STEINBERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-17 published
HOAG, Howard Arthur
Died Sunday, June 15, 2003, at home in Toronto, surrounded by Friends. Howard will be greatly missed by his beloved bride Louise RICH and her daughter Odette HUTCHINGS, as well as by his innumerable Friends and his family, in particular his sister Sharon. Howard loved life. His humour, wit, intelligence and broad smile charmed everyone he met. Diagnosed with liver cancer in December, Howard lived the last six months with incredible courage, determination and optimism. The devotion and concern of his wide group of Friends, including those from the Toronto Racquet Club and the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club has been remarkable. The annual Robbie Burns Supper will not be the same without him. Many thanks to Dr. SIU at Princess Margaret, Drs SINGH, HUSSEIN, STEINBERG, Rosa BERG and the Palliative Care Team at Mt. Sinai and Trinity Hospice. Special thanks to Howard's friend Fred REID- WILKINSON for being there. A service to celebrate Howard's life will be held 4: 00 p.m., Saturday, June 21, East Common Room, Hart House, University of Toronto, with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Howard's name to Trinity Home Hospice, Suite 1102 - 25 King St. West, Toronto M5L 1G7.

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STEINBURGH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-06 published
LOW/LOWE/LOUGH, Nora Helen (STEINBURGH)
August 3, 1946 - October 4, 2003. Died peacefully, at home, with her loving family, after a two year battle against ovarian cancer. She leaves her husband John and sons Andrew and Eric in Mansfield, Ontario, her sisters Jane BEER and Susan BOLAN, her mother Helen STEINBURGH and mother-in-law Georgina LOW/LOWE/LOUGH of Toronto, sister-in-law Kathy MONARDO and brothers-in-law Dr. Tom BEER, Justice Michael BOLAN and Richard and Peter LOW/LOWE/LOUGH. Memorial Service Thursday, October 9 at 11 a.m. at Saint John's United Church, Alliston. Cremation. Memorial bequests, if desired, to the U.N. Global Fund to fight A.I.D.S. in Africa at www.unfoundation.org

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STEINER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-26 published
WALKER, Barbara Catherine (née HARVEY)
Died peacefully in Toronto on Sunday, August 24, 2003 in her 93rd year. Predeceased by her husband Martin M. WALKER. Dear sister of James M. HARVEY (Dona.) Predeceased by sister Jessie SMYLIE and brothers Gordon HARVEY and Walter HARVEY. Loved aunt of Brenda ENGEL, Linda STEINER, Douglas HARVEY, James E. HARVEY, Peter HARVEY, Barbara DOLAN, Patti JOHNSON, Jane PALMER and Walter E. HARVEY. At Barbara's request there will be no visitation or service. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, 1920 Yonge Street, 4th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M4S 3E2 or The Arthritis Society, 1700-393 University Ave., Toronto, Ontario M4A 2E7. Scarborough Funeral Centre 416-289-2558

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STELMACHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-24 published
COBLENTZ, Harry Stagg
Born in London, England, June 12, 1926 and died on Saturday, September 20, 2003. He dearly loved, and was dearly loved by, his wife Josephine (Craig) and his children, Linda (Bernard BECK,) Jenny (Edmund STELMACHER,) Craig (Bonnie CAMERON,) and Eliza (Michael KENDRICK.) He will be greatly missed and lovingly remembered by his grandchildren, Amy (Warren STEVENS,) Andrew, Aaron, Bianca, Ailish, Maggie, Hunter, Parkes, and Rennie, and great-grand_sons Sajen and Cannon.
He was educated at King's College, Durham University and University of North Carolina. He worked in the Planning profession in London, England, Toronto Township, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Arizona. He was professor of planning at Waterloo, Arizona State, and Pennsylvania State Universities.
Friends and family will gather to celebrate his beautiful life at Saint John's Anglican Church in Elora, Friday, September 26 at 3: 30 p.m. In memory of his lifelong passion for learning, teaching, and books, remembrances to the Waterloo Region Library, Elmira Branch, Children's Department, would be greatly appreciated by his family.

