TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Donald Gregor McGREGOR
In loving memory of Donald Gregor McGREGOR, December 17, 1931 to December 20, 2002.
Donald Gregor McGREGOR Senior of Whitefish River First Nation, Birch Island who passed on to the Spirit World on Friday, December 20, 2002 at the Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 71 years. Known for his gentle spirit and kind sense of humour, he enjoyed spending time with his family, fishing, hunting, bingo and home projects. He worked for E. B. Eddy for 20 years before retiring in 1996. He also served several terms as Band Councillor on the Whitefish River Band Council and was President of St. Gabriel's Parish Council for many years. He was honoured as an Elder and Eagle Staff Carrier of Whitefish River First Nation. He was of the Eagle Clan and his Ojibway name he proudly carried was Ogimas, given to him by his father when he was a young lad. He played many years with the Sheguiandah Bears and was an avid supporter of minor hockey. Much beloved husband of 41 years and best friend of Mary Grace (nee MANITOWABI.) Loving and cherished father of Lucy Ann (husband Donald TRUDEAU) of Blind River, Patty (husband Leon LIGHTNING) of Hobbema, Alberta, Donald (wife Sandrah RECOLLET) and Kiki (husband Stephen PELLETIER) of Birch Island and Christopher WAHSQUONAIKEZHIK (wife Carol) of Sudbury. Proud and very loving grandfather of Donnelley, Kigen, Akeshia, Paskwawmotosis, Donald, Assinyawasis, Anthony, Kihiwawasis, Kianna Rae, Waasnode, Christina, Charles and Christopher. Survived by sisters Lillian McGREGOR of Toronto, Shirley McGREGOR of Birch Island and brother Peter McGREGOR of Nova Scotia and brother-in-law Roman BILASH. Also survived by brothers-in-law David (Linda), Ron (Nikki), Dominic (Brenda), and sisters-in-law Veronica (Andrew,) Rosie GAUVREAU (Gordon) and Medora(Don). Predeceased by parents Augustine and Victoria and in-laws David and Agatha MANITOWABI. Also predeceased by brothers Robert E. McGREGOR, Allan A. McGREGOR, and sister, Mary JACKO, Colleen FONT, Estelle CYWINK, Violet BONADIO and Olive McGREGOR and sister-in-law Shirley MANITOWABI McKAY. He was also a special uncle to 67 nieces and nephews.
Rested at the Whitefish River Community Centre. Funeral Mass was held at St. Gabriel's Lalamant Church, Birch Island on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 with Father Mike STROGRE officiating. Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
TRUDEAU
-In loving memory of Isadore Ignatius Sr., who passed away January 24, 2002.
This month comes back with deep regret.
It brings a day we will never forget.
You went away without saying good-bye.
But our memories of you will never die.
We miss you more than anyone knows,
As each day passes our emptiness grows.
The tears that we shed will wipe away
But the ache in our hearts will always stay.
No one knows the grief we share
When our family meets and you're not there.
You left us suddenly, your thoughts unknown.
But you left us memories we are proud to own.
-Sadly missed by Linda, Jimmy, Donna, Richard, Monica, Isadore Jr., Arthur, Stuart, Ramona and all the grandchildren.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-23 published
Marlon Dale ASSINEWAI
In loving memory of Marlon Dale ASSINEWAI born October 28, 1978, age 24 years of Wikwemikong, who passed away Wednesday night, April 16, 2003.
Beloved son of Donald K. ASSINEWAI of Sudbury and Deborah PHEASANT of Sault Ste. Marie. Loving brother of Marcia ASSINEWAI (friend Brendan,) Misty ASSINEWAI, both of Wikwemikong. Joy ASSINEWAI, Patricia and Trisha A. PHEASANT of Sault Ste. Marie and Derek and Megan TRUDEAU of Sudbury. Loving uncle of Kirsten ASSINIWE of Wikwemikong. Also loving grand_son of Reverend Isadore L. and Verna PHEASANT and Josephine M. ASSINEWAI, all of Wikwemikong.
He will be sadly missed by many family and Friends. Marlon was a handsome young man who loved his family. He was looking forward to a bigger, brighter future. The great sadness of his death will leave an empty space in our hearts.
Visitation and Funeral Service will be at the Resurrection Life Centre in Wikwemikong. Please call Island Funeral Home 368-2490 for the times. Burial in South Bay Cemetery.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Ruby WILLSON
In loving memory of Ruby WILLSON, May 15, 1937 to April 30, 2003.
Ruby WILLSON, a resident of Ice Lake, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 at the age of 65 years. She was born in Kagawong, daughter of the late Nelson and Lillian (TRUDEAU) PIERCE.
Ruby was an "Adventuress" and enjoyed life to its fullest. She had worked as a hostess at Harbour Island as well as being a navigator on sail boats, and had sailed many places, including the open seas. She enjoyed many things, such as needlework, baking, reading and especially loved to entertain and host people. Her favourite place was Harbour Island. A loving wife, mother and grandmother, she will be sadly missed, but many happy memories will be cherished. Dearly loved wife and best friend of Chuc WILLSON. Loving and loved mother of Dennis BECKETT and Deanna BENOIT both of Kagawong, Rob BECKETT of Pefferlaw and Juanda GEORGE of Espanola. Proud grandmother of James, Charles, Kevin, Crestienne, Aaron, Brandon and Sheldon. Also survived by Lake WILSON and his daughter Jasmine. Dear sister of Sandra JAMES. Predeceased by husbands Robert BECKETT, Carl REINGUETTE and John PETRIE and brother Reynold PIERCE.
A private family funeral service will be conducted at the Culgin Funeral Home, followed by cremation. A public memorial service will be conducted at Lyons Memorial United Church on Thursday, May 15, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. If so desired, donations may be made to Strawberry Point Christian Camp or the Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-16 published
Ayrika Kylie AGUONIE
In loving memory of Ayrika Kylie AGUONIE who passed away on Friday, July 11, 2003 at Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 4 months, 2 days.
Beloved baby daughter of Josephine FOX and Garfield AGUONIE of Sheguiandah. Cherished baby sister of Chantel, Tamara, Bianca, Ocean, Scott and Jasmine. Dear granddaughter of Winnifred TRUDEAU and Ron FOX predeceased) and Lawrence AGUONIE and (Dorothy predeceased.)
Chosen godparents Ron ROY and Cherie THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Niece of many aunts and uncles. Rested at the Sheguiandah First Nation Community Centre from Sunday until funeral mass on July 15, 2003. Interment in the Sheguiandah Cemetery. Feast to follow. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-20 published
Violet Cleona NAOKWEGIJIG
Violet Cleona NAOKWEGIJIG of Wikwemikong passed away peacefully at her home surrounded by her family on Tuesday, August 12, 2003 in her 90th year.
Beloved wife of the late Joseph NAOKWEGIJIG (1961.) Dear daughter of the late Andrew and Mary Louise (ROY) TRUDEAU.
Loving mother of Thomas (wife Lillian) of Surrey, B.C., Leonard (wife Theresa), Louis (wife Beverly), James (friend Mary) and Rosemary ENOSSE (Clifford) all of Wikwemikong, Mary Ann (Mrs. Boniface CORBIERE) of Lively and the late Marina, Lawrence, Eugene and Allen. Will be sadly missed by 18 grandchildren, 37 great-grandchildren and 2 great-great-grandchildren. Predeceased by 1 grand_son and 2 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Albert ROY of Toronto and the late Fred ROY, Clara PANGOWISH and Frances ROY. Dear aunt of Urban OSHKAWBEWISENIS, and Roland and Eric PANGOWISH. Foster mother of Sandra RECOLLET and Kenneth Kimewon. Niibna gii-sag'igoon, niibna da-mesnigoon.
Rested on Thursday, August 14th from 2 pm at the Holy Cross Mission Roman Catholic Church, Wikwemikong. Funeral mass took place on Saturday, August 16, 2003 at 10 am with Father Douglas McCarthy officiating. Interment Wikwemikong Cemetery.
also linked as linked as ROI

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Theodore " Ted" Ernest MANITOWABI
Theodore " Ted" Ernest MANITOWABI of Wikwemikong passed away peacefully at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Little Current surrounded by his family on Wednesday, September 3rd, 2003 in his 71st year.
Beloved husband of Yvonne (née PANGOWISH) at home. Loving father of Calvin (wife Gloria) of Lansing, Michigan, Marlene (friend Gary) of Spanish, Yvette, Benita, Barbara (husband Eugene PELTIER,) Patricia (husband Mark TRUDEAU,) Mavis (friend Chuck) all of Wikwemikong.
Will be sadly missed by 13 grandchildren, Stevie Rae, Calvin Jr., James, Jacqueline, Beedahbin, Nawautin, Jewel, Elliot, Tracy, Mark Jr., Trisha, Harley and Jayden and his special pal "Otis". son of the late Samuel and Isabelle (née TRUDEAU) MANITOWABI and stepson of the late Harriet (née TRUDEAU) MANITOWABI. Son-in-law of the late Joachim and Nancy (née ROY) PANGOWISH. Dear brother-in-law of Wayne and Verna OSAWAMICK. Dear brother of Nancy RECOLLET, Rene, Julian and Louie G. MANITOWABI, Connie and Marina PITAWANAKWAT, Tina and Caroline MANDAMIN, Elizabeth ABEL, Mary WEMIGWANS, Frances SHAWANDA and the late Wildred and Gertrude MANITOWABI. Dear uncle and great uncle of many nieces and nephews. Godfather to Veda (née MANITOWABI) TRUDEAU and Louie AGOUNIE. Ted provided for his family and worked for many years with Algoma Steel, Inco and as a self employed logger. He enjoyed life to the fullest with his children and grandchildren after retiring. He loved gardening, camping, fishing, baseball, curling and hockey. He especially enjoyed watching his son and grandchildren play the game of hockey he loved so much and just being with all his grandchildren as he watched with pride, always smiling. Rested at the Holy Cross Mission Roman Catholic Church, Wikwemikong on Thursday, September 4th from 2: 00 p.m. Funeral Mass from the Holy Cross Mission Church was on Saturday, September 6th at 11: 00 a.m. with Father D. McCarthy officiating. Interment in the Wikwemikong Cemetery.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-15 published
TRUDEAU--In loving memory of Sarah. October 19, 1993.
Silently the angels took you away
Ten years ago today.
As our memories are fond of you,
Our silent mourning is still strong and true.
Each of our broken hearts shed a tear When your favourite songs, we hear. Those we love we never lose For always they will be Loved, remembered, treasured, Always in our memory. --Sadly missed by your family.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
TRUDEAU
- In memory of Daniel Lloyd on December 16, 2002.
My Deary it has been one year since that tragic day I lost you.
I think of you in silence and often speak your name.
All I have are memories and your picture in a frame.
My heart continues to ache, and secret tears still flow.
In life I loved you deeply, so in death I do the same.
You might be gone, but you will never be forgotten.
I miss you and love you, My Deary.
Sadly missed, lovingly remembered forever.
Liz

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
TRUDEAU
- I memory of Daniel Lloyd, on December 16, 2002.
One year has passed, since you were taken so suddenly from us.
A loving father most sincere, loved by all he knew.
