STEVENSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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STEVENSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-02 published
CHARTERIS, Richard
A family interment service was held at Old Maple Leaf Cemetery, Chatham, on Friday morning May 30th for Richard Walter CHARTERIS of Toronto who died on Saturday, February 22 last. Officiating were the Reverend Canon James STEVENSON of St. George's Anglican Church, Goderich and Reverend John HODGINS of Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Chatham.

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STEVENSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-16 published
Dorothy Mae SEALE
By Grace STEVENSON Monday, June 16, 2003 - Page A18
Teacher, student, writer, wife and mother. Born December 7, 1907, in Chisholm Township, Ontario Died April 6, 2003, in Oshawa, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 95.
'Fifty years ago, a neighbour seeing my three small children said, 'Dorothy, this is the best part of your life.' She was wrong. Being alive right now is the best part of my life."
Dorothy SEALE wrote this two years ago in an assignment for the Creative Writing class she was enrolled in at the Oshawa Senior Citizens Centres. At the time, she was 93.
Confined to a wheelchair a great part of the day because of the ravages of peripheral neuropathy, Dorothy never lost her interest in life. Another of her articles focused on the many disturbing happenings in the world and complained that she was suffering from "a malady with no cure in sight called Too Much Information." But, much as it worried her, she made no effort to escape the information overload. She watched television, listened to radio broadcasts and ingested news reports daily. She also read and discussed with her many visitors the latest books. The day she went to the hospital and, with little warning, died, she left an atlas opened to a map of Iraq propped on a stand near her chair in her apartment.
Born to Tom and Annie ANDERSON, Dorothy grew up on a farm in Chisholm Township in Ontario. She took her nursing training at Riverdale Hospital, attended the University of Toronto, and then taught anatomy at a hospital in Quebec City. When she married Lewis SEALE, they bought a house in Sillery, a suburb of Quebec. Lewis worked in his father's lumber mill during the years their two sons and one daughter grew up. Later, he did auditing for the provincial government. Dorothy often went with him on these jobs and, while she waited in the car, made beautiful sketches of anything that caught her fancy. In 1983, they moved to Oshawa, Ontario, to be near their children, but Dorothy always retained a deep concern for the problems of the province where 53 of her 95 years were spent.
In 1987, when the program director of the Senior Citizens Centre suggested Dorothy join a memoir writing group, she protested, "I can't write; I never could write; and I come from a long line of people who didn't write." But she did join the class and, delving into her past, discovered more than one writer in her family. Her great-great-great grandfather, John THOMAS, head factor at Moosonee, Ontario, for Hudson Bay Co. between 1769 and 1813, wrote copious notes to head office. His extensive reports, now in the Hudson Bay Company archives in Winnipeg, continue to be a valuable source of research information on the era. About him, Dorothy wrote, "At this time, the company did not allow European women at its posts. So John married a native woman, Margaret (whose name he anglicized), and had nine children by her." Dorothy was very proud of her native genes.
Charles THOMAS, John's oldest son and Dorothy's great-great grandfather, was sent to England to be educated, but returned to take charge of several trading posts across Canada. He kept detailed diaries, now lost, but his life story, too, is well documented in the Hudson Bay Company archives. In more recent years, Dorothy's cousin, Stanley ANDERSON, received an Ontario Heritage Foundation award for his help in compiling a history of Chisholm Township, and a "first cousin once removed" married writer Carol SHIELDS. Dorothy was certainly wrong when she said there were no writers in her family.
Like other seniors who join writing groups, Dorothy made many new Friends and found an added dimension to her life through her writing. Although unable to attend the classes in person the last months of her life, she continued to enroll, receive the assignments, and send her submissions to the teacher every week.
Grace STEVENSON is a friend of Dorothy's.

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STEVENSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
THOMASSON, Edna (née RUSHTON)
Edna THOMASSON, beloved wife of the late Frank James THOMASSON, died peacefully in her sleep, at home, on November 16, 2003. Edna will be fondly remembered by her children and their spouses: Linda STEVENSON and John STEVENSON, Clive THOMASSON and Deborah ZWICKER, Andrew THOMASSON and Amanda RICKETT; and by her grandchildren Julia, Pippa, Simon, Freya and Sian.
Edna was born in 1928 in Bolton, England, the oldest child of Thomas and Linda RUSHTON and sister of Jim, Leonard, Arnold and Tom. Following an early career in business, she trained as a teacher and continued to further her education, pursuing studies at Wilfred Laurier University while, at the same time, raising her family. In retirement from teaching business studies at Thistletown Collegiate Institute in Toronto, Edna continued to pursue her love of traveling, spending her time between her brothers in England, her grandchildren in Australia and always returning home to her family in Canada.
Edna's family will receive Friends in the Mount Pleasant Cemetery Chapel from 10: 30 to 11:30 a.m. on Friday, November 21, 2003. A short ceremony will be held at 11: 30 at the graveside.

