WALDEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-04 published
Dorothy Della SCOTT
By Eugen BANNERMAN, Thursday, December 4, 2003 - Page A26
Mother, friend, practical joker. Born June 13, 1917. Died October 5, in Wingham, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 86.
Dorothy Scott's grandparents arrived with their family from England in 1876, and, several years later, rented a house and farm near Brussels, Ontario
It was a long journey by wagon over the rough, corduroy roads that wound through Huron County. They carried all their belongings with them. When they arrived, they found the house was still occupied, so the family had to make do in the barn's milking parlour. Dorothy's grandfather was a carpenter and boarded off one corner of the stable. Her grandmother scrubbed, whitewashed the walls and ceiling and tidied the place for her growing family, until the other family moved out.
Dorothy's grandmother was expecting, and it was here she gave birth to her fifth child (Dorothy's mother), and named her Thirza. Her grandfather took the newborn infant and wrapped her in a home-made blanket. He put clean straw in the cattle manger and laid her in it. "Just like the baby Jesus."
Dorothy told me this story on one of my first visits. I was the newly appointed United Church minister in Blyth, Ontario, and at 85, Dorothy was one of its oldest members. Old in years but not in spirit. Growing old should not keep us from laughing and having a good time, Dorothy often told me, for as soon as we stop laughing, we age rapidly. Dorothy's joie de vivre was spontaneous and infectious. Even when she was hooked up to plastic tubing supplying her with vital oxygen, the sparkle (and laughter) in her eyes was always present.
Dorothy Della SCOTT was born to Thirza (WALDEN) and John CALDWELL. She grew up on her parents' farm and on June 15, 1938, married Laurie SCOTT, also a farmer. She received a dining-room suite and a milk-cow as a wedding gift from her father. They had two children, Robert and Donald.
Dorothy SCOTT learned as a child to have fun and laugh. In spite of the hard work and deprivations of farm life, the years did not repress or smother her inner child. Often it burst forth in unexpected and unique ways.
Her worst prank, she told me, was when she was a nurse and decided to play a trick on a new orderly. She had the other nurses cover her with a sheet as she lay down on a trolley and "played dead." The new orderly was called and told to take the body to the morgue. She lay absolutely still until they were in the elevator. Then she sat up, and frightened the poor man, "really bad," as she said.
There was also a serious dimension to Dorothy's life. As a young mother, she almost died giving birth to her second son, Donald. But in the privacy of that moment, she had a near-death vision of Christ. "If this was death," [she] thought, "no one need be afraid."
Dorothy was unsentimental about many things but not her family. She concluded her memoirs, Dorothy's Memories (2002), by tracing her own happy life to a happy childhood and loving husband and family.
Shortly after my arrival in Blyth, Dorothy tested her new minister's tolerance for humour. She slipped a white envelope into my hand as I was saying goodbye to parishioners after worship. "Don't open it now. Give it to your wife and read it when you get home." It was the first of many jokes from the Internet that made us laugh with pleasure and anticipation.
We will miss Dorothy, her cheerful disposition, her countless stories, her white envelopes, and her cushion-seat in the third row of the sanctuary.
Eugen is Dorothy's friend and minister.

