. Getting back into the patrol car, Mr. NOBLE commented on how attractive he had found the store manager and that he wished he could get to know her better.
"But she's probably married," he lamented.
"Jim, what kind of detective are you?" Mr. FOSTER said. "Didn't you notice that she's got no wedding ring on her finger?"
"No, I didn't. I guess I was too busy taking notes."
Mr. FOSTER insisted that Mr. NOBLE, then 35 and single, make the requisite follow-up call on his own. He did, and he and the store manager, Barbara, were married in 1961.
Although he could play rough when the situation demanded, Mr. NOBLE was known as an impeccable gentleman and a guardian of old-fashioned standards and family values.
He once upbraided some bikers for using profanity in the presence of their girlfriends; the biker girls explained they weren't typical ladies but seemed touched by his courtesy all the same.
According to his daughter, Elaine NOBLE Tames, Jim NOBLE rarely spoke about his professional life at home.
"Being in a house with two ladies, the typical gentleman side of him would say, 'That's not the sort of thing to discuss with your wife and daughter,' " she said.
Mr. NOBLE was the subject of a cover story in Toronto Life magazine in 1972 that used him as a prism through which to view the entire police force. The article described him as "gentle, thoughtful and courteous," and noted that, except in target practice, he had never fired the snubnosed Smith and Wesson.38 revolver that he wore on his right hip.
American authors Bruce Henderson and Sam Summerlin devoted a chapter to him in their 1976 book The Super Sleuths, and described him as "one of the most highly respected operatives in the history of Canadian justice."
"He was the embodiment of professionalism in everything he did, and that was the standard to which he held other people," Mr. FANTINO said.
Jim NOBLE died in Toronto on July 15, leaving his wife Barbara, daughter Elaine and sister Pat WILKINSON, all of Toronto.

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WILKINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-04 published
Thelma Eaton Hutchison WILKINSON
By Laurie SEHL Tuesday, November 4, 2003 - Page A24
Mother, sister, teacher. Born February 2, 1913, in Arthur, Ontario Died August 1, in Brampton, Ontario, of old age, aged 90.
Thelma Laurene EATON, the second child of Hugh and Jean EATON, was sister to Clifford and Irene. At the age of 10, Thelma wrote her entrance exams to high school. She was held back a year because of her age and was delayed another year when she became quite ill with whooping cough. She started high school when she was During her years at Arthur High, Thelma was heavily involved in the community. She was the church pianist and was involved in staging several community plays. Thelma applied to and was accepted at Toronto Normal School and she graduated at the age of 17. She returned to her elementary school, Metz School, where she taught many younger than she who had been in the same one-room school. In the subsequent 39 years, Thelma taught students in many Ontario towns.
"Thelma was a dedicated teacher -- she cared for and had concerns for all of her pupils and in turn they cared for and were inspired by her," says stepdaughter Ruth CRUMP of Windsor, Ontario "She was an excellent teacher of our academics but still made time to umpire a ball game, organize the yearly gala Christmas concert or whatever else it took to keep about 40 pupils in eight grades busy and on their paths to becoming productive citizens."
Thelma met Gordon HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, who also was from the Arthur area, and they dated for about seven years. The marriage was delayed while they both helped support their families during the Depression years. They finally tied the knot on November 18, 1939. Thelma had two children, Donna Jean (now WANLESS) and Wayne Alexander.
The years from 1969 to 1975 were difficult for Thelma and the strength of her character shone through. She quit her teaching career to care for ailing husband Gordon (who died in August, 1971), her father who died in June of that same year and a brother who became critically ill with diabetes.
Over the years, one of Thelma's passions beyond her family and teaching was the Federated Women's Institute of Ontario. From 1959 until she was no longer able, Thelma was heavily involved with the Institute. She served her branch, district, area and province as president, vice-president and in various other executive positions. One of her favourite projects was attracting and arranging the appearance of guest speaker Pauline McGIBBON, Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario, at a special Institute event. Thelma was honoured by her branch in 1984 by becoming a life member of the Federated Women's Institutes of Ontario. Thelma also became a life member of the Associated Country Women of the World.
On October 11, 1975, Thelma married Edgerton WILKINSON from Milton, Ontario, who had been a long-time family friend; he, too, had lost his spouse. Together they enjoyed 20 years and with their blended families, shared five children, 18 grandchildren and 33 great-grandchildren. Thelma lived with Ed until his death in 1996, after which she moved to Southbrook Retirement Community for most of her final years.
"Thelma was always fun and always welcomed us," says Ruth CRUMP. "She loved to be active -- either entertaining or being entertained. She was a true conversationalist and could tell great stories and jokes. She never turned down an offer for a game of bridge or euchre. Most of all, she loved her family and many Friends. The times she laughed, gave advice or just listened echo in the memories of those lives (she) touched -- and, in being so remembered, her legacy will live on."
Laurie SEHL is Thelma's granddaughter.

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WILKINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-15 published
SNELGROVE, William H.
Died peacefully in Victoria on December 11, 2003. Born in Toronto December 30, 1915. Bill graduated from McGill University, then served overseas for five years in the Royal Canadian Air Force as Squadron Leader (410). He will be lovingly remembered by his wife of 53 years, Anne (née WILKINSON;) his daughter Wendy SNELGROVE of Vancouver; son Bob SNELGROVE (Judy née SIMPSON) and his beloved grandchildren John, Jill and Peter of Brockville, Ontario. He is survived by his sister Wilma HOFFMAN of Wilmington, Delaware and brother Hal (Ada née HARRIS) of Hudson Heights, Quebec. He will be missed by his many Friends in the North Toronto Kiwanis Club, Victoria Probus Club and the ''Jolly Boys''.
The Funeral Service will be held at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 at St. Michael and All Angels Parish, 4733 West Saanich Road, Victoria. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Veteran's Health Centre at the Lodge at Broadmead or The Heart and Stroke Foundation. We are very thankful for the loving care given to Bill in the past few years.

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WILLARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-11 published
GRIFFIN, Oda Rockliff
Died peacefully at home on June 9, 2003, with dignity and courage. Beloved wife of the late Peter GRIFFIN. Loving mother of Tova and Gail. Predeceased by her daughter June. Cherished mother-in-law to Don WILLARD, Ed Charles and Dr. Lee BOOKER. Adored by her grandchildren, John, Lee Ann, Jill, Leilani, Terry, Peter and her great-grand_son Justin. Oda will be sadly missed by Tony, Kitty and family, and by the dear family of the late Peter GRIFFIN. The Funeral Service will be held at Holy Rosary Church, 354 St. Clair Ave. West, Toronto, on Friday, June 13, at 10: 30 a.m., with family visitation at 10 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care, 700 University Ave. (3rd floor), Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z5 or Mississippi Society of Canada (National Office), 250 Bloor St. East, Suite 1000, Toronto, Ontario M4W 3P9.