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STEVENSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-20 published
BULL, Stewart Hastings (1916-2003) Teacher, soldier, author, historian, churchman, and loving family man. Born in Windsor, Ontario, died peacefully at home in Toronto on November 17, leaving Doris, his loving wife of 55 years, dear daughters Catherine (Richard GOLD) and Muriel (Kenneth OLSEN) and his adored grandchildren, Laura, Susanna and James. Predeceased by brothers, Henry BULL, Q.C. and the Reverend Edgar BULL, and sister Jane DOBROTA, R.N. A World War 2 veteran who served with the Essex and Kent Scottish Regiment, he was severely wounded in Normandy in 1944. He will be remembered first and foremost as a lively and inspiring teacher of History and English at Walkerville Collegiate, the University of Toronto Schools, and the Faculty of Education, U. of T. He encouraged generations of students, and dedicated boundless energy to school spirit, cadets, debating and dramatics. He was regimental historian, museum curator and Council member with the Queen's York Rangers of Toronto. A committed Anglican, he was active in parish work and community outreach at Saint Thomas's and All Saints' Kingsway Churches. Stewart was a steady leader who shared his love of people, creative spirit, and enthusiasm for life with all he knew. Sincere thanks to Dr. SWARTZ, Dr. PREOBRAZENSKI, Olive, Audrey, Karen, and to Colonel Michael STEVENSON, for their care and support. Visitation at Turner and Porter Funeral Home, Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W. on Friday November 21 from 7 - 9 p.m. Funeral service Saturday November 22 at 1: 30 p.m. All Saints' Kingsway Church, 2850 Bloor St. W. at Prince Edward Rd. Memorial donations to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, Médecins sans Frontières or All Saints' Kingsway Church.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Ruth Lenora BOYD
In loving memory of Ruth Lenora BOYD, a resident of Centennial Manor in Little Current on Saturday December 21, 2002. Predeceased by husband Doran BOYD (Oct. 31, 1987) and former husband Jack STEWARD/STEWART/STUART (Feb. 12, 1981.) Loving mother of Janis and husband Carl ANNETT. Cherished grandmother of Todd and wife Karen GAUTHIER of Pembroke, Chris GAUTHIER of Little Current, Michelle GAUTHIER of Kingston. Special great grandmother of Aiden, Rachel, Brett and Garret. Will be missed by brothers Bill and Wendell BUIE and sister Norma WAYDA. Visitation was held on Sunday, December 22, 2002. Funeral service was held on Monday December 23, 2002 at Island Funeral Home. Burial in Mountainview Cemetery in the spring.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-12 published
Alice Lucy WILLIAMS
Alice Lucy WILLIAMS passed away at the Collingwood Nursing Home, on Friday, February 7, 2003 in her 88th year.
Alice (McGIBBON) beloved wife of the late George WILLIAMS. Dear mother of Wilda and her husband Hazen WHITE/WHYTE of Providence Bay, Manitoulin Island and the late Eileen WILLIAMS and Robert Arthur WILLIAMS. Survived by her daughter-in-law Helen BOUTET. Loving grandmother of Bruce and the late Shirley WHITE/WHYTE, Wilma Eileen WHITE/WHYTE, Linda Darlene and her husband Bradford LEIBEL, Robert Bruce WILLIAMS, Julie Marie and her husband Joe STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and the late Douglas Allan WHITE/WHYTE, nine great grandchildren: Matthew WHITE/WHYTE, Marcus WHITE/WHYTE, Sarah HAMILL, Curtis MERRITT, Liana MERRITT, Joshua COX, Kimberly LEIBEL, Neil LEIBEL, Nicole STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and three great great grandchildren, Dominique, Tristan and Brayden. Funeral service was held at the Chatterson-Long Funeral Home, 404 Hurontario Street, Collingwood, on Tuesday, February 11, 2003. Spring Interment Silver Water Cemetery, Manitoulin Island.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Joan HANER (née BOCK)
After a courageous struggle with cancer on Wednesday, May 28, 2003 at the age of 68.
Beloved wife of Harold for 25 years. Cherished mother of Jim STEWARD/STEWART/STUART (Debbie,) Bud STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Debbie WHALEN (Terry), Lorrie STADNISKY (Steve), Heather BOUCHARD (Eric), Shelley SAGHAFI (Abdi), Kevin STEWARD/STEWART/STUART (Liz) and Pamela BORETZ.
Loving grandmother of 27 and great grandmother of 21. Sister of Ruth STEELE (Jim,) Rosella HARRISON (Orville) and Evelyn TARABAS (Pete.) Daughter of the late Ernest and stepdaughter of Frances BOCK. Aunt to several nieces and nephews. Friends called the Arthur Funeral Home and Cremation Centre on Friday, May 30, 2003. The funeral service was held on Saturday May 31 with Reverend Phil MILLER officiating. Interment Greenwood Cemetery.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-25 published
'Death has never fazed me'
Joyful teenager taught children and parents how to live with cancer
By Michael VALPY Saturday, January 25, 2003, Page F11
Cory MAESTRELLO didn't just have cancer, he was a philosopher of cancer. This week he left life celebrated, something he would have considered appropriate for every young person inflicted with his disease.
He was a month short of his 18th birthday. He believed cancer was a gift that had enriched his life.
He died remembered for his infectious enthusiasm, his joy, his grin, his insights into living with a terminal illness, the love he showed to other sufferers, his toughness and his inclination to do impromptu Riverdance imitations in hospital elevators.
On Tuesday afternoon, lying in a hospital bed in Sudbury, Ontario, with pneumonia, he told his father Art: "I'm going to beat this." He was dead a few hours later.
His Sudbury high school, St. Benedict Catholic Secondary School, cancelled exams, declared a "Cory Day" and allowed its students to go home.
The lead singer of a student band in which he had once played composed a song for him. Students from high schools across the city turned up to sign a Cory poster in St. Benedict's chapel.
CJOH-Television, the Canadian Television Network outlet in Ottawa, broadcast a 3½-minute tribute to him on its 6 o'clock news, part of a documentary-in-the-making of his life that now will never be completed. The station's vice-president of news and public affairs, Max KEEPING, was to attend Cory's funeral mass today.
Many members of the Ottawa Senators hockey team planned to attend a memorial service for him at Ottawa's Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario.
Parents of other children with cancer being treated at the hospital were devastated by the news that he had died, said palliative care nurse Marilyn CASSIDY. " There have been so many families calling."
Cory had befriended and counselled them. He had taught them, parents and children, how to live with cancer and the process of dying.
Interviewed last November for a Globe and Mail Focus article on how to live life at the edge of death, he said: "Death has never fazed me. The only thing that's fazed me is not getting the chance to live this life . . . and I've lived more in two years [with cancer] than most people will live in their entire life, and I appreciate that."
Cory MAESTRELLO, the son of a retired mine worker, revelled in living for his last two years.
"I feel there's a path out there for me," he said. "Be it by God or whatever the higher power is, I always feel there's a path set out for me."
He visited with dying children in the hospital, even after doctors told him that he himself was beyond treatment. He spoke at dead children's memorial services.
He approached Mr. KEEPING last year and asked if he could appear on CJOH's annual fundraising telethon for the hospital. Mr. KEEPING agreed.
Cory was on air for an hour, talking about what it was like to have cancer and showing photographs of Serge, his closest friend at the hospital, who had died. Mr. KEEPING called his presence "compelling."
Cory said excitedly afterward: "Working on the telethon was a blast. The words that I said helped people. It's given me the tools to help people. I don't care if I die tomorrow."