He loved us all so very dear, and we loved him too.
But God in his mercy will give us hope, and help bear the strain.
Of the one we cherished, loved and lost, to meet in Heaven again.
As we look upon his picture, sweet memories we recall.
Of a face so full of sunshine, and a smile for one and all.
Sweet Jesus take this message to our dear father up above.
Tell him how we miss him, and give him all our love.
Sadly missed and forever in our hearts by your daughters Jaclyn and Brittany, your son Jared, and grand_son Braiedyn.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Deacon David Roland COLEMAN TRUDEAU
In loving memory of Deacon David Roland COLEMAN TRUDEAU at the age of 78 years Thirty years of sobriety. Died peacefully surrounded by his wife and family at the Manitoulin Health Centre on Wednesday evening December 10, 2003.
Beloved husband of Clara (FOX) TRUDEAU of Wikwemikong and first wife the late Tillie KUBUNT of Newberry, Michigan. Dear son of the late Dominic and Angeline (WASSEGIJIG) TRUDEAU of Wikwemikong. Dear step-father to Bill TUCKER, Sharon (husband Ray) Wynn and Bob TUCKER of Newberry, Michigan, Lindell MATHEWS of Wikwemikong, Annie KAY (friend Eric EADIE,) Mathew and Linda MATHEWS (predeceased.) Loving grandfather to Billy, Karen, Jimmy, Linda (friend Wayne), Ronald (friend Tracy), Maxwell, Lindsay, Michael, Darla and a few more from Newberry, Michigan (names unknown at time of printing). Predeceased by two grandchildren Linda Marie and Lucy Marie. One great granddaughter Deanna MATHEWS. Loving brother of Stella (Jim predeceased) PAVLOT of Sault, Michigan, Ursula (Bob) SCHUPP of Meza, Arizona, Elsie (John predeceased) BOWES of Shorter, Alabama. Predeceased by brothers and sisters and in-laws Tony (Margaret) TRUDEAU, Isadore (Marge) WEMIGWANS, Lena (Bova) GRENIER, and Francis (Nestor) KARMINSKI. Will be sadly missed by Godchildren Jonathon DEBASSIGE, Alison RECOLLET, Darcy SPANISH, and many nieces, nephews and cousins.
Rested at St. Ignatius Church, Buzwah. Funeral Mass was held at Holy Cross Mission, Wikwemikong on Monday, December 15, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Doug McCarthy s.j. officiating. Cremation at the Sagamok Anishnawbek First Nations Crematorium. Lougheed Funeral Home.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
Gordon Kenneth FLEMING/FLEMMING
By Jack FORTIN Thursday, February 13, 2003, Page A30
Musician, husband, father. Born August 3, 1931, in Winnipeg. Died August 31, 2002, in Scarborough, Ontario, following a stroke, aged 71.
Gordie FLEMING/FLEMMING was a remarkable music talent, known internationally as a master of the accordion, especially in the jazz idiom. He was a life member of Local 149 of the Toronto Musicians' Association.
In show-business vernacular, Gordie was "born in a trunk." He began playing accordion when his older brother gave him lessons. His musical ability was such that he began performing publicly at the age of five. His schoolteachers often saw him being whisked away in a taxi to perform at theatres and radio stations in Winnipeg. By the age of 10, he was a working member of various bands in that city.
In 1949, Gordie lost his accordion in a fire at a Winnipeg hotel. With the insurance money, he headed for the bright lights of Montreal where he soon became an important part of that city's musical life. His accordion ability was complemented by the fact that he was also a gifted arranger and composer.
He had a marvellous ability to improvise and could string out complex bebop lines, leaving his listeners in awe. He often slipped a jazz phrase into ballads or commercial tunes, confirming that jazz was indeed his first love.
One of Montreal's busiest musicians, he wrote for local orchestras, shows, radio and television. He had perfect pitch and often wrote without reference to a keyboard. He was at home in every type of music from classics to jazz. For several years, he worked at the National Film Board as a composer and musician.
In Montreal, Gordie performed with many show business headliners: there was a wealth of home-grown talent in Montreal, such as Oscar PETERSON and Maynard FERGUSON, as well as other jazz musicians who were beginning to be noticed.
Gordie had said that when when he first heard bebop it was like entering another world. As his career indicates, he had no trouble in that world. He worked with many personalities including: Charlie PARKER, Mel TORMÉ, Hank SNOW, Lena HORNE, Englebert HUMPERDINCK, Dennis DAY, Gordon MacRAE, Cab CALLOWAY, Nat King COLE, Cat STEVENS, Rich LITTLE, Billy ECKSTEIN, Pee Wee HUNT, Arthur GODFREY and Buddy DEFRANCO.
He also performed with Tommy AMBROSE, Allan MILLS, Wally KOSTER, Tommy HUNTER, Bert NIOSI, Wayne and Shuster, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation jazz shows with Al BACULIS, and many other Canadian jazz musicians.
On Montreal's French music scene, Gordie performed on radio and television with Emile GENEST, Ti-Jean CARIGNAN, André GAGNON and Ginette RENO. He was a featured soloist with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on several occasions.
Internationally, Gordie toured France in 1952 and performed with Edith PIAF and Tino ROSSI. He had the honour to perform for former prime minister Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU at a Commonwealth Conference.
He participated with other top Canadian musicians in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation tour to entertain Canadian and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Europe in 1952 and 1968.
For me, a memorable experience was playing in a group with Gordie for several winters in Florida. A popular member of the Panama City Beach family of musicians, Gordie looked forward to his winter trek south. Many of the American musicians will miss him, as will the many snowbirds who looked forward to hearing him each year.
His extensive repertoire allowed Gordie to author a book called Music of the World, in which he wrote the music to 280 songs from more than 30 countries.
Gordie leaves his wife of 47 years, Joanne, and seven children.
Jack FORTIN is Gordie's friend.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-14 published
Thomas MacDONALD
By Joan ROBINSON Friday, March 14, 2003 - Page A24
Father, husband, caterer. Born November 12, 1915, in Liverpool, England. Died January 25, in Ottawa, of a stroke, aged 87.
Tom MacDONALD was the third of nine children born to William and Mary Ellen MacDONALD. The family emigrated from England to Canada in 1924 and settled in Kingston, Ontario With the outbreak of the Second World War, Tom and his four brothers joined the Armed Forces. Tom enlisted in the Canadian Army on January 25, 1940. He was assigned as batman/driver to Lieutenant-General H. D. R. CRERAR. In 1944, the Kingston Whig Standard featured a photo of "Cpl. T. McDONALD" sewing an extra pip on CRERAR's uniform, marking his promotion to full General; CRERAR was then Commander of the First Canadian Army. During those war years, Tom served with the general in Italy, Sicily, the Netherlands, Belgium, North Africa, France and Germany. One of his duties was to prepare the general's meals; he became proficient at obtaining and preparing reasonable meals with scant resources. It was during this time that he developed a keen interest in food preparation.
After the war, Tom remained in the army. Although he had no professional training, his natural flair for food preparation and presentation led to his employment in Ottawa by National Defence Headquarters as organizer and caterer of official banquets and what was known as "the cocktail party circuit." On a private basis, the United States Embassy also employed him in this capacity.
Among his effects are letters of appreciation from Ambassador Livingston MERCHANT of the U.S. Embassy and one from then-president Dwight EISENHOWER, thanking Tom for his efforts during the Second World War, as well as his contributions during two presidential trips to Ottawa. It concludes: "With best wishes to a former comrade-in-arms."
During this time he also accompanied General CRERAR on official business trips, wherein his role was to assist in the personal needs of the CRERAR family. Many of these trips were to major Canadian cities but in 1947, Tom accompanied General CRERAR on a trade development mission to Hawaii, Hong Kong, Tokyo and Manila. His last international trip took place in the 1960s when, in a similar role, he travelled to Cyprus with a delegation headed by Minister of Defence Paul HELLYER.
In 1965, he was honourably released from the army. He then assumed the position of steward at 24 Sussex Drive. He served with Prime Minister Lester PEARSON from 1965 to 1968 and with Prime Minister Pierre TRUDEAU from 1968 to 1975. He was again responsible for the organization of formal banquets and other entertainment. On one such occasion, a photo much prized by Tom's English mother shows him in formal dress, standing ready to serve the Queen Mother.
Although officially retired in 1975, he maintained his interest in cooking both in his private catering business and at home. He was a lively, fun-loving man and with his wife, Verena, hosted many memorable parties wherein his love of people and sense of humour had full rein.
Tom was proud of his country, his city and his war service. He could be moved to tears by memories of his war years and every year that he was physically able he marched in the Veteran's Day parade wearing his war medals.
In his declining years, he was comforted by the care and companionship of his family and Friends. At Uncle Tom's funeral they volunteered their special memories of him. There was much laughter and few tears as befitted the man. The music of his favourite song We'll Meet Again concluded the ceremony -- sung, of course, by Vera LYNN. He will be missed by many, including nieces, nephews, Friends and surviving comrades-in-arms.
Joan is Tom MacDONALD's niece.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-19 published
'His heart was always in the labour movement'
United Auto Workers director and Canadian Labour Congress president, he was one of labour's most influential leaders
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - Page R7
He went from the assembly line to the lofty heights of union leadership. Dennis McDERMOTT, who died last month at age 80, was one of Canada's most influential labour leaders throughout the 1970s and 1980s as Canadian director of the United Auto Workers and later president of the Canadian Labour Congress.
Mr. McDERMOTT's life in the labour movement began in 1948 when he started work as an assembler and welder at the Massey Harris (later Massey Ferguson) plant in Toronto. He joined United Auto Workers Local 439 and quickly rose through the ranks.
"He had a lot of pizzazz, said Bob WHITE/WHYTE, former president of the Canadian Auto Workers and the Canadian Labour Congress. "He had a good sense of what was good for working people."
After a 38-year career in the Canadian labour movement, Mr. McDERMOTT was made Canadian ambassador to Ireland in 1986 by Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY. Mr. McDERMOTT received some criticism within the labour movement for the appointment, but he made no apologies.
"I didn't cross the floor and become a Conservative. I am a social democrat and will continue to be a social democrat, " he said at the time. "I will continue to act and speak as a trade unionist, Mr. McDERMOTT said in 1986 after accepting his appointment.
Mr. McDERMOTT was known for his sharp tongue and had a particularly abrasive relationship with former prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU. He fought against the anti-inflation policies of the Trudeau government, in particular wage and price controls.
On November 21, 1981, Mr. McDERMOTT led a massive rally on Parliament Hill, said to be the largest such demonstration in Canadian history. About 100,000 people protested against the oppressive burden of high interest rates that created high unemployment and economic instability.
Behind his combative style, Mr. McDERMOTT had a strong intellect and a talent for building consensus. As Canadian Labour Congress president, he was able to reach out to other groups and build a coalition among various social interests in Canada in pursuit of common goals.
"I am confrontational. When I have to play hardball, I play hardball. But I can be just as conciliatory as anyone else. I can walk with the bat or I can walk with the olive branch. It depends on what's happening, Mr. McDERMOTT once told a reporter.