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WALDIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-08 published
Observers hail ASPER contribution
But views on Israel and direction of news coverage also provoked controversy
By Richard BLOOM and Paul WALDIE Wednesday, October 8, 2003 - Page B7
In its early days, CanWest Global Communications Corp. may have had the dubious moniker of The Love Boat network, but there is no doubt Izzy ASPER made "very significant" contributions to Canadian media, industry observers said yesterday.
At the same time, his actions as head of the media empire weren't without controversy.
Mr. ASPER died yesterday at 71. A tax lawyer by training, he is more commonly known as the founder of Winnipeg-based CanWest the parent of the Global network of television stations, and which, in 2000, engineered a multibillion-dollar purchase of Southam Newspaper Group, National Post and other assets from Conrad BLACK's Hollinger Inc.
Glenn O'FARRELL, president and chief executive officer of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters, said Mr. ASPER left a huge broadcasting legacy.
"The Canadian broadcasting system has been built over the last number of decades through the efforts of some fairly significant entrepreneurs, and Izzy ASPER was clearly one of those," Mr. O'FARRELL said. "He brought an incredibly astute vision of what could be done and what should be done in the name of strengthening Canada's place both domestically and internationally."
Mr. O'FARRELL worked at CanWest for 12 years and said working for Mr. ASPER was stimulating. "It was absolutely a privilege to work with somebody who possessed the depth and the breadth of his intellectual curiosity and interests."
Mr. ASPER also provoked controversy over the years with his views on Israel and his drive to converge news coverage at CanWest's newspapers.
In 2002, he fired Russell MILLS, publisher of the Ottawa Citizen, after an apparent conflict over editorial independence. At the time, CanWest forced papers across the chain to carry editorials written by officials in the company's head office. The policy sparked a barrage of complaints about a lack of editorial freedom at the papers. The removal of Mr. MILLS prompted a wave of protests against CanWest from Parliament to media organizations around the world. Mr. MILLS sued and reached a settlement with the company a few months later.
Mr. ASPER's staunch defence of Israel also left him open to charges that CanWest's papers do not fairly cover events in the Middle East. In a speech last year, he attacked media coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and accused several media outlets of having an anti-Israel bias. He singled out coverage by CNN, The New York Times, British Broadcasting Corp. and Canadian Broadcasting Corp. and said anti-Israel bias was a "cancer" destroying media credibility.
He has often criticized the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. in particular for what he has called the broadcaster's anti-Israel coverage. Yesterday, a Canadian Broadcasting Corp. official declined to comment on Mr. ASPER's views.
Still, amid the controversy, Christopher DORNAN, director of Carleton University's School of Journalism and Communication, praised Mr. ASPER's role in Canadian journalism.
"We're still, in the entertainment area, overshadowed by the exports of the juggernaut to the south. What's really ours is non-fiction, it's journalism... in as much as Israel ASPER built CanWest into a major, major player in that sector, his contribution is clearly significant."
Added Mr. DORNAN: " There are uncharitable souls that would argue that CanWest's contribution to the Canadian cultural landscape was negligible.
"Because when CanWest built itself as a network, in the early days, it was known as The Love Boat Network -- all they did was buy cheap, populist American programming, got ratings and contributed very little to Canadian cultural production. They made very little programming of their own and what they did make was in grudging compliance with Canadian content regulations," he said.
Mr. DORNAN argued that the Canadian media industry is not about keeping the Americans at bay, but instead about funnelling in highly desired American content in the most advantageous way possible.
Mr. ASPER built a television network that now employs "people from network executives to janitors. Those jobs would not have existed had he not done that. And now, of course, they do actually make some programming," Mr. DORNAN said.
Vince CARLIN, chairman of the School of Journalism at Ryerson University in Toronto, agreed, noting that history books won't likely describe him as a great endorser of Canadian culture.
"That's not what he was about. He was a businessman," said Mr. CARLIN, the former head of Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Newsworld, who had met with Mr. ASPER on numerous occasions.
"He learned how to use those [business] skills to create very dynamic business enterprises, but [CanWest] would never put cultural considerations ahead of business considerations," Mr. CARLIN said.
He explained how in his company's early days, Mr. ASPER insisted to government officials that his chain of television stations was not a "network" but instead a "system," because being dubbed a network was less advantageous from a business perspective. When regulations shifted, Mr. ASPER changed gears, calling the stations a network, Mr. CARLIN said.
Mr. ASPER was also involved in a bitter legal battle with Robert LANTOS, a prominent Toronto-based filmmaker. Mr. ASPER sued Mr. LANTOS for libel over comments he made during a speech in 1998. In the speech, Mr. LANTOS described Mr. ASPER as "the forces of darkness, whose greed is surpassed only by their hypocrisy." Mr. ASPER said the comments left the impression he was dishonest and disloyal.

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WALDMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-01 published
EGAR, Shirley (née LEMON)
Died peacefully at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, on Monday, March 31, 2003, in her 81st year. Dear wife of Stanley. Mother of Joann (Will MITCHELL) and John (Vanessa ROSE.) Grandmother of Martha (Jaron WALDMAN,) Lauren and Shannon. Sister of the late Harris LEMON and his wife Shirley. Aunt of Cynthia (Mark LEMON) and Tim (Jackie.) A service will be held in the chapel of the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East) on Thursday, April 3rd at one o'clock. A reception will follow.