He talked to his Globe and Mail interviewer about the joy he felt with life. "Your very best day is probably my worst day," he said.
He talked about the importance of each day. "I always let everyone know I love them," he said, "just in case I don't get the chance to. I've got to say everything that I need to say today. I may not be here tomorrow to say it."
Said Ms. CASSIDY: " You sometimes found yourself asking if he was too good to be true. He was the real thing, big-time. He was a very special kid" -- a hero to other youngsters with cancer, she said, who faced his own adversity with inner strength and inner ability.
Cory and Max KEEPING became Friends after the CJOH telethon. The station executive took him to Senators' games and introduced him to the players. People introduced to Cory rarely, if ever, forgot him.
He had a delightful, buzzy energy, with an intelligence that measured off the Richter scale, said Nic BATTIGELLI, one of Cory's St. Benedict teachers who gave a eulogy for him at his funeral.
He was charming, and attractive to girls -- frequently girls older than himself. Mr. BATTIGELLI recalled him taking a beautiful Grade 13 student to an event while he was still in Grade 9.
Mr. KEEPING recalled taking Cory to a party for his 30th anniversary as a television broadcaster just before Christmas (Cory was living at the children's hospital's Ronald McDonald House; he went home to Sudbury at Christmas and never returned).
At 2 a.m., Mr. KEEPING suggested to Cory that it was maybe time to to leave. Cory replied that there were still two people at the party, and as long as someone was partying, he wanted to party.
Mr. KEEPING said: "I feel so good that even in six months this kid could teach me how important today is . . . that what's important is what you do with today. He turned on a light and, I know I shouldn't say this, but the light's gone out. It's sad for me. But how enriched I've been -- and I said that on air."
Mr. BATTIGELLI and Cory had developed a bond even before the boy was diagnosed with cancer. Cory wanted to become a teacher, and told Mr. BATTIGELLI shortly after he met him: "You're the teacher I want to be."
Mr. BATTIGELLI said Cory, as a 14-year-old Grade 9 student, asked to join an anti-violence peer-meditation program the teacher ran at the school, and later asked to accompany Mr. BATTIGELLI on a similar conflict resolution project he had started in a nearby first nations community. He said Cory was superb at it.
"He just was a kid who was not a kid," Mr. BATTIGELLI said. "I think God has truly picked up an angel. God sends us signposts. I think he will be my guardian angel for the rest of my teaching career."
St. Benedict principal Teresa STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, when she cancelled exams this week, said: "This is a time for Cory."

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-27 published
Jet pilot helped hold North American Air Defence Command fort
Career military man proud how command handled Russian false alarm
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, January 27, 2003, Page R7
Lieutenant-General Robert MORTON became interested in flying as a youngster in the Ottawa Valley community of Almonte, where he often spent long hours gluing photographs of aircraft into his scrapbook.
"He wanted to be a fighter pilot, he was always talking about airplanes," recalled his wife Pat. "Later in life, he once told me: 'I can't believe they are paying me to fly.' He loved it so much."
Gen. MORTON, who received his pilot's wings in 1960 and went on to become deputy commander-in-chief of the North American Air Defence Command in Colorado, died on December 7 in Ottawa. He was 65.
He attended Almonte High School, which, despite having 360 students, turned out a handful of Canadian Armed Forces air-force generals, including Major-General B.R. CAMPBELL and Don STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and Murray RAMSBOTTOM, both brigadier-generals. They jokingly referred to themselves as the Almonte Mafia.
Prior to graduation, Gen. MORTON toyed with the idea of becoming a pharmacist but opted for a career in the military, which would pay his way through university and cater to his interest in flying. After Grade 13, he joined the air force and spent two years at Royal Roads Military College in Victoria, before finishing his studies at the Royal Military College in Kingston. It was the beginning of a 37-year career. He learned to fly during the summers and received his wings when he graduated from Royal Military College with a B.Sc.
"He was bright, energetic and full of life," recalls Gen. RAMSBOTTOM, retired and living in Cumberland, Ontario "In our high-school days, I'd say his interest in flying was not all apparent. We were more interested in basketball, academics and socializing."
After pilot training, Gen. MORTON was posted to France where until 1963 he served as a fighter pilot with 421 Fighter Squadron in Grostenquin, flying CF-86 Sabres, the Korean War-era jet.
During his career, he flew many different types of aircraft, including the CF-101 Voodoo twin-engine interceptor, the T-39 Saberliner and the T-33 Shooting star, which was Canada's main advanced fighter trainer for decades. He also flew the CF-104 Starfighter, a tricky supersonic plane nicknamed the "widow maker" by German pilots.
He returned to Ottawa in 1963 and was assigned to air-force headquarters, holding several administrative jobs. From 1966 to 1968, he was a flying instructor in Gimli, Manitoba His first posting to Colorado Springs was in 1968 as a major, his second in 1978 as colonel and his third as lieutenant-general in 1989. In between, he held a number of posts, including commander of the North American Air Defence Command base at North Bay, Ontario, chief of staff operations of Fourth Allied Tactical Air Force in Hiedelberg, Germany, and base operations officer and flight commander, 416 Squadron at Canadian Forces Base in Chatham, New Brunswick.
He was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general in 1982, major-general in 1984 and lieutenant-general in 1989.
During one of his stints with North American Air Defence Command, which was established to protect Canada and the United States from surprise attacks, Gen. MORTON was command director inside Cheyenne Mountain, the bunker carved out of a Colorado mountain that was designed to withstand a direct hit from a nuclear warhead.
On a number of occasions during his career, there were false alarms, including a burst of solar energy during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan that set off radar stations in Alaska and across the Canadian Arctic. This put North American Air Defence Command and Strategic Air Command systems on a heightened state of alert while the command and control network worked quickly to assure it was not a real attack.
"This was a significant thing when you consider the consequences of a bad decision," said Gen. MORTON's son Bruce. "In the post-event analysis, after the mountain had made the ultimate decision that it was not an attack and our forces were ordered to stand down, my father, his people and North American Air Defence Command, were proud that they had all done their jobs properly."
While working with North American Air Defence Command, Gen. MORTON knew the Soviet Union tested North American defences by sending flights along the Arctic and Labrador coasts. On one such trip, he ordered CF-18 fighters into the air to photograph the Canadian fighter shadowing the Soviet plane, proving to the North American public that the defence system had a real job to do.