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WILLETTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-16 published
Bluesman made his mark
Canadian harpist's brush with greatness was frustrated by his battle with the bottle
By Bruce Farley MOWAT Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, January 16, 2003, Page R9
He will be remembered for creating some of the high water marks in the history of popular music in Canada. Blues harpist Richard NEWELL, also known as King Biscuit Boy, has died. He was found dead at his house in Hamilton on January 5.
Richard NEWELL's story is the stuff of legend, but not legendary. The Oxford Canadian Dictionary defines legend as "a traditional story sometimes popularly regarded as historical, but unauthenticated."
Nearly all the career anecdotes surrounding King Biscuit Boy have been verified. Yes, he really was recruited for the Allman Brothers in 1969, for Janis JOPLIN's Full Tilt Boogie Band in 1970 and for a mid-seventies session with Aretha FRANKLIN. The stellar Houston blues guitarist, Albert COLLINS was recording a version of Mr. NEWELL's Mean Old Lady, before he died in 1994.
Mr. NEWELL, though, would rarely volunteer to offer up such information, unless you prodded him for it. He didn't think it was important.
He was born the son of Lily and Walter (Dick) NEWELL, an Royal Air Force airman stationed in Canada during the Second World War. Richard NEWELL developed an early interest in music, from the country of Hank WILLIAMS Sr. to the jump blues of Louis JORDAN, to the frenetic sounds of such original rock 'n' rollers as Little Richard. At age 12, he purchased his first harmonica after discovering the blues via late-night AM radio.
Mr. NEWELL spent seven years rehearsing his ever-expanding collection of blues 45s, which he purchased on regular hitchhiking forays to Buffalo. Few of his Friends at the time were even aware that he played harmonica and guitar.
In 1963, Ronnie COPPLE's sock-hop rock 'n' roll group, the Barons, recruited Mr. NEWELL as its lead singer. Mr. NEWELL had heard a recording of their instrumental original, Bottleneck, and came by with an record by the prototypical American electric blues slide guitarist, Elmore JAMES.
Within weeks of his joining, the group was transfigured into the flat-out, deep blues band, The Chessmen Featuring son Richard. The sound was guitar driven and harmonica-heavy, certainly not the type of thing you'd find at the average mid-sixties Southern Ontario teen dance. The band made it to Europe the following summer, playing successful shows at U.S. Army bases to predominantly black audiences.
Back in Canada, Mr. NEWELL would go on to become the lead singer of Richie Knight and The Mid Knights in 1966. He also made his debut professional recording at this time, as a session harmonica player on a recording by country singer, Dallas HARMS, best known for writing such hits as Paper Rosie for American country singer Gene WATSON.
When ex-Mid Knight and future Full Tilt Boogie band member Rick BELL was recruited for the Ronnie HAWKINS band in 1968, Mr. NEWELL's name came up. After one audition, he was hired on the spot and rechristened with the royal King Biscuit Boy moniker, a title he was never totally comfortable with.
Back in his native Arkansas, HAWKINS had rehearsed in the basement of the old KFFA radio station where blues harpist, Sonny Boy Williamson 2nd (Rice MILLER,) did his King Biscuit Flour Hour broadcasts. To HAWKINS, Mr. NEWELL must have sounded like a letter from home.
When JOPLIN scooped BELL and guitarist John TILL from HAWKINS's band early in 1970, Mr. NEWELL and drummer Larry ATAMANUIK were left with the task of re-assembling the band. That group would become the first King Biscuit Boy-led outfit, Crowbar. In a fit of pique, HAWKINS had inadvertently given the band its name in an exchange of parting shots at the Grange Tavern in Hamilton. "You guys are so dumb," he yelled, "you could fuck up the moving parts of a crowbar."
As the bandleader, singer, harmonica player and guitarist on Official Music, Mr. NEWELL was responsible for building a razor-sharp and singularly intense sound. The rehearsals for these sessions were apparently tension-laden affairs, but the payoff came when the album muscled its way on to the Canadian charts, (without the benefit of Canadian-content regulations), the fastest-selling domestic release to date.
Mr. NEWELL and the band would part ways after King Biscuit Boy and Crowbar had scored on the singles chart with the traditional piece, Corrina, Corrina. In 1971, Crowbar (without King Biscuit Boy) earned a place on the bestseller charts with a song that was to become a perennial Canuck rock anthem. Oh, What a Feeling was the first domestic single to take advantage of the newly legislated Canadian-content rules for broadcasting.
Fate intervened throughout the following years to rob Mr. NEWELL of his career momentum. The backing band he assembled to promote Good 'Uns, the 1971 followup to Official Music, was beginning to work on a third album, when the funding for it ran out.
With the momentum lost, that unit disintegrated, with guitarist Earl JOHNSON leaving to form the hard-rock outfit, Moxy.
In 1974, sessions produced by Allen TOUSSAINT, the architect of many a New Orleans Rhythm and Blues classic, would culminate in the Epic label release of a self-titled recording. Mr. NEWELL would tour the United States the following year with The Meters (featuring future members of the Neville Brothers) as his backup band. When the Epic label cleaned house later that year, though, he was one of the acts dropped.
In 1972, Mr. NEWELL wed Jacqueline WILLETTS but found that married life did not curb his increasingly frequent drinking binges. The couple divorced in 1979. Alcoholism was also the source of most of his professional woes for the better part of his life, as key shows were either cancelled, or worse, rendered into shambles. Musicians who worked with him tended to admire him, but found it incredibly frustrating that such an enormous talent was being squandered.
At several junctures in his career, Mr. NEWELL managed to quit drinking. Of the three albums he recorded and released in the eighties and nineties, two were the direct dividends of his abstinence. Those recordings earned him Juno nominations, in 1988 for Richard NEWELL aka King Biscuit Boy,and in 1996 for Urban Blues Re: NEWELL. The latter is still in print on Holger Peterson's Stony Plain label. Official Music, along with Good'Uns and Badly Bent, a best-of compilation, are available on the Unidisc label (http://www.unidisc.com). The rest of the King Biscuit Boy catalogue, including the 1980 Mouth of Steel album, is out of print.
In 2000, Mr. NEWELL's mother died and he left regular stage work, preferring the seclusion of his home in the central Mountain neighbourhood of Hamilton. His last recordings include a version of Blue Christmas, available on the Hamilton Hometown Christmas Compact Disk compilation assembled by saxophonist and long-time friend, Sonny DEL RIO. An original composition, Two Hound Blues, along with material recorded by DEL RIO and Mr. NEWELL in the late seventies (the Biscuit With Gravy sessions) is planned for release this year.
Mr. NEWELL, who leaves his father Dick, brother Walter (Randy,) and son Richard James Oddie, made his last public performance in a cameo appearance with The Little Red Blues Gang on September 12, 2002, at Mermaids Lounge in Hamilton. The 60 or so audience members present were treated to a version of his hit, Corrina, Corrina, which is strange, because he never particularly cared for that song.
Richard Alfred NEWELL, musician; born March 9, 1944, in Hamilton died in Hamilton, January 5, 2003.

