STARR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
GENSER, Bonnie
It is with great sadness that we announce the death of our mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, Bonnie GENSER, who died on Sunday, November 29th, 2003. She died peacefully, without pain, with her family by her side. She was predeceased by her husband Harold GENSER who died in 1980, and her siblings Rebecca JAUVOISH, Lottie BECKMAN, Bessie MELEMADE, David LEVIN, Rosie LEVIN, Esther POLLOCK and Harry LEVIN. She leaves to grieve her death and celebrate her life, three daughters, Naomi COHEN (Jared SABLE,) Toronto, Barbara BUTLER, Winnipeg, Susan STARR (Don STARR), Toronto, London, six grandchildren, 6 great-grandchildren. In addition to her immediate family, she is remembered by her sisters-in-law Esther Genser KAPLAN, Myrna LEVIN, Beverley LEVIN and Marion Vaisley GENSER, and many nieces and nephews.
Bonnie served in a leadership capacity in various areas of the community; president of the Bride's group, National Council of Jewish Women, president of Lillian Frieman Chapter of Hadassah, founder of the Shaarey Zedek Girl Guides, and later as a commissioner of the Manitoba Girl Guides. During her many visits to Israel she served as a volunteer in areas of agriculture, education, archaelogy, and social services.
She lived life to the fullest, and will be remembered for her dynamic personality, wit, charm, generosity, and infectious smile which made everyone feel special.
We wish to thank Vangie, Claire, Amy, and Ruth for their loving care.
Pallbearers were her grand_sons Scott COHEN, Paul RAYBURN, Josh BUTLER, Sheldon POTTER, granddaughters Hally and Misha STARR, and nephews Michael and Daniel LEVIN. Honorary pallbearers were Don STARR, Jared SABLE, Perry RAYBURN, and Mayer LAWEE.
Rabbi Allan GREEN officiated and her granddaughter Leanne POTTER spoke on behalf of the family. Donations in Bonnie's memory may be made to The Bonnie Genser Fund in the Women's Endowment Fund of the Jewish Foundation of Manitoba, C-400-123 Doncaster Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3N 2B2, (204) 477-7525 or www.jewishfoundation.org or the charity of your choice.

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STARR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-23 published
Mary Elizabeth STARR
By Elizabeth STARR, Michael STARR and Laurie STARR Tuesday, December 23, 2003 - Page A22
Musician, teacher, mother, mother-in-law, sister, granny. Born March 4, 1920, in Toronto. Died August 3 in Toronto, of a brain hemorrhage, aged 83.
Mary STARR lived a full life teaching the cello to generations of students and enjoying a close relationship with her family.
Growing up in Toronto, Mary received her licentiate in cello in 1947 from the then-Toronto Conservatory of Music (now the Royal Conservatory) -- the highest possible diploma, and a rather uncommon achievement at the time for cellists. As a member of the Conservatory orchestra, she remembered seeing "a young kid" who played a piano concerto with the orchestra. The "young kid" was Glenn GOULD. Through the 1940s and 1950s she travelled extensively throughout Ontario playing chamber music with various Canadian musicians who were to become well known: Victor FELDBRILL, Eugene KASH, Stuart HAMILTON, Steven STARYK, and John COVEART among them.
After her future husband Frank (a singer) went to England, he managed to entice Mary over in 1951 by sending her programs of the concerts that were happening in London. There Mary worked, practised, played, went to concerts, and got married in 1952.
After returning to Canada (and two children later), Mary's teaching career was well under way. Through her career she taught with the Metropolitan Toronto School Board as an itinerant cello teacher, privately with the Royal Conservatory of Music, and in the Seneca College Suzuki program. She taught three-year-olds, school-aged children, high-school students, university students and even a few of the parents of her students. After years of doing four to six schools per day walking up three flights of stairs (it always seemed to be three flights of stairs) with a cello and music, she left to concentrate on private teaching. Although a number of her students went on to become professional cellists, Mary remained a tireless advocate of the fundamental value of musical education to developing and informing the enjoyment of the art of music throughout one's life; this was more important to her than becoming a professional musician.