Gen. MORTON retired in 1992 to become a member of the Air Command Advisory Council, a body set up to advise Canada's air-force leadership. He also served as honorary national president of the Air Force Association of Canada from 1994 to 1999 and under his leadership it grew to 20,000 members from 12,000, said executive director Bob TRACEY. The association is a lobby group with the goal of improving Canada's military.
Mr. TRACEY, who worked for Gen. MORTON in Colorado, remembers his former boss as a commander who understood the needs and wants of his troops. "He could get an awful lot of work out of people with him."
Gen. MORTON, a devoted family man, met his wife in Grade 5; they started going steady at age 15, and married at 23. They had two children, Bruce and Jennie. Gen. MORTON also leaves his father Stanley.
Robert MORTON, air force officer; born in Almonte, Ontario, March 23, 1937; died in Ottawa, December 7, 2002.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Suzanne Katherine (née BUCK)
Peacefully, at the Cancer Palliative Care Unit of Sunnybrook & Women's College Health Sciences Centre - Sunnybrook Campus, on Tuesday, February 18, 2003. Suzanne (Sue), of Toronto, in her 68th year. Dearly loved and loving wife of 45 years of Dr. Barclay G. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, mother of Paul and Ian (Heather) STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, and sister of Peter (Victoria) BUCK. Fondly remembered by Irene STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and Dr. Donald A. (Peggy) STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. A Service of Remembrance will be held at Saint John's York Mills Anglican Church, 19 Don Ridge Drive, Toronto, on Wednesday, February 26th at 2: 00 p.m. A reception will follow at the church. If desired, donations may be made to the Freeman Centre for Palliative Care, c/o North York General Hospital (416-756-6214).

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-25 published
CHARTERIS, Richard Walter
Died suddenly of a heart attack, at home in Toronto, on Saturday, February 22, 2003. Born in Toledo, Ohio on October 20, 1955, he was the son of Dr. Richard Webster CHARTERIS of Chatham and the late Mary Campbell CHARTERIS, and stepson of the late Joan Fleming CHARTERIS. He leaves his father, daughters Mary and Anna of Toronto, and his friend Jill STEWARD/STEWART/STUART of Etobicoke. He was a graduate of Upper Canada College and Victoria University of the University of Toronto. Richard was a devoted son and father, and a keen sailor at the Queen City Yacht Club. Cremation has taken place. Interment in Maple City Cemetery, Chatham at a later date. A reception will be held at the Royal Canadian Military Institute, 426 University Avenue, from 3-7 p.m. on Friday, February 28th. If desired, memorial donations in his name may be made to the Chatham-Kent Public Library, 120 Queen Street, Chatham N7M 2G6, or Missions to Seamen, 8 Unwin Avenue, Pier 51, Toronto M5A 1A1.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
LADD, Harold Stewart
Of Kingston, Ontario and Sandy Cove, Nova Scotia. Born in Regina, Saskatchewan, August 21, 1920, died peacefully on Wednesday, March 5, 2003 at Kingston, Ontario. son of the late Harold Lafayette LADD and Mary Jane STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Predeceased by his beloved wife Ada. Father of Mary Elizabeth RAYSIDE (husband Jim) and Ian Stewart LADD (wife Elaine.) Dear ''Grampaw'' to Derek, Alexa, Ian and Renee RAYSIDE and Elizabeth and Jane LADD. Stew enjoyed a 43 year career with Alcan Aluminum Limited where he held a number of positions including Works Manager, Kingston Works, and Vice President, Personnel. He was a proud graduate of the University of Saskatchewan and served Queen's University for many years as a trustee and as a member of the Advisory Council of the School of Business. He was chair of the Conference Board in Canada Personnel Council, a member of the Advisory Committee of IMI (Geneva) and a member of the board of directors of Polysar Canada. Funeral service will be held in ''The Chapel on the Corner'' of the Robert J. Reid and Sons Funeral Home, 309 Johnson Street, Kingston, Ontario, on Saturday, March 8, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. Reception to follow at the Donald Gordon Centre, College and Union Street. Private inurnment will be at a later date at Mount Royal Cemetery (Montreal). If desired, donations in lieu of flowers may be made to Queen's University or to the University of Saskatchewan.
Online Guest Book
ReidFuneralHome.com

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-17 published
McCLEARY, John Raymond Walker
Passed away peacefully at Ottawa General Hospital on Tuesday, April 15, 2003 in his 41st. year. Beloved husband and best friend of Lisa, and Super Dad to Matthew and Kelsey. John was involved in an experimental stem cell program for the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis. He died from complications after the successful transplant procedure. John is survived by his parents David and Nancy McCLEARY of Orangeville, his sister Cathy and her husband Ross STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, his mother and father-in-law Clarence and Eva MURPHY of Orillia, and by his sister-in-law Sherry and her husband Dan TEETER, brother-in-law Bill MURPHY and his wife Sherry. Uncle John was always very proud of, Sarah and Jake STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Morgan and Ryan TEETER, Sarah, Megan and Lori MURPHY and will be sadly missed. John was very special to his most cherished friend and ''brother'' Dave DENNING, and his wife Lisa and their children Alex, Larissa and Brent.
''John, We Will Cherish Our Memories Forever, And We Will Always Admire Your Courage.''
''We Love You As Big As The Universe.''