Dennis McDERMOTT was born on November 3, 1922, in Portsmouth, England. He was the eldest of three children to his Irish parents John and Beatrice McDERMOTT. Growing up poor, Mr. McDERMOTT learned firsthand about some of life's injustices. As a young boy in the church choir, Mr. McDERMOTT remembered being left behind on the bus while the rest of the choir performed at a concert because his family was too poor to buy him a uniform, said his wife, Claire McDERMOTT.
Mr. McDERMOTT left school at age 14 to become a butcher's helper. Two years later, he joined the Royal Navy. During the Second World War, he served on a destroyer escort travelling on convoy duty to different parts of Europe and sometimes to the Russian port of Murmansk. In 1947, he left the navy to work in a Scottish coal mine before coming the Canada.
After landing a job at Massey Harris in Toronto, Mr. McDERMOTT quickly became involved in the United Auto Workers. Small in stature, but with a quick mind and wit, he became a budding leader.
"He was very impressive, said Bromley ARMSTRONG, a civil and human-rights activist who worked with Mr. McDERMOTT at Massey Harris. "He held rapt attention."
During his first year in the union, Mr. McDERMOTT worked on the Joint Labour Committee to Combat Racial Intolerance, which successfully lobbied to help bring about Ontario's first piece of human-rights legislation, the Fair Employment Practices Act of 1948.
His work in human rights continued throughout his career. He later served on the executive of the Toronto Committee for Human Rights and as a member of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association. He was awarded the Order of Ontario for his work in the trade-union and human-rights movements. After serving in several positions in the United Auto Workers Local 439, Mr. McDERMOTT became a full-time organizer for the union in 1954. He was made subregional director of the Toronto area in 1960, a position he held until being elected Canadian director of the United Auto Workers in 1968. During his first year as Canadian director, he moved the union headquarters from Windsor, Ontario, to Toronto.
"He started down the road towards more autonomy for the Canadian union, and he reached out to all points of view inside the union, Mr. WHITE/WHYTE said. (In 1985, the Canadian arm of the United Auto Workers broke away to form its own union -- the Canadian Auto Workers,)
"Dennis McDERMOTT raised the profile of the Canadian labour movement to new heights, said Canadian Auto Workers president Buzz HARGROVE. "He was a tough and effective negotiator at the bargaining table, but he also took on the key social and political issues of the day."
Mr. HARGROVE added that his friend and colleague "always had a vision for the movement."
Mr. McDERMOTT was a strong supporter of American Cesar CHAVEZ and the United Farm Workers. He led a contingent of Canadians to California and also organized a march in Toronto to raise money for Mr. CHAVEZ.
Elected Canadian Labour Congress president in 1978, Mr. McDERMOTT served in that position until his retirement in 1986. When asked by a reporter what he considered his prime accomplishment, he pointed to the labour congress. "I think putting the Canadian Labour Congress on the map. Before I came there, it was pretty low profile. You never heard of it. I was kind of proud of that, Mr. McDERMOTT said in a 1989 interview with The Toronto Star.
McDERMOTT also broadened the Canadian Labour Congress's role in international affairs. He was a member of the executive board of the Inter-American Regional Organization of Workers and served as vice-president of the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions.
"His heart was always in the labour movement, Ms. McDERMOTT said. During his three years as ambassador to Ireland in the late 1980s, Mr. McDERMOTT made headlines when he lashed out at Irish government officials for giving better treatment to singer Michael Jackson's pet chimpanzee than the McDERMOTT's Great Dane, Murphy. Mr. Jackson's chimp was whisked into the country while Murphy had to endure six months of quarantine. The dog died shortly after being freed.
Mr. McDERMOTT enjoyed both writing and painting. While in Ireland, he sold a few of his paintings. One of his short stories, about his war experiences, was published in The Toronto Star as part of the newspaper's short-story contest.
Returning from Ireland, Mr. McDERMOTT retired and spent his time between a home near Peterborough, Ontario, and a place in Florida. He continued to paint and write. His letters to the editor frequently appeared in newspapers.
"He lived an incredible life if you think of where he came from, Mr. WHITE/WHYTE said. "He would be the first to say that he was fortunate."
Mr. McDERMOTT died on February 13 in a Peterborough hospital. He had been suffering from a lung disease. He leaves his wife Claire and five children.
A memorial service will be held on March 24 at 1 p.m. at the Toronto Centre for the Arts, 5040 Yonge Street, Toronto.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
Canada's Catholic leader, CARTER dies at 91
By Michael VALPY Religion And Ethics Reporter Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page A1
Three weeks ago, John TURNER met Gerald Emmett CARTER for their annual St. Patrick's Day drink. The former prime minister held the glass for his friend of 50 years while he sipped his Irish whisky through a straw.
When the retired cardinal archbishop of Toronto died yesterday morning at the age of 91, a reputation as richly coloured as the scarlet of his soutane died with him.
Canadian Roman Catholicism will probably never see his like again: a prince of the church who, while never unmindful of the meek and the poor, made no bones about being comfortable rubbing elbows with fellow princes of politics and business.
He was the close friend of prime ministers and premiers. He enjoyed socializing in the corridors of power with people like Conrad BLACK, Hilary and Galen WESTON and Fredrik EATON. He displayed an unabashed fondness for Progressive Conservative Party gatherings. ("I think at one Christmas party, I was the only Liberal there," Mr. TURNER said in an interview.)
Yet academics and religious and business leaders also spoke yesterday of a man with an acute understanding of Canada and its history.
They described an intense, intellectual democrat who believed he should speak out forcefully on the moral and political issues of the day and who welcomed debate with those who disagreed with him. And they talked of a cleric who profoundly understood the nature of the church and who welcomed ecumenism and Canada's emerging pluralism.
"He felt the institution of religion should have a public voice and he was not shy about exercising it," said Michael HIGGINS, principal of St. Jerome's University in Waterloo and co-author of My Father's Business, the 1990 biography of Cardinal CARTER.
"Whenever he spoke, his voice was strong, clear, public, undiluted and welcomed by political leaders even when they disagreed with him. It is an unfortunate circumstance that the marginalization of religious debate occurred at the same time as he was eclipsed by a stroke, retirement and age, at a time when his church needed him. He embodied a certain kind of churchman we probably won't see again."
Cardinal CARTER suffered a stroke in 1981 and retired in 1990.
Cardinal Aloysius AMBROZIC, his successor as archbishop of Toronto, said Cardinal CARTER "wanted to know what the movers and shakers were doing."
Cardinal AMBROZIC described him as a man totally engaged with his church and with his society -- an advocate for the poor, for immigrants and for the homeless.
"What I admired about him, what I found so instructive about him, was his sense of responsibility for the church and for society at large. He was very much a man of Vatican 2 [the church's 1962-65 ecumenical council] and he knew what the Catholic Church was about."
There was also, said Cardinal AMBROZIC, "his own personal style. He had panache."
The priest who rose from a working-class Montreal background to become the most powerful cleric in Canada met Mr. TURNER when the former prime minister was a young lawyer in Montreal doing legal work for the church. "He was a great human being who understood the balance between the religious and secular worlds," Mr. TURNER said.
"He loved tennis, and he had a wicked serve."
Former prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU consulted him on the Constitution in the early 1980s and became a close friend. At the celebration of Cardinal CARTER's 75th birthday in 1987, instructions were given that an entire pew was to be reserved for Mr. TRUDEAU in Toronto's St. Michael's Cathedral.
Mr. TRUDEAU delayed his arrival until just before the cardinal entered the church. "All eyes were trained on TRUDEAU until Cardinal CARTER arrived," said Dr. HIGGINS. "It was symbolic of the close relationship they had."
Toronto's Anglican Archbishop, Terence FINLAY, who first met Cardinal CARTER when they were both bishops in London, Ontario, in the 1970s, said the Roman Catholic Church in Canada had lost a great leader.
"He enabled us to bring our churches closer together. I certainly counted on him as a friend and colleague. He had an impressive understanding of Canada's history and political situations. He knew who we were."

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
The Globe was his church'
The editor-in-chief was mentor to journalists, defender of social policies, respected by those criticized in print, and described as a man with a 'warm human touch'
By Michael VALPY Thursday, April 10, 2003 - Page R11
In his two decades as editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, former senator Richard (Dic) James DOYLE wielded a journalistic influence in Canadian public life matched only by that of George BROWN, the newspaper's founder.
He died yesterday in Toronto, one month past his 80th birthday. His wife of 50 years, Florence, passed away on March 20.
Senator DOYLE -- editor from 1963 to 1983 -- gave the newspaper a boldly independent voice, loosening up its then lock-step support for the Progressive Conservative Party.
Under his direction, the newspaper would praise a government one day and lambaste it the next. He was a passionate defender of civil liberties, intensely engaged in the development of Canada's social policies throughout the 1960s and 1970s and as much concerned with the powerless in Canadian society as the powerful.
"In the time I've been editor," he once said, "we've not supported any party in office. I think we make whomever we support uncomfortable. We're the kind of friend you could do without."
He once said he felt more intellectually comfortable with Pierre TRUDEAU than all the prime ministers he knew, and one of his favourite editorial cartoons was one he suggested after overhearing his daughter Judith talking to a friend in her bedroom. It showed two teenage girls sitting on a bed under a poster of Mr. TRUDEAU. One girl says to the other: "He's not 50 like your father's 50."
His views, although stamped on the editorial page, were never imposed on his reporters. He was concerned with a story's news value -- not the fallout -- and he expected his staff to act with the same concern.
He wanted The Globe to be a writer's newspaper and gave his writers autonomy, even when their views went against his own philosophies. He had a special place in his heart for columnists who expressed contradictory opinions.
The young writers invited to attend the buffet lunches he gave regularly for prime ministers, premiers and cabinet ministers, bank presidents and giants of the arts were treated to superb tutorials in the life of their nation that left an indelible mark on their minds.
Warm, funny, theatrical and gregarious, he was a mentor and model for many of Canada's best-known journalists -- among them, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Michael ENRIGHT and Don NEWMAN, former Globe and Maclean's managing editor Geoffrey STEVENS, his successor as Globe editor Norman WEBSTER, and former foreign correspondent, dance critic and now master of the University of Toronto's Massey College, John FRASER.
"He was absolutely fearless," Mr. STEVENS said yesterday. "He did tough stuff. He did important stuff. And he refused to bow to pressure from business, from politicians and for that matter from journalists. I didn't always agree with him, but I always, always respected what he said."
Mr. FRASER said: "He was an editor who made young journalists' dreams come true. Like many who came under his spell at The Globe and Mail, I will go to my grave grateful for the horizons he opened up to me."
George BAIN, for years The Globe's Ottawa columnist, recalled the only time Senator DOYLE actually complained about something Mr. BAIN had written was when he filed an end-piece to a royal tour and suggested that the institution wasn't appropriate to the Canadian circumstances.
"Dic, as a devoted monarchist, was moved to say, 'Did you have to?' The fact is I felt I did -- and he, despite strong feelings, didn't say, 'You can't.' "
When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY appointed him to the Senate in 1985, he decided to sit as a Conservative out of courtesy.
Mr. MULRONEY described him yesterday as "a marvellous man, rigorous, thoughtful, with a disciplined approach to life and a very warm human touch to everything he did.