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-12 published
Alice Lucy WILLIAMS
Alice Lucy WILLIAMS passed away at the Collingwood Nursing Home, on Friday, February 7, 2003 in her 88th year.
Alice (McGIBBON) beloved wife of the late George WILLIAMS. Dear mother of Wilda and her husband Hazen WHITE/WHYTE of Providence Bay, Manitoulin Island and the late Eileen WILLIAMS and Robert Arthur WILLIAMS. Survived by her daughter-in-law Helen BOUTET. Loving grandmother of Bruce and the late Shirley WHITE/WHYTE, Wilma Eileen WHITE/WHYTE, Linda Darlene and her husband Bradford LEIBEL, Robert Bruce WILLIAMS, Julie Marie and her husband Joe STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and the late Douglas Allan WHITE/WHYTE, nine great grandchildren: Matthew WHITE/WHYTE, Marcus WHITE/WHYTE, Sarah HAMILL, Curtis MERRITT, Liana MERRITT, Joshua COX, Kimberly LEIBEL, Neil LEIBEL, Nicole STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and three great great grandchildren, Dominique, Tristan and Brayden. Funeral service was held at the Chatterson-Long Funeral Home, 404 Hurontario Street, Collingwood, on Tuesday, February 11, 2003. Spring Interment Silver Water Cemetery, Manitoulin Island.

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
Lois Irene (MUCKLOW) WHITE/WHYTE
In loving memory of Lois Irene (MUCKLOW) WHITE/WHYTE who passed away at Mindemoya Hospital on Thursday, May 8, 2003 at the age of 59 years.
Dear wife of Reginald WHITE/WHYTE, of Mindemoya. Predeceased by son Reginald. Predeceased by parents James and Irene MUCKLOW of North Bay. Loving sister to James and Ines MUCKLOW of Kirkland Lake, sister-in-law to Mary and Eric SEARLE of Huntsville, Beulah AYLES of Newfoundland, Doris WILHSHIRE and Weslley of Newfoundland, Millicent WILLIAMS of Denver, Colorado. Predeceased by brothers-in-law, Bill, Jack, Philip and Frank all of Newfoundland. Will be sadly missed by nieces and nephews. Visitation and Funeral Service were held on Saturday, May 10, 2003 at the Mindemoya Missionary Church. Cremation to follow. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-21 published
Roseanne Rebecca (KIMEWON) “slow Cat” WILLIAMS
Roseanne WILLIAMS, a resident of Wikwemikong, passed away at residence in Wikwemikong, on Saturday, May 17 2003 at the age of 40 years. She was born in Little Current, daughter of the late John and Clara PITAWANAKWAT) WILLIAMS. She was a member of the Catholic Church and more recently became a member of the Resurrection Life Center in Manitowaning. Her family and extended family will miss Roseanne, but many happy memories will be cherished.
Roseanne is survived by two children Crystal and Martin both of Wikwemikong. Dear grandmother of 2 grandchildren Alaya and Michael. Loving sister of 4 brothers Donald, Paul, Joseph, Philip and 4 sisters Mary, Phyllis, Kitty and Diane. Predeceased by one brother James in 1984. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the resurrection Life Center, Manitowaning after 7: 00 pm Wednesday, May 21, 2003. Funeral services will be held on Friday, May 23, 2003, at 11: 00 am from the church. Pastor Isadore PHEASANT will officiate. Interment in Kaboni Cemetery.

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Josephine Rita (SHIGWADJA) DEBASSIGE
Josephine DEBASSIGE, a resident of Wikwemikong died at the Wikwemikong
Nursing Home on Friday May 23, 2003 at the age of 76 years.
Josephine was born at Wikwemikong, daughter of the late Mary SHIGWADJA. She retired after 22 years of working at the Band Office as a custodian and was a member of the West Bay Gospel Fellowship Church in M'Chigeeng. Her hobbies included reading, sewing, gardening and going to yard sales. Her family will miss her great sense of humour and the many cherished memories.
Beloved wife of the late Jerome A. DEBASSIGE (1990.) Loving and loved mother of Donna DEBASSIGE, Toronto, Sharon DEBASSIGE (partner Ron,) M'Chigeeng, Gail DEBASSIGE (predeceased 1967,) Brenda DEBASSIGE (partner Rocco,) Guelph, Peter DEBASSIGE (partner Lydia) M'Chigeeng and Denise DEBASSIGE (partner Taylor,) M'Chigeeng. Proud grandmother of Karen, Melanie, Mark, Marko, Nancy, Teague, Kristin, Carly, Olivia and Peter Jr. Dear great-grandmother of Luis, Kayla and Dean. Dearly loved sister of Rose ROY, Alice JOCKO, Elizabeth JOCKO and the KABONI Family of Wikwemikong. Predeceased by brother Franklin and sister Mary Louise. Also survived by many nieces and nephews.
Friends called Josephine's home in M'Chigeeng on Saturday May 24, 2003. The funeral service was held from the Mindemoya Missionary Church on Tuesday May 27, 2003 with Pastor Richard WILLIAMS officiating. Interment Whispering Pines Cemetery in M'Chigeeng. Culgin Funeral Home
also linked as linked as ROI

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Kayla Patricia JIMENEZ- DEBASSIGE
In loving memory of Kayla Patricia JIMENEZ- DEBASSIGE, born January 28, 1992, died September 1, 2003.
Loving daughter of Karen DEBASSIGE and the late Luis JIMUNEZ. Dear sister of Luis DEBASSIGE. Granddaughter of Donna and Mike and Mila and Miguel. Great-grand-daughter of the late Josephine. Niece of Nancy, Glenda (Xiomara), Marco, Carlos and the late Miguelito. A funeral service was held on Monday, September 8, 2003 at 11: 00 am from Mindemoya Missionary Church, Pastor Richard WILLIAMS officiated with interment in Whispering Pines Cemetery, M'Chigeeng. Culgin Funeral Home