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WALKER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Denise Catherine OLMSTEAD
In loving memory of Denise Catherine OLMSTEAD, October 25, 1925 to December 20, 2002.
Denise OLMSTEAD, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge, Gore Bay and formerly of Mississauga, died at the Mindemoya Hospital, on Friday, December 20, 2002 at the age of 77 years. She was born in London, England, daughter of the late Wm. Timothy and Anne (BUCKLAND) WALKER. Denise has been an R.N. in the R.A.F. and also at the Scarborough Centenary Hospital and the Trillium Hospital, Mississauga. She had been a very active person, having been a member of the Girl Guides Lion's Club, and had been Co-founder of the Parents Without Partners Chapter in her area. She was fondly referred to as "the Duchess", and will be remembered as a lady who kept others organized. Her greatest joys were being involved with her many Friends, her family and PWP. Through these relationships, she was an inspiration and mentor to many. Denise never "gave up" and her inspiration and love of life will be cherished by family and all who knew her. Dearly loved and loving mother of Gloria and Bill KENNEDY of London and Terry and Rosanne OLMSTEAD of Gore Bay. Proud grandmother of Jessica, Jason and Jennifer. Dear sister of Bill and his wife Ruth WALKER of Kingston and Pat KERRISON of England. Also survived by many nieces and nephews.
Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home, Gore Bay, on Monday December 23, 2002. The funeral service was conducted with Fr. Bert FOLIOT officiating. Cremation to follow. Culgin Funeral Home

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WALKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-22 published
She danced on tabletops of Ottawa
Former reporter with capital connections hosted parties for the powerful and waged a spirited campaign to save railway cabooses
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, January 22, 2003, Page R5
Most who knew her have a story to tell about Starr SOLOMON, a journalist and public-relations practitioner who for years hosted glamorous parties in Ottawa that attracted a who's who of cabinet ministers, bureaucrats and media people.
Ms. SOLOMON, the widow of Hy SOLOMON, former Ottawa bureau chief for The Financial Post, has died in Toronto. She was 64.
Long-time friend and colleague Walter GRAY/GREY remembers the time Ms. SOLOMON convinced former Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY and Liberal Member of Parliament Sheila COPPS -- for years Mr. MULRONEY's nemesis -- to sing together at the National Press Club in Ottawa in the mid-1980s, following the annual Parliamentary Press Gallery dinner.
"They sang a duet. The song was You Made Me Love You," says Mr. GRAY/GREY, a former Globe and Mail bureau chief in Ottawa, who played the piano while the two politicians crooned in tandem. Ms. COPPS is now Canada's heritage minister.
Edna HAMPTON, one of Ms. SOLOMON's closest Friends, said acquaintances, colleagues and politicians always looked forward to dinner parties at the SOLOMON home in Ottawa's trendy Glebe neighbourhood. Trouble was, you never knew when the meal would be served.
"I always used to eat first because the parties would zip along and she would let dinner go. You might eat at 8, you might eat at 11 . . . but you always knew the food would be good," said Ms. HAMPTON, a retired journalist.
Ms. SOLOMON was born in Ottawa and moved to North Bay, Ontario, as a child, where she attended elementary and high school. In the late 1950s, she landed a reporting job with The North Bay Nugget, where Ms. HAMPTON was a senior reporter at the time. Later, The Ottawa Citizen hired her as a reporter and she wrote under the byline Starr COTE, the surname of her first husband.
"She was always full of energy and fond of fun assignments," recalls Ms. HAMPTON. " She would cover anything from a royal tour to a St. Patrick's Day event up the Ottawa Valley."
Among her plum assignments was the visit to Ottawa by U.S. president John F. KENNEDY and his wife, Jacqueline. She also wrote restaurant reviews for The Citizen, where she developed a reputation as a lively writer who was quick-witted, entertaining and personal. Ms. SOLOMON often fought it out for the big local stories with Joyce FAIRBAIRN, a reporter with the now-defunct Ottawa Journal. Ms. FAIRBAIRN later became a Senator.
Ms. SOLOMON left The Citizen in the mid-1960s and moved to Toronto, where she worked with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a writer/producer. She married Mr. SOLOMON on January 23, 1966. The couple lived in Toronto until Mr. SOLOMON was transferred to Washington to open a bureau for The Financial Post.
When the SOLOMONs returned to Ottawa, Ms. SOLOMON and a partner formed a public-relations firm. She quickly became a fixture in the city's media and political circles, a move Mr. GRAY/GREY calls "networking at its best. She had a wide range of Friends and she used these connections to her greatest advantage. I wish I had her Rolodex."
For about 10 years in the 1980s, Ms. SOLOMON and Mr. GRAY/GREY worked at the same public-relations firm, where they teamed up on a variety of projects.
"There was the day the African chief Butelezi arrived in Ottawa as a front for a group of Canadian businesses trying to develop business relations with South Africa. I was assigned to shepherd the chief around town," says Mr. GRAY/GREY. " Starr was to accompany his lady, the lovely Princess Irene, whose sole interest was to shop -- especially at Zellers. As they made their departure laden down with Zellers bags. I think the princess gave Starr a tip for her services."
The pair also worked together on an unsuccessful campaign to stop the Canadian National Railway from eliminating railway cabooses. "The cabooses disappeared, but to this day, the Save the Caboose sweatshirt has been the most comfortable sweatshirt in our respective wardrobes," says Mr. GRAY/GREY.
Over the years Ms. SOLOMON volunteered her public-relations skills for many campaigns. She was a founding member of the Legal Education and Action Fund, which was established to advance women's equality rights, and served on the board of directors of the Ottawa Civic Hospital.
As a couple, the SOLOMONs were known in Ottawa for throwing glamorous parties, some planned, some spontaneous, that attracted the leading cabinet ministers, writers and journalists of the day. Ms. SOLOMON entertained and amused guests with her wit and political insights, while her husband was an engaging conversationalist whose business and political insights held the attention of politicians and bureaucrats.
Those who attended their soirees remember Ms. SOLOMON as a welcoming hostess and terrific cook, whose specialty was Greek and Mediterranean dishes. When guests arrived, she was always beautifully dressed and "the records were on the turntable," recalls Mr. GRAY/GREY. " Patsy Cline was her favourite. But also lots of jazz -- her friend Brian Browne, Oscar Peterson, Oliver Jones." Often guests would sing and dance around the SOLOMONs' dining-room table.
"We did have serious discussions on serious subjects, from time to time," adds Mr. GRAY/GREY.
Former Ottawa Citizen food editor and restaurant reviewer Kathleen WALKER remembers Ms. SOLOMON as "literally . . . the kind of person who danced on tabletops. She was just wonderful and wild. We had a ball together. Great sense of humour. A terrific lady."
She will also be remembered as a great friend "who was there in thick and thin if you had a problem," says Mr. GRAY/GREY.
After her husband died in 1991, Ms. SOLOMON moved back to Toronto, where she did volunteer consulting and public relations work for various organizations, including Legal Education and Action Fund and a Greek nursing home. She was also a trustee of the Hyman SOLOMON Award for Excellence in Public Policy Journalism, established to honour her husband's legacy.
Ms. SOLOMON leaves her two sons, Adam and Ben, two grandchildren and two brothers. A celebration of her life is to be held at the National Press Club in Ottawa on January 29 at 5: 30 p.m.
Starr SOLOMON, journalist, public-relations specialist; born Ottawa, February 27, 1938; died Toronto, January 3, 2003.