"When he cut people up, including me, there was no malice to it, no ad hominem attack, he was never bitter or partisan in any way.'The full impact of Senator DOYLE's presence as editor was probably first felt by The Globe's readers on March 20, 1964, when a front-page editorial appeared under the heading, Bill of Wrongs.
It was prompted by legislation proposed by Ontario's Conservative attorney-general, Frederick CASS, which empowered the Ontario Police Commission to summon any person for questioning in secret deprive him of legal advice; and keep him in prison indefinitely if he refused to answer.
"For the public good," the editorial stated, the Ontario Government "proposes to trample upon the Magna Carta, Habeas Corpus, the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Rule of Law.
"Are we in... the Canada of 1964 -- or in the Germany of 1934?
"This legislation is supposed to be directed against organized crime. In fact, it is directed against every man and woman in the province."
Soon after, Mr. CASS resigned.
Senator DOYLE's skills as a writer were particularly evident on an election night when the paper would present an editorial on the results between editions. Alastair LAWRIE, now retired as an editorial writer, recalled that once the results were known, Senator DOYLE would stand in silent thought for maybe a minute and a half and then start to dictate. In a matter of a few minutes, he would complete a reasoned editorial that scarcely required the addition of a comma.
Senator DOYLE preferred to work in anonymity, only accepting honorary degrees and later the seat in the Senate near the end of his newspaper career.
He sat on no boards, belonged to no important clubs, almost never appeared on television or radio, didn't sign petitions and seldom gave speeches. When he met a politician, there were usually witnesses.
He didn't hold a driver's licence and for years arrived at the old Globe office on King Street by streetcar. When The Globe moved to its present office on Front Street, Senator DOYLE took a taxi.
Retired Ottawa Citizen publisher Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and a close friend of Senator DOYLE, suspected "he didn't trust his Irish temper [to drive] and that was probably to the common good."
Mr. DAVEY said Senator DOYLE's low public profile "was part of his own protection against conflicts on his own part. The Globe was his church. Journalism was his religion.
"I think that Dic, in the context of his time, probably had a greater influence on Canadian journalism than any other single individual," Mr. DAVEY said.
"It was Dic's execution that made the Report on Business what it became and is. He was the moving force from within The Globe often unseen -- in the whole question of conflicts of interest as they affected journalists.
"He was really the wellspring of that kind of thinking and, of course, what The Globe did affected very directly what a lot of other organizations did."
Born in Toronto on March 10, 1923, Dic DOYLE seemed destined to get ink on his hands. He said in 1985 that he had decided on a newspaper career at age 7 and joined the Chatham Daily News as a sports reporter after he graduated from Chatham Collegiate Institute. He was promoted to sports editor, city editor and then news editor.
During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and served with the 115 (Bomber) Squadron (Royal Air Force) at Ely, near Cambridge in England. He was discharged at the end of the war with the rank of flying officer.
He was 23 and felt that life was passing him by, so rather than attending university, as other returning air-force officers were doing, he returned to the Chatham paper. It was a decision he said he later regretted.
He came to The Globe in 1951, initially as a copy editor, the only job available. His first byline appeared in The Globe in December of 1952 over a story about milk bottles.
In the same year, he also wrote a book called The Royal Story, a labour of love that proved to be a standard treatment of the monarchy, and which he was the first to acknowledge, replowed already well-tilled soil.
(The Royal family had a special status at The Globe under Senator DOYLE. One former senior editor, the legendary Martin LYNCH, told of being taken off the front-page layout after he replaced a picture of Princess Margaret, which appeared in early editions, with a photograph of a prize-winning pig.
When The Globe decided to publish a weekly supplement in 1957, Senator DOYLE became its first editor, with a staff that had no experience in the weekly field. The paper was laid out on the carpet of the managing editor's office after he had gone home.
It shrunk over the years because, Mr. DOYLE said, it was ahead of its time. It died in 1971.
From there, in 1959, he became managing editor of the newspaper and then editor in 1963. He stepped aside in 1983 to take on the role of editor emeritus and to write a column -- an experience, he said two years later, that left him chastened. "The guy [columnist] out there has his problems."
Former Globe publisher A. Roy MEGARRY, said, "In my opinion, no one -- including the seven publishers that Dic has served with during his time at the paper -- had made a more positive and lasting impression on The Globe than he has."
Likely among the greatest tributes paid to him as an editor came from the Kent Commission established by the federal government in 1980 to investigate the ownership of Canada's daily newspapers after the Ottawa Journal and the Winnipeg Tribune folded in virtually simultaneous moves by the Thomson and Southam chains.
In its report, the commission credited Senator DOYLE with "adhering to an ideal of press freedom that often tends to get lost in the management of newspapers....
"To a great extent, the editor-in-chief of The Globe belongs to a breed which unfortunately is on its way to extinction.
"The Globe and Mail testifies to the influence that continues to be exerted by a newspaper with a clearly defined idea of its role and substantial editorial resources. It is read by almost three-quarters of the country's most important decision-makers in all parts of Canada and at all levels of government. More than 90 per cent of media executives read it regularly and it tends to set the pace for other news organizations."
The Globe and Mail was bought by Thomson Newspapers in 1980. Senator DOYLE made no secret of the fact that he would have preferred having the newspaper bought by R. Howard Webster, who owned it before it became part of the Financial Post chain. However, in 1985 he said that Thomson was the best alternative among the others in the field.
When Prime Minister MULRONEY named him to the Senate, he became the first active Globe journalist to receive such an appointment since George BROWN in 1873. As an editor and a columnist, Senator DOYLE had often preached Senate reform and had opposed patronage appointments.
His acceptance prompted a flow of letters to the editor that favoured and disapproved of the appointment in about equal measure.Senator DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. Funeral arrangements have not been announced.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-18 published
Died This Day -- Eric MORSE, 1986
Friday, April 18, 2003 - Page R13
Canoeist and outdoorsman born in Naini Tal, India, on December 27, 1904; in 1942, served with Royal Canadian Air Force; named National Secretary of the United Nations Association in Canada became national director, Association of Canadian Clubs; introduced influential Ottawa Friends to canoe voyaging; in 1966, accompanied by Pierre TRUDEAU, retraced fur-traders' and explorers' routes traversed Barren Lands from Hudson Bay to Alaska; wrote Fur Trade Routes of Canada and posthumously published memoir Whitewater Saga; died in Ottawa.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-07 published
Bureaucrat 'invaluable' to ministers
Analyst was a key negotiator in talks that led to the formation of the World Trade Organization in 1995
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, June 7, 2003 - Page F11
Gerry SHANNON could have been a professional hockey player like his father, but decided instead to play in a much bigger arena.
Mr. SHANNON went on to become a top career public servant who helped to formulate the federal government's policies on international trade. At one time, he held the No. 2 posting in the Canadian embassy in Washington and was a key negotiator in the talks known as the Uruguay Round, which led to the formation of the World Trade Organization in 1995.
Mr. SHANNON, who died recently in Vancouver at the age of 67, is remembered as a fair, tough and passionate trade-policy analyst who was a trusted adviser to ministers in the successive cabinets of Pierre TRUDEAU and Brian MULRONEY in the 1980s.
"Gerry was a larger-than-life character," said Peter SUTHERLAND, a former director-general of the World Trade Organization. "He played a crucial role in the conclusion of the Uruguay Round. He had a belief in the multilateral system that he combined with an intense Canadian patriotism. His personality was also a factor in bringing peaceful resolution to difficult negotiations."
"He was a straightforward guy -- you always knew where you stood with him," said Marc Lalonde, a former Liberal finance minister. "He was a man with a very solid judgment. He was a good team player in that regard, the kind of guy you would want to have as a senior public servant."
Born in Ottawa in 1935, Mr. SHANNON received an early lesson from his father -- hockey player Jerry SHANNON, who played for the Montreal Canadiens, Boston Bruins and other National Hockey League teams -- on the necessity of appearing strong, no matter what. Once, after a puck knocked out the boy's two front teeth, his father shouted, "Get up, son, shake it off!" Young Gerry did so and stayed in the game.
The same spirit of toughness also probably helped him cope with the death of his mother when he was 10.
Despite an offer to try out for the Bruins, Mr. SHANNON took his father's advice and went to university. Graduating from Carleton University's school of journalism, he worked as a reporter for the Sudbury Star for several years before lifting his sights once again. He wrote a foreign-service exam and was accepted as a diplomat in 1963. "He realized that being a small-town reporter was great and he enjoyed it, but he wanted to be involved in the big world," said his wife, Anne Park SHANNON.
His first posting was in Washington, where, despite any formal training as an economist, he handled matters of trade and economic policy. "He was good at pursuing Canadian interests with the Americans. They liked him," Ms. Park SHANNON said. "He was very affable and very good at just getting to the essence of things."
He also served as Canada's senior foreign affairs representative in Belgrade in the former Yugoslavia, and as ambassador to Korea, one of Canada's youngest ambassadors at the time.
In the mid-1970s, at the height of the Trudeau era, he became director of commercial policy for the department of external affairs. After several years, he returned to Washington as the embassy's second-in-command at a time when Canada's national energy program generated heated discussions.
Recalled to Ottawa about 1982, he became the assistant deputy minister of finance for the Liberals, then deputy minister of international trade for the Progressive Conservatives. In these capacities, he advised Mr. LALONDE and Tory ministers Michael WILSON and Barbara McDOUGALL.
"He was a very professional public servant, he had a sense of professionalism, he had a very good mind, he was tough, and he understood very well the role of the senior public servant, " Ms. McDOUGALL said. "He never tried to be the minister and he was a straight shooter, which many of us appreciated when we realized that this was the exception and not the rule.
"I worked with a lot of great public servants, but he was certainly right up at the top," she said.
Anne Marie DOYLE, who worked extensively with Mr. SHANNON in various government departments, recalls that he would go out on a limb for employees when he thought that they were in the right, and he possessed "iron in his spine" that made his superiors respect him as steadfast and trustworthy.
"He had this phenomenal gift -- the ability to take a very complex problem, see to its core and express it in just two or three very articulate sentences so that someone like a minister or prime minister would have found him just invaluable," she said. "They would have his complex briefing and he would say, 'Well, Minister, what it boils down to is just this, ' and it would be just brilliant."
Mr. SHANNON was "one of the giants of Canadian trade policy of the '80s and '90s," said Bill DYMOND, executive director of the Centre for Trade Policy and Law at Carleton University. "The politicians trusted him because he was blunt, honest and loyal to the government."
Known for his enthusiasm and for being indefatigable on the job, Mr. SHANNON performed an astonishing array of official duties while in Geneva from 1989 to 1995. As Canada's chief negotiator for the Uruguay Round, he developed a binding dispute-settlement system that was hailed as a major breakthrough. He was Canada's first ambassador to the World Trade Organization as he had been to its predecessor, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.
As an occasional ambassador to the United Nations, he gave to its committee on disarmament the " SHANNON mandate," a significant negotiating protocol still in use today.
Mr. SHANNON was known as a loyal defender of Canadian interests. Soon after leaving government in 1995 to work as an international trade policy consultant, he wrote an article for The Globe and Mail on Canada's seemingly never-ending softwood-lumber dispute with the United States.