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STENROOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-18 published
Nova Scotia's marathon man
Cape Breton boy was Boston's most surprising victor
By Kevin COX Wednesday, June 18, 2003 - Page R5
Halifax -- Johnny MILES was first the determined champion, then the gentle grandfather of Canadian distance running.
His first major running prize was a sack of flour in North Sydney, Nova Scotia, in 1922 -- he finished third in the three-mile race but was first to sprint by the store. After four years of training including sprints behind his grocery cart, the humble, unknown 20-year-old Cape Breton delivery boy and Sunday-school teacher stunned the running world by defeating its best athletes to win the prestigious Boston Marathon.
It was a win that Mr. MILES and his father had calmly predicted to a policeman and a race official the day before. But even Johnny MILES had his doubts on that chilly April Monday as he pounded along the 26.2-mile course on his 95-cent shoes from the Co-op store in his hometown.
At the 22-mile mark, Mr. MILES was running stride for stride with leader and Finnish running legend Albin STENROOS when he looked over and saw a blank and exhausted expression on his rival's face.
"I knew right there that I had him and I had to make a move," he recalled with the gleam of a fierce competitor in his eye in an interview 54 years later. "He was rubbing his side and he had a stitch, so I didn't look back. I speeded up and I think that took the heart out of him."
He is still widely hailed among running raconteurs as the most surprising victor in the 107-year history of the event. Mr. MILES's time -- then a world marathon record -- was so unbelievable that race officials measured the Boston course -- and found it 176 yards short of the classic 26-mile, 385-yard distance.
"I don't know what all the fuss is about," he said in an interview in 1995. "I had a God-given gift and I used it."
Mr. MILES, his father and his mother arrived in Boston by train a few days before the marathon. The day before the race, father and son walked the course, got lost and ended up asking a burly Irish policeman for directions and received some advice that was not exactly a vote of confidence.
"My son needs to know the route because he's entered in tomorrow's race." The friendly officer smiled and said, "Tell your son to just follow the crowd."
On race day, Mr. MILES wore a red, homemade maple leaf on a white undershirt. His performance shattered the 1924 record held by the other race favourite, Clarence DEMAR, the four-time winner of the event.
"That boy ran the best marathon since that Indian [Canadian Tom LONGBOAT] in 1907," a stunned Mr. DEMAR was reported to have said.
A year later, he again challenged the gruelling course but suffered an embarrassing setback when he had to withdraw from the race with serious burns to his feet. His dad had taken a pair of his 95-cent sneakers and shaved down the soles with a straight razor so they wouldn't be so heavy. His feet -- tops and bottoms -- had bled.
It was a rare retreat. Mr. MILES, who trained on rural Cape Breton roads, dominated Canadian distance running through the late 1920s and early 1930s. He captured the Boston crown again in 1929 and won a bronze medal at the British Empire Games in 1931 and also ran the marathon in the Olympic Games in 1928 and 1932.
Born in Halifax, England, on October 30, 1905, Mr. MILES moved with his family to Cape Breton the following year. He worked as a grocery delivery boy at the time of his big win. But his first job as a young teen was in the Cape Breton coal mines. He went to work there to help support his family when his father went off to fight in the First World War.
Mr. MILES left the mines a few years later and entered his first contest -- a three-mile race in Sydney, Nova Scotia -- with the hopes of winning some fishing supplies.
He is revered in his home province of Nova Scotia even though he moved to Hamilton, Ontario, to train and take a job with International Harvester in 1927.
After his victories, some parents even named newborn children after the marathon hero. One of those babies, Johnny Miles WILLISTON, went on to become a driving force in establishing the Johnny Miles Marathon in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia.
The victories on the tracks and roads by a local boy who had worked as a child coal miner at the age of 11 injected some joy and hope into Cape Breton's coal-mining towns at a time when the industry was going through tough times and work underground was brutish and dangerous.
After he hung up his thin-soled racing shoes in 1932, Mr. MILES became an ambassador for fitness and clean living. He became a manager at International Harvester and worked in many parts of the world for the company after being told by a company executive that he could make something of himself if he put the same effort into his work that he exerted in running.
When running regained popularity in the 1970s, he was startled to become a celebrity among the new set of competitors who recognized his accomplishments. While Quebec runner Gérard CÔTÉ would dominate the Boston Marathon in the 1940s, winning it four times, Johnny MILES's time of 2: 25:40 stood as the Canadian record for the event until Jerome DRAYTON ran 2: 14:46 in 1977.
He was taken aback in 1967 at being named to the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
"That I should now be in the same illustrious company as the great stars of hockey, football, track and field, and other Canadian sports was a bit mind-boggling," he told author Floyd WILLISTON in the biography Johnny MILES: Nova Scotia's Marathon King in He was also caught off guard by being named to the Order of Canada in 1983.
"It's not going to change my life -- same hat size and shirt size," he told the New Glasgow Evening News.
Mr. MILES, who regularly attended races in the Hamilton area as a spectator in the 1980s, wondered how well he might have run with the technology offered to runners today.
"I think now I wouldn't eat steak before a race and I'd get these cushioned shoes and I'd know how to train," he said in an interview in New Glasgow at the marathon that was created and named after him in 1975 and still bears his name.
Mr. MILES and his wife Bess were fixtures at the Johnny Miles Marathon, which took place this past Sunday shortly after his death. Runners best remember him for his personal attention, anecdotes, quiet kindness and his enthusiasm for the sport.
Jerome BRUHM, a long-time Halifax runner and historian, remembered his first encounter with the running legend at the Johnny Miles Marathon in 1981.
"He was there and I'm nobody -- I'm just a runner. He came over and I said it was my first marathon and I was kind of nervous. He took me aside and talked to me and he said, 'Do you think you'll win the marathon'? Mr. BRUHM recalled this week. "I said, 'No, I'm a slow runner.' So, he said, 'Then go out there and do that -- finish the race and enjoy it.' He came over to me after the race and asked me how I did and how I felt. I thought that was fantastic that he would talk to me before the race and come over and check on me after the race."
He was a humble, personable man, Mr. BRUHM said.
"When he was inducted into the Canadian Running Hall of Fame, I went over to talk to him and he only wanted to talk about other people, not about what he had done."
Nova Scotia Premier John HAMM praised Mr. MILES for bringing international attention to his home province.
"We will always remember with pride his athletic accomplishments at the Boston Marathon and numerous other competitions as well as his success in business and accomplishments in life," the Premier said Monday.
In 2001, Boston Marathon officials celebrated the 75th anniversary of his startling 1926 win -- but at the age of 95, Mr. MILES said his health prevented him from attending the festivities. However, he promised to try to attend the 75th anniversary of his last Boston triumph.
Will CLONEY, long-time Boston Marathon official, had only praise for Mr. MILES. " There hasn't been a Johnny MILES in Boston since Johnny MILES."
Now there never will be.
Kevin COX is Atlantic correspondent of The Globe and Mail. He has completed 50 marathons -- including the Johhny Miles Marathon and the Boston Marathon.