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
WILLIAMS
-In loving memory of Stan, who passed away October 15, 1998.
You've crossed over the river, on the other side,
You live in the realms of glory, as with Jesus you abide
The joy that you brought to me can still bring forth a smile,
And the music of your laughter lives in me all the while,
The love that I feel for you burns always in my heart
And time won't dull its brilliance even though we are apart.
I know we'll be reunited on the shore or God's promised land.
And you'll lead me to my saviour where we'll meet Him hand in hand.
-Fondly remembered and sadly missed by Marg

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-16 published
Bluesman made his mark
Canadian harpist's brush with greatness was frustrated by his battle with the bottle
By Bruce Farley MOWAT Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, January 16, 2003, Page R9
He will be remembered for creating some of the high water marks in the history of popular music in Canada. Blues harpist Richard NEWELL, also known as King Biscuit Boy, has died. He was found dead at his house in Hamilton on January 5.
Richard NEWELL's story is the stuff of legend, but not legendary. The Oxford Canadian Dictionary defines legend as "a traditional story sometimes popularly regarded as historical, but unauthenticated."
Nearly all the career anecdotes surrounding King Biscuit Boy have been verified. Yes, he really was recruited for the Allman Brothers in 1969, for Janis JOPLIN's Full Tilt Boogie Band in 1970 and for a mid-seventies session with Aretha FRANKLIN. The stellar Houston blues guitarist, Albert COLLINS was recording a version of Mr. NEWELL's Mean Old Lady, before he died in 1994.
Mr. NEWELL, though, would rarely volunteer to offer up such information, unless you prodded him for it. He didn't think it was important.
He was born the son of Lily and Walter (Dick) NEWELL, an Royal Air Force airman stationed in Canada during the Second World War. Richard NEWELL developed an early interest in music, from the country of Hank WILLIAMS Sr. to the jump blues of Louis JORDAN, to the frenetic sounds of such original rock 'n' rollers as Little Richard. At age 12, he purchased his first harmonica after discovering the blues via late-night AM radio.
Mr. NEWELL spent seven years rehearsing his ever-expanding collection of blues 45s, which he purchased on regular hitchhiking forays to Buffalo. Few of his Friends at the time were even aware that he played harmonica and guitar.
In 1963, Ronnie COPPLE's sock-hop rock 'n' roll group, the Barons, recruited Mr. NEWELL as its lead singer. Mr. NEWELL had heard a recording of their instrumental original, Bottleneck, and came by with an record by the prototypical American electric blues slide guitarist, Elmore JAMES.
Within weeks of his joining, the group was transfigured into the flat-out, deep blues band, The Chessmen Featuring son Richard. The sound was guitar driven and harmonica-heavy, certainly not the type of thing you'd find at the average mid-sixties Southern Ontario teen dance. The band made it to Europe the following summer, playing successful shows at U.S. Army bases to predominantly black audiences.
Back in Canada, Mr. NEWELL would go on to become the lead singer of Richie Knight and The Mid Knights in 1966. He also made his debut professional recording at this time, as a session harmonica player on a recording by country singer, Dallas HARMS, best known for writing such hits as Paper Rosie for American country singer Gene WATSON.
When ex-Mid Knight and future Full Tilt Boogie band member Rick BELL was recruited for the Ronnie HAWKINS band in 1968, Mr. NEWELL's name came up. After one audition, he was hired on the spot and rechristened with the royal King Biscuit Boy moniker, a title he was never totally comfortable with.
Back in his native Arkansas, HAWKINS had rehearsed in the basement of the old KFFA radio station where blues harpist, Sonny Boy Williamson 2nd (Rice MILLER,) did his King Biscuit Flour Hour broadcasts. To HAWKINS, Mr. NEWELL must have sounded like a letter from home.
When JOPLIN scooped BELL and guitarist John TILL from HAWKINS's band early in 1970, Mr. NEWELL and drummer Larry ATAMANUIK were left with the task of re-assembling the band. That group would become the first King Biscuit Boy-led outfit, Crowbar. In a fit of pique, HAWKINS had inadvertently given the band its name in an exchange of parting shots at the Grange Tavern in Hamilton. "You guys are so dumb," he yelled, "you could fuck up the moving parts of a crowbar."
As the bandleader, singer, harmonica player and guitarist on Official Music, Mr. NEWELL was responsible for building a razor-sharp and singularly intense sound. The rehearsals for these sessions were apparently tension-laden affairs, but the payoff came when the album muscled its way on to the Canadian charts, (without the benefit of Canadian-content regulations), the fastest-selling domestic release to date.
Mr. NEWELL and the band would part ways after King Biscuit Boy and Crowbar had scored on the singles chart with the traditional piece, Corrina, Corrina. In 1971, Crowbar (without King Biscuit Boy) earned a place on the bestseller charts with a song that was to become a perennial Canuck rock anthem. Oh, What a Feeling was the first domestic single to take advantage of the newly legislated Canadian-content rules for broadcasting.
Fate intervened throughout the following years to rob Mr. NEWELL of his career momentum. The backing band he assembled to promote Good 'Uns, the 1971 followup to Official Music, was beginning to work on a third album, when the funding for it ran out.
With the momentum lost, that unit disintegrated, with guitarist Earl JOHNSON leaving to form the hard-rock outfit, Moxy.
In 1974, sessions produced by Allen TOUSSAINT, the architect of many a New Orleans Rhythm and Blues classic, would culminate in the Epic label release of a self-titled recording. Mr. NEWELL would tour the United States the following year with The Meters (featuring future members of the Neville Brothers) as his backup band. When the Epic label cleaned house later that year, though, he was one of the acts dropped.
In 1972, Mr. NEWELL wed Jacqueline WILLETTS but found that married life did not curb his increasingly frequent drinking binges. The couple divorced in 1979. Alcoholism was also the source of most of his professional woes for the better part of his life, as key shows were either cancelled, or worse, rendered into shambles. Musicians who worked with him tended to admire him, but found it incredibly frustrating that such an enormous talent was being squandered.
At several junctures in his career, Mr. NEWELL managed to quit drinking. Of the three albums he recorded and released in the eighties and nineties, two were the direct dividends of his abstinence. Those recordings earned him Juno nominations, in 1988 for Richard NEWELL aka King Biscuit Boy,and in 1996 for Urban Blues Re: NEWELL. The latter is still in print on Holger Peterson's Stony Plain label. Official Music, along with Good'Uns and Badly Bent, a best-of compilation, are available on the Unidisc label (http://www.unidisc.com). The rest of the King Biscuit Boy catalogue, including the 1980 Mouth of Steel album, is out of print.
In 2000, Mr. NEWELL's mother died and he left regular stage work, preferring the seclusion of his home in the central Mountain neighbourhood of Hamilton. His last recordings include a version of Blue Christmas, available on the Hamilton Hometown Christmas Compact Disk compilation assembled by saxophonist and long-time friend, Sonny DEL RIO. An original composition, Two Hound Blues, along with material recorded by DEL RIO and Mr. NEWELL in the late seventies (the Biscuit With Gravy sessions) is planned for release this year.
Mr. NEWELL, who leaves his father Dick, brother Walter (Randy,) and son Richard James Oddie, made his last public performance in a cameo appearance with The Little Red Blues Gang on September 12, 2002, at Mermaids Lounge in Hamilton. The 60 or so audience members present were treated to a version of his hit, Corrina, Corrina, which is strange, because he never particularly cared for that song.
Richard Alfred NEWELL, musician; born March 9, 1944, in Hamilton died in Hamilton, January 5, 2003.

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-15 published
GENDRON, Jacqueline (Jackie)
Jacqueline GENDRON (née COOPER) was born 18 September 1909, Toronto and died peacefully at Avalon Nursing Home, Orangeville, Ontario on Thursday, 13 February 2003 in her 94th year. She was predeceased by her husband 'Vince' and son Jim, her sisters Blanche PITMAN and Glad GILLEN, brother Jim COOPER and recently her daughter-in-law Margaret (Mrs. Michael GENDRON). She is survived by her sons Peter (Judy), Owen Sound and Michael, Brockville; grandchildren Greg, Steven, Mark (Shaune) and Andrea (Anthony); sisters Audrey IRWIN and Alma WILLIAMS (Al;) sister-in-law Barb COOPER; many nieces and nephews and several close Friends. Jackie lived life her way. She was a responsible stay at home wife and mother, roles of which she was proud. She was a good mom. She loved New Year's parties with Friends, played golf, curled, skied, volunteered and travelled in Europe, East Asia and Africa into her 80's. Her Friends meant a great deal to her. She will be remembered for her flair and skill in cooking, carpentry, ceramics, wood carving, sewing, millinery and home decorating. Jackie was awarded a life membership in the Lord Dufferin Chapter of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire after 35 years of dedicated service. She was a member of Westminster United Church. At Jackie's request she was cremated and a memorial service, for immediate family, will be held during the summer, followed by burial in the family plot at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Orangeville. Special thanks to the staff of both Lord Dufferin Centre and Avalon Nursing Home, Dr. MARIEN and Dr. VEENMAN. Your care and sensitivity were much appreciated. Arrangements by Egan Funeral Home Baxter and Giles Chapel, 273 Broadway, Orangeville L9W 1K8 (519-941-2630).

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-10 published
WILLIAMS, Tony
Born in London, on December 20th, 1933 died suddenly and unexpectedly at Kelowna General Hospital on May 2nd, 2003. Dearest and most loving husband to Nola, step-father to Simone, brother to Rosalind, Jane (Dave) and uncle to Ned and Martha, sister-in-law: Melanie. Tony was a tireless worker for social justice and human rights and a dedicated volunteer for various organizations, including College and Institutes Retirees Association of British Columbia and the Kidney Foundation. Tony loved his years of teaching Sociology at Okanagan University College and was appointed an honorary Lifetime member of the Faculty Association. We will miss his intellect, immense kindness, quick wit and sense of humour. Viewing will be on Thursday, May 8th, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. A gathering of family and Friends will take place on Thursday, May 8th, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. at the home of Simone SHORI, 3526 Country Pines Drive, Wesbank, British Columbia In lieu of flowers, donations to the Okanagan University College Library Fund in memory of Tony would be appreciated. Condolences may be sent to the family by visiting our website www.firstmemorialkelowna.com Arrangements entrusted with First Memorial Funeral Services, Kelowna, British Columbia (250) 762-2299.

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-21 published
BLYTH, Reverend Patricia (née WILLIAMS) M.A. (Oxon)
Born January 10, 1916, Reigate, England; died, after a long and impressive life - as war bride, army wife, teacher, headmistress, diplomatic spouse, priest, chaplain, volunteer - in Ottawa on May 20, 2003, with her children at her side. Dearly beloved wife of the late David Wilson BLYTH. Much loved and loving mother of Susan PERREN, Sally BLYTH (Alan BULL,) Carol FINLAY (Bryan,) Molly BLYTH (John MILLOY,) Jane O'BRIAN (Geoffrey) and Sam (Rosemary PHELAN.) Loving grandmother to Max (Sarah,) Bianca and Henry Emily (Brian) and Megan; Molly (Sam) and Charles; Michael-John, Bridget, Jeremy and Clare; Patrick and Katie; Frannie and Maddie great-grandmother to Quinn and Rachel. Mourned by her many Friends and colleagues, including those at Rideau Place, Island Lodge and St. Bartholomew's Church. A celebration of her life with Holy Eucharist will take place at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, 125 MacKay Street, Ottawa, Friday, May 23, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Primate's World Relief Development Fund, 600 Jarvis Street, Toronto M4Y 2J6 (or through www.pwrdf.org). Funeral arrangements with the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, Ottawa 613-233-1143 Condolences/donations at: mcgarryfamily.ca

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-02 published
SHARPE, David Buscombe
Born October 22, 1924, died after a brief illness on May 29, 2003. Loving husband of Bette (née ATKIN,) father of Joanne, Nancy WILLIAMS and husband Richard. Father-in- law of Nancy SHARPE, grandfather of Ian SHARPE, David and Kevin WILLIAMS. Pre- deceased by his sons John David SHARPE and Brian William SHARPE. The family will receive Friends at W.C. Town Funeral Chapel, 110 Dundas Street, East, Whitby (905-668-3410) on Wednesday, June 4, 2003, from 1 to 3 and 7 to 9 p.m. Service at All Saints Anglican Church, 300 Dundas Street West (at Centre Street), Whitby on Thursday, June 5, 2003, at 11 a.m. Private family interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto at a later date. For those who wish in lieu of flowers, donations made to the Lakeridge Health Whitby Foundation or All Saints Anglican Church would be appreciated.

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-03 published
HASSARD, John Richard
died peacefully on Saturday, May 31, 2003 at Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. He was predeceased in 2000 by his loving wife, Elizabeth (née WILLIAMS.) He is survived by his son Richard and wife Donna of New York; son James and wife Caryn and granddaughters Emily, Sydney and Jamie of Los Angeles; son Jason of Morrisburg and sister Evelyn EATON of London. There will be a private family service at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations to Toronto General - Cardiac Unit - Dr. SCULLY; Princess Margaret Hospial or Northumberland Health Care Centre. Family can be reached: Richard HASSARD, 30 Park Ave, P.H. 'B', New York, New York, 10016. James A. HASSARD, 115 Parkside Drive Wood Ranch/Sima Valley, California 93065. Jason HASSARD, P.O. Box 564, Morrisburg, Ontario, K0C 1X0.

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-04 published
Patricia BLYTH
By Sam BLYTH Friday, July 4, 2003 - Page A18
Wife, mother, teacher, headmistress, priest. Born January 10, 1916, in Reigate, Surrey. Died May 20 in Ottawa, of cancer, aged In the middle of the night, in the middle of February 1953, in a blinding snowstorm, mother disembarked from the Canadian in Brandon, Manitoba, with her five young daughters in hand. Dressed in a full-length mink coat and direct from London via Halifax, she watched as the porter hurled her trunks onto the platform and told her: "If this is where you are going to live -- God help you." Fifty years later she dryly observed that He certainly did.
Mother was born Patricia WILLIAMS to a gentler life in England. Educated at Cheltenham Ladies College and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, she read English and was tutored by C.S. LEWIS and J.R.R. TOLKIEN. Oxford life between the wars was both elegant and edgy, with the likes of John PROFUMO and Harold WILSON in her year. While mom inherited a strong Christian work ethic from her great-grandfather, Sir George WILLIAMS, she was not above enjoying some of the better things in life.
The war brought both drama and excitement and then devastating loss as her only sibling Graham was killed in action.
She met my father on a golf course in Kent during the darkest days of the war. He was a clean-cut Canadian from Regina who went on to command a flight squadron. Their romance played out in London during the blitz and on their wedding night the fires burned so brightly that they could read at night without turning the lights on. Undeterred, they produced three children before the end of the war and went on to have three more, including a son born in Camp Shilo, Manitoba, where mom was bound that February in 1953.
After the family relocated to Ottawa, Mom's career as a mother and a military wife soon gave way to a second career of teaching at Elmwood School. Success in the classroom led to her appointment as headmistress. Mrs. BLYTH was an imposing figure and not to be trifled with. But she was also caring of her students and they returned her devotion.
It must have been with a heavy heart that she gave it all up to accompany dad to diplomatic posts in England, West Germany and Greece. In Bonn, she decided to learn to drive and, after buying an orange Volkswagen, took to the roads and autobahns with a determination that impressed even the locals. Her third career as a diplomatic spouse was unfulfilling.
Mom's fourth career was perhaps her calling in life. Following dad's death in 1985, she started as a lay reader in a small Anglican parish in the West Country of England. Soon she ran up against the Church of England's refusal to ordain woman so she relocated one last time to Ottawa, where she was ordained shortly before her 70th birthday. Every summer thereafter she returned to Devon, installed herself at the local inn and met her former parishioners.
For the last 17 years in Ottawa, she spent her life ministering to the elderly and dying in a large public health facility. In this grim setting she was superb and much loved by both the patients and the caregivers. In her last months, she cared for people who were likely both younger and healthier than Mom as she dealt with terminal lung cancer. Typically, she refused to see a doctor, knowing that the diagnosis would be bad and perhaps curtail her day-to-day life. When she finally agreed to see a doctor she would have less than a week to live.
Several weeks prior to that she summoned the priest in charge of her church to discuss her funeral arrangements. She told him that he should do what he thought was best and then proceeded to tell him exactly what to do. At the funeral, he told an enormous congregation that Pat had insisted that there be no eulogies and then proceeded to deliver one. It was a fitting tribute.
Sam BLYTH is Patricia BLYTH's son.

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
EDWARDS, Barbara Grace (née WILLIAMS)
Died peacefully at the Jewish General Hospital on Thursday, July 17, 2003, in her seventy-third year. Beloved daughter of the late Aston and the late Isolyn WILLIAMS. Beloved wife of Alfred Barington (Barrie). Beloved mother of David Gregory. Beloved sister of Dorothy (in Switzerland). Predeceased by her sisters Pearl and Mizpah and her brothers Buzzie and Percy. Special thanks to the staff of the Jewish General Hospital for their care and compassion. Visitation with urn on Monday, July 21st from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Mount Royal Funeral Complex, 1297 Chemin de la Fôret, Outremont (514) 279-6540. Memorial service in the chapel of the complex on Tuesday, July 22nd at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated. Your condolences to the family may be sent through www.everlastinglifestories.com.

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-13 published
Katharine Johnston LAMONT
By Wallace McLEOD Wednesday, August 13, 2003 - Page A16
Historian, teacher, school principal, author. Born December 25, 1905, in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Died February 19, in Toronto, of natural causes, aged 97.
Throughout her life, Katharine Johnston LAMONT would recall her vivid memories of the cyclone that hit Regina in the afternoon of June 30, 1912, blowing away the third storey of the family home, while she hid under the dining-room table.
Katharine's father was John Henderson LAMONT (1865-1936;) he was successively a member of the federal Parliament (1904-1905), the first attorney-general of the new province of Saskatchewan (1905-1907), a judge of the Provincial Supreme Court (1907), and a justice of the Supreme Court of Canada (1927). The town of LAMONT, 56 kilometres northeast of Edmonton, was named for him. Katherine's mother was Margaret Murray JOHNSTON (1865-1950,) the daughter of William Soules JOHNSTON (1838-1869,) who edited and published the Iroquois Chief, the first newspaper in Dundas County, Ontario (1858), and the granddaughter of Reverend William Henry WILLIAMS (1795-1873,) who conducted the first Methodist camp-meeting in the eastern part of Upper Canada (near Point Iroquois, in 1823), and who later served as the junior minister of the Hay Bay Church, in Adolphustown (1838-1840).
She received her schooling in Saskatchewan, graduating from Regina College. She then attended Victoria College at the University of Toronto, where she earned a degree in English and history in 1927. Her entry in the Torontonensis yearbook gives as her characteristic motto, "Making a virtue of necessity." Then she went on to Oxford University, where she enrolled in Lady Margaret Hall, the oldest women's college there (founded in 1878), and graduated in 1930. She received the degree of Master of Arts from Oxford in 1934.
On her return to Canada, she obtained a position as a teacher at the Bishop Strachan School for girls in Toronto, where she served as head of the history department from 1930 to 1952. Then in 1952 she accepted a call to become the third headmistress (principal) of The Study, a school for girls in Montreal, which had been founded in 1915. She presided over its move to a new location in 1959/60, and continued in office there until her retirement in 1970. Soon after that, she returned to Toronto.
Over the years, she received a good measure of recognition from the alumnae of the Bishop Strachan School. A bursary was established in her name in 1992, and a celebratory dinner was held in her honour; her former students were invited to submit written testimonials. They included such assessments as "She made history come alive " "a truly remarkable woman; " "the most outstanding teacher I ever had; " "known throughout the Province as its finest history teacher; " "she had a way of making her pupils think things out."
And, as another testimony of appreciation, in 2001 one of the student subdivisions of the Bishop Strachan School was named "LAMONT House." A pupil she had taught 60 years earlier said at the time that she especially remembered "an enlightened and influential history teacher, Miss LAMONT, who taught her how to look at, question and analyze the world around her -- not with cynicism but with reason."
After her retirement from teaching, as a student of the past, Katharine wrote a history of her Montreal school, titled The Study: A Chronicle (published in Montreal in 1974). Then, to celebrate the bicentenary of the Loyalist settlement on the Bay of Quinte, she wrote Adolphustown 1784-1984 (Napanee, 1984).
Early in 1996, as her health deteriorated and it became impractical for her to live on her own, she took up residence in the Glebe Manor, in Toronto, where she received excellent care.
Wallace is a friend of Katharine LAMONT.

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-08 published
Tales of derring-do
By Rod MICKLEBURGH, Saturday, November 8, 2003 - Page F6
Thunder Bay -- In a senseless war that lasted four years and took millions of lives, it was rare for individuals to stand out amid the carnage. But some managed.
Meet Hector Fraser DOUGALL, a corker of a Canadian with more tales of derring-do attached to his name than you could shake a First World War riding stick at. You think Steve McQueen's motorcycle ride was heroic in The Great Escape? After his shelled Sopwith Camel was shot down behind German lines and he was taken prisoner, Mr. DOUGALL made at least three dramatic escape attempts.
During one dash for freedom, the story goes, he saved the life of fellow escaper William STEPHENSON, who later became the legendary spymaster Intrepid, by tossing him over a stone wall as the pair fled a furious, gun-firing farmer who didn't appreciate his ducks being pilfered. When their capture appeared inevitable, Mr. STEPHENSON impersonated a German officer and ordered Mr. DOUGALL returned to prison. As he was marched away, Mr. STEPHENSON made good his own escape.
It was a typically audacious DOUGALL stunt that yielded the largest and most vivid of the First World War artifacts sent in by Canadians to The Globe and Mail -- the huge German flag that flew over the grim, fortress-like PoW camp at Holzminden, where guards did their best to contain the fighter pilot.
Mr. DOUGALL pinched the flag on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, the day the Imperial German Army surrendered.
"The prisoners woke up that morning and the guards were all gone," said his son, Fraser DOUGALL. " Some of the prisoners went down to the village to cause a bit of wrack and ruin. But dad wanted the flag. He knew how to get to the roof from one of his escape attempts. So he picked a few locks, went up there, took it down, and kept it."
Mr. DOUGALL then managed to lug the bulky flag all the way through Germany, back to England and finally to Canada. When he died in 1960, it was found at the bottom of a trunk full of souvenirs, including grenades, bayonets, old muskets, bombs, diaries, photos, old German money, helmets and his thin, black flying cap.
"This is a piece of work, this is. It went right through the war," Fraser DOUGALL said as he unfurled the old flag across his dining room table in Thunder Bay. The edges fell over the side like a table cloth.
The flag is dominated by a fierce black-and-gold representation of the imperial German eagle, with an iron cross in the top left-hand corner -- the state flag of Prussia from 1892 to 1918. Eighty-five years later, the colours are still bright. A red tongue flickers menacingly in the eagle's open beak, on its head a red-and-gold crown topped by a blue cross, while a mace and a bejewelled orb are clutched in its dark talons.
"It was really meant to convey a sense of power. You can see that, even now."
It has become his son's passion to recount, preserve and even relive Mr. DOUGALL's wartime experiences. Mementos are prominently displayed in the downstairs recreation room, and scrapbooks have been put together meticulously.
Fraser DOUGALL even organized a trip to Europe three years ago to revisit as many of his father's prison stops as possible. To ensure that the lore remained in the family, he brought along his wife and children, enticing them with newsletters, quizzes about his father that brought cash rewards and tapes describing what they could expect to find there.
More than once during the expedition, he knocked on the doors of unsuspecting Germans, asking if they knew that the places they lived were once PoW stopovers. (Few did.) And on his return, Fraser DOUGALL had a 23-minute video, which he will show this Remembrance Day to the local Rotary Club, and the experience of a lifetime.
"The war. The war. The war. The aura of it has always been with me," he said. "When we found the first place where my father was incarcerated -- prison from Napoleonic times -- the others found it interesting. But for me, it was incredibly emotional. It was my first face-to-face meeting with the dirt and filth that my father endured.
"I felt a real sense of closure, of fulfilment."
His father, a tough, intimidating Winnipegger from a family of carriage-makers and blacksmiths, signed up for the war while still in his teens. Hector Fraser DOUGALL had spent 14 months in the trenches when he was wounded. While recuperating in hospital, he decided the infantry was not for him. According to his son, he told them, "There are too many people with missing arms and legs. I want out!"
He learned to fly and joined the Royal Flying Corps. "I once asked him why he became a pilot," Fraser DOUGALL said. "He said it was simple: 'I could shoot back.' "
Even in the trenches, however, Mr. DOUGALL was no pussycat. Once, his father kidnapped a piano player so "the boys" could enjoy a bit of a sing-song. Mr. DOUGALL noticed one of the soldiers singing much louder than the others, so he took out his pistol and shot him in the face. Mr. DOUGALL believed the man was a German spy, trying too hard to fit in. He turned out to be right.
In his diary, Mr. DOUGALL nonchalantly recorded a close call on a patrol, 10 days before he was shot down: "Went eight miles into Hunland.... Came back about a foot off the ground with machine guns blazing after me, three bullet holes thru my machine. Froze my nose."
As a prisoner, Mr. DOUGALL was forever getting into trouble, whether for insubordination or for his actual escapes. One time, he and flying mate S.G. WILLIAMS jumped from a train transporting them between prisons, a 500-kilometre trek from Holland. For 17 days, they travelled only at night, swimming rivers to escape pursuers and raiding farms for food. At one point, Mr. WILLIAMS reported, " DOUGALL jumped a six-foot fence with a half-dozen eggs, basin of milk, jam, large pot of honey and many other articles. Everything was intact."
When the two were finally nabbed just short of the frontier, Mr. WILLIAMS bolted again. As a guard prepared to shoot, Mr. DOUGALL tussled with him and ruined his aim. His friend lived to make it back to England.
Mr. DOUGALL's last escape effort at Holzminden was typically brazen. He rounded up two ladders, bound them with rope from the camp's flagstaffs, and was just about to project himself on the end of the ladders out a second-floor window and over the barbed wire to safety when he was discovered by guards.
At war's end, he hid the flag from his desultory German captors until arrangements finally were made to have the prisoners sent home. He was no slouch after that, either. He earned money stunt flying for a while; was the first pilot to venture into Northern Ontario; captained an early version of the Winnipeg Blue Bombers started CKPR, the first radio station in Port Arthur, Ontario took a leading role in training pilots for the Second World War and, in 1954, opened the Lakehead's first television station.
Today, DOUGALL Media owns four radio stations, a community newspaper and both television stations in Thunder Bay.
Mr. DOUGALL accomplished all this in spite of permanent leftover pain from his war wounds, according to his son. "He had a brace on his back. His ribs hurt. He was always ill." Mr. DOUGALL was eventually worth millions, but could never get life insurance or a pension because of his injuries.
After all his research, Fraser DOUGALL, a trim, athletic 61-year-old, said he feels closer than ever to his larger-than-life father, who was in his late 40s when Fraser was born.
"I'd been living away from home since I was 13," he said, gesturing toward his lovingly preserved collection of war relics. "For me, all this is my father.... I wanted to preserve his story. It's part of me, and now, I think I understand him a lot better."

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WILLIAMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-25 published
A world-class forensic scientist
Expert in hair and fibre analysis and DNA techniques helped revolutionized police investigations worldwide
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, November 25, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- A simple demonstration using a red pullover and an ultraviolet light during one of the United State's most infamous murder cases helped cement Barry GAUDETTE's reputation as an internationally renowned forensic scientist.
While testifying as an expert witness during the 1981 trial of Wayne WILLIAMS for the murder of several black children in Atlanta, Mr. GAUDETTE asked members of the jury to pass the sweater back and forth. Then he switched off the lights in the courtroom and shone an ultraviolet light on the jury members, revealing fibres from the pullover all over them..
His testimony made a strong connection between carpet fibres from Mr. WILLIAMS's residences and vehicles, and fibres found on several of the young victims, including some whose bodies were found submerged in water. Soon after, Mr. WILLIAMS was convicted as the first black serial killer in the U.S.
"It was a graphic, innovative and very compelling demonstration that showed how fibre transfer worked, and it led to a conviction," said Skip PALENIK, a forensic scientist and president of Microtrace in Chicago, who was involved in the WILLIAMS trial.
"Barry's demonstration helped the jury buy into the theory of fibre transfer... they were hostile to the idea that a black man could kill other blacks, but it tied WILLIAMS to the victims. It was the kind of demonstration that brought science home to a jury.'' Mr. GAUDETTE, a native of Edmonton, died in Ottawa on October 1 after a brief battle with multiple myeloma. He was At the time of the Atlanta child-murders case, Mr. GAUDETTE, a forensic scientist by training, was an expert in hair and fibre analysis. Later, he would help implement the use of DNA technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police laboratories across Canada. His findings in hair and fibre analysis and his legwork in DNA helped revolutionize police investigative tools in Canada and around the world, so much so that his work became instrumental in tracking down society's most feared criminals.
Born in Edmonton on April 2, 1947, the oldest of six children, Mr. GAUDETTE received an honours bachelor of science degree in chemistry from the University of Calgary in 1969 and that year was hired by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to work as a forensic scientist in its hair and fibre section in Edmonton. In 1971 he married Leslie Ann CLARK, whom he'd met while the pair worked at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., in Pinawa, Manitoba
He worked for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Edmonton until 1980, during which time he wrote a groundbreaking paper and published various research articles on the high probability that human scalp hair comparisons could be used to link persons to crimes. "His work proved hair comparisons were even more conclusive than blood," said Ms. GAUDETTE, an epidemiologist for Health Canada in Ottawa.
"Barry showed for the first time scientifically that human hair comparisons were a legitimate type of examination to pursue. His work put what had been conventional wisdom onto a scientific footing," adds Mr. PALENIK, whose company provides expert scientific analysis and consultation in the area of small-particle analysis.
After undergoing a year's training with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in hair and fibre analysis, Mr. GAUDETTE was accredited in 1970 as an expert witness and often testified in court cases in Edmonton and later across Canada and in the United States. In 1980, he was transferred to Ottawa to be the chief scientist for hair and fibre analysis at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's central forensic laboratory.
"Barry developed the hair and fibre field and brought it to prominence in the world arena," said John BOWEN, chief scientific officer for Royal Canadian Mounted Police Forensic Laboratory Services in Ottawa, who was trained in hair and fibre analysis by Mr. GAUDETTE in the mid-1980s.
"He was an individual with a lot of vision, a world-class expert in his field.'' In the late 1980s, Mr. GAUDETTE envisioned the potential of DNA analysis in forensic science. He helped implement the technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police labs across Canada and worked to promote the national DNA databank legislation that came into force in 1997.
"Barry did not invent DNA testing," said Mr. PALENIK, "but he saw that it was a powerful tool that could give investigators an ultimate kind of identification. Blood, semen and hair were good, but he recognized that DNA was as good as a fingerprint. He was the one who said the Royal Canadian Mounted Police should put all of its resources into developing DNA as a forensic tool. He said 'let's not waste time on our old ways.' "
It's no stretch, said Mr. PALENIK, to link Mr. GAUDETTE's work in DNA to the conviction of many criminals linked to crimes by their DNA and exoneration of others whose DNA did not match DNA samples taken from crime scenes.
"Barry GAUDETTE made a large contribution to the DNA business because it has significantly changed the investigation procedures in policing," said John ARNOLD, chief scientist for the Ottawa-based Canadian Police Research Centre, a collaboration of the National Research Council, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, which was set up to develop tools for use by police.
"Today, they are solving cases that could never have been solved before without this kind of technology."
In 1999, Mr. GAUDETTE became manager of the Canadian Police Research Centre, where his innovative ways continued. Before retiring in 2002, he helped develop a website, scheduled to be up and running next year, to provide Web-based training for police. He was also involved in developing a cross-Canada standard for protective equipment worn by police. The standard is expected to be in place by the end of 2004, Mr. ARNOLD said.
Even when he was in the twilight years of his career, Mr. GAUDETTE had an appetite for fieldwork and was never content to sit in a cushy office chair and watch his subordinates do all of the work.
"When some people get into management they don't want to work. They want to be the one who directs it. That wasn't Barry," Mr. ARNOLD said.
His stellar reputation led to a position on the U.S./Canada bilateral counterterrorism research and development committee from 1999 to 2002. He received numerous accolades for his pioneering forensic work. In 1996, he was awarded the government of Canada Public Service Award of Excellence, and in 2003 a Golden Jubilee Medal.
Friends and colleagues said that away from the job, Mr. GAUDETTE enjoyed time with his family and took part in community affairs.
Mr. GAUDETTE leaves his wife Leslie and children Lisa, 18, and Darrell, 22.

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