"We always get roughed up in dealing alone with the Americans on issues they deem to be critical to them," he observed. "They simply have too many guns and they persevere until they win."
Mr. SHANNON enjoyed hiking, gardening, opera, travelling, dogs, crossword puzzles and playing hockey.
He and his wife moved from Ottawa to Victoria about a year ago with the intent of retiring there. He was sick only a few weeks before he died on April 26.
He leaves his wife, Anne Park SHANNON, and sons Michael and Steven from a previous marriage. He also leaves a sister, Carol SCHWARZ, of Ottawa.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-20 published
Trudeau-era cabinet minister John MUNRO dies, aged 72
By Jeff GRAY/GREY With reports from Campbell CLARK and Canadian Press Wednesday, August 20, 2003 - Page A2
Former Trudeau cabinet minister John MUNRO, whose federal political career ended with a lengthy legal fight, died yesterday of a heart attack in his Hamilton home. He was 72.
Former colleagues remembered Mr. MUNRO, the member from Hamilton-East from 1962 to 1984, as a politician who fought hard for working people around the cabinet table, where he held several key portfolios.
"I think he was a feisty, progressive person of conviction, and was, I guess, part of a somewhat diminishing breed called a real Liberal," said Lloyd AXWORTHY, who served in cabinet with Mr. MUNRO in the early 1980s.
Mr. MUNRO, a Hamilton lawyer, was re-elected eight times and was a cabinet minister for most of the years between 1968 and 1984, handling health and welfare, labour and Indian affairs. As minister of welfare, he brought in the Guaranteed Income Supplement, which helped lift many senior citizens out of poverty.
But in 1989, after he left government, an Royal Canadian Mounted Police investigation accused him of corruption during his time as a minister. The charges were eventually thrown out, but Mr. MUNRO, hobbled by an estimated $1-million in legal bills, launched a civil suit to get the government to cover his costs. He eventually received about $1.4-million in a settlement.
Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN, who was elected to Parliament a year after Mr. MUNRO, remembered him as a hard-working minister.
"We were very good Friends, and I'm terribly sorry that he passed away, and I would like to offer my condolences to his family," Mr. CHRÉTIEN told reporters. "He was a very good member of Parliament, and he was a very good minister and a guy who worked very, very hard in all the files that was given to him."
Heritage Minister Sheila COPPS, the minister from Hamilton and daughter of the city's former mayor, said Mr. MUNRO gave her some political lessons when she served as a poll captain for his election in 1968.
"He was a great Canadian; he was a great parliamentarian, and also someone who will be sorely missed in Hamilton. He was well loved, and had politics in his blood."
Tom AXWORTHY, who was prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU's principal secretary, said Mr. MUNRO was a key figure in Mr. TRUDEAU's cabinet.
"He was a man who always had a great heart. He had tremendous empathy for the disadvantaged," he said.
Mr. TRUDEAU looked to Mr. MUNRO to fight for his social liberal positions at cabinet meetings, his former aide said. "When we had those kind of debates, he would kind of look over to MUNRO when he wanted to hear the liberal perspective on the issue."
The complex political scandal left Mr. MUNRO fighting for his reputation, instead of Liberal policies.
"That was a sad and distracting end to what had been a pretty good career," Tom AXWORTHY said.
"He'd spent his whole life fighting battles for the little guy, and then he ended fighting all kinds of battles against allegations and so on."
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police filed more 37 charges against Mr. MUNRO -- corruption, breach of trust, fraud, conspiracy and theft -- going back to his time as minister of Indian affairs. At the centre of the case was the allegation that part of a $1.5-million grant to the National Indian Brotherhood (now the Assembly of First Nations) actually went toward Mr. MUNRO's usuccessful 1984 Liberal leadership bid.
The 1991 trial lasted several months, but the judge tossed out the charges before even hearing evidence from the defence.
Things did start to turn around. In mid-1998, Hamilton's airport, which he fought hard to expand, was named after him.
"In a time when Canada, I think, needs liberal voices, we've lost a great one," Tom AXWORTHY said.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-30 published
A man of uncommon passion and drive
Despite hints of scandal, the scrappy former Liberal member of parliament, who spent a lifetime fighting for social safety nets, earned a reputation as a tireless crusader for the working people
By Ron CSILLAG Special to the Globe and Mail; With a report from staff Saturday, August 30, 2003 - Page F8
He died with his boots on.
John MUNRO, a Trudeau era Liberal warhorse once described as a rumpled fighter who had gone too many rounds, had just put the finishing touches to a barn-burning speech, to be delivered to a Rotary Club, on the evils of concentration of media ownership when he suffered at heart attack at his desk in his Hamilton home on August 19. He was 72.
It was almost just as well that he went suddenly, his daughter, Anne, said in a eulogy, for her father could not stand suffering. Rather, he would not abide it. Suffering had no place in Canada, he reasoned, which is why his name is so closely associated with such social safety nets as medicare, the Canada Pension Plan and improvements to Old Age Security.
More than 500 well-wishers, including old political pals, steel-workers, artists, business people and labourers, packed the James Street Baptist Church last Saturday to laud Hamilton's favourite son, a scrappy lawyer who earned a reputation as a tireless crusader for working people, despite the recurring taint of scandal.
As the Member of Parliament for Hamilton East from 1962 to 1984 and through five cabinet posts, he was proudly on the left of the Liberal Party, alongside people such as Allan MacEACHEN, Judy LAMARSH, Lloyd AXWORTHY, Eugene WHELAN -- and probably Pierre TRUDEAU himself -- fighting for medicare, against capital punishment and in favour of a guaranteed annual income. As minister of national health and welfare, he didn't win the battle for a guaranteed annual income, but he did get the Guaranteed Income Supplement that has made life easier for many seniors. He was also known and often ridiculed -- for being a chain-smoking health minister.
Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN, who entered Parliament a year after Mr. MUNRO, mourned the death of his former cabinet colleague. "We were very good Friends, and I'm terribly sorry that he passed away. He was a very good member of Parliament, and he was a very good minister and a guy who worked very, very hard in all the files that were given to him."
The political bug bit early. At 18, Mr. MUNRO ran for president of the Tribune Society at Westdale Secondary School in Hamilton. Mark NEMIGAN, a lifelong friend, remembers his resourcefulness: "He went to a local bus stop and festooned all the park benches with banners reading, 'Vote for John.' It worked too. He had uncommon drive and passion, even then."
Born in Hamilton on March 26, 1931, to lawyer John Anderson MUNRO and Katherine CARR, a housewife, John Carr MUNRO became a municipal alderman at the age of 23 while attending law school at Osgoode Hall in Toronto.
"I have no idea how he did that," Mr. NEMIGAN says. "The guy didn't sleep."
Mr. MUNRO took his first run at federal politics in the seat of Hamilton West in 1957, but was beaten by Ellen FAIRCLOUGH, who went on to become Canada's first female cabinet minister. In 1962, he switched ridings, and won the seat he would hold for the next 22 years.
With the election of Mr. TRUDEAU in 1968, a string of cabinet positions followed for Mr. MUNRO: minister without portfolio, amateur sport, health and welfare, labour and Indian affairs and northern development, the last earning him the hard-won respect of aboriginal groups.
In the 1968 general election, an aggressive young poll captain named Sheila COPPS worked on Mr. MUNRO's re-election bid. She would go on to replace him in the seat in 1984.
Tom AXWORTHY, who was Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary, recalled that the prime minister often turned to Mr. MUNRO for support on progressive positions at the cabinet table: "When we had those kind of debates, he would kind of look over to MUNRO when he wanted to hear the liberal perspective on the issue."
Mr. MUNRO's support for the decriminalization of marijuana led to a perk in December, 1969: A 90-minute chat about drugs with John LENNON and Yoko ONO, fresh from the duo's "bed-in" at Montreal's Queen Elizabeth Hotel. Documents unearthed this spring by a researcher for an Ottawa Beatles Web site revealed that Mr. LENNON joked that while Mr. TRUDEAU and Mr. MUNRO, then health minister, were members of the "establishment," they were both "hip."
"Mr. MUNRO's speech [on the decriminalization of marijuana] was the only political speech I ever heard about that had anything to do with reality that came through to me," Mr. LENNON is quoted as saying in the 12,000-word document.
Contacted by a reporter in May, Mr. MUNRO recalled that the incident, and his stand on cannabis, didn't go over well. "Yeah, I was in a little hot water at the time," he laughed. "Everybody thought I wanted to give the country to the junkies."
Mr. LENNON and Ms. ONO made a distinct impression, he said. "The more I think about it, the more I remember he and his wife were very polite and committed people."
In 1974, the water became considerably hotter when the Royal Canadian Mounted Police raided Mr. MUNRO's campaign headquarters during a probe into kickbacks and bid rigging on Hamilton Harbour dredging contracts.
Around the same time, Mr. MUNRO was criticized for accepting a $500 campaign donation from a union whose leaders were under investigation.
In 1978, he was forced to resign from the cabinet when it was revealed that he had talked to a judge by telephone to give a character reference for a constituent on the day of the person's sentencing for assault. But he bounced back with a tenacity that Mr. TRUDEAU was said to have admired and in 1980 won reappointment to the cabinet.
Mr. MUNRO's stamp on Hamilton was legendary, from the reclamation of land that gave the city Confederation Park, to the Canada Centre for Inland Waters, to the fundraising of more than $50-million for the local airport, renamed in his honour in 1998. "Without a doubt, he was the feistiest, most stubborn person I knew in public life," former mayor Bob MORROW remarked. "I don't think we will ever meet his equal of scaring up funds for Hamilton."
When Mr. TRUDEAU retired in 1984, Mr. MUNRO ran for the Liberal leadership and prime minister. He finished a poor fifth in a field of six. There began what his daughter called the "decade from hell," starting with a four-year Royal Canadian Mounted Police investigation so vigorous, the Mounties even considered using a helicopter to track Mr. MUNRO because the officers assigned to tail him couldn't keep up with his car.
That investigation killed a re-election bid in 1988 and scuttled his marriage to Lilly Oddie MUNRO, a minister in the former Ontario Liberal government. It eventually produced 37 flimsy charges of breach of trust, conspiracy, corruption, fraud and theft stemming from his years as Indian affairs minister. After a trial that dragged on for most of 1991, the judge threw out nearly all the charges without even calling for defence evidence. The Crown later withdrew the rest.
Mr. MUNRO welcomed the verdict as "complete exoneration" but was left with legal bills estimated at nearly $1-million and a reputation in ruins. Swimming in debt (he had to rely on Ontario Legal Aid), he filed a civil suit in 1992, claiming malicious prosecution and maintaining he had been targeted by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to embarrass him. He attempted a political comeback in 1993, only to have Mr. CHRÉTIEN refuse to sign his nomination papers. Mr. MUNRO responded by filing an unsuccessful court challenge seeking to strip Mr. CHRÉTIEN of his power to appoint candidates.
Mr. MUNRO, who had returned to an immigration law practice in Hamilton, felt betrayed by the government's refusal to pay his legal bills, and it took an emotional toll.
"I'm not mad at the world," he said in 1996. "I realized this could totally destroy me if I didn't live a day at a time. You have to impose discipline, or you're finished. The motivation to carry on is voided. There's nothing to look forward to except endless grief."