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WALKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
Walter Lenord Gordon FOSTER
Walter FOSTER died peacefully after a short illness at St. Michael's Hospital in his 80th year on February 19, 2003. Born in Toronto on June 9, 1923, Walter served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. Walter was a Charter dancer with the National Ballet of Canada, 1951-1953. He joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1959, retiring in 1985, and serving in many roles including Classical Music Programming, Announcer and Benefits Counselor. Walter was predeceased by his life-long companion, David WALKER in May, 1994. Walter is survived by his beloved sister Anne, his brother Owen, and by many nephews and nieces and their children and grandchildren. Walter will be greatly missed by his dear friend Mary McDONALD and his neighbours Frances and Amber, Paul and Mary, Mike, Maddy, Heather and Nadine and by his friend Adrian. A memorial service will be held later in the Spring, after the release of Walter's remains by the School of Medicine, University of Toronto. Donations to St. Michael's Hospital or the Canadian Cancer Society.

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WALKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-25 published
FOSTER, Walter Lenord Gordon
Walter FOSTER died peacefully after a short illness at St. Michael's Hospital in his 80th year on February 19, 2003. Born in Toronto on June 9, 1923, Walter served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. Walter was a Charter dancer with the National Ballet of Canada, 1951-1953. He joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1959, retiring in 1985, and serving in many roles including Classical Music Programming, Announcer and Benefits Counselor. Walter was predeceased by his life-long companion, David WALKER in May, 1994. Walter is survived by his beloved sister Anne, his brother Owen, and by many nephews and nieces and their children and grandchildren. Walter will be greatly missed by his dear friend Mary McDONALD and his neighbours Frances and Amber, Paul and Mary, Mike, Maddy, Heather and Nadine and by his friend Adrian. A memorial service will be held later in the Spring, after the release of Walter's remains by the School of Medicine, University of Toronto. Donations to St. Michael's Hospital or the Canadian Cancer Society. Further information may be obtained from Dr. Adrian HILL at (416) 694-8438.