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STEPHENS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-12 published
Michael Benn JANSEN
In loving memory of Michael Benn JANSEN who passed away on Friday, February 7, 2003 at Sudbury General Hospital at the age of 23 years.
Husband of Christine. Father of Alexandra and Brianna. son of Evert & Barbara JANSEN. Brother of Serena and husband Marius VERBOOM of Providence Bay, Kyla at home, Erica of Kingston and Peter at home. Grandson of Alie JANSEN of Whitby and Azetta STEPHENS of Little Current. Predeceased by grandfathers Cornelis JANSEN and Ellwood STEPHENS. Brother-in-law of Nathan POLMATEER. Visitation was held on Tuesday, February 11, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Funeral Service at 11: 00 am Wednesday, February 12, 2003 at Grace Bible Church.

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STEPHENS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Mary Elizabeth McCULLIGH (née HANER)
In loving memory of Mary Elizabeth McCULLIGH who passed away peacefully at the Welland Hospital, on Thursday, June 5, 2003 at the age of 54 years.
Predeceased by husband Roy (Nov. 17, 1999). Loving mother of Sharon GIBSON (predeceased,) Robert GIBSON, Lloyd and Michelle GIBSON and Mary Lynn. Step mother of Catherine and Bill GRAHAM and George and Diane McCULLIGH. Cherished grandma of Jesse, Jamilee, Kyle, Ashley, Jessica and Jason. Step grandma of Aaron GRAHAM, Ashley, George, Sebastian McCULLIGH. Dear daughter of Lloyd and Mae HANER. Will be missed by brothers and sisters Bill and Marion HANER, Gertrude and Evan MORRELL, Marilyn HANER, Frank and Anne HANER, Charlie HANER, Nancy and Dale SAGLE and Susan and Derek STEPHENS. Remembered by many nieces and nephews. Visitation was held on Saturday, June 7, 2003. Funeral Service was held on Sunday, June 8, 2003 both at Island Funeral Home, Little Current, Ontario. Burial in Nairn Cemetery.

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STEPHENS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-24 published
STEPHENS
-In memory of our beloved Tanya Marie, September 24, 1992.
Gone but not forgotten
And never shall you be
For you filled our lives with love and joy
And happy memories.
Life goes on or so they say
So we try to make it through each day
To do the things we have to do
and everyday we think of you
Your music meant so much to you.
It has now become a part of our lives too
Sometimes a song will play and we think if we could return to that day
of all the things we would want to say,
Or could there be a way to change what took place
And put a smile upon our face.
We have heard it said life is like a roller coaster
It has its ups and downs
I guess we were at the highest point
the day you were born and remained
there for fifteen beautiful years.
We struck bottom so suddenly
Then God took you by the hand and
lead you to the Promised Land.
For those of us you left behind
You will always remain on our mind,
Your smiling face, your caring ways,
you loving touch we miss more each day
Our Tanya Marie
Until we meet again.
--Love Mom, Dad, Melanie and Scott.

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STEPHENS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-26 published
MAY, Stephanie Middleton
Sculptor, Pianist, Activist, Writer, Raconteur. ''She was the first to complain.'' (what she always said she would want for an epitaph.) Born New York, April 16, 1927. Died Margaree Harbour, Nova Scotia, peacefully, unexpectedly, at home on August 23, 2003. Predeceased by parents, Thomas Hazlehurst MIDDLETON of Charleston, South Carolina, and Ruth Vincent STEPHENS of Wales and Ohio. Survived by loving husband of fifty five years, John Middleton MAY of Margaree Harbour, brother, Thomas Hazlehurst MIDDLETON (Jeannie MIDDLETON) of Los Angeles. Dearly missed by son Geoffrey Middleton MAY and his wife Rebecca-Lynne MacDONALD- MAY of Margaree Harbour and grand_son, Andrew Charles MacDONALD of Ottawa, and daughter Elizabeth Evans MAY and granddaughter Victoria Cate May BURTON of New Edinburgh, Ottawa. Stephanie MAY had a rich, rewarding and exciting life. As a young woman, she was a competitive figure skater. In the 1950s and 1960s, she became a leader in the civil rights and peace movement in the U.S. With 17 Nobel Laureates, including Bertrand Russell and Linus Pauling, she sued the governments of the U.S., United Kingdom and U.S.S.R. to stop atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. With Norman Cousins, she was a founding member of the Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy. She addressed 100,000 people at the 1961 Aldermaston March rally in Trafalgar Square and, later, went on a six day hunger strike to oppose Soviet nuclear testing, drawing international media attention. Stephanie MAY worked with the Hartford Council of Churches to advance civil rights, social justice and urban renewal. Opposing the war in Vietnam, she helped found Dissenting Democrats, leading to the challenge by Senator Eugene McCarthy to Lyndon Johnson's presidency. Her work for peace candidates led to President Richard Nixon including her name on his infamous ''Enemies List.'' She was an accomplished portrait sculptor, having been urged to study sculpture by Eleanor Roosevelt. She was also a professional pianist. In 1973, the family moved to Cape Breton Island and Stephanie MAY applied her considerable talents and energy to establishing Schooner Village, a restaurant and gift shop on the Cabot Trail, where she played piano on board the Schooner Restaurant. Sadly, the business is no more, as it was demolished to make way for the new bridge. She also worked on environmental causes in Nova Scotia, sacrificing retirement acreage over-looking the Bras D'Or Lake to Scott Paper in a court case against the use of Agent Orange. A service to celebrate her life and praise the glory of God in whose hands she now rejoices will be held on Thursday, August 28th at 2 p.m. at the Calvin United Church in Margaree Harbour. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Sierra Club of Canada, 412-1 Nicholas Street, Ottawa, K1N 7B7, would be much appreciated.

