TRUJILLO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
Visionary performer waged war on trivial art
Her trademark was a experimental process that embraced dance, music, text, mime, clown, ritual and mask
By Paula CITRON Friday, April 11, 2003 - Page R13
Canada has lost a powerful force in experimental theatre and dance. Director, dancer, actor, writer and choreographer Elizabeth SZATHMARY died last month in Toronto.
While she will be remembered as a dynamic figure, her artistic life will remain a contradiction. At the beginning of her career, Ms. SZATHMARY was one of the gilded darlings of Toronto's burgeoning experimental theatre. At the end, she was seen by some as a marginalized, religious eccentric who put on plays in church basements.
To her long-time Friends and loyalists, however, Ms. SZATHMARY's life was a spiritual journey in which art, religion and morality were inextricably intertwined in a nobility of purpose.
Ms. SZATHMARY was born in New York on October 12, 1937, to Jewish-Hungarian parents. Her mother was an unhappy former opera singer and vaudeville performer and her father was a composer and arranger who wrote the theme for the popular television show Get Smart and who abandoned his family. Ms. SZATHMARY attended New York's High School of Performing Arts and later performed with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet under choreographer Antony TUDOR.
A ravishing beauty with masses of long, jet-black curls and compelling light-coloured eyes, Ms. SZATHMARY attracted followers throughout her career. She was, says Toronto choreographer David EARLE, a powerful, mysterious presence and a charismatic performer.
Another admirer was Canadian Robert SWERDLOW. Mr. TUDOR's piano accompanist, he fell in love with the beautiful young dancer and followed her to France where Ms. SZATHMARY danced with such companies as Les Ballets Classique de Monte Carlo and Les Ballets Contemporains de Paris. He was the first of many artists to be inspired by Ms. SZATHMARY.
"Elizabeth was a theatre philosopher who wanted to save the world through the beauty and truth of her art," Mr. SWERDLOW said.
The couple relocated to Montreal in the mid-sixties where Mr. SWERDLOW got a job with the National Film Board. One assignment brought him to Toronto, and it was Ms. SZATHMARY who persuaded him to settle there because of the city's "happening" dance scene. Performing under the name Elizabeth SWERDLOW, she first worked with Mr. EARLE and the future co-founders of Toronto Dance Theatre.
In 1969, Mr. SWERDLOW took an unexpected windfall of $30,000 and built his wife a performing venue of her own. In this way, Global Village Theatre emerged from a former Royal Canadian Mounted Police stable and the couple went on to became synonymous with a new wave of provocative, political, issue-oriented theatre.
Mr. SWERDLOW provided the words and music, and co-wrote the shows Elizabeth co-wrote, choreographed, directed and was the featured performer. Importantly, she was the visionary who came up with original concepts and her trademark, multidisciplinary theatrical process embraced dance, music, text, mime, clown, ritual and mask.
Among their better-known collaborations was Blue.S.A., an indictment of the "American empire," and Justine, the story of a young girl who gains wisdom through the vicissitudes of life. A huge hit, Justine went to New York where it won off-Broadway awards and enjoyed a long run.
Its success meant Global Village became a stopping place for others. Gilda RADNER, John CANDY and Salome BEY represented just some of the talent that passed through. Later, when Ms. SZATHMARY founded Inner Stage Theatre, she helped propel the early careers of Antoni CIMOLINO and Donald CARRIER of the Stratford Festival, Jeannette ZINGG and Marshall PYNKOSKI of Opera Atelier and Native American performer Raoul TRUJILLO.
In the mid-seventies, Ms. SZATHMARY experienced a religious conversion and became a devout Christian.
For Mr. SWERDLOW, it was the last straw in an already turbulent relationship. After the couple split up, Ms. SZATHMARY founded Inner Stage, a name that expressed her desire to produce art that would transform and heal through spirituality. To better strike out on her own, she also shed the SWERDLOW name. Until the 1990s, the main work of Inner Stage was a series of acclaimed morality tales -- or modern fables as Ms. SZATHMARY called them which toured schools from coast to coast. She also explored the storytelling power of Native American myths and turned to such themes as the plight of street youth or to the Holocaust from a teenager's point of view. Her final project, No Fixed Address, attempted to air the true voice of the homeless by both telling their stories and casting them as actors.
By all accounts, Ms. SZATHMARY was a true eccentric who personalized everything. Her computer, for example, was called Daisy. Her home was a living museum dominated by a family of cats who occupied their own stools at the dining table, held conversations and sent out Christmas cards to the pets of Friends. Spiritual sayings, religious art and theatre memorabilia covered every scrap of wall and floor space. On an even more personal level, Ms. SZATHMARY kept a journal of religious visions and dreams written in ornate calligraphy and illustrated in Hungarian folk-style art. What is more, she described ecstatic events and augurisms, including a personal affinity with bison, as if such occurrences were as routine as the weather.