He finally won nearly $1.4-million in compensation from Ottawa in 1999, but most of the money went to pay taxes, legal bills and other expenses. He could have avoided problems by declaring bankruptcy, but insisted on clearing his debts.
"He was no saint, but he was dedicated and hardworking," said his daughter Susan. "He was deeply hurt."
Mr. MUNRO had no interest in the personal trappings of wealth, she said, adding that he had a weakness only for Chevy Chevettes and homemade muffins. Good thing too, for a proposal for bankruptcy he filed in 1995 showed a monthly living balance of $476.
His last political gasp came in 2000 when he ran unsuccessfully for mayor of Hamilton. Asked in 1996 about writing his memoirs, he said: "I'm not ready. There's no last chapter yet."
Mr. MUNRO leaves his third wife, Barbara, and four children.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
Died This Day -- Paul Joseph James MARTIN, 1992
Saturday, September 13, 2003 - Page F11
Politician and statesman born on June 23, 1903, at Ottawa; 1935, first elected to House of Commons; 1943 appointed parliamentary assistant to minister of labour; 1945, entered cabinet as secretary of state; 1946, became minister of national health and welfare forced prime minister SSAINTURENT to accept national health insurance 1963, appointed secretary of state for external affairs; 1968-74, served as government leader in Senate; 1975-79, served as high commissioner to Britain; made three failed attempts at Liberal Party leadership (in 1968, lost to Pierre TRUDEAU;) died at Windsor, Ontario; two-volume memoirs, A Very Public Life, published in 1983 and 1986.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-22 published
Quiet minister a Trudeau stalwart
Former Bay Street whiz kid helped revamp Canada's social safety net and served as both secretary of state and labour minister
By Ron CSILLAG Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, September 22, 2003 - Page R7
His children possess no qualms about pronouncing Martin O'CONNELL as having been a bit of a policy wonk. "Oh, totally," says his son John.
"My dad wasn't interested in money -- odd, given his Bay Street successes. Just policy, and formulating policy."
"He was a classic workaholic," concurs Mr. O'CONNELL's daughter Caryn. "He was just driven by his work. It's one of the things that kept him going."
Rare is the politician remembered for self-effacing skills and effectiveness rather than bombast. Mr. O'CONNELL was indeed serious and conscientious. He worked hard and achieved much. But of all the cabinet ministers from the Pierre TRUDEAU era, his name probably rings the quietist bell for Canadians old enough to recall names like Don Jamieson, Otto Lang and Marc Lalonde.
Mr. O'CONNELL, who died in Toronto on August 11 at 87 of complications from Parkinson's disease, served as Canada's labour minister on two separate occasions, and was Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary for two years when Trudeaumania had been replaced by the infuriation of millions with Canada's philosopher-king.
How does one keep a low profile in federal politics, especially in a contentious cabinet post? Mr. O'CONNELL did it by guiding the country with a steady hand through great labour turbulence in the early 1970s, including convincing his boss to pass emergency legislation that terminated work stoppages at the Vancouver and Montreal dockyards.
"He was an exceptionally low-key guy. He liked it that way," recalls Barney DANSON, who served as Minister of National Defence in the Trudeau cabinet. Doubtless Mr. TRUDEAU saw in Mr. O'CONNELL a kind of kinship. Both men were unflappable philosophers and academics at heart who entered politics relatively late in life, both sacrificing cushier lives to hasten Mr. TRUDEAU's vaunted "just society."
For Mr. O'CONNELL, the bug bit in 1965 when he and two other Bay Street whiz kids were summoned to Ottawa by then finance minister Walter GORDON -- still stinging from a disastrous budget two years earlier -- to help revamp Canada's social safety net. The group ultimately designed policies that led to the Canada Pension Plan, the Municipal Loan Development Fund and medicare.
Martin Patrick O'CONNELL was one of four children born in Victoria to a mother from Ontario and a horticulturist father from County Kerry in Ireland who farmed a few acres and raised livestock. Mr. O'CONNELL taught elementary school for six years and completed a B.A. at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, before beginning a wartime stint in the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps and Infantry Regiment. Haunted perhaps by the death of his brother Johnny, cut down in the battle for Caen, France, in June, 1944, Mr. O'CONNELL volunteered for action in the Pacific just as the fighting ceased.
It was while in uniform that he met his future wife of 58 years, Helen Alice DIONNE. The two met at the Art Gallery of Ontario while Mr. O'CONNELL was on leave from his base, and Ms. DIONNE was volunteering at the museum.
He spent the decade after the war at the University of Toronto, earning graduate degrees in economics and political science and lecturing on Plato, John Stuart Mill and liberal democratic principles. He had learned French for his doctoral thesis on Henri Bourassa, one of the first scholarly studies in English on the fiery Quebec journalist and Canadian nationalist.
Academia gave way to Bay Street, where Mr. O'CONNELL spent 11 years in investing and bond underwriting while heading the volunteer Indian and Eskimo Association of Canada, as it was then called, where he represented aboriginal concerns to governments and encouraged the devolution of federal powers to native groups.
He had run and lost in 1965 in the federal seat of Greenwood in Toronto but was swept up in the 1968 Trudeau whirlwind, winning the seat of Scarborough East. In 1971, he was named Secretary of State, and was appointed Labour Minister the following year, just before Mr. TRUDEAU called an election that ended in a minority Liberal government. Mr. O'CONNELL, like 46 other Grit members of parliament, was defeated.
But he bounced back as Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary for those two lean minority years between 1972 and 1974. Mr. O'CONNELL laid the groundwork for Mr. TRUDEAU's first official visit to the People's Republic of China in 1973 and was instrumental in establishing diplomatic relations with Beijing. (His interest in China would later find expression in his role as co-chair of the Canadian Foundation for the Preservation of Chinese Cultural and Historical Treasures.)
Mr. O'CONNELL also reshaped the Prime Minister's Office in an effort to bring the party closer to the grassroots of Canadian society.
The 1974 general election returned a majority Liberal government and Mr. O'CONNELL as the Member of Parliament for Scarborough East. In 1978, he was back as Labour Minister.
Around the cabinet table, "he wasn't terribly assertive," recalls Mr. DANSON. "He only spoke when he knew what he was talking about." During question period, "he was logical and solid. He was never asked the same question twice. He exuded integrity."
Mr. O'CONNELL lost to Tory Gordon GILCHRIST in the 1979 and 1980 elections (the latter by 511 votes) and he took no pleasure in Mr. GILCHRIST's resignation of the seat in 1984 after a tax-evasion conviction.
Mr. O'CONNELL took a stab at the presidency of the Liberal Party, losing by two just votes. Despite the lack of backing by old Friends, he took the losses gracefully, saying they were part of politics. "They all say that," remarked Mr. O'CONNELL's long-time friend David GOLDBERG. "He took it stoically, but hard."
He bid politics farewell and returned to the private sector as a consultant to government agencies and corporations. The only time his name was ever remotely linked to controversy was in 1983. He was acting as a consultant to multinational drug companies when he was hired by the government to consult on legislation the companies wanted repealed. Mr. O'CONNELL disclosed his role with the drug companies immediately, and Ottawa explained he was tapped precisely because he knew his way around the industry.
He was a taciturn man but prescient when he pronounced, in 1984, that tobacco smoke was a legitimate health problem in the workplace. As head of the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, Mr. O'CONNELL commented on the recently changed Canada Labour Code: "My own feeling is that the right to refuse work is an essential right, ... personally, I wouldn't think it would be an abuse [of the legislation] to refuse work because of tobacco smoke.''
Mr. O'CONNELL's daughter Caryn recalls somewhat ruefully that as a child she would sometimes hesitate to tell her Friends' parents about what her father did for a living, fearing a typical tirade about Mr. TRUDEAU.
"But my Dad really was different," she recalls. "He may not have been as colourful [as other politicians] but he taught us to play fair and to accept defeat. He taught us the values of honesty, tolerance, patience and the concept of justice. But we never felt pressured. He never force-fed us. I think he was the rare person who entered politics to do good."
Mr. O'CONNELL leaves his wife, children, a brother, sister, four grandchildren and something rare indeed: a good name.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-24 published
Norman KNOTT
By Maurice SWITZER Friday, October 24, 2003 - Page A22
Norman KNOTT
Anishinabe artist. Born February 5, 1945, in Toronto. Died July 31, of a heart attack, in Haliburton, Ontario, aged 58.
The day before he died, Norman KNOTT (Waabshki ki Mukwa -- White Bear) called to give me hell, in a good way.
"Hey, chum, you're going to cost me money," the renowned Anishinabe artist joked.
It seems the caption in July's Anishinabek News, under a photo of his large, four-by-four-foot canvas titled Native Heritage, said he was willing to part with it for $4,000. The actual selling price is $15,000. Norman had already received several inquiries at the lower figure.
Collectors from all over the world sought him out to buy his paintings, which were owned by collectors including Johnny Cash, Queen Elizabeth, Lee Trevino, and the late Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU.
"I still get people from France and Italy looking me up," he told me, during a late June visit to the Union of Ontario Indians head office near North Bay. Like many lesser-known Native artisans and crafters, he had just pulled into the parking lot and set up shop in the reception area.
He had no business cards, no website, and he hadn't been selling his art on the pow-wow trail for years. What about people interested in buying his paintings of splashing loons and perching cranes, or intricately carved moose antler combs, or bear-tooth pendants with jade inlay?
"They'll find me," he shrugged. "I go out when I want. I could have shows but as long as I can pay my bills..." his voice drifted off. "This not having a hydro bill is something else!"
He was describing a new lifestyle. He and his partner Crystal had recently retreated to a 200-acre hideaway, where they would burn wood for heat and grow their own vegetables. It wasn't too far from his Curve Lake First Nation roots, Norman said, although he was careful not to be too specific.
The retreat was a long way from what he called "the world of champagne and caviar" that he enjoyed when his 16-by-20-inch paintings sold for $9,000. Those were heady times, when he and other Native Woodlands artists like Norval MORISSEAU were the darlings of the North American art scene. The times had taken their toll, leaving Norman with a heart condition and a face that looked like it had weathered more than 58 years. He said he hadn't had a drink for the last 16 or 17 years, after a car accident.
These days he was trying to get his paintings, carvings, and jewelry into the hands of as many people as he could, hawking it like a door-to-door salesman and giving it away to those who couldn't afford it. He said true happiness was making his art affordable to everyone who liked it. Minutes after he and Crystal had packed up the mobile Norman KNOTT art gallery outside our office, he returned, handing out Norman KNOTT originals as giveaways for those who didn't (or couldn't afford to) buy them earlier.
Then, several weeks later, two telephone calls. The first, from Norman, joking about me understating his prices. The next day, word about his heart attack and death. He is survived by Crystal, former wife Barb, sons Tony and Norman, and daughters Jessica and Naomi.
I hadn't heard a loon's call all summer until one day on a high place overlooking Lake Laurentian near Sudbury. It reminded me of the little painted paddle -- a Norman KNOTT original -- I had purchased from him for a mere $60.
May his spirit be in a better place and shine in the night sky with all the other stars.