Friends may call at the Dods and McNair Funeral Home and Chapel, 21 First St. Orangeville on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be from St. Timothy Catholic Church, 42 Dawson Road, Orangeville on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Forest Lawn Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy donations to the Ontario M.S. Society or Hospice Dufferin would be appreciated. A tree will be planted in memory of John in the Dods and McNair Memorial Forest at the Island Lake Conservation Area, Orangeville. A dedication service will be held on Sunday September 7, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
PETERS, George
Formerly of London, Ontario, and longtime resident of Aylmer, Quebec, passed away on April 30th, 2003. His first wife, Patricia BELK, passed away in 1989. His second wife, Françoise (''Toto'') BACH- KOLLING, died in 2000. He is survived by his sister Dorothy McLAREN of London, Ontario, his stepdaughter Felicia HOUTMAN, by Gordene STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, and by his nieces and nephews. A gathering of Friends and family will take place at the Beauchamp Funeral Home, 47 Denise Friend Street, Aylmer, on Sunday, May 4th beginning at 2 o'clock. For more information, please call (819) 770-1300.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-07 published
SCHEFFEL, Maxwell Lewis (Lew)
Of Niagara-on-the-Lake died peacefully after a short illness at the Greater Niagara General Hospital on May 1, 2003 aged 83. Cherished husband for 35 years of Marie Virginia (LAVIS.) Beloved brother of Clifford A. SCHEFFEL and his wife Helen (HENDERSON) of Cambridge. Lovingly remembered by his nieces and nephews Kenneth M. SCHEFFEL, Ronald P. SCHEFFEL, Susan E. BOUGHTON and Sandra L. WANKLIN and their families. Remembered affectionately also by Albert R. LAVIS and Georgette and Victoria E. and Edward E. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. He is survived also by many cousins in Canada, Germany and U.S.A. B.A.Sc. Toronto 1945, he was a long-time employee of Stone and Webster, Toronto. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Niagara-on-the-Lake on Thursday May 29, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, if desired donations may be made to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church or the charity of your choice. Arrangements entrusted to the Morgan Funeral Home, Niagara-on- the-Lake.
On line guest register
www.morganfuneral.com

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-17 published
STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Gerald A.
Died peacefully of complications related to cancer on Thursday, May 15, 2003 at Ross Memorial Hospital in Lindsay, Ontario at age 70. Husband and best friend of Nelia MacMILLAN. son of the late Mabel PEACHMAN and Horace STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Brother of Bernice STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Father of Christopher, Lisa VEHRS and her husband Jason. Brother-in-law of Kerr MacMILLAN, the late Jim MacMILLAN and Joan MacMILLAN. Uncle of Ann MacMILLAN and Tyler MacMILLAN, his wife Jill and great-uncle of Lindsay. He was a longtime member of the MG Car Club of Canada throughout the 50s, 60s and 70s, a dedicated parent and coach at Leaside Girls' Hockey in the 80s and 90s, and for years an enthusiastic member of the executive committee at the Sturgeon Point Golf Club. A memorial service will be held in the chapel of the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto (2 stop lights west of Yonge Street), Wednesday, May 21, 2003, 4 p.m. If desired, please make a donation to a favourite charity.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-20 published
STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Gerald A.
Died peacefully of complications related to cancer on Thursday, May 15, 2003 at Ross Memorial Hospital in Lindsay, Ontario at age 70. Husband and best friend of Nelia MacMILLAN. son of the late Mabel PEACHMAN and Horace STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Brother of Bernice STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Father of Christopher, Lisa VEHRS and her husband Jason. Brother-in-law of Kerr MacMILLAN, the late Jim MacMILLAN and Joan MacMILLAN. Uncle of Ann MacMILLAN and Tyler MacMILLAN, his wife Jill and great-uncle of Lindsay. He was a longtime member of the MG Car Club of Canada throughout the 50s, 60s and 70s, a dedicated parent and coach at Leaside Girls' Hockey in the 80s and 90s, and for years an enthusiastic member of the executive committee at the Sturgeon Point Golf Club. A memorial service will be held in the chapel of the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto (2 stop lights west of Yonge Street), Wednesday, May 21, 2003, 4 p.m. If desired, please make a donation to a favourite charity.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-19 published
John Bruce FERGUSON
By Anne MILLERD Thursday, June 19, 2003- page A18
Chartered accountant, husband, father and grandfather. Born March 10, 1922, in Edmonton. Died Feb.16, 2003, in North Vancouver, of cancer, aged 80.
John FERGUSON's father, a charming but hard-drinking Scot, left his wife and son when John was five, after which he and his mother shared a home with grandparents, aunt, uncle and cousins. A clever boy who was keen on sports, John was known in the grocery stores as the lad who knew the total of the bill before it was rung in. John's maternal grandfather, an inventor and machinist, became an important mentor to the boy. John never forgot his grandfather's kindness nor his father's desertion.
Following high school, John's apprenticeship to an accounting firm in Edmonton was interrupted by the onset of war. He served with the Air Force in Egypt, where he met red-headed Sandy (Flora Jean) REYNOLDS from liverpool. John and Sandy married at the end of the war, and John brought his bride home to Edmonton, where he resumed his apprenticeship. John spoke of the war years as the best years of his life.
John and Sandy had two children, Jean and Ian. John worked days and studied nights. Money was scarce, and Sandy's health suffered in the severe prairie winters. In 1950, when John qualified as a chartered accountant in Alberta, he moved his family to Vancouver, qualifying with the British Columbia Institute of Chartered Accountants in February, 1951.
John worked for Gulf of Georgia Towing from 1951 to 1977, and was an active member of the British Columbia Institute of Chartered Accountants, particularly in matters relating to professional ethics and discipline. In 1970, John was made a Fellow of the Institute, the highest honour it is able to confer on members.
John worked six days a week and most evenings. The family progressed from a motel in Burnaby, British Columbia, to a home in West Vancouver and a family membership to the Capilano Winter Club. While his children learned to skate, he served on the board and helped build sets for winter carnivals. Typically a stern and uncompromising father, John loved to take his children by surprise on Christmas Eve, coming home with extravagant gifts for everyone.
In 1977, Gulf of Georgia Towing was bought out and John retired. He built rock walls, travelled with Sandy, golfed and kept up his committee work at the Institute. John and Sandy enjoyed their two young granddaughters. Sandy's health failed, and when she died of cancer in 1984, John said, "There are people who just say they're sorry, and there are people who leave muffins on your doorstep or ask you to lunch. I found out who my Friends were."
In 1985, John married Babs MILLERD (née Dorothea STEWARD/STEWART/STUART,) also widowed. Attached to a large and comparatively chaotic clan, John made himself useful. He administered an educational trust fund for the 21 MILLERD grandchildren, and dispatched advice on financial matters. He took particular interest in a business started by Babs's youngest son and his wife, teaching them bookkeeping and coaching them in proper business practice, advising "Always remember the receiver general is a partner in your business."