In her work, Ms. SZATHMARY demanded perfection, which meant she often proved impossible to work alongside. Friends and colleagues Robert MASON, Julia AMES and Peter GUGELER all talk about Ms. SZATHMARY's middle-of-the-night phone calls -- and the fact that she brooked no criticism or contrary opinions. All the same, their devotion never lessened.
"She was a queen and we were her subjects," said Mr. GUGELER. "Elizabeth never left you once she got ahold of you."
Guerrilla theatre, grass-roots theatre, shoe-string theatre, theatre against all odds, a "let's-make-a-show" mentality -- that was the brave, artistic world in which Ms. SZATHMARY waged her war against what she saw as frivolous or commercial art. In 1989, Inner Stage lost its operating grant and from that time on she financed her own productions. During the last year that she was able to work, she earned a pitiful $5,000.
Ms. SZATHMARY continued to perform in all her productions, turning more to straight acting as her dancing powers declined. Even so, she never gave up the stage to anyone.
Elizabeth SZATHMARY died of rectal cancer in Toronto on March 28. A memorial service will be held at the Church of the Redeemer, 162 Bloor St. W., Toronto, at 3 p.m. on April 27.

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TRUMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
Politician, chef, farmer cooked for presidents
He first came to Canada after the Second World War at the invitation of the Dutch ambassador
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, March 5, 2003 - Page R9
Ottawa -- Anton WYTENBURG was a proficient chef who had little time to prepare meals for his wife and 10 children because he was often too busy cooking for others, including presidents and other dignitaries.
"He was never a chef at home, because he was always working in a hotel somewhere or at the bakery, " says his son Rudy of Ottawa, who says his father's specialties were Dutch pastries and cakes.
At one point, Mr. WYTENBURG was a cook at the venerable Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York, where he helped prepare meals for U.S. presidents Dwight EISENHOWER and Harry TRUMAN, and president-to-be John F. KENNEDY. In 1945, he worked as a chef for General Henry CRERAR at a Canadian Officers' Club in Holland.
Mr. WYTENBURG, a native of Delft, the Netherlands, died in Ottawa on January 30. He was 83.
The son of a Dutch tailor, Mr. WYTENBURG completed Grade 8 in Delft and landed a job at a bakery. Later, he moved to Scheveningen to work as a sous chef in an oceanside hotel.
While working there, he learned to speak German, French and English and, during the Second World War, used his language skills as part of the Dutch resistance in its fight against the invading Germans.
Later, while working for Gen. CRERAR, Mr. WYTENBURG was asked by Dr. Jan VAN ROYEN, the Dutch ambassador to Canada, to come to work for him as a chef at the Dutch embassy in Ottawa.
"Anton gladly accepted the opportunity. The Dutch were and are forever grateful for the support of the Canadians during the war, " said Rudy. In 1947, he came to Canada to work at the embassy in Ottawa.
In 1950, when the Dutch ambassador was transferred to Washington, Mr. WYTENBURG worked as a chef at the French embassy in Ottawa before buying a bakery in Ottawa that became the first Dutch pastry shop in the city. The business, renamed Anton's Select Pastries, later expanded to include five outlets.
In 1952, he married Catharina VAN VUGT, also a native of the Netherlands, whom he met when she was a nanny for the secretary to the Dutch ambassador. That year, Dutch Queen Juliana paid a visit to one of Anton's bakeries.
While running their bakeries, the WYTENBURGs made many Friends, including some who farmed outside Ottawa and spoke highly of life in the country. This led them to buy a small farm west of Ottawa in 1962 and in 1964 would see the family give up its bakeries in favour of full-time agriculture on larger Ottawa Valley spreads, first in Richmond and later in Renfrew, where dairy farming would become the family's bread and butter.
As a farmer, Mr. WYTENBURG took a keen interest in agricultural organizations and committees. "He had a way with people, he could diffuse tense situations and always find a solution, " says Rudy.
Over the years, Mr. WYTENBURG's sons took on more of the farming responsibilities, leaving their father with more time for the many organizations he worked with, including the Ottawa-Carleton Safety Council and the Richmond Agricultural Society. In the late 1970s, Friends and neighbours urged him to consider politics.
In 1978, he won a councillor's seat in the rural ward of Goulbourn in 1980, he ran for mayor but lost; he tried again in 1982 and was successful, sitting as Mayor of Goulbourn Township from 1982 through to 1991. He was also on the council of the former Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton.