Whether at music camp where she was a faculty member for many years, or her regular Monday night quartet sessions where we will always appreciate the warm vibrations and wonderful harmonies that crept through our house, the opportunity to play chamber music, just for fun, was one of the great pleasures for Mary throughout her life.
With the death of Frank in 1969, Mary had to work hard to support the family to cover all the "needs" and most of the "wants." She did this admirably.
The last six years of Mary's life, after moving into an apartment in her son and daughter-in-law's house, were surely among her best. There she had security with independence, community with privacy, and a granddaughter who lived just downstairs. She would sit ensconced in her big green chair, content to let life swirl around her as she read, needle-pointed, embroidered, or knitted.
Nothing thrilled Mary more than when 11-year-old Laurie and a few of her Friends took up cello last year. So began private teaching all over again -- not something she expected at the age of 82, but this was much more fun!.
Mary was Mary right to the end. After making an impressive recovery from a broken hip and arm suffered through an encounter with a revolving door, she was soon to be discharged from the rehabilitation hospital. She was in good spirits, had her sense of humour, and craved her "big green chair." She worked hard for that goal that unfortunately was not to be.
Elizabeth and Michael are Mary's children; Laurie is Mary's granddaughter.

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START o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-30 published
Doctor gave the 'gift of life'
'Test-tube' baby expert helped introduce In Vitro Fertilization program at the University of Toronto
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, April 30, 2003 - Page R9
Nine months ago, a long-time patient of Dr. Alan SHEWCHUK offered the reproductive endocrinologist and infertility specialist a choice of pictures depicting her daughter to add to his collage of kids' photos from grateful parents. Upon choosing one, he flipped it over and read an inscription: "Thank you for the gift of life."
Dr. SHEWCHUK had unknowingly made an apt choice, one that spoke of the joy his work brought to his patients and their families.
"It was wonderful to have the experience [of having a child]. It was truly a great gift of life, "said the woman, who conceived under Dr. SHEWCHUK's care. Her reaction was typical of those he treated and it drove him: "They [his patients] were just so happy and that was the kick that he got out of it, "said Valerie SHEWCHUK, his wife of 42 years.
Dr. SHEWCHUK, who throughout his career directed the Toronto General Hospital's reproductive biology unit, helped start the University of Toronto's In Vitro Fertilization program, ran a private practice, taught medical school and co-founded a private infertility clinic -- with many activities overlapping -- died of cancer on March 29 at the age of 66.
Known as "Big Al" to many colleagues for his tongue-in-cheek persona of the grand old man of infertility treatment, the good-looking doctor worked briefly as a model and worked evenings at a variety store to pay his way through medical school.
After completing his training, Dr. SHEWCHUK practised family medicine in Toronto's Little Italy. There, in order to communicate with his patients, he learned Italian, adding to the French, German and Ukrainian he already knew. Three years later, he left to study obstetrics and gynecology, completing his residency in 1969. That year he became an associate staff member of Toronto General Hospital and a clinical research fellow in what was later named its reproductive biology unit.
Appointed a staff member at the hospital in 1972, Dr. SHEWCHUK attended more than 3,000 births during his career.
"He just loved delivering babies, "said his daughter Melanie, who worked with her father for 25 years. "He said, when you pulled out a baby, the baby was the most perfect thing in the world. And you hand it to the parents and the parents are just elated."
witnessing the joy of birth motivated Dr. SHEWCHUK to help those who suffered the sorrow of infertility.
"As each decade brought new things to the field of infertility, he kept up and tried to enhance people's fertility in the best way he could with the tools he had at the time, "said Nancy BRYCELAND, the nurse manager who worked with Dr. SHEWCHUK in the reproductive biology unit he headed from 1974 to 1988. One of those tools was in vitro fertilization. Dr. SHEWCHUK travelled with colleagues to Melbourne, Australia, late in 1983 to study the technique and in January, 1984, was among those who began the University of Toronto in vitro fertilization program located at Toronto General.