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WALKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
JOHNSON, Marion Sellers
Passed away peacefully on March 5, 2003 in Toronto at the age of 96. Beloved wife of J. Ragnar JOHNSON, Q.C. (deceased October 15, 1985,) dear mother of Jon R. JOHNSON and dear mother-in-law of Patricia C. JOHNSON, lovingly remembered by grand_sons, Jon (Karen) and Patrick (Julie) JOHNSON and dear great-grandmother of Jon and Lilja JOHNSON. Dear aunt of Louise Delaware KRIEGER, James WALKER, Douglas WALKER, Edward STOCKELBACH and Herbert SOLEM. Predeceased by her sisters, Flora, Lois, Alice and Mary. Gold medalist in Political Science at the University of Manitoba and member of the Pi Phi Sorority. Graduated in nursing from Columbia Presbyterian Hospital and practised paediatrics at Winnipeg General Hospital. Active member of Calvin Presbyterian Church in Toronto and the University Women's Club in Toronto. She dedicated many years as a volunteer at the Toronto General Hospital, the Canadian Cancer Society and the Canadian Opera Company. Marion had a long and productive life and will be missed by all who knew her. Visitation will take place at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W., on Monday, March 10, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m.. Private Service. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, the Heart and Stroke Foundation or to a charity of your choice.

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WALKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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WALKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-30 published
Harry Cawthorpe Daniel KIERANS Died suddenly 25 July 2003.
Born Seven weeks early and weighing only 4lbs. 2 oz., 20th March, 1953 in Toronto, Harry clung to life and eventually joined his large family in Sudbury, Ontario. Although never as robust as his siblings, Harry earned all but four credits on his Bachelor of Arts degree. While at York University, he was stricken with schizophrenia at age 19, so severely that he was hospitalized in Vancouver from time to time where he had moved to be closer to his family. Cherished Husband and best friend of Silvana MONNO for 21 years and very proud father of his loyal son Christopher. Beloved son of Thomas Wm. KIERANS, (Saint John's) and Mary (MULLIGAN) KIERANS, Coquitlam and dearly loved brother of Sr. Mae KIERANS, North Bay, Tom (MariJo) Montreal, Murray, Collingwood, Brenda WAHLEN (Len), Coquitlam, Michael, (Dagmar), Prague, Teresa SPURR (Jim), Coquitlam, Kathleen WALKER, Vancouver, and Paul, Burnaby. Harry's family have been especially supported by Rosa and Vitto MILILLO. Harry will be sadly missed by many aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews. In Spite of his long and debilitating illness, Harry held onto his senses: sense of family, sense of loyalty, and sense of humour. Harry's determined effort to live with dignity and grace under a very heavy burden will always be remembered with loving pride by his family who thank God for the great gift his life has been to all of us. Prayers will be offered on Wednesday, July 30, 2003 at 8: 00 p.m. from the chapel of Forest Lawn Funeral Home 3789 Royal Oak Avenue, Burnaby. Funeral Service will be held Thursday, July 31, 2003 at 10: 30 a.m. from Our Lady of Fatima Parish 315 Walker Street, Coquitlam. In lieu of flowers, donation may be made to the Christopher Kierans trust fund at the funeral, or to a mental health charity of your choice. 'Good night sweet prince: and flights of angels sing thee to thy rest'