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STEPHENSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-08 published
Tales of derring-do
By Rod MICKLEBURGH, Saturday, November 8, 2003 - Page F6
Thunder Bay -- In a senseless war that lasted four years and took millions of lives, it was rare for individuals to stand out amid the carnage. But some managed.
Meet Hector Fraser DOUGALL, a corker of a Canadian with more tales of derring-do attached to his name than you could shake a First World War riding stick at. You think Steve McQueen's motorcycle ride was heroic in The Great Escape? After his shelled Sopwith Camel was shot down behind German lines and he was taken prisoner, Mr. DOUGALL made at least three dramatic escape attempts.
During one dash for freedom, the story goes, he saved the life of fellow escaper William STEPHENSON, who later became the legendary spymaster Intrepid, by tossing him over a stone wall as the pair fled a furious, gun-firing farmer who didn't appreciate his ducks being pilfered. When their capture appeared inevitable, Mr. STEPHENSON impersonated a German officer and ordered Mr. DOUGALL returned to prison. As he was marched away, Mr. STEPHENSON made good his own escape.
It was a typically audacious DOUGALL stunt that yielded the largest and most vivid of the First World War artifacts sent in by Canadians to The Globe and Mail -- the huge German flag that flew over the grim, fortress-like PoW camp at Holzminden, where guards did their best to contain the fighter pilot.
Mr. DOUGALL pinched the flag on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, the day the Imperial German Army surrendered.
"The prisoners woke up that morning and the guards were all gone," said his son, Fraser DOUGALL. " Some of the prisoners went down to the village to cause a bit of wrack and ruin. But dad wanted the flag. He knew how to get to the roof from one of his escape attempts. So he picked a few locks, went up there, took it down, and kept it."
Mr. DOUGALL then managed to lug the bulky flag all the way through Germany, back to England and finally to Canada. When he died in 1960, it was found at the bottom of a trunk full of souvenirs, including grenades, bayonets, old muskets, bombs, diaries, photos, old German money, helmets and his thin, black flying cap.
"This is a piece of work, this is. It went right through the war," Fraser DOUGALL said as he unfurled the old flag across his dining room table in Thunder Bay. The edges fell over the side like a table cloth.
The flag is dominated by a fierce black-and-gold representation of the imperial German eagle, with an iron cross in the top left-hand corner -- the state flag of Prussia from 1892 to 1918. Eighty-five years later, the colours are still bright. A red tongue flickers menacingly in the eagle's open beak, on its head a red-and-gold crown topped by a blue cross, while a mace and a bejewelled orb are clutched in its dark talons.
"It was really meant to convey a sense of power. You can see that, even now."
It has become his son's passion to recount, preserve and even relive Mr. DOUGALL's wartime experiences. Mementos are prominently displayed in the downstairs recreation room, and scrapbooks have been put together meticulously.
Fraser DOUGALL even organized a trip to Europe three years ago to revisit as many of his father's prison stops as possible. To ensure that the lore remained in the family, he brought along his wife and children, enticing them with newsletters, quizzes about his father that brought cash rewards and tapes describing what they could expect to find there.
More than once during the expedition, he knocked on the doors of unsuspecting Germans, asking if they knew that the places they lived were once PoW stopovers. (Few did.) And on his return, Fraser DOUGALL had a 23-minute video, which he will show this Remembrance Day to the local Rotary Club, and the experience of a lifetime.
"The war. The war. The war. The aura of it has always been with me," he said. "When we found the first place where my father was incarcerated -- prison from Napoleonic times -- the others found it interesting. But for me, it was incredibly emotional. It was my first face-to-face meeting with the dirt and filth that my father endured.
"I felt a real sense of closure, of fulfilment."
His father, a tough, intimidating Winnipegger from a family of carriage-makers and blacksmiths, signed up for the war while still in his teens. Hector Fraser DOUGALL had spent 14 months in the trenches when he was wounded. While recuperating in hospital, he decided the infantry was not for him. According to his son, he told them, "There are too many people with missing arms and legs. I want out!"
He learned to fly and joined the Royal Flying Corps. "I once asked him why he became a pilot," Fraser DOUGALL said. "He said it was simple: 'I could shoot back.' "
Even in the trenches, however, Mr. DOUGALL was no pussycat. Once, his father kidnapped a piano player so "the boys" could enjoy a bit of a sing-song. Mr. DOUGALL noticed one of the soldiers singing much louder than the others, so he took out his pistol and shot him in the face. Mr. DOUGALL believed the man was a German spy, trying too hard to fit in. He turned out to be right.
In his diary, Mr. DOUGALL nonchalantly recorded a close call on a patrol, 10 days before he was shot down: "Went eight miles into Hunland.... Came back about a foot off the ground with machine guns blazing after me, three bullet holes thru my machine. Froze my nose."
As a prisoner, Mr. DOUGALL was forever getting into trouble, whether for insubordination or for his actual escapes. One time, he and flying mate S.G. WILLIAMS jumped from a train transporting them between prisons, a 500-kilometre trek from Holland. For 17 days, they travelled only at night, swimming rivers to escape pursuers and raiding farms for food. At one point, Mr. WILLIAMS reported, " DOUGALL jumped a six-foot fence with a half-dozen eggs, basin of milk, jam, large pot of honey and many other articles. Everything was intact."
When the two were finally nabbed just short of the frontier, Mr. WILLIAMS bolted again. As a guard prepared to shoot, Mr. DOUGALL tussled with him and ruined his aim. His friend lived to make it back to England.
Mr. DOUGALL's last escape effort at Holzminden was typically brazen. He rounded up two ladders, bound them with rope from the camp's flagstaffs, and was just about to project himself on the end of the ladders out a second-floor window and over the barbed wire to safety when he was discovered by guards.
At war's end, he hid the flag from his desultory German captors until arrangements finally were made to have the prisoners sent home. He was no slouch after that, either. He earned money stunt flying for a while; was the first pilot to venture into Northern Ontario; captained an early version of the Winnipeg Blue Bombers started CKPR, the first radio station in Port Arthur, Ontario took a leading role in training pilots for the Second World War and, in 1954, opened the Lakehead's first television station.
Today, DOUGALL Media owns four radio stations, a community newspaper and both television stations in Thunder Bay.
Mr. DOUGALL accomplished all this in spite of permanent leftover pain from his war wounds, according to his son. "He had a brace on his back. His ribs hurt. He was always ill." Mr. DOUGALL was eventually worth millions, but could never get life insurance or a pension because of his injuries.
After all his research, Fraser DOUGALL, a trim, athletic 61-year-old, said he feels closer than ever to his larger-than-life father, who was in his late 40s when Fraser was born.
"I'd been living away from home since I was 13," he said, gesturing toward his lovingly preserved collection of war relics. "For me, all this is my father.... I wanted to preserve his story. It's part of me, and now, I think I understand him a lot better."