On June 21 of that year, Dr. SHEWCHUK told the Ontario Medical Association that a Toronto woman participating in the in vitro fertilization program was four-months pregnant, The Globe and Mail reported. In November, 1984, the program's first baby was born.
Dr. SHEWCHUK was born in Toronto on October 18, 1936, the middle of three sons of a schoolteacher of Ukrainian descent and a Ukrainian father who immigrated to Canada during the First World War. Interned in northern Ontario for two years because of his Austro-Hungarian citizenship, Dr. SHEWCHUK's father later worked as a house painter and carpenter.
Dr. SHEWCHUK was a gifted athlete who played quarterback in high-school football and turned down the chance to pursue professional baseball. Instead, he attended the University of Toronto medical school.
As an assistant professor with the school from 1976 to 1983, following time as a clinical instructor and lecturer, Dr. SHEWCHUK demanded a lot of his students, including standards of professional dress. The doctor, who himself wore a lab coat, required they wear a shirt and tie in the presence of patients and sent them home to change if they appeared otherwise.
"He was a great motivator, "said Dr. Matt GYSLER, a former student of Dr. SHEWCHUK's and now chief of obstetrics and gynecology at Credit Valley Hospital in Mississauga, Ontario "He made this area [reproductive medicine] sound interesting."
Appreciative patients brought babies and gifts of baking to his office.
"Dr. SHEWCHUK was like a father figure to his patients, "said Dr. Murray KROACH, chief of obstetrics and gynecology at the Toronto East General Hospital. "He had a presence that gave confidence and he was motivated very strongly to expand this area of reproductive biology."
Said one patient: "He was larger than life and had a magical quality." She remembers how Dr. SHEWCHUK told her that he had slept poorly the night before her ultrasound, worrying about the success of her pregnancy. "He balanced hope with reality," another said.
With a heavy workload, Dr. SHEWCHUK reluctantly stopped delivering babies in the late 1980s. In 1992, along with three others, Dr. SHEWCHUK established START, a private infertility clinic.
"Dr. SHEWCHUK was a great idea man, "said Dr. Carl LASKIN, one of the clinic's co-founders. "He was a real character who would never just accept that it was just by the book. The obvious was never the way he liked to think."
During clinical meetings when colleagues presented sound physiological reasons for a patient's problems, Dr. SHEWCHUK would often counter with an "off-the-wall" explanation. "Many times he would be absolutely wrong, "Dr. LASKIN said, "but he pushed everyone to think differently."
Two and a half months before his death, Dr. SHEWCHUK wrote a letter to a married couple who had seen him. In it, he encouraged them not to give up hope and reminded them that they could adopt. They would make wonderful parents. And he said that people like them were the reason he came to work. They had given him joy, said the man who himself brought joy to so many.
Dr. SHEWCHUK leaves his wife Valerie and children Melanie, Leslie and Alan.

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STARYK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-23 published
Mary Elizabeth STARR
By Elizabeth STARR, Michael STARR and Laurie STARR Tuesday, December 23, 2003 - Page A22
Musician, teacher, mother, mother-in-law, sister, granny. Born March 4, 1920, in Toronto. Died August 3 in Toronto, of a brain hemorrhage, aged 83.
Mary STARR lived a full life teaching the cello to generations of students and enjoying a close relationship with her family.
Growing up in Toronto, Mary received her licentiate in cello in 1947 from the then-Toronto Conservatory of Music (now the Royal Conservatory) -- the highest possible diploma, and a rather uncommon achievement at the time for cellists. As a member of the Conservatory orchestra, she remembered seeing "a young kid" who played a piano concerto with the orchestra. The "young kid" was Glenn GOULD. Through the 1940s and 1950s she travelled extensively throughout Ontario playing chamber music with various Canadian musicians who were to become well known: Victor FELDBRILL, Eugene KASH, Stuart HAMILTON, Steven STARYK, and John COVEART among them.
After her future husband Frank (a singer) went to England, he managed to entice Mary over in 1951 by sending her programs of the concerts that were happening in London. There Mary worked, practised, played, went to concerts, and got married in 1952.