Maurice SWITZER is director of communications for the Union of Ontario Indians in North Bay.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-10 published
FULTON quietly kept the Canadian Football League in running order
By Stephen BRUNT, Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - Page S8
Less than a month back, during Grey Cup week, Greg FULTON picked up his phone to answer a few questions from a reporter.
Frail health had kept him from making the trip to Regina, but in conversation he was sharp as a tack and again proved himself to be a one-man encyclopedia of Canadian football history.
Paul MARTIN, the prime minister to be, was going to make a much publicized pregame appearance at Taylor Field, fresh from the Liberal leadership convention.
Aside from Pierre TRUDEAU, FULTON was asked, did he remember any other prime minister taking the time to attend the Grey Cup? "Well," he said, "I don't remember Mackenzie KING being there. Or Louis SSAINTURENT."
Of course, he knew because he was there. It seemed he was always there -- a player beginning in Winnipeg in 1939, a statistician and treasurer for the Calgary Stampeders from 1950 to 1966, a fixture in the Canadian Football League office from 1967 on, and, finally in his last job, the Canadian Football League's honorary secretary and official historian, a title surely unique in all of pro sports.
The National Football League still has a few owners with connections to the game's early days, and in hockey and baseball there are at least a handful of sportswriting elders who still remember when. But only the Canadian Football League actually employed someone who had an inside view extending back more than 60 years.
Considering how tumultuous some of those seasons have been and considering the game's highs and lows and the cast of strange and wonderful characters who came and went, what a tale FULTON could tell.
He was 84 when he died on Monday, and with him, sadly, is lost much of the anecdotal story of the league. (Commissioner Tom WRIGHT, who during his relatively short term on the job had come to appreciate FULTON's special role, planned to have FULTON's memories committed to tape and transcribed. Sadly, that didn't happen before FULTON fell ill.)
FULTON's tenure with the league office was perhaps the only significant legacy of Keith DAVEY's 54-day reign as commissioner in 1967. Davey lured FULTON to Toronto from Calgary to act as the league's treasurer. When Jake GAUDAUR took over from DAVEY, he decided to keep FULTON on.
"It would be the most important decision I would make," GAUDAUR says now, which, given the events of his 16 years in office, is quite a statement. Every subsequent commissioner -- and there have been a bunch -- endorsed and echoed that original decision.
Not that anyone on the outside would really understand. "All of those beneficial things he did for the league were all out of public view," GAUDAUR said. "He never received any sort of media credit, nor did he want any. Clearly, it was a labour of love for him. That's kind of corny to say that, but I really believe it was."
In those early days, the league was a two-man, two-secretary operation. FULTON, an accountant by profession, kept the books, kept an eye on club finances and kept the minutes during league meetings -- all during a period when the game grew into a multimillion-dollar sports business. He was also charged with producing the schedule every year, a trickier proposition than it might seem, given the uneven number of teams, the east-west split and the importance of certain dates in certain places.
At one point, GAUDAUR remembers, they turned the task over to a computer. And then, after the computer coughed out its work, they handed it to FULTON, who fixed it. "He had what I consider to be a computer mind," GAUDAUR said. "It was an incredible mind."
The Canadian Football League took a turn for the worse after GAUDAUR left the post. Commissioners came and went, the league at times teetered on the brink of insolvency, the disastrous U.S. expansion played itself out and the owners at times resembled a bag of mixed nuts.
But there was always FULTON, quietly keeping things in running order, breaking the tension with his wry, quiet sense of humour, loyal first and foremost to the game he loved.
"He was a remarkable person," GAUDAUR said. "It really was a pleasure to be around the guy."
Several generations of those who spent time in the Canadian Football League orbit share those sentiments and mourn the loss.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
Party leaders pay tribute
Tories fondly remember Stanfield as best prime minister Canada never had
By Kim LUNMAN and Drew FAGAN, Thursday, December 18, 2003 - Page A10
Ottawa -- Robert Lorne STANFIELD, the former leader of the federal Progressive Conservatives, was remembered yesterday as a Canadian icon.
Political tributes were made across the country for Mr. STANFIELD, who died Tuesday at the Montfort Hospital in Ottawa. He was 89.
He had been in poor health for several years after a stroke. A private funeral will be held in Ottawa tomorrow and a family burial in Halifax.
Mr. STANFIELD led the federal Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 against Pierre TRUDEAU and was known within the party as the greatest prime minister Canada never had. In later years, he was regarded as the conscience of the Conservatives, representing their progressive side on social issues.
"Today we mourn the passing of one of the most distinguished and committed Canadians of the past half-century," said Prime Minister Paul MARTIN. "I, like other Canadians, fondly remember Mr. STANFIELD's great warmth, humility and compassionate nature, but also his intellect and humour."
Progressive Conservative Leader Peter MacKAY said Mr. STANFIELD will be remembered as an icon.
"It's a very sad and poignant day. He had a larger-than-life persona and I think he can be accurately described as an icon in Conservative politics and Canadian politics," Mr. MacKAY said.
"Conservatives across the country, and indeed all Canadians, have lost a great leader and a great Canadian," Canadian Alliance Leader Stephen HARPER said.
In an interview yesterday, former prime minister Brian MULRONEY described Mr. STANFIELD as having brought the Progressive Conservative Party into the mainstream of modern Canadian life through his support for the Official Languages Act and his openness to ethnic minorities and diversity. Mr. MULRONEY said it was appropriate that Mr. STANFIELD had been receiving treatment at Montfort Hospital, the French-language facility in Ottawa, considering how hard he had worked as leader to make the Tories comfortable with bilingualism and how much effort he himself had made to learn French. "He was a strikingly impressive, quiet, thoughtful man, but who was very resolved and determined -- and with a generous view of Canada," Mr. MULRONEY said.
When Mr. MULRONEY was prime minister from 1984 to 1993, he would occasionally invite Mr. STANFIELD to 24 Sussex Dr. for lunch. Mr. MULRONEY revealed yesterday that, in the late 1980s, when Mr. STANFIELD was almost 75, he offered him the post of Canadian ambassador to the United Nations.
"He thought it was a great honour. He wrestled with it for a little while, but decided that, though he would love to do it, he thought it would be a bit much at that stage of his life," Mr. MULRONEY said.
"He brought compassion to politics," Nova Scotia's Premier John HAMM said yesterday.
"He brought a love of his country to his politics."
Flora MacDONALD, a former federal Tory cabinet minister, first worked with Mr. STANFIELD during the 1956 provincial campaign that made him Nova Scotia premier. "He set a very high standard for himself as a politician and expected others to do the same," she said yesterday. Mr. STANFIELD supported official bilingualism and abolition of the death penalty when his other caucus colleagues were strongly opposed, she said. "He didn't do things just because they were popular. He did things because he thought they were intrinsically right."
Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON said Mr. STANFIELD "will be remembered for his integrity, his devotion to his country, his social conscience and especially for his wit and sense of humour."
Mr. STANFIELD was premier of Nova Scotia from 1956 to 1967. He was born in Truro into a family famous for its underwear business and became a lawyer before turning to politics, first provincially and later on the federal stage. But his awkward image contrasted sharply to that of the hip, telegenic Mr. TRUDEAU, costing the party every election it fought under his leadership. The 1972 election was Mr. STANFIELD's closest brush with federal power, when the Liberals narrowly defeated the Conservatives by 109 to 107 seats. Two years later, the Liberals regained their majority and Mr. STANFIELD announced his decision to step down. He remained as leader until Joe CLARK succeeded him in 1976.
After relinquishing his seat in the Commons in 1979, Mr. STANFIELD became Canada's special envoy to the Middle East and North Africa until 1980, and was chairman of the Commonwealth Foundation from 1987 to 1991.
He married three times. His first wife died in a car crash in 1954 and his second wife died of cancer in 1976. He married his third wife, Anne Henderson AUSTIN, in 1978. He had four children.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
Ottawa bids STANFIELD goodbye
'He was a sage.... He was quite extraordinary,' Charest says at funeral
By Kim LUNMAN, Saturday, December 20, 2003 - Page A9
Ottawa -- Robert STANFIELD was fondly remembered yesterday as a sage statesman.
The former Nova Scotia premier and federal Progressive Conservative leader remained one of the country's most respected politicians even years after leaving the national arena, Tory Senator Lowell MURRAY told more than 100 mourners yesterday at Mr. STANFIELD's funeral in Ottawa.
"There has survived perhaps only the kernel of something, but its essence in the Canadian consciousness -- that once, uniquely, there was STANFIELD, leader of a major party, a man of such civility, such humanity, such integrity, who adorned our national life," Mr. MURRAY said
Mr. STANFIELD, who suffered a stroke several years ago, died Tuesday in Ottawa. He was 89.
At the private ceremony at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, he was remembered as a respected politician with a dry wit. He will be buried today in Halifax's Camp Hill cemetery.
Politicians of all stripes attended the service to pay tribute. Outside the church, Prime Minister Paul MARTIN told reporters his father and Mr. STANFIELD were "great Friends. My father had huge admiration for Mr. STANFIELD. And I actually shudder to think what the two of them are doing up there right now, the amount of discussions that are going on."
Mr. MARTIN said he remembered Mr. STANFIELD for his "great sense of decency, integrity, and his deep, deep love of country." Progressive Conservative Leader Peter MacKAY said Canada has lost "one of its greatest statesmen, a person who raised the standard of politics and public service.... He was very much substance over style."
"He was a sage," Quebec Liberal Premier Jean Charest, the former federal Tory leader, said. Mr. STANFIELD "looked at life with a bit of a smile, I think. He was quite extraordinary."
Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON called Mr. STANFIELD remarkable, "a man of deep conviction, a man who was decent and fair and honest and very funny." Other political colleagues at the funeral included former Tory prime ministers Kim CAMPBELL and Joe CLARK and former Tory cabinet minister Flora MacDONALD.
Mr. STANFIELD married three times. His first wife died in a crash in 1954 and his second wife died of cancer in 1976. He married his third wife, Anne Henderson AUSTIN, in 1978. He had four children.
Even as the service was going on in Ottawa, hundreds of people filed into the Nova Scotia legislature in Halifax to sign a book of condolence next to a portrait of the former premier, who led the province for 11 years, from 1956 to 1967.
Mr. STANFIELD led the federal Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 against Pierre TRUDEAU and was known within the party as the greatest prime minister Canada never had.
In his later years, he was regarded as the Conservatives' conscience, representing the party's progressive side on social issues. He supported Mr. TRUDEAU's Official Languages Act despite a revolt by his fellow Tory members of parliament and also backed abolishing the death penalty.
He was born in Truro into a family famous for its underwear business and became a lawyer before turning to politics.
Bespectacled and known for his slow-speaking style, Mr. STANFIELD conveyed an awkward image that contrasted sharply with the youthful, charismatic Mr. Trudeau, costing the party every election it fought under his leadership.
But he came within two seats of office in the 1972 election when the Liberals defeated the Conservatives by 109 to 107 seats.
