SHAHVIRI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
GONSALVES, Grace
Passed away peacefully at Castleview Wychwood Towers on Friday, February 28, 2003 at the age of 79. Beloved wife of Major General Benjamin GONSALVES (Indian Army Ret'd.) Cherished mother of Robert and wife Maria, Steve, Lewie, Cheryl and her husband Mehran SHAHVIRI. Much loved grandmother of Melanie, Erica, Ashley, Darren, Tahira, Alexander and Phillip. Dear sister of Sister Louisa, Paxy, Banu, Jason, and the late Joana. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West, Etobicoke (between Islington and Kipling Avenues), from 5-9 p.m. on Sunday. Funeral Mass to be held at Nativity of Our Lord Church, 480 Rathburn Road, Etobicoke on Monday, March 3 at 1: 30 p.m. Cremation at Assumption Crematorium. If desired, donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society.

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SHAMESS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
Dorothy Mary WILSON
In loving memory of Dorothy Mary WILSON of Espanola who passed away at the Espanola General Hospital on Saturday, June 28, 2003 in her 74th year.
Dorothy was a former President of the Office Workers Union at the E. B. Eddy Paper Mill and had worked on the Espanola Town Council as a Councillor, Deputy Mayor and Mayor.
Beloved wife of the late Cyril WILSON. Loving mother of Debbie MUNERA HEDGERS of Sydney, B.C. and Kathy May MASKEL (husband Walter) of Whitefish Falls.Will be sadly missed by grand_sons Dylan and Sean HEDGER. Dear sister of John SHAMESS of Elliot Lake, Alfie SHAMESS of Michigan and the late Joe SHAMESS and half-sister to Laurie LUKKARILA of Sudbury.
Visitation will be Thursday, July 3rd from 7-9 p.m. at the Bourcier Funeral Home, Espanola. A Memorial Service will be held Friday, July 4, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. at the Calvary Baptist Church, Espanola with John FAULKNER officiating. Interment of the ashes will be in the Espanola Cemetery.

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SHANAHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-13 published
Edward James HOUSTON
By Jim HOUSTON, Thursday, November 13, 2003 - Page A28
Lawyer, judge, war veteran, "sports nut," father, friend to many. Born September 15, 1918, in Arnprior, Ontario Died May 27 in Ottawa, of colon cancer, aged 84.
Ed HOUSTON accomplished much in his life: He was a bomb aimer in Lancaster bombers in the Second World War, a prominent lawyer and judge in Ottawa for almost 50 years, and the National Hockey League's first arbitrator. But it was his family and Friends, not his accomplishments, which mattered most to him. Speaking at Ed's funeral in Ottawa on a sunny Friday in late May, the Honourable Patrick GALLIGAN (Ed's former law partner and long-time friend) said there are "legions of people" whose lives have been affected for the better by Ed HOUSTON.
Ed was a product of his generation -- the people that came of age in the "dirty thirties," served their country in wartime, and then made their contributions (and let off some steam) as civilians in a more prosperous post-war Canada. Born and raised in modest circumstances in the Ottawa Valley town of Arnprior, Ed left home in the Depression to find work. He ended up working in a drug store in Schumacher, Ontario, near Timmins. There he met a Torontonian, Joe GREENE, who was to become his best friend and my godfather. Like thousands of other young Canadians, Ed volunteered for military service in the Second World War. His air force days changed his life. In January, 1944, he was shot down over Berlin, with five of seven aboard perishing, and became a prisoner of war for 15 months (he escaped in April, 1945). The veteran's benefits he earned through his wartime service gave him the opportunity to attend the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall Law School, which opened the door to a successful career and countless Friendships in the legal fraternity. While at university, Ed met and married Mary McKAY of Galt, Ontario, and the first of their two sons, Bill, was born. In 1950 they moved to Ottawa where Ed began his legal career as an assistant Crown attorney. Later -- as a lawyer in private practice and then as a judge -- Ed became known for helping younger lawyers learn the ropes.
Ed was, by his own admission, a "sports nut." As a participant, golf was his passion -- and on the course he was known as Steady Eddie for his straight drives and sure putting. As a spectator, he was an avid fan of almost every sport. Even in the final days of his life, when you handed him a newspaper -- another benign addiction of his -- he would still dive for the sports section, and be lost in it for hours. On the day before his death, he rejoiced in the Blue Jays having just swept the Yankees in a four-game series.
As a judge, Ed had to make lots of tough decisions. However, the decisions that got him the most publicity took place outside the courtroom, in his capacity as arbitrator for the National Hockey League. In 1991, Brendan SHANAHAN became a free agent and jumped from the New Jersey Devils to the St. Louis Blues. Under the free-agency compensation regime then in effect, Ed had to decide which player the Blues would have to give to the Devils as compensation for signing SHANAHAN. When Ed chose defenseman Scott STEVENS (who captained the Devils to the Stanley Cup earlier this year), his decision was greeted with a storm of media criticism. But Ed never second-guessed himself, and moved on.
In a letter Ed received a couple of years ago, another friend of his, the late Ray HNATYSHYN, former Governor-General of Canada, summed up how he will be remembered by family, Friends and acquaintances alike: "Ed, you have served your community, province and country with great distinction, and I am privileged to call you my friend." My sentiments exactly.
Jim HOUSTON is Ed's son.