Moving a large family around the community and the farm was difficult, until Mr. WYTENBURG bought a used, fully stretched Cadillac limousine.
"It sure raised a few eyebrows when we were being chauffeured to the hay fields in a black limo, " recalls Rudy. "It often made for a bit of fun when the boys would ask an unsuspecting gal out on a date."
Mr. WYTENBURG left politics and farming in 1991 at age 72. After retiring, he continued to volunteer his time to help out on committees and task forces and as a strong supporter of the church. At the age of 75, he was the oldest participant in a walkathon for a local charity.
Mr. WYTENBURG leaves 10 children who live in California, Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, Renfrew, Ottawa and in England. Two of them continue to operate the family's 440-hectare farm near Renfrew.

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TRUMBLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
KELLY, Thomas Patrick " Tim" (1922 - 2003)
Tim KELLY of Bromley Avenue, Moncton, died peacefully at the Moncton Hospital on Monday October 27, 2003. He was born in Toronto on October 18, 1922 and was the son of the late Emmett and Barbara (DOLLY) KELLY. Tim worked as a senior executive with Canadian Marconi Company, Montreal, Quebec and a business owner of the electronics distributor Keldon Electronics Limited, Pointe Claire, Quebec. In 1979 he established the Moncton, New Brunswick based consumer electronics retailer, Sounds Fantastic Atlantic Limited. As a business leader Tim had a gift for marketing and financial management. He built a strong business that grew and flourished well after his retirement in 1986, which is a legacy to his sound planning and leadership. He was one of the original believers in the United Way and was an active member of the Elks Lodge of Moncton since 1979. As well Tim served with the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1943-1945. Tim is survived by his wife of 54 years, Ivy Anita (née TRUMBLEY) and seven children: Brian (Lynne ARSENEAULT) of Peterborough, Steve of Dieppe, Jeff (Lila DONOVAN) of Moncton, Brad (Sandra THORBURN) of Edmonton, Scott (Jamie PENFOLD) of Moncton, Jan KOSHYLANYK (Terry) of Ancaster and Jill SMITH (Gary) of Riverview. He will be dearly missed by his 17 grandchildren: Kevin, Autumn, Christopher, Patrick, Jessica, Ryan, Alison, Kieran, Nicholas, Regan, Tyler, Wesley, Stephen, Kaileigh, Brandon, Morgan and Talia, as well his 2 great grand_sons Carter and William. He is also survived by his sisters Bernie KELLY of Beaconsfield and Barbara MURPHY (Ted) Uxbridge, and a brother Paul of Ottawa. He was predeceased by brothers Fred and Jim. Visiting hours will be held at Cadman's Funeral Home, 114 Alma Street, Moncton on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 with parish prayers to be held at the funeral home Thursday evening at 8: 30 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be held from St. Bernard's Catholic Church on Friday October 31 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Peter McKEE officiating. The interment will take place at Our Lady of Calvary Cemetery, Dieppe. Donations to the memorial of the donor's choice would be appreciated by the family. The family would like to thank the staff at both the Dr. George L. Dumont Hospital and the Moncton Hospital for the professional and loving care that they provided to Tim, as well to our family over the last few months. There are truly many angels at both our hospitals. www.cadmansfh.com

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TRUSCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
TRUSCOTT, Peggy (née SAULT)
Peggy lived her life as a beautiful, special person who brought joy, love and light to everyone she touched. Her kindness, compassion and overwhelming energy to help others was ever present from her days as a nurse at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto Western Hospital and the Victorian Order of Nurses, to her work as a nursing instructor at Centennial College and as a public health nurse for the City of Toronto. A wife, a mother, a daughter, a sister and a wonderful friend. Peggy lived courageously with ovarian cancer for the last four years, her strength, positive outlook and love of life never wavering. Peggy died peacefully at home, on May 25th, 2003, wrapped in the love of her husband and best friend Bruce and her daughters - Sarah, Rebecca and Martha and son-in-law Josh KESTER. Peggy will be dearly missed by all who knew her including her parents John and Beth SAULT, her in-laws Marg and Os TRUSCOTT, her siblings Mary McKELVEY (Max,) Cathie HUGHES (Wayne,) John SAULT (Linda,) Barb SAULT (Liz THOMAS,) Patty BONTJE (Michael) as well as by her many Friends, cousins, nieces and nephews. We wish to thank Dr. J. STURGEON and Dr. D. DEPETRILLO (Princess Margaret Hospital), Dr. J. MEHARCHAND (Toronto East General Hospital), Dr. J. RIEGER (Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care,) and nurses Barb MOFFAT and Ann Marie HOGAN (St. Elizabeth Health Care) for their compassionate and supportive care. At Peggy's request, a private cremation has occurred, arranged by The Simple Alternative Funeral Centre. A service celebrating her life will be held for family and Friends at the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, 10365 Islington Ave, Kleinburg, Ontario (905-893-1121) on Monday, June 2nd, 2003 at 5: 30 p.m. The family extends a warm welcome to all who wish to join them. In lieu of flowers, we encourage donations to the National Ovarian Cancer Association, 27 Park Road, Toronto M4W 2N2 (416-962-2700). In September 2002 Peggy founded the first annual ''Walk of Hope'' to raise awareness about ovarian cancer. Please join us on September 7th, 2003 at the second annual National Ovarian Cancer Association ''Walk of Hope'' and remember Peggy. Further details will be available at: www.ovariancanada.org

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TRUSCOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-27 published
SAULT, John Henry (1918 - 2003)
Died peacefully in Toronto on Friday, October 24, 2003 surrounded by his wife and family. Loving husband of Beth (HARRISON) for over 60 years. Great Dad to Mary (Max McKELVEY,) the late Peggy (Bruce TRUSCOTT), Cathie (Wayne HUGHES), John (Linda), Barb (Liz THOMAS,) Patty (Michael BONTJE.) Wonderful Grampa who will be missed particularly at Boshkung Lake by his grandchildren Keith, Andrew and Heather McKELVEY; Sarah, Rebecca (Josh KESTER), and Martha TRUSCOTT; Alison, Calum and Jeremy HUGHES; Harrison and Alex BONTJE. Predeceased by sister Helen (SAULT) LINDSAY whose children looked to him as a mentor and guide. Special Uncle to his many nieces and nephews. Jock, affectionately known as ''Saltie'' was a long-time salesman for the Canadian Salt Company. Along with a busy career and active family life, Jock coached hockey, golfed and drove the water-ski-boat. He was a dedicated Big Brother, Boy Scout Leader and Elder at Forest Hill United Church. Later in life he volunteered with North Toronto Meals on Wheels. He served a term as Mayor of Donarvon Park, Boshkung Lake and spent a cherished year as President of the Boshkung Lake Cottagers Association ending the summer by holding the First Annual Presidents Ball. A large man who loved life, he will be missed by his family, many relatives, Friends and co-workers. Jock was well known for his favourite saying, ''It's great to be alive''.The family extends sincere gratitude to the staff at Kingsway Retirement Home and the Trillium Health Centre (Mississauga) for their devoted and professional care. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. West at Windermere, east of the Jane subway from 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm, Monday; Memorial Service in the Chapel on Tuesday October 28, 2003 at 3: 00 pm. If desired a donation may be made to National Ovarian Cancer Association, 27 Park Road, Toronto, Ontario Canada, M4W 2N2.

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TRUSZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-04 published
KRAFCHIK, Terrie (Theresa)
Died at Saint Mary's Hospital on Monday, November 3, 2003, at 90 years of age. Beloved wife of the late Paul Peter KRAFCHIK (February 1989.) Mother of Gail and her husband Bob HASLER of Ottawa, and Jim and his wife Lillian KRAFCHIK of Toronto. Grandmother of Michael KRAFCHIK, David KRAFCHIK, both of Toronto, and Laurel Anne HASLER of Saint John's, Newfoundland. Sister of Dorothy WEILER of Kitchener, Marie KARN of Puslinch, Loretta McCASKILL of Barrie, and Helen HIPEL of Waterloo. Sister-in-law of Gladys HERGOTT of Kitchener. Predeceased by her brothers, Irvin, Elmer and Jerome HERGOTT. Terrie was an active member of Saint Mark's R.C. Parish where she was also a member of the Catholic Women's League. She taught bridge to the blind from 1973-1975, and was very involved in parish bridge marathons from 1954-2003. The KRAFCHIK family will receive Friends at the Henry Walser Funeral Home, 507 Frederick Street, Kitchener (519-749-8467) Tuesday and Wednesday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m., with parish prayers on Wednesday at 8: 30 p.m. Prayers will be offered at the Funeral Home on Thursday, November 6, 2003 at 10: 15 a.m., then followed by Terrie's Funeral Mass at Saint Mark's R.C. Parish, 55 Driftwood Drive, Kitchener, at 11 a.m. Fr. Bill TRUSZ officiating. Interment Woodland Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations to Saint Mark's R.C. Parish Mortgage Fund or to Saint Mary's Hospital Foundation would be appreciated by the family. Visit www.obit411.com/1135 for Theresa's memorial.

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