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WALKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-11 published
STANBURY, Amadita Diana Oland Halifax (née OLAND)
Died peacefully at her family home on August 9, 2003 after a long and courageous battle with breast cancer. Born a twin on Easter Sunday, 1918 in Guildford, England, she was the only daughter of the late Colonel Sidney C. OLAND and Herlinda deBedia OLAND. Following World War 1, she lived in Havana, Cuba, Halifax and later in Hollywood, where both her parents were in motion pictures.
Upon her return to Nova Scotia, she attended the Convent of the Sacred Heart and then Mount Saint Vincent Academy and has enjoyed her affiliations with both schools ever since. She was also educated abroad in Lausanne, Paris and London. One of her passions was riding horses, where she excelled and won various awards both in Halifax. Still remembered as a significant social event, her marriage to Norman STANBURY in July 1938 took place on the first sunny day following six weeks of rain. On its front page, above a wedding photo, the Halifax Herald ran a huge banner ''Happy the Bride the Sun Shines On''. The sun continued to shine for over 50 years of marriage.
She joined the Junior League and loved her work in the Well Baby Clinic, During her lifetime of dedication to raising her family, she was active in her support of the Arts including the Canadian Opera Company, the London Theatre Company, the Kiwanis Music Festival and numerous local theatre companies including Neptune Theatre She was knowledgeable about and gained great pleasure from her study of antiques.
As a alumna of Mount Saint Vincent, she was Chair of their Project One-Futures for Women fund raising campaign and was among the first to receive the University Alumnae Award of Distinction.
She is survived by her six children - Penelope (Barry RUSSELL,) Michael, and Lindita (Charles WALKER) all of Halifax; Bruce and Christopher (Asifa BHATIA) of Vancouver, Norman, Toronto; also eight grandchildren-Charles (Loraine TOBIA,) Paul (Dawna BEARISTO) and Dick RUSSELL, Susannah and Katherine STANBURY, Roland STANBURY and Diana and Charles WALKER; three great-grandchildren and two and two step great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her twin brother, Bruce S. OLAND, Halifax , and many cousins, nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her husband, Norman, and two brothers, Victor deBedia and Don Jamie.
Visitation will be at Snows Funeral Home from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated by Reverend Gordon MacLEAN at Canadian Martyrs Church, 5900 Inglis Street, Halifax at 11: 00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 13. A private family burial service will be held later at Santa Maria del Pilar Chapel, Sackville, Nova Scotia. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Nova Scotia Division of the Canadian Breast Cancer Society or the charity of your choice. On line condolences snow@funeralscanada.com

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WALKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-26 published
WALKER, Barbara Catherine (née HARVEY)
Died peacefully in Toronto on Sunday, August 24, 2003 in her 93rd year. Predeceased by her husband Martin M. WALKER. Dear sister of James M. HARVEY (Dona.) Predeceased by sister Jessie SMYLIE and brothers Gordon HARVEY and Walter HARVEY. Loved aunt of Brenda ENGEL, Linda STEINER, Douglas HARVEY, James E. HARVEY, Peter HARVEY, Barbara DOLAN, Patti JOHNSON, Jane PALMER and Walter E. HARVEY. At Barbara's request there will be no visitation or service. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, 1920 Yonge Street, 4th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M4S 3E2 or The Arthritis Society, 1700-393 University Ave., Toronto, Ontario M4A 2E7. Scarborough Funeral Centre 416-289-2558

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WALKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-03 published
CRESSY, Sybil (née WALKER)
In her 88th year, died peacefully at her retirement home, August 31, 2003. Sybil, predeceased by her loving husband Joe and her son Bill, is survived by her son Gordon, his wife Joanne; and her son, Jim. She was adored by her fantastic grandchildren Jennifer, Jillian, Joseph and Keith. Sybil was a woman of great courage, compassion and warmth; she was a giver throughout her extraordinary life. She was part of a group of dedicated women who volunteered with the Macaulay Child Development Centre for over 60 years. Sybil was the connector in 'The Bridge Club', a group of extraordinary women who nurtured each other and their families for some 70 years. Special thanks go to the truly amazing and kind staff of 4 Teddington Park. Visitation is on Friday September 5th, 2: 00 - 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton West (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.). Funeral Service will be held Saturday September 6th, 2: 00 p.m. at St. Leonard's Anglican Church, 25 Wanless Ave. (east of Yonge Street, 2 blocks north of Lawrence Ave.) Reception follows. Memorial donations to St. Leonard's Church would be appreciated.