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STERLING o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-18 published
Emma KERR
In loving memory of Emma KERR who passed away peacefully on Saturday, June 14, 2003 at the Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 88 years.
Predeceased by husband Lloyd KERR (1993.) Predeceased by her parents Daniel and Emma (STERLING) KAY. Dear mother of Wayne and wife Joyce of Naughton, Garry and wife Dawn of Manitowaning. Cherished grandmother of seven and great grandmother of 13. Loved sister of Hannah Jane (husband John BUIE), William Thomas, George Wesley (wife Lottie), Robert John (wife Doreen), Daniel Francis (wife Grace), Joseph Edward (wife Mary), Donald Lee, Susan (husband George PILON), Herman Roy (wife Lizzie), all predeceased. Survived by sister Mary Matilda and husband William BONIFACE. Visitation from 1: 00 pm until Memorial Service at 2: 00 pm on Friday, June 20, 2003 at Knox United Church, Manitowaning, Ont.
Burial of ashes in Hilly Grove Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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STERN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-31 published
Deena (Dinny) Marion GREER/GRIER (née STERN)
Born December 18, 1933 10: 13 p.m.
Died July 27, 2003 4: 22 p.m.
Sagittarius
''Two roads diverge in a wood, And I -- I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.''
Passed away peacefully on Sunday, July 27, with her loving children, Jon, Wendy and Robin, at her side, after fighting cancer bravely for seven years. Loving grandmother of Mathieu, Stephanie and Lucas GREER/GRIER- BEAUREGARD. Mother-in-law to Stacey (Jon) and Bruno (Wendy.) Her former husband David GREER/GRIER remained a devoted friend.
Born and raised in Montreal, with Friendships extending from her childhood and McGill University days through to the Canadian astrological community and beyond, she was mentor to many who sought out her tolerance and wisdom. Deena was widely known and loved for her sense of humour and feisty independence. Her youthful and vibrant spirit will be sadly missed by all who knew her. Fly away, fly away...
Her family wishes to extend their deep gratitude to the caring staff of the Jewish General Hospital.
Memorial at 3 p.m. Friday, August 8th at Mount Royal Funeral Complex, 1297 Chemin de la Foret, Outremont, Quebec, (514) 279-6540, www.mountroyalcem.com
Condolences to www.everlastinglifestories.com
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made ''In Memoriam Deena Grier'' to the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, 790 Bay Street, Suite 100, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1N8 1-800-387-6816 www.cbcf.org

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STERRITT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
Patricia Joan STERRITT
In loving memory of Patricia Joan STERRITT (née MORRIS) a resident of Manitowaning, died at Laurentian Hospital, Sudbury, on Sunday, October 19, 2003 at the age of 69.
Pat was born in Brampton, daughter of the late Gilbert and Mona (TRIMBLE) MORRIS. Will be dearly missed by her loving husband Malcolm SINCLAIR STERRITT and her children Richard (Rick) STERRITT of Brampton, Wendy (GRAY/GREY) and husband Jim of Palgrave, Robert and wife Lorie of Caledon East, Carl and wife Karen of Alton. Her six grandchildren Mandy, Laura, Nicole, Samantha, Jake and Benjamin will miss their "Nanny"
Predeceased by brothers Robert and Brian and survived by dear sister Virginia and husband Yvon GALIPEAU of Milton, Gail GRIFFITH of Brampton, Mary (CLARIDGE) and husband Hap of Salmon Arm, BC, Julie (CAMPBELL) and husband Brian of Brampton, brothers John, of Brampton and Grant and wife Pam of Chatham. Visitation was held on Monday, October 20, 2003. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, October 21, 2003 all at St. Paul's Anglican Church, Manitowaning, Ontario. Reverend Canon Bain PEEVER officiating. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery.