After returning to Canada (and two children later), Mary's teaching career was well under way. Through her career she taught with the Metropolitan Toronto School Board as an itinerant cello teacher, privately with the Royal Conservatory of Music, and in the Seneca College Suzuki program. She taught three-year-olds, school-aged children, high-school students, university students and even a few of the parents of her students. After years of doing four to six schools per day walking up three flights of stairs (it always seemed to be three flights of stairs) with a cello and music, she left to concentrate on private teaching. Although a number of her students went on to become professional cellists, Mary remained a tireless advocate of the fundamental value of musical education to developing and informing the enjoyment of the art of music throughout one's life; this was more important to her than becoming a professional musician.
Whether at music camp where she was a faculty member for many years, or her regular Monday night quartet sessions where we will always appreciate the warm vibrations and wonderful harmonies that crept through our house, the opportunity to play chamber music, just for fun, was one of the great pleasures for Mary throughout her life.
With the death of Frank in 1969, Mary had to work hard to support the family to cover all the "needs" and most of the "wants." She did this admirably.
The last six years of Mary's life, after moving into an apartment in her son and daughter-in-law's house, were surely among her best. There she had security with independence, community with privacy, and a granddaughter who lived just downstairs. She would sit ensconced in her big green chair, content to let life swirl around her as she read, needle-pointed, embroidered, or knitted.
Nothing thrilled Mary more than when 11-year-old Laurie and a few of her Friends took up cello last year. So began private teaching all over again -- not something she expected at the age of 82, but this was much more fun!.
Mary was Mary right to the end. After making an impressive recovery from a broken hip and arm suffered through an encounter with a revolving door, she was soon to be discharged from the rehabilitation hospital. She was in good spirits, had her sense of humour, and craved her "big green chair." She worked hard for that goal that unfortunately was not to be.
Elizabeth and Michael are Mary's children; Laurie is Mary's granddaughter.

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STATHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-02 published
DAVIS, Curtiss Gridley
Born August 31, 1916 in Rochester, New York died after a long and courageous battle, on July 31, 2003 at the Guelph General Hospital. He was a resident for the past year at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph. Predeceased by his first wife Grace TURNER. Lovingly remembered and missed by his wife Audrey LIVERNOIS. Dearly loved father of Natasha VAN BENTUM (Henri) and Bruce Gridley DAVIS (Janet WRIGHT,) of Vancouver. Stepfather of John LIVERNOIS of Guelph, and Laurie STATHER of Belleville; dear brother of Joyce LOVETT (Bob) of Kitchener and Jim DAVIS (Mary) of Maple grandfather of Rachel DAVIS, Celine and Jacob RICHMOND, Nicole STATHER, Michael STATHER (Tabitha), Ryan STATHER, and Ali and Becky LIVERNOIS; and great grandfather of four. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. During World War 2, he served with the Toronto Scottish Regiment in England and Europe. He will be remembered for his thirst for knowledge and as a gifted writer and reader. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, August 6, 2003, at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 20 Quebec Street, Guelph, with the Reverend Thomas KAY officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Knox Church, or to the charity of your choice. (Arrangements entrusted to Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (416) 822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com).

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STATHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
DAVIS, Curtiss Gridley
Born August 31, 1916 in Rochester, New York died after a long and courageous battle, on July 31, 2003 at the Guelph General Hospital. He was a resident for the past year at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph. Predeceased by his first wife Grace TURNER. Lovingly remembered and missed by his wife Audrey LIVERNOIS. Dearly loved father of Natasha VAN BENTUM (Henri) and Bruce Gridley DAVIS (Janet WRIGHT,) of Vancouver. Stepfather of John LIVERNOIS of Guelph, and Laurie STATHER of Belleville; dear brother of Joyce LOVETT (Bob) of Kitchener and Jim DAVIS (Mary) of Maple grandfather of Rachel Davis, Celine and Jacob RICHMOND, Nicole STATHER, Michael STATHER (Tabitha), Ryan STATHER, and Ali and Becky LIVERNOIS; and great grandfather of four. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. During World War 2, he served with the Toronto Scottish Regiment in England and Europe. He will be remembered for his thirst for knowledge and as a gifted writer and reader. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, August 6, 2003, at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 20 Quebec Street, Guelph, with the Reverend Thomas KAY officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Knox Church, or to the charity of your choice. (Arrangements entrusted to Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (416) 822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com).