In the last years of his life, John gave up curling, but continued to golf. He devoted himself to the care of Babs, as she became less able to care for herself. John became ill in the last few months of his life, but remained lucid, loquacious, and fond of maxims to the end. "Always do your best," he would say, as well as, "Nothing else is good enough."
John FERGUSON is survived and missed by his wife Babs, son Ian FERGUSON, daughter Jean ELLIS, grandchildren Ursula, Jessica and Julian, great-grandchildren Sam and Tyler, and by all the MILLERD clan.
Anne MILLERD is a step-daughter-in-law of the late John FERGUSON.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-29 published
BENNETT, Bruce Thompson
Died peacefully in the presence of his wife Margit and daughter Kristina on Saturday, August 23rd, 2003 at the Bennett Health Care Centre, Georgetown. Beloved husband of Margit (WOGNSBECK) and loving father of Kristina BENNETT- STEWARD/STEWART/STUART (Alan) and son David (Kathie) and dear grandfather of Ian and Robbie. Born in Saskatoon to Harry and Hetty BENNETT, predeceased by brother Harry, he is survived by his sister-in-law Elva and nieces and nephews in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Cremation has taken place. Bruce began his career as a concert pianist and music teacher in Saskatoon and retained his love of music throughout his life. An eye injury excluded Bruce from military service in the war years and he therefore worked in Washington with the Australian War Supply Organization. After the war he joined E.P. Taylor (Argus Corp. Ltd.) of Toronto and later Canadian Breweries Ltd. (Toronto) as an international director and travelled the world for several years promoting their interests abroad. Bruce finished his career with Markborough Properties Limited and retired in 1985. Friends are invited to join the family for a celebration of Bruce's life at the Ward Funeral Home, 109 Reynolds Street, Oakville, on Friday, September 5th, at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the Victorian Order of Nurses, Halton Branch, Oakville, or The Bennett Health Care Centre, Georgetown, would be appreciated.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
BLOCK, Matthew Alexander
Tragically died of injuries sustained when struck by a car on Hallowe'en evening. Matthew passed away peacefully with his family by his side at the McMaster Medical Centre on Saturday, November 1, 2003. He was 12 years old.
Matthew BLOCK (Cambridge, Ontario) is the cherished son of Kelly (née FLOOD) and Robert BROOK, dear brother of Stephen, Kevin, Andrew, Caitlin and Jenny, friend of Brent, and precious grand_son of Ellen and Denis CASE, Dennis and Patricia FLOOD, Stanley and Evelyn BROOK. He will also be sadly missed by his great aunts and uncles.
Loved nephew of Sheryl FLOOD and Douglas RITCHIE, Christopher CASE, Leslie (née CASE) and Rodney GIEBLER, Debbie and Jerry and Dave and Denise; and cousins Nicole and Alexander. Special friend of Keith, Lena, Zeo and Matthew BENNETT; Ted and Joe GIBBONS Doreen BROWN and Lloyd STEWARD/STEWART/STUART; and all of his many Friends and their families.
Matthew was a student at St. Joseph's School in Cambridge, and he enjoyed playing left wing with Hespler Minor Hockey. Matthew was also an aspiring chef who shared his passion for cooking with all who knew him.
We wish to thank all those who have given us their love and support, and we offer our heartfelt gratitude to the staff at Cambridge Memorial Hospital, McMaster Medical Centre, and specifically Dr. Holly SMITH, Nancy FRAM, and Chaplin Steve. We were comforted to know that Matthew gave the gift of life to seven families through organ donation.
Our dear Matthew will be greatly missed by all who knew him. It was a great joy and honour to have shared 12 years with him.
Friends will be received on Tuesday and Wednesday from 6: 00-9:00 p.m. at Littles Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 223 Main Street East, Cambridge www.funeralscanada.com Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Clements R.C. Church, 745 Duke Street, Cambridge on Thursday, November 6th at 10: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. In memory of Matthew, donations would be appreciated to ''Kids Can Play'' and to the school that he loved, St. Joseph's in Preston, for any educational needs.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
Kathleen Innes Stewart Roland CROWE
By C.N.R. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Wednesday, November 5, 2003 - Page A26
Sister, friend, actor, social worker. Born April 9, 1908, in London, England. Died August 26, 2003 in New York City, aged Although born in England, Kitty -- or The Doy, as she was called en famille -- spent her early life in Cleveland, Ohio, where our father headed the H.K. Cushing Laboratory for Experimental Medicine at Western Reserve University. Her three brothers (I am the youngest) were born there. Our father, in 1922, moved our mother and the four children to Toronto where we were enrolled in those private schools that met his high standards. My sister went to Havergal College on Jarvis Street in Toronto and hated it. She stuck it out, though, and, on graduation, was accepted into the arts program at University College at the University of Toronto. After graduation, she and a girlfriend went to Europe where, among other adventures, they bicycled through Normandy and Brittany, an unusual escapade for two young women in the late 1920s. It was a life-enhancing experience as the journals she so meticulously kept attest.
Hers was indeed a privileged upbringing but throughout her long life she identified more with the downtrodden. After our father died in 1930, she returned to the family home in Toronto's Lawrence Park where, after our mother died in 1933, she, 10 years my elder, became my surrogate mother.
Next door to us was a family by the name of CROWE and, in 1935, she married the boy next door who went by the imposing moniker of James Fitz-Randolph. Both were aspiring actors and singers and moved to New York. Under their stage names, Kathleen and Norman ROLAND, for the next 30 years or so they appeared in theatres all over the eastern United States and Canada. In 1953, they appeared together at the first Stratford Festival in the famous tent. (Kitty understudied Irene WORTH who was playing Queen Margaret in Richard III. She told me she was terrified that one day Ms. WORTH would be unable to appear because she felt she could not play the part. Ms. WORTH was in robust good health and Kitty's fears were never tested.) Brendan Behan's The Hostage was another vehicle for their talents, as it ran for years off Broadway.
When without a part she augmented her income by writing cookbooks for a major American publisher. Shamelessly, she cribbed recipes from other cookbooks to supplement her own creations (she was a great cook). Proudly she retained her Canadian citizenship and worked for the National Film Board during the Second World War.
Sadly, married life became a hell for Kitty. Eventually, she sued successfully for divorce.
She followed her stage career until well into her 60s, appearing last in Toronto in 1975 in Noël Coward's Present Laughter, which starred Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.