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STEVENS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
Gordon Kenneth FLEMING/FLEMMING
By Jack FORTIN Thursday, February 13, 2003, Page A30
Musician, husband, father. Born August 3, 1931, in Winnipeg. Died August 31, 2002, in Scarborough, Ontario, following a stroke, aged 71.
Gordie FLEMING/FLEMMING was a remarkable music talent, known internationally as a master of the accordion, especially in the jazz idiom. He was a life member of Local 149 of the Toronto Musicians' Association.
In show-business vernacular, Gordie was "born in a trunk." He began playing accordion when his older brother gave him lessons. His musical ability was such that he began performing publicly at the age of five. His schoolteachers often saw him being whisked away in a taxi to perform at theatres and radio stations in Winnipeg. By the age of 10, he was a working member of various bands in that city.
In 1949, Gordie lost his accordion in a fire at a Winnipeg hotel. With the insurance money, he headed for the bright lights of Montreal where he soon became an important part of that city's musical life. His accordion ability was complemented by the fact that he was also a gifted arranger and composer.
He had a marvellous ability to improvise and could string out complex bebop lines, leaving his listeners in awe. He often slipped a jazz phrase into ballads or commercial tunes, confirming that jazz was indeed his first love.
One of Montreal's busiest musicians, he wrote for local orchestras, shows, radio and television. He had perfect pitch and often wrote without reference to a keyboard. He was at home in every type of music from classics to jazz. For several years, he worked at the National Film Board as a composer and musician.
In Montreal, Gordie performed with many show business headliners: there was a wealth of home-grown talent in Montreal, such as Oscar PETERSON and Maynard FERGUSON, as well as other jazz musicians who were beginning to be noticed.
Gordie had said that when when he first heard bebop it was like entering another world. As his career indicates, he had no trouble in that world. He worked with many personalities including: Charlie PARKER, Mel TORMÉ, Hank SNOW, Lena HORNE, Englebert HUMPERDINCK, Dennis DAY, Gordon MacRAE, Cab CALLOWAY, Nat King COLE, Cat STEVENS, Rich LITTLE, Billy ECKSTEIN, Pee Wee HUNT, Arthur GODFREY and Buddy DEFRANCO.
He also performed with Tommy AMBROSE, Allan MILLS, Wally KOSTER, Tommy HUNTER, Bert NIOSI, Wayne and Shuster, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation jazz shows with Al BACULIS, and many other Canadian jazz musicians.
On Montreal's French music scene, Gordie performed on radio and television with Emile GENEST, Ti-Jean CARIGNAN, André GAGNON and Ginette RENO. He was a featured soloist with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on several occasions.
Internationally, Gordie toured France in 1952 and performed with Edith PIAF and Tino ROSSI. He had the honour to perform for former prime minister Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU at a Commonwealth Conference.
He participated with other top Canadian musicians in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation tour to entertain Canadian and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Europe in 1952 and 1968.
For me, a memorable experience was playing in a group with Gordie for several winters in Florida. A popular member of the Panama City Beach family of musicians, Gordie looked forward to his winter trek south. Many of the American musicians will miss him, as will the many snowbirds who looked forward to hearing him each year.
His extensive repertoire allowed Gordie to author a book called Music of the World, in which he wrote the music to 280 songs from more than 30 countries.
Gordie leaves his wife of 47 years, Joanne, and seven children.
Jack FORTIN is Gordie's friend.