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SHANFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-17 published
Henry A.H. SHANFIELD
Friday, October 17, 2003 - Page A22
Husband, brother, father, community leader, friend. Born June 9, 1919, in Toronto. Died June 25 in Windsor, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 84.
By Jacqueline Gies SHANFIELD, Jack SHANFIELD
Henry SHANFIELD lived a complete life guided by generosity. His passionate spirit and fierce determination enhanced the community of Windsor. Henry's civic participation and leadership were committed to the enrichment and protection of public spaces, most notably Peche Island. His perseverance made possible the 40-year concerted effort to protect Peche Island from development.
Henry SHANFIELD moved to Windsor from Toronto in 1927. He was the son of a merchant and the lessons learned from retailing coincided with a growing appreciation for the environment. Early memories of picnics, corn roasts, rowboats and island beauty sparked a desire to keep Peche Island's natural charm accessible for future generations. The interplay between Henry's dedication and appreciation motivated many to join his quest.
In 1942, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy and served in the Northern Atlantic on a sub-chasing frigate, which sank a U-boat.
Henry received a wide spectrum of awards ranging from an Achievement Award from the Province of Ontario for his "distinguished contributions in the field of Fitness and Amateur Sport" to awards for his environmental work.
Henry opened a dry-goods store in the Riverside area upon returning from the Second World War. His increasing participation in the community led him to serve as an alderman for the city of Riverside. The provision of public space for community enjoyment satisfied Henry.
In the late 1960s Henry moved to downtown Windsor and opened Shanfield's Fabrics. It was a common sight downtown to see Henry riding a bicycle -- one way he protected the environment. Henry continued to get involved in public service. He was an elected city councillor before serving on the Windsor Utilities Commission. Henry served as the president for the former Downtown Business Association, as a director for the Children's Aid Society, and on many other boards and for other organizations. His guidance and leadership arose from his immense participation in the community.
Henry was a loving husband, brother, father, grandfather and great-grand father. Jacqueline, wife of 34 years, was supportive of Henry's undertakings, taking on extra responsibilities at the store and caring endlessly for Henry. Henry loved and treasured his children, Gary, Janece and David, his grandchildren and his great-grandchild. Henry's family provided a rich environment with a mixture of personalities contributing to his joyful demeanour.
Henry directed the energy of the community and urged the City of Windsor to acquire Peche Island. His optimistic outlook was infectious and served him well through the years of effort it took to secure Peche Island as a Municipal Park. He was the spark that fuelled enthusiasm.
Henry was there, fiercely opposing private ownership plans that ranged from a housing development to a landfill scheme. His belief in protecting the environment and providing public space initiated his relentless pursuit for Peche Island. Its beauty is now protected for future generations to share the same experience Henry had as a young child.
Jacqueline is Henry's wife, Jack is Henry's brother.

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SHANK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-05 published
COTTIER, Roy Thomas
At home in London, Ontario, on November 29, 2003, Roy Thomas COTTIER, aged 82. He is survived by two daughters, Candyce Bebensee COTTIER and Sherris Cottier SHANK, one son, Derek Lee COTTIER, and five grandchildren. He was the beloved husband of Jean Bebensee COTTIER, who died December 29, 1998 at the age of 79. Mr. COTTIER held senior executive positions with a number of prominent North American companies, including W.R. Grace and Co., Molson Companies Limited and Massey-Ferguson Ltd. From 1973 until his retirement in 1985, Mr. COTTIER served as a senior executive of Northern Telecom Limited, now known as Nortel Networks Corp., retiring as Senior Vice President - Corporate Relations. In that position, he had global responsibility for the direction of all corporate and financial communications, investor relations, government relations and public affairs. He was also a member of the corporation's executive council, the senior management body which established corporate policies, objectives and strategies. Upon his retirement, Mr. COTTIER served as a consultant to the Department of International Trade of the Government of Canada and director of the International Trade Advisory Committee. Mr. COTTIER was also a director of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, the International Business Council of Canada, the Institute for Political Involvement and the Ontario Association of Art Galleries, as well as a member of the advisory boards of the University of Toronto Business School and the Canadian Music Centre. Mr. COTTIER was born in Portsmouth, England, and educated in English private schools. He joined the army of the United Kingdom in 1939, serving as a Commando and attaining the rank of Lieutenant. After surviving four years as a prisoner of war, he was demobilized in 1946 and immigrated to Canada. Interment will be at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London, Ontario; family only. No flowers please, but memorial contributions to the Parkwood Hospital Foundation for the Jean Bebensee Cottier and Roy Cottier Award for Rehabilitation Staff Development are welcomed and encouraged. Contributions may be forwarded to the Parkwood Hospital Foundation, 801 Commissioners Road, E., London, Ontario N6C 5J1. For further information concerning the Foundation or the Award, please contact Michelle CAMPBELL, Executive Director of the Foundation, at (519) 685-4030.