As parts dried up she started another career as a social worker for New York City where her ability to speak Spanish (she also spoke French, German and a smattering of other languages), proved to be a valuable tool. For many years she was also active in the West Side Tenants Association. She hated grasping landlords with a passion and at one time she herself successfully sued her landlord for wrongful eviction. She was not all sugar candy.
During 2001 and 2002 she suffered a series of falls that resulted in fractured bones; she was forced to give up her independence. She moved into the Jewish Home and Hospital which is a fine place but a place to which she could not adapt. Finally, I think, she decided that life was no longer worth living. At 3 a.m. on August 26 last, she died, apparently peacefully.
C.N.R. (Jock) STEWARD/STEWART/STUART is Kathleen CROWE's kid brother.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-11 published
An old-fashioned newsman
Distinguished journalist began humbly as a copy boy at the Hamilton Spectator and soared to the top of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
By James McCREADY, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 11, 2003 - Page R11
During the October Crisis of 1970, there were a lot of editors who buckled under. They followed the orders of the police and the Quebec and federal governments about not printing or broadcasting some details about the kidnapping of British Trade Commissioner James CROSS and the kidnapping and murder of Quebec cabinet minister Pierre LAPORTE.
Many editors and broadcast executives took to self-censorship, anticipating what the authorities wanted and keeping newscasts and newspapers clean. Denis HARVEY, who has died at age of 74, was not one of them.
Then editor of The Gazette of Montreal, the man he faced down was Jerome CHOQUETTE, Quebec's justice minister and the public face of authority during much of the crisis. CHOQUETTE did not want newspapers to publish the full manifesto of the Front de libération du Québec. Denis HARVEY ignored the request and published it.
The paper also broke the news that police had a photograph of James CROSS sitting on what looked like a box of dynamite. The justice minister warned The Gazette editor he could be arrested under the terms of the War Measures Act, but Mr. HARVEY called his bluff.
During the crisis, Mr. HARVEY didn't change his habits. When the paper was put to bed, he would walk to the Montreal Men's Press Club in the Mount Royal Hotel carrying the bulldog or first edition of the paper and sit at the bar and argue statistics with the sports editor, Brodie SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER.
There would also be political discussions, some of them heated, since the man who wrote the stamp column at the paper had been called up from the reserves in the military and took himself, and the War Measures Act, quite seriously.
Mr. HARVEY was an old-fashioned newsman, a high-school dropout who rose to edit newspapers and who went on to run the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television news service and then the entire Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television network.
Denis Martin HARVEY was born on August 15, 1929, in Hamilton, where his father was a customs inspector. He left school halfway through Grade 13 and landed a job as a copy boy at The Hamilton Spectator. This was not uncommon and was the traditional route for a young person coming into the newspaper business. Journalism schools were all but unknown and university-educated reporters and editors were rare.
He went from copy boy, ripping the wire copy off the machines, to listening in for police tips on radio scanners. He became a sports writer and in 1952 quit the paper and went to travel in Europe for six months. He came back to the Spectator as a general reporter the next year.
He did everything, from labour columnist to business writer. At 26, he was city editor of the Spectator and then news editor. In 1961, he was executive editor and held that job for five years.
In 1966, he moved to The Canadian Magazine, a joint venture with the Toronto Star. It meant leaving Hamilton after 21 years, but it was the first step to the most important job in his career editor of The Gazette, which he took over in 1969, the year he turned 40.
Mr. HARVEY was tough. He scared people with a gruff demeanour, which at times seemed like something out of The Front Page. When he arrived at The Gazette, it was losing the newspaper war with rival Montreal Star. Many editors had cozy sinecures. Almost right away, Mr. HARVEY fired the head of every department but one. When one editor came into his office and said he had found another job and was giving two weeks' notice. HARVEY shot back: "Two hours' notice." The man was gone in less.
However, he inspired loyalty in his staff of reporters and editors.
"He could be tough but he stood up for his staff. And he was completely honest and honourable. A stand-up guy," said Brian STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, who covered city hall at The Gazette and was later hired by Mr. HARVEY at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. "You always wanted to impress him."
One night at Martin's, a bar next door to The Gazette, there were complaints about a sports picture in the paper. The photographer said to Mr. HARVEY: " I'd like to see you do better."
Next night he was at the Forum for a Canadiens game. Along with two regular photographers, he took pictures which, unsigned, went back to the office for selection. His picture made the paper.
It was a combination of hot news stories and the ability to turn around a failing newspaper that made his reputation at The Gazette. The police strike in 1969, the October Crisis, riots and labour battles made the period one of the most exciting in the paper's history.
Having secured his reputation as an editor, Mr. HARVEY was lured away to television in 1973 to become chief news editor at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television News in Toronto. His colleagues told him he was crazy.
"My newspaper Friends said: 'How can you make the transition?' Mr. HARVEY said years later. "But I'm surprised more people don't. I believe in changing jobs."
Although he didn't know anything about television, he told people: "I do know pictures." He went to CBS in New York for a crash course in television news.
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television News was as much of a mess as The Gazette had been. There had been a series of editors who hadn't managed to get a handle on the place. Mr. HARVEY took quick action and made it more professional, spending less time on bureaucracy and more time on the main newscast.
One night, an old-time producer was called into his office and the new chief news editor asked him why he hadn't gone with a fresh lead story. The producer replied he couldn't order anyone to do that -- that was the lineup editor's job. Mr. HARVEY disagreed and said: "Put on your coat and go home." The man kept his job, but worked on the desk and not as a producer.
During his short reign at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation News, he brought in fresh faces and got television reporters to think about breaking stories instead of following newspaper headlines. Audience levels rose and so did Mr. HARVEY, moving up the ladder at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. But the promise of a big paycheque lured him to a three-year stint at The Toronto Star starting in 1978.
There, he was first in charge of the editorial page and then became editor in chief and vice-president. He left the Star in 1981 and was replaced by George RADWANSKI, the future federal privacy commissioner, who had worked for him at The Gazette. Mr. HARVEY returned to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, taking over sports for the English network. By 1983, he was vice-president of the entire English network of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
He held that job for seven years. He used to say his favourite part of the job was the power to do programming. He changed the face of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and it has stayed that way. Mr. HARVEY took the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation all Canadian -- it took several years but he stopped running American program in prime time.