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STEVENS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
The Globe was his church'
The editor-in-chief was mentor to journalists, defender of social policies, respected by those criticized in print, and described as a man with a 'warm human touch'
By Michael VALPY Thursday, April 10, 2003 - Page R11
In his two decades as editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, former senator Richard (Dic) James DOYLE wielded a journalistic influence in Canadian public life matched only by that of George BROWN, the newspaper's founder.
He died yesterday in Toronto, one month past his 80th birthday. His wife of 50 years, Florence, passed away on March 20.
Senator DOYLE -- editor from 1963 to 1983 -- gave the newspaper a boldly independent voice, loosening up its then lock-step support for the Progressive Conservative Party.
Under his direction, the newspaper would praise a government one day and lambaste it the next. He was a passionate defender of civil liberties, intensely engaged in the development of Canada's social policies throughout the 1960s and 1970s and as much concerned with the powerless in Canadian society as the powerful.
"In the time I've been editor," he once said, "we've not supported any party in office. I think we make whomever we support uncomfortable. We're the kind of friend you could do without."
He once said he felt more intellectually comfortable with Pierre TRUDEAU than all the prime ministers he knew, and one of his favourite editorial cartoons was one he suggested after overhearing his daughter Judith talking to a friend in her bedroom. It showed two teenage girls sitting on a bed under a poster of Mr. TRUDEAU. One girl says to the other: "He's not 50 like your father's 50."
His views, although stamped on the editorial page, were never imposed on his reporters. He was concerned with a story's news value -- not the fallout -- and he expected his staff to act with the same concern.
He wanted The Globe to be a writer's newspaper and gave his writers autonomy, even when their views went against his own philosophies. He had a special place in his heart for columnists who expressed contradictory opinions.
The young writers invited to attend the buffet lunches he gave regularly for prime ministers, premiers and cabinet ministers, bank presidents and giants of the arts were treated to superb tutorials in the life of their nation that left an indelible mark on their minds.
Warm, funny, theatrical and gregarious, he was a mentor and model for many of Canada's best-known journalists -- among them, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Michael ENRIGHT and Don NEWMAN, former Globe and Maclean's managing editor Geoffrey STEVENS, his successor as Globe editor Norman WEBSTER, and former foreign correspondent, dance critic and now master of the University of Toronto's Massey College, John FRASER.
"He was absolutely fearless," Mr. STEVENS said yesterday. "He did tough stuff. He did important stuff. And he refused to bow to pressure from business, from politicians and for that matter from journalists. I didn't always agree with him, but I always, always respected what he said."
Mr. FRASER said: "He was an editor who made young journalists' dreams come true. Like many who came under his spell at The Globe and Mail, I will go to my grave grateful for the horizons he opened up to me."
George BAIN, for years The Globe's Ottawa columnist, recalled the only time Senator DOYLE actually complained about something Mr. BAIN had written was when he filed an end-piece to a royal tour and suggested that the institution wasn't appropriate to the Canadian circumstances.
"Dic, as a devoted monarchist, was moved to say, 'Did you have to?' The fact is I felt I did -- and he, despite strong feelings, didn't say, 'You can't.' "
When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY appointed him to the Senate in 1985, he decided to sit as a Conservative out of courtesy.
Mr. MULRONEY described him yesterday as "a marvellous man, rigorous, thoughtful, with a disciplined approach to life and a very warm human touch to everything he did.
"When he cut people up, including me, there was no malice to it, no ad hominem attack, he was never bitter or partisan in any way.'The full impact of Senator DOYLE's presence as editor was probably first felt by The Globe's readers on March 20, 1964, when a front-page editorial appeared under the heading, Bill of Wrongs.
It was prompted by legislation proposed by Ontario's Conservative attorney-general, Frederick CASS, which empowered the Ontario Police Commission to summon any person for questioning in secret deprive him of legal advice; and keep him in prison indefinitely if he refused to answer.
"For the public good," the editorial stated, the Ontario Government "proposes to trample upon the Magna Carta, Habeas Corpus, the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Rule of Law.
"Are we in... the Canada of 1964 -- or in the Germany of 1934?
"This legislation is supposed to be directed against organized crime. In fact, it is directed against every man and woman in the province."
Soon after, Mr. CASS resigned.
Senator DOYLE's skills as a writer were particularly evident on an election night when the paper would present an editorial on the results between editions. Alastair LAWRIE, now retired as an editorial writer, recalled that once the results were known, Senator DOYLE would stand in silent thought for maybe a minute and a half and then start to dictate. In a matter of a few minutes, he would complete a reasoned editorial that scarcely required the addition of a comma.
Senator DOYLE preferred to work in anonymity, only accepting honorary degrees and later the seat in the Senate near the end of his newspaper career.
He sat on no boards, belonged to no important clubs, almost never appeared on television or radio, didn't sign petitions and seldom gave speeches. When he met a politician, there were usually witnesses.
He didn't hold a driver's licence and for years arrived at the old Globe office on King Street by streetcar. When The Globe moved to its present office on Front Street, Senator DOYLE took a taxi.
Retired Ottawa Citizen publisher Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and a close friend of Senator DOYLE, suspected "he didn't trust his Irish temper [to drive] and that was probably to the common good."
Mr. DAVEY said Senator DOYLE's low public profile "was part of his own protection against conflicts on his own part. The Globe was his church. Journalism was his religion.
"I think that Dic, in the context of his time, probably had a greater influence on Canadian journalism than any other single individual," Mr. DAVEY said.
"It was Dic's execution that made the Report on Business what it became and is. He was the moving force from within The Globe often unseen -- in the whole question of conflicts of interest as they affected journalists.
"He was really the wellspring of that kind of thinking and, of course, what The Globe did affected very directly what a lot of other organizations did."
Born in Toronto on March 10, 1923, Dic DOYLE seemed destined to get ink on his hands. He said in 1985 that he had decided on a newspaper career at age 7 and joined the Chatham Daily News as a sports reporter after he graduated from Chatham Collegiate Institute. He was promoted to sports editor, city editor and then news editor.
During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and served with the 115 (Bomber) Squadron (Royal Air Force) at Ely, near Cambridge in England. He was discharged at the end of the war with the rank of flying officer.
He was 23 and felt that life was passing him by, so rather than attending university, as other returning air-force officers were doing, he returned to the Chatham paper. It was a decision he said he later regretted.
He came to The Globe in 1951, initially as a copy editor, the only job available. His first byline appeared in The Globe in December of 1952 over a story about milk bottles.
In the same year, he also wrote a book called The Royal Story, a labour of love that proved to be a standard treatment of the monarchy, and which he was the first to acknowledge, replowed already well-tilled soil.
(The Royal family had a special status at The Globe under Senator DOYLE. One former senior editor, the legendary Martin LYNCH, told of being taken off the front-page layout after he replaced a picture of Princess Margaret, which appeared in early editions, with a photograph of a prize-winning pig.
When The Globe decided to publish a weekly supplement in 1957, Senator DOYLE became its first editor, with a staff that had no experience in the weekly field. The paper was laid out on the carpet of the managing editor's office after he had gone home.
It shrunk over the years because, Mr. DOYLE said, it was ahead of its time. It died in 1971.
From there, in 1959, he became managing editor of the newspaper and then editor in 1963. He stepped aside in 1983 to take on the role of editor emeritus and to write a column -- an experience, he said two years later, that left him chastened. "The guy [columnist] out there has his problems."
Former Globe publisher A. Roy MEGARRY, said, "In my opinion, no one -- including the seven publishers that Dic has served with during his time at the paper -- had made a more positive and lasting impression on The Globe than he has."
Likely among the greatest tributes paid to him as an editor came from the Kent Commission established by the federal government in 1980 to investigate the ownership of Canada's daily newspapers after the Ottawa Journal and the Winnipeg Tribune folded in virtually simultaneous moves by the Thomson and Southam chains.
In its report, the commission credited Senator DOYLE with "adhering to an ideal of press freedom that often tends to get lost in the management of newspapers....
"To a great extent, the editor-in-chief of The Globe belongs to a breed which unfortunately is on its way to extinction.
"The Globe and Mail testifies to the influence that continues to be exerted by a newspaper with a clearly defined idea of its role and substantial editorial resources. It is read by almost three-quarters of the country's most important decision-makers in all parts of Canada and at all levels of government. More than 90 per cent of media executives read it regularly and it tends to set the pace for other news organizations."
The Globe and Mail was bought by Thomson Newspapers in 1980. Senator DOYLE made no secret of the fact that he would have preferred having the newspaper bought by R. Howard Webster, who owned it before it became part of the Financial Post chain. However, in 1985 he said that Thomson was the best alternative among the others in the field.
When Prime Minister MULRONEY named him to the Senate, he became the first active Globe journalist to receive such an appointment since George BROWN in 1873. As an editor and a columnist, Senator DOYLE had often preached Senate reform and had opposed patronage appointments.
His acceptance prompted a flow of letters to the editor that favoured and disapproved of the appointment in about equal measure.Senator DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. Funeral arrangements have not been announced.