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WALKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
CHERRY, Elizabeth Tiffin (née WALKER) 1917-2003
Died peacefully on Tuesday, October 14, 2003, after a wonderful summer season and Thanksgiving celebration at her beloved Clovelly cottage on Boskung Lake in the Haliburton Highlands. Wife of the late H.W. (Bud) CHERRY. She will be sadly missed by her sister Mary HARRISON, sons Bill and Paul, daughters-in-law Linda and Shelley and grandchildren Warren, Meghan, Clayton and Cameron. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Friday. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Saturday, October 18, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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WALKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
FOGELL, David 1923-2003
Born December 22, 1923 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Died October 27, 2003 at home with his family in Vancouver, British Columbia. He was predeceased by his parents Melach and Surka, brother, Ben and sisters Dora and Netty. Dave is mourned by his wife, Estelle, children, Melanie and her husband Ken GOLDSTEIN, Wayne and Mark. He will be greatly missed by his grandchildren Carie and her husband Stuart, Daniel, Sarah, Kylie; Sammy, Benji and their mother Dorothy ULLMAN as well as great-grand_son, Kade. He will never be forgotten by his many relatives and Friends. Dave was an incredibly charismatic and an intensely joyful human being. He felt deeply and loved unquestioningly. Those who were fortunate enough to be part of his life will be forever enriched by having known him. Dave approached everything in his life with meticulous attention. He had very humble beginnings yet he always remembered those who helped him throughout his life. He had a rare passion for living extending to everything and everyone. His seemingly endless energy led to numerous accomplishments and successes. He will be remembered most for his ability to make those around him feel loved. The funeral is Wednesday, October 29, 2003 at the Beth Israel Cemetary, 1721 Willingdon, Burnaby, at 12 noon. The pallbearers are Sammy and Benji FOGELL, Daniel GOLDSTEIN, Lanny GOULD, Howard DINER and Joel ALTMAN. Honourary pallbearers are Zivey FELDMAN and Harry GELFANT. The family would like to thank caregivers Denyse TREPANIER and Bryan WALKER as well as Dr. Larry COLLINS and Dr. Victoria BERNSTEIN. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Fund or the Jewish Family Service Agency.

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WALKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-16 published
WALKER, William James, P.Eng.
Born February 8, 1931, died peacefully at Toronto Grace Hospital on Monday, December 15, 2003, after a brief, difficult and courageous battle with cancer. Prior to his retirement, Jim worked with Atomic Energy of Canada and Ontario Hydro, having spent time at Chalk River, Douglas Point, Trois-Riviýres, Quebec, and finishing at Sheridan Park, Mississauga and Toronto. He had many interests, such as cycling, astronomy, and for many years was a piper in both the 48th Highlanders Pipe Band and the Metro Toronto Police Band. Jim leaves his brother Donald Stuart WALKER and his wife Betty of Gravenhurst, sister Margaret and her husband William AYLESWORTH of Evanston, Illinois, nephews Glenn (Betty) WALKER of Ajax and Colin (Pat) WALKER of Newmarket, and other loving family. A Service of Remembrance will be held in the chapel of the Humphrey Funeral Home-A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (South of Eglinton Avenue East), on Friday, December 19th at 3 o'clock. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Salvation Army, 1645 Warden Avenue, Toronto M1R 5B3, or the Canadian Cancer Society, 20 Holly Street, Suite 101, Toronto M4S 3B1, would be appreciated.

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WALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-24 published
Lawrence Raymond BOUSQUET
In loving memory of Lawrence Raymond BOUSQUET on Saturday, September 20, 2003 at Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 92 years.
Beloved husband of Irene (née LEHMAN.) Loving father of Marion and husband Andrew BUTELLA of Brantford, Laurine and husband Harold LOOSEMORE of Killarney, James and wife Joanne of Little Current. Cherished grandfather of Catherine BUTELLA and husband Don ROBINSON, Robert BUTELLA and wife Kim SONNET, Debra LOOSEMORE, Sheri LOOSEMORE, Lauri LOOSEMORE and husband Brian WALL, Cheryl BOUSQUET, Marsha BOUSQUET, Chistopher BOUSQUET and wife Kristen JACKLIN. Great grandfather of nine. Brother of James and wife Ann, Wilber and wife Marie and sister Florence and husband Arnet THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, all predeceased. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, September 23, 2003 at Island Funeral Home with burial in Mountainview Cemetery.

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WALLACE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-11 published
Died This Day -- William Stewart WALLACE, 1970
Tuesday, March 11, 2003 - Page R7
Librarian, historian born at Georgetown, Ontario June 23, 1884 educated at Toronto and Oxford; served in First World War as major and as commanding officer of Khaki College Shorncliffe 1923-54, chief librarian at University of Toronto; 1920-30, first editor of Canadian Historical Review; 1923-40, editor of Champlain Society; in 1936, published Dictionary of Canadian Biography (revised 1945, 1963); wrote most articles in Encyclopedia of Canada.