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STATTEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-01 published
EBBS, Adèle ''Couchie'' Page (STATTEN)
Died serenely, at peace, on Saturday, June 28, 2003, in her own home 10 days before her 94th birthday. Lovingly cared for by her son John, his partner Bill YEADAN and other compassionate caregivers. Companion since 1924 of the late Dr. Harry EBBS (1906 - 2000). ''Their portages often diverged but they paddled as one.'' Daughter of the late Taylor ''Chief'' and Ethel ''Tonakela'' STATTEN. Sister of Dr. Tay STATTEN and the late Dr. Page STATTEN. Wonderful mother to Bobsie, Susan, John EBBS. ''Geeya'' was so proud of her grandchildren (children of Jim HAYHURST and Sue EBBS) Cindy HAYHURST (Scott HANSON), Jimmy HAYHURST (Beth) and Barbara HAYHURST (Paddy FLYNN.) ''NanaGeeya'' was joyously entertained by her great-grandchildren Ben, Cameron, Griffen HANSON; Statten, Quinn, Tatum HAYHURSAINT_Dear to her always, Eleanor PARMENTER and Jean BUCHANAN. From birth Couchie summered under canvass, first at Geneva Park, Lake Couchiching, where her father directed the Central Toronto Young Men's Christian Association camp and from 1913 when the Stattens took a lease on Canoe Lake, Algonquin Park. In 1921 and 1924 Camps Ahmek and Wapomeo were founded. Graduate of Brown P.S., Bishop Strachan School, University College U31T, O.C.E. Inductee of the University of Toronto Sports Hall of Fame. Teacher at Oakwood Collegiate, after which she assumed full-time directorship of Wapomeo until retirement in 1975. Involved member of the Canadian, Ontario and American Camping Associations, Bolton Camp Committee, Young Men's Christian Association Board. Founding member of the Society of Camp Directors. Supporter of the Taylor Statten Bursary Fund and Camp Tonakela in Madra, India. Recipient of the Directors' Award of Friends of Algonquin. Patron of the Tom Thomson exhibit, in memory of her husband, at the Algonquin Park Visitors Centre. Loyal sister of Kappa Kappa Gamma. Avid member of the Federation of Ontario Naturalists, Toronto Mycology Society, the Toronto Camera Club, Rotary Club of Toronto Inner Wheel, Women's Auxiliary at the Hospital for Sick Children, University Women's Club. Enthusiastic member of Osler Bluff Ski Club and Rosedale Golf Club. Founding member of Lawrence Park Community Church. She and Harry travelled widely sharing their passion for children in camping, paediatric medicine and other youth causes. Her strong leadership, fairness, integrity, wisdom and instinct to see the good in all has touched thousands and will be her legacy for generations. If you wish, remember Couchie by donating to The Camping Archives, Bata Library, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7B8 or to any of the above organizations. In early September a Celebration of her Life will be held at Lawrence Park Community Church, Toronto. Friends on Canoe Lake are invited to renimisce and tell tall tales at her beloved Little Wapomeo Island on Monday, July 7th, 3-6 p.m. Memories may be posted at www.firesoffriendship.com. ''Here Let the Northwoods' Spirit Kindle Fires of Friendship.''

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STATTEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
STATTEN, Mary (MOORE)
Died on Monday, October 27, 2003 at Shelburne Hospital. Beloved wife of the late Ernest STATTEN. Survived by sons Joseph and William and grandchildren Jason, Susan, Michael, Nicholas, Christopher, and Jacqueline. Cremation and private service. If desired, donations may be made to Abbeyfield Houses of Canada or Abbeyfield Houses of Caledon, 427 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1X7 or a charity of your choice.

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