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STEVENS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-14 published
STEVENS, Margaret (née VANTREIGHT)
Died peacefully Sunday August 10, 2003 at Trillium Mississauga Hospital in Mississauga, Ontario at the age of 88. She leaves her children, Jane (Compton, Quebec), Herb (Waterloo, Quebec) and Geoffrey (Calgary, Alberta), their families, her sister Elsie LOKER (née VANTREIGHT) and the extended BARTHOLOMEW and VANTREIGHT families. Those who wish may make a contribution in Margaret's memory to the Maud Vantreight Memorial Fund at the Queen Alexandra Hospital For Children, 2400 Arbutus Rd., Victoria, British Columbia V8N 1V7.

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STEVENS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-24 published
COBLENTZ, Harry Stagg
Born in London, England, June 12, 1926 and died on Saturday, September 20, 2003. He dearly loved, and was dearly loved by, his wife Josephine (Craig) and his children, Linda (Bernard BECK,) Jenny (Edmund STELMACHER,) Craig (Bonnie CAMERON,) and Eliza (Michael KENDRICK.) He will be greatly missed and lovingly remembered by his grandchildren, Amy (Warren STEVENS,) Andrew, Aaron, Bianca, Ailish, Maggie, Hunter, Parkes, and Rennie, and great-grand_sons Sajen and Cannon.
He was educated at King's College, Durham University and University of North Carolina. He worked in the Planning profession in London, England, Toronto Township, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Arizona. He was professor of planning at Waterloo, Arizona State, and Pennsylvania State Universities.
Friends and family will gather to celebrate his beautiful life at Saint John's Anglican Church in Elora, Friday, September 26 at 3: 30 p.m. In memory of his lifelong passion for learning, teaching, and books, remembrances to the Waterloo Region Library, Elmira Branch, Children's Department, would be greatly appreciated by his family.

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STEVENS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-13 published
Edward James HOUSTON
By Jim HOUSTON, Thursday, November 13, 2003 - Page A28
Lawyer, judge, war veteran, "sports nut," father, friend to many. Born September 15, 1918, in Arnprior, Ontario Died May 27 in Ottawa, of colon cancer, aged 84.
Ed HOUSTON accomplished much in his life: He was a bomb aimer in Lancaster bombers in the Second World War, a prominent lawyer and judge in Ottawa for almost 50 years, and the National Hockey League's first arbitrator. But it was his family and Friends, not his accomplishments, which mattered most to him. Speaking at Ed's funeral in Ottawa on a sunny Friday in late May, the Honourable Patrick GALLIGAN (Ed's former law partner and long-time friend) said there are "legions of people" whose lives have been affected for the better by Ed HOUSTON.
Ed was a product of his generation -- the people that came of age in the "dirty thirties," served their country in wartime, and then made their contributions (and let off some steam) as civilians in a more prosperous post-war Canada. Born and raised in modest circumstances in the Ottawa Valley town of Arnprior, Ed left home in the Depression to find work. He ended up working in a drug store in Schumacher, Ontario, near Timmins. There he met a Torontonian, Joe GREENE, who was to become his best friend and my godfather. Like thousands of other young Canadians, Ed volunteered for military service in the Second World War. His air force days changed his life. In January, 1944, he was shot down over Berlin, with five of seven aboard perishing, and became a prisoner of war for 15 months (he escaped in April, 1945). The veteran's benefits he earned through his wartime service gave him the opportunity to attend the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall Law School, which opened the door to a successful career and countless Friendships in the legal fraternity. While at university, Ed met and married Mary McKAY of Galt, Ontario, and the first of their two sons, Bill, was born. In 1950 they moved to Ottawa where Ed began his legal career as an assistant Crown attorney. Later -- as a lawyer in private practice and then as a judge -- Ed became known for helping younger lawyers learn the ropes.
Ed was, by his own admission, a "sports nut." As a participant, golf was his passion -- and on the course he was known as Steady Eddie for his straight drives and sure putting. As a spectator, he was an avid fan of almost every sport. Even in the final days of his life, when you handed him a newspaper -- another benign addiction of his -- he would still dive for the sports section, and be lost in it for hours. On the day before his death, he rejoiced in the Blue Jays having just swept the Yankees in a four-game series.
As a judge, Ed had to make lots of tough decisions. However, the decisions that got him the most publicity took place outside the courtroom, in his capacity as arbitrator for the National Hockey League. In 1991, Brendan SHANAHAN became a free agent and jumped from the New Jersey Devils to the St. Louis Blues. Under the free-agency compensation regime then in effect, Ed had to decide which player the Blues would have to give to the Devils as compensation for signing SHANAHAN. When Ed chose defenseman Scott STEVENS (who captained the Devils to the Stanley Cup earlier this year), his decision was greeted with a storm of media criticism. But Ed never second-guessed himself, and moved on.
In a letter Ed received a couple of years ago, another friend of his, the late Ray HNATYSHYN, former Governor-General of Canada, summed up how he will be remembered by family, Friends and acquaintances alike: "Ed, you have served your community, province and country with great distinction, and I am privileged to call you my friend." My sentiments exactly.
Jim HOUSTON is Ed's son.

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