Two years later, the Liberals regained their majority and Mr. STANFIELD announced his decision to step down. He was succeeded by Mr. CLARK in 1976.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
Diplomat shaped cultural policy
Art-loving ambassador to Moscow and Bucharest also served as Trudeau's press secretary and as a director of the Canada Council
By Bill GLADSTONE, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - Page R7
Peter ROBERTS, a former press secretary to Pierre Trudeau who served as Canada's ambassador to Moscow and Bucharest and as director of the Canada Council, is being remembered as a major shaper of Canadian cultural policy and a late representative of an older generation of broadly based, multitalented diplomats that has all but vanished from the scene.
A native Albertan, Mr. ROBERTS died in Ottawa on November 21 after a varied career that stretched over four decades and included stints in Washington, Hong Kong, Saigon and Brussels. He was 76.
As assistant undersecretary of state responsible for cultural affairs from 1973 to 1979, he helped Ottawa develop protective policies toward the domestic film and book-publishing industries, and was instrumental in drafting the government's nationalistic Bill C-58, which applied tariffs to American magazines sold on Canadian newsstands. He also helped to establish the National Arts Centre.
"He was a superb civil servant because he had a capacity to listen to ministers, understand their viewpoints and help them achieve what they wanted to achieve," said John ROBERTS (no relation,) who was Secretary of State when Peter ROBERTS was undersecretary. "But at the same time, he had an extraordinary passion for the arts and for culture. So he did have his own ideas about things that should be done. He stimulated you to think and to adapt your thinking."
As ambassador to the Soviet Union, Mr. ROBERTS took a keen interest in George COSTAKIS, a former junior employee of the Canadian embassy who had spent a lifetime amassing an outstanding but illegal collection of modern art, both Russian and international. Mr. ROBERTS helped arrange a major exhibition of the collection at the Musée des beaux-arts in Montreal and later wrote a full-length biography, George Costakis: A Russian Life in Art, published by Carleton University Press in 1994.
Raising Eyebrows, a book of memoirs and character sketches, was published in 2000. He also wrote a book-length profile of former Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, whom he met often during his posting in Bucharest from 1979 to 1983, and who was executed in 1989. The book, Revenge on Christmas Day: Fact and Fiction in Bucharest, is slated for publication in 2004.
"Peter was a multifaceted person who bridged the cultural world, the literary world, the academic world and the world of the foreign service," said Allan GOTLIEB, a former ambassador to Washington. "If you go back to the golden age of Canadian diplomacy, you find examples of these very broadly engaged minds. Peter joined a little later, in the 1950s, but he still seemed a part of that era."
Peter McLaren ROBERTS was born in Calgary on July 5, 1927, and grew up in Lethbridge, Alberta. His father was a locally stationed federal tax official, his mother a schoolteacher. A brilliant student, he earned an M.A. in English literature from the University of Alberta in 1951, as well as a Rhodes scholarship that enabled him to study for three years at Oxford.
Afterward, he went down to London with a group of Friends, including Mr. GOTLIEB, who convinced him to write the Canadian foreign-service exam. He did so on a whim -- and passed. He taught English literature for a year at Bishop's University in Lennoxville, Quebec, and joined the foreign service in 1955.
Initially stationed in Ottawa, Mr. ROBERTS began studying German in anticipation of a posting in Bonn or Vienna. "The department had just then begun to realize that it was an advantage for a foreign-service officer, and for Canada, if the officer knew the language of the country where he or she was working," he noted in Raising Eyebrows.
"I hear you're learning German," the personnel manager remarked to him one day.
"Yes."
"You must be interested in languages."
"Yes."
"How'd you like to learn Russian?"
Several months later he travelled by ship and train to Moscow, where he served as third-in-command of the Canadian embassy from 1955 to 1958. He was posted to Hong Kong and Vietnam in the early 1960s and to Washington for the rest of that tumultuous decade.
In 1970, the Prime Minister's Office essentially borrowed him from the Department of External Affairs, as it was then known, so he could serve as assistant press secretary to Prime Minister Pierre TRUDEAU. Returning to Canada after a nine-year absence that had included a dreary stint working for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Brussels, Mr. ROBERTS showed up for his first day of work -- just as the Front de libération du Québec hostage crisis was erupting. Marc LALONDE, Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary, asked him to represent him at a strategy-planning meeting with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
"I had been long enough in diplomacy to know that this was a situation in which one did not speak without instructions," Mr. ROBERTS would recall. "I had no instructions, and I hadn't the faintest idea what the prime minister's views were on this abrupt development. I promised I would listen, make notes, report, and phone everyone. That I did, but I was glad that I had not ventured to predict which way TRUDEAU would jump. It was only a few days later that the troops were in Montreal, suspects rounded up and in jail, the War Measures Act proclaimed, and the prime minister saying to the press, 'Just watch me.' By that time I was veteran and expert."
After that baptism by fire, Mr. ROBERTS became full press secretary and met daily with Mr. TRUDEAU, often advising him on issues that the Prime Minister may have considered unimportant, and sometimes having the sobering thrill of hearing his words repeated verbatim to reporters later in the day. It was Mr. ROBERTS himself who announced the Prime Minister's marriage to an "incredulous" press gallery on March 4, 1971, and the birth of a son on Christmas Day.
External Affairs reclaimed Mr. ROBERTS in 1972 and parachuted him into the cultural division of the Department of the Secretary of State. The new assistant undersecretary awoke at 4 every morning and studied for three hours before going to work, but even with a "marvellous staff" who "filled in for me when I was stupid or ignorant," he sometimes found the learning curve excessively steep.
"Gradually my diplomatic experience came into play," he would write. "Diplomacy is partly a matter of faking. If you don't know the answer, if you don't know who someone is, don't let on. Smile enigmatically, and change the subject to the situation in Peru. I did a lot of that at the Secretary of State."
Mr. ROBERTS learned Romanian before becoming that country's ambassador in 1979, and found that the effort had been worthwhile because it gave him exceptionally good access to Mr. Ceausescu, who seemed flattered that a Canadian could speak his language; the leader would dismiss his retinue of advisers and translators and meet with Mr. ROBERTS alone to discuss a variety of political issues ranging from the situation in Poland to the situation in Quebec. Mr. ROBERTS enjoyed the meetings but understood that he was dealing with "the most desperate dictator and tyrant in Europe" and one who was becoming increasingly unhinged.
Among the visitors to Bucharest during that time was Allan GOTLIEB, by then undersecretary of state for External Affairs, who recalled being feted with Mr. ROBERTS by their Romanian hosts at a deluxe and crowded restaurant, where they washed down wonderful steaks with equally wonderful wines. The next evening, seeking a place for dinner, he suggested they return to the same establishment. "He told me, 'It's not there any more -- it's not real,' " Mr. GOTLIEB recalled. "He said, 'They opened it just for you.' He took me back there and it was all boarded up. There wasn't a soul there. It was like one of those Russian Potemkin villages you hear about."
As Soviet ambassador, Mr. ROBERTS joined Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY's entourage for the funeral of general secretary Konstantin Chernenko in Moscow in 1985. Like most other world leaders present, Mr. MULRONEY was keenly interested in meeting the incoming general secretary, Mikhail Gorbachev, and so was "predictably enraged" when the appointment was abruptly cancelled because an inept bureaucrat had overfilled Mr. Gorbachev's daybook with appointments. Persuading Mr. MULRONEY to be patient, Mr. ROBERTS quickly convinced the Soviets to rectify the error, and the meeting occurred in the Kremlin as originally planned.
Six months later, Mr. MULRONEY expressed his gratitude to Mr. ROBERTS by summoning him back to Ottawa to head the Canada Council. Fascinated as always by the Soviets, Mr. ROBERTS was reluctant to go, but realized he could not refuse.
"He was sad because Gorbachev had just come to power, and things were just beginning to show signs of change," recalls his wife, Glenna ROBERTS.
"He left with a great deal of regret, because he was really interested in seeing those changes."
Mr. ROBERTS retired from the Canada Council in 1989 and was an adjunct research professor of political science at Ottawa's Carleton University from 1990. He was diagnosed about 10 years ago with the cancer that increasingly incapacitated him over the past year.
He leaves his second wife Glenna, children Frances and Jeremy and their families, sister Mary, stepchildren Graham, Brendan and Hannah REID.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
Elizabeth Miriam Rose DASHWOOD
The DASHWOOD and SOUTHGATE families. Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - Page A20
Wife, mother, returning officer, organizer. Born January 12, 1929, in Toronto. Died April 6 in Toronto, of heart failure, aged 74.
Betty was a conservative person. Except about the date of her birth -- about that she was progressive, insisting it was 1930, when it was really 1929. There it conservatively remained; no one argued with Betty.
Betty SOUTHGATE spent her early years on Edgewood Crescent in Rosedale, but left Canada when her stockbroker father decided to return to England to try his fortune. Her finest times were spent at her mother's family farm, a place that, 60 years later, still seemed idyllic to her.
The war brought the SOUTHGATEs back to Canada on one of the last passenger ships to cross the Atlantic. Betty survived burning factories, bombers and submarines and shared sandwiches with bloodied soldiers rescued from Dunkirk to return to Rosedale. She was schooled at Branksome Hall and Trinity College, University of Toronto. She left Trinity with an honours B.A. and an engagement to John DASHWOOD. After Trinity came a job at the Canadian Cancer Society, a wedding in 1957 and then children, Geoffrey and Monica.
The swinging sixties came. Betty did not notice the changing times. But not to worry: church and schools still stood. Betty intended to make sure they continued.
After a brief sojourn in Scarborough, Ontario, Betty returned to Edgewood Crescent. There she remained the rest of her life. The house became an epicentre for a broad range of people and organizations. Edgewood housed potential immigrants, relatives and Friends, refugees from house fires and renovations, cats, dogs, and canoes. Betty put up with model-soldier exhibitions, a boa constrictor, drunken teenage parties, punk-rock bands, and, ultimately, rambunctious grandchildren.
The life of the house was often hectic, particularly politically. The DASHWOODs were divided: John was New Democratic Party; Betty worked tirelessly for the Tories. Every election, opposing campaign signs went up. The one thing on which they agreed was their strong dislike of Pierre TRUDEAU. Her staunch support paid off when David CROMBIE became a member of parliament and then a cabinet minister. Her political work led to her becoming returning officer for the diverse Rosedale riding. Betty relished, and excelled at, running an effective election. Several of her elections were hotly contested, but Betty survived with her dignity and integrity intact.
Compassion went with Betty's conservatism. She was involved with (to name several) St. Simon's Church, the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario and St. Peter's food bank. For her beloved Trinity, she was a major organizer of the annual book sale, which has raised millions of dollars for the library. Trinity was so important to her that Betty put off medical treatment in her last year to organize the 50th reunion of her class.
Betty had a gift for Friendship. Twenty summers in Port Hope extended her already-broad circle. She had Branksome Friends, Trinity Friends, church Friends, tennis Friends, English Friends and Edgewood Friends. Her correspondence was huge. She sent and received a massive number of Christmas cards.
Her heart was large. Our own hearts ache when we consider her stoic insistence on her way of doing things. Betty drank, refused to stop smoking when she should have, and drove badly: That should be said, too. She held us all together, until she no longer could. She died in her sleep, her heart failed, her body beset by a cancer she defied until the end. She took food to a sick friend, in a snow storm, the day before she died.
Her church was full for her funeral. The church bell tolled her knell. Traditional. Just like Betty.

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