"We have handed over this most powerful medium to a foreign country," he told a broadcasting conference in 1990. "Nowhere else in the world had one country imported the total television of another country."
Along with Canadian content, one of his lasting creations was the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's news and current-affairs specialty channel Newsworld. He left the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1991 and worked off and on as a broadcast consultant. He spent a lot of time travelling and took up some rather un-tough-guy hobbies, such as bird-watching and going to the ballet.
Mr. HARVEY, who died after a brief struggle with cancer, leaves his wife Louise LORE, and Lynn and Brian, his two children from an earlier marriage.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-12 published
STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Irene Florence Patricia (née PORTER)
Peacefully, at Toronto East General Hospital, on Wednesday, December 10, 2003, after a 9-month struggle with heart and stroke problems, our dear Irene passed away to be reunited in the next with her beloved husband, John. Remarkably, she died exactly 97 years after her birth on December 10, 1906 in the town of Trillich, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland, the last of 12 children of William and Maria PORTER. Very much loved and loving wife of the late Dr. John STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and mother of Dr. Donald (Peggy) and Dr. Barclay (Suzanne) STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Devoted Granny of Ian (Heather,) Paul, Don, Brenda, Sandra (Dave BUTLER), Jill (Wally MacKAY) and Great-Granny of Nicholas and Jamie. Cherished sister of Mina, Bill, Vida, Paul, Daisy, May, Helen, Jack and Hattie. The family will receive Friends at the Saint John's Anglican Church York Mills, 19 Don Ridge Drive, one hour prior to the service which will be held on Tuesday, December 16th at 2 o'clock. Interment in the churchyard followed by a reception at the church. If desired, donations in lieu of flowers may be made to Pilot Place Society (416-368-5823), the Schizophrenia Society of Canada (905-415-2007), the British Columbia Transplant Society (604-877-2240), or the charity of your choice.

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STEWARD/STEWART/STUART o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-12 published
'Galloping Ghost' of Canadian football made five halls of fame
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, December 12, 2003 - Page R17
Ottawa -- If Gordon PERRY had one regret following his illustrious career in Canadian sports, it's that he never competed as a sprinter in the Olympics.
A glance at the Moncton native's résumé clearly shows why he never ran for Canada at the Games: He didn't have time.
Mr. PERRY, who died in Ottawa on September 18 at the age of 100, competed successfully in seven sports. His extraordinary feats earned him a place in five Canadian sports halls of fame: Canadian Football Hall of Fame, Canadian Sports Hall of Fame, Quebec Sports Hall of Fame, New Brunswick Sports Hall of Fame and Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame.
Friends and colleagues have compared him to Canada's Lionel CONACHER, who played hockey and football, and American Deion SANDERS who was both a baseball and football player. Mr. PERRY, however, excelled in football, baseball, hockey, boxing, track and field, curling and swimming.
As a kid, "all he ever wanted to do was play sports," says his son Gordon PERRY Jr. of Ottawa. "It seemed like he always had a baseball glove on his hand or skates on his feet. And he could run like a deer." Born of Welsh ancestry in Moncton on March 18, 1903, Mr. PERRY went to school in Moncton and Quebec City. His father Harry, was a composer and musician who played the organ at a church in Quebec City.
Mr. PERRY, who began his working career in banking and stocks in Carleton Place, Ontario, boxed as an amateur in Quebec City and was a goaltender in the Bankers' Hockey League, a highly competitive loop in the 1920s and '30s that played at the Montreal Forum. As a sprinter, Mr. PERRY posted times of 10 seconds and under for 100 yards.
But he's best known for his role as captain of the undefeated Montreal Amateur Athletic Association Winged Wheelers that beat the Regina Roughriders 22-0 in the 1931 Grey Cup game. Small and quick, and standing at just at five foot eight and 165 pounds, PERRY was nicknamed the "Galloping Ghost" because of his elusiveness.
He was a four-time Eastern all-star in the Canadian Rugby Union, precursor to today's Canadian Football League. In 1931, he won the Jeff Russel Trophy as the player who best combined athletic ability with sportsmanship. Sir Edward BEATTY, president of the Canadian Pacific Rail, awarded PERRY the trophy, which earned him $200 on top of his football salary of $1,200.
From 1928 to 1934, the Wheelers squad was built around Mr. PERRY.
"I played both ways," he told The Ottawa Citizen on the eve of his 100th birthday. "I didn't often sit down, that's for sure." He once told the Montreal Gazette the secret to his success against bigger men was that "You can run like hell when you're scared." There was one time, however, when Mr. PERRY couldn't run fast enough.
"He was playing in Montreal against Ottawa and he laughed at a lineman," recalls his son. "When the teams came back here [Ottawa], the guy caught up with my dad and he was carried off the field with three broken ribs. He did not always get away." Mr. PERRY often said baseball was his favourite sport, a game he played with grace and skill. He was invited as a young teen to go to Boston to play but his father would not let him leave Moncton. Later, as a centre-fielder in Montreal, he helped his Atwater Baseball League team win five championships in seven seasons.
After retiring from football in 1934, Mr. PERRY, took up curling. After settling down in Ottawa in 1941, he won curling's Royal Jubilee Trophy in 1953 and 1956. At age 60, he scored a rare eight-ender while competing in a provincial event, says his son, who is president of the Ottawa Curling Club, which for 42 years has run a spring bonspiel in his father's name.
In Ottawa, he worked in several positions with the Bank of Canada. When he retired in the early 1970s, he was involved in the printing and distribution of Canada Savings Bonds -- ironically, working alongside Ron STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, who was once a fleet-footed running back with the Ottawa Rough Riders.
Mr. PERRY continued to curl until he was 90 and played his last round of golf at 98. At 100, the honours continued to pour in. In the 1903 Canadian Football League season, Mr. PERRY was named honorary captain of the Montreal Alouettes.
Mr. PERRY and his first wife, Jay KEITH, had three children, Gord Jr., Pat and Lynn. His second wife was Betty THOMAS. Ms. KEITH and Ms. THOMAS died in their 60s; at age 91, Mr. PERRY married Muriel TAGGART, then a 72-year-old widow. He leaves his wife and three children.

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