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SHANKMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
SONE, Maurice
Peacefully, on Thursday, March 6, 2003, in his 95th year. Beloved husband of the late Sonya SONE. Loving father of Luby CARR and Ian and Laurie SONE. He will be deeply missed by his treasured grandchildren Matthew and Paul CARR and Judith, Eli, Abigail, David, and Jacob SONE. Survived by his loving sister Min SHANKMAN, sisters and brothers-in-law Dora SENELNICK, Eva SCHOLNICK, Frida JOLSON, David ZIMMERMAN and Willie ZIMMERMAN, and his nieces and nephews and their families. Funeral will be held at Steeles Memorial Chapel, 350 Steeles Ave. W. (between Yonge and Bathurst) on Friday, March 7, 2003 at 1 p.m. Interment at Mount Sinai Cemetery, Beth Shalom Section. Memorial donations to the Baycrest Centre, (416) 785-2875, would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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SHANLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-22 published
Died This Day -- Walter SHANLEY, 1899
Monday, December 22, 2003 - Page R7
Civil and consulting engineer and builder born at Stradbally, Ireland, October 11, 1817; with brother Francis SHANLY, worked on Ogdensburg and Lake Champlain Railroad; 1858, became general manager of Grand Trunk Railway; 1867, among first members of Parliament; confidant of Sir John A. MacDONALD.

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SHANLY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-22 published
Died This Day -- Walter SHANLEY, 1899
Monday, December 22, 2003 - Page R7
Civil and consulting engineer and builder born at Stradbally, Ireland, October 11, 1817; with brother Francis SHANLY, worked on Ogdensburg and Lake Champlain Railroad; 1858, became general manager of Grand Trunk Railway; 1867, among first members of Parliament; confidant of Sir John A. MacDONALD.

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SHANNON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-07 published
Bureaucrat 'invaluable' to ministers
Analyst was a key negotiator in talks that led to the formation of the World Trade Organization in 1995
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, June 7, 2003 - Page F11
Gerry SHANNON could have been a professional hockey player like his father, but decided instead to play in a much bigger arena.
Mr. SHANNON went on to become a top career public servant who helped to formulate the federal government's policies on international trade. At one time, he held the No. 2 posting in the Canadian embassy in Washington and was a key negotiator in the talks known as the Uruguay Round, which led to the formation of the World Trade Organization in 1995.
Mr. SHANNON, who died recently in Vancouver at the age of 67, is remembered as a fair, tough and passionate trade-policy analyst who was a trusted adviser to ministers in the successive cabinets of Pierre TRUDEAU and Brian MULRONEY in the 1980s.
"Gerry was a larger-than-life character," said Peter SUTHERLAND, a former director-general of the World Trade Organization. "He played a crucial role in the conclusion of the Uruguay Round. He had a belief in the multilateral system that he combined with an intense Canadian patriotism. His personality was also a factor in bringing peaceful resolution to difficult negotiations."
"He was a straightforward guy -- you always knew where you stood with him," said Marc Lalonde, a former Liberal finance minister. "He was a man with a very solid judgment. He was a good team player in that regard, the kind of guy you would want to have as a senior public servant."
Born in Ottawa in 1935, Mr. SHANNON received an early lesson from his father -- hockey player Jerry SHANNON, who played for the Montreal Canadiens, Boston Bruins and other National Hockey League teams -- on the necessity of appearing strong, no matter what. Once, after a puck knocked out the boy's two front teeth, his father shouted, "Get up, son, shake it off!" Young Gerry did so and stayed in the game.
The same spirit of toughness also probably helped him cope with the death of his mother when he was 10.
Despite an offer to try out for the Bruins, Mr. SHANNON took his father's advice and went to university. Graduating from Carleton University's school of journalism, he worked as a reporter for the Sudbury Star for several years before lifting his sights once again. He wrote a foreign-service exam and was accepted as a diplomat in 1963. "He realized that being a small-town reporter was great and he enjoyed it, but he wanted to be involved in the big world," said his wife, Anne Park SHANNON.
His first posting was in Washington, where, despite any formal training as an economist, he handled matters of trade and economic policy. "He was good at pursuing Canadian interests with the Americans. They liked him," Ms. Park SHANNON said. "He was very affable and very good at just getting to the essence of things."
He also served as Canada's senior foreign affairs representative in Belgrade in the former Yugoslavia, and as ambassador to Korea, one of Canada's youngest ambassadors at the time.
In the mid-1970s, at the height of the Trudeau era, he became director of commercial policy for the department of external affairs. After several years, he returned to Washington as the embassy's second-in-command at a time when Canada's national energy program generated heated discussions.
Recalled to Ottawa about 1982, he became the assistant deputy minister of finance for the Liberals, then deputy minister of international trade for the Progressive Conservatives. In these capacities, he advised Mr. LALONDE and Tory ministers Michael WILSON and Barbara McDOUGALL.
"He was a very professional public servant, he had a sense of professionalism, he had a very good mind, he was tough, and he understood very well the role of the senior public servant, " Ms. McDOUGALL said. "He