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WALLACE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-21 published
WALLACE, Matthew Maurice ''Mo'' (Long term Confederation Life Employee, World War 2 Veteran, avid bridge player)
Died peacefully, on June 19, 2003, in his 81st year, at the Toronto East General Hospital. Loving husband of 55 years to Hazel and much loved father of Sean, Tony and his fiancée Barb SECKER, Erin WALLACE and her husband Steve BROWN, and Laura WALLACE. Cherished Grand-Dad and ''Zaide'' of Naomi and Colin BROWN, and Sarah and Rachel BECKERMAN. Sadly missed brother of Virginia WALLACE and predeceased by his dear sister Barbara. Fondly remembered Godfather of Jeanne SHEMILT and her family. ''Mo'' will always be remembered by his many Friends and relatives. As he wished, his body has been donated to the Division of Anatomy at the University of Toronto. Mo's family will receive Friends at the Sherrin Funeral Home, 873 Kingston Road (west of Victoria Park Avenue), Toronto (416) 698-2861, on Sunday, June 22, 2003 from 4 - 6 p.m. We will celebrate a life lived well in the funeral home chapel on Monday at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Anne Frank House, would be appreciated by the family.

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WALLI o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
R. J. Leland COULTIS
In loving memory of R. J. Leland COULTIS who passed away Saturday morning, May 3rd, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital-Memorial Site at the age of 66 years.
Beloved husband of Gladys (WALLI) COULTIS of Sudbury. Loving father of Richard and Philip both of Copper Cliff and Norma BELANGER of Sudbury. Cherished grandfather of Kaitlyn and Justin. Dear son of Phillip and Jessie COULTIS predeceased. Dear brother of Laureen BAILEY (husband Arden predeceased) of Sudbury, Loretta PYETTE (husband Eugene) of Tehkummah, Georgina MacKENZIE (husband Jim) of Little Current and George predeceased. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews.
At Leland's request there will be no visitation or service.
Cremation with interment of the cremains in the family plot at Waters Cemetery.
Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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WALLIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-14 published
HEATHCOTE, Eric Thomas Blake
Died peacefully, after a short illness, at North York General Hospital, on March 12, 2003. The loving husband of Barbara, father of Isobel and Blake, grandfather of Elspeth, Zoe, Elizabeth, Edward and Maggie, and brother of Joan GRIGNON of Ajax. He was predeceased by his father, Major E.T. HEATHCOTE, Military Medal, Canadian Efficiency Decoration, and his mother, Winnifred (WALLIS) HEATHCOTE. Blake was born in Toronto in 1925, attended Lawrence Park Collegiate, and graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in engineering after serving with the Canadian Signal Corps (1944-1946). His career took him from work under the Eisenhower administration in radio technologies, and back to Canada in engineering consultancy work until 1964. He then spent 23 years with the firm of McGregor and Associates, retiring as senior partner to work with the firm of Proctor and Redfern as senior Vice President until his retirement. He continued working as an independent engineering consultant until December 2002, when he completed his last assignment for St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. Blake was a member of the Don Mills Civitan Club and helped found their hockey league; of the Professional Engineers of Ontario, the Canadian Healthcare Engineering Society, the Royal Canadian Legion, the Royal Canadian Military Institute, and a range of other professional associations. In 1998, he was presented with an award for 25 years' service from the Canadian Standards Association, for whom he had done extensive work in the medical gas sector, serving on many inquiries and boards as an expert analyst. He was an active member of the Church of Our Saviour in Don Mills, and also took great pleasure from such activities as woodworking, winemaking, fixing pretty much everything that got broken, and travel with his family. He also took great satisfaction in maintaining a colourful correspondence with a wide range of corporate and political thorns in his side. His family would like to extend warmest thanks to Dr. Sid FELDMAN, Dr. Simon YU, the nursing staff of North York General Hospital (particularly the pastoral support people), as well as the many Friends who showed such compassion and support as his rapidly-moving illness emerged and took hold. There will be a visitation at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home (159 Eglinton Avenue West, 2 lights west of Yonge) Sunday, March 16th from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. The funeral will take place at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home on Monday, March 17th at 11 a.m., with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Church of Our Saviour in Don Mills (1 Laurentide Drive, Don Mills, M3A 3C6), the North York General Hospital 4001 Leslie Street, Toronto, M2K 1E1), or the charity of your choice.

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WAL surnames continued to 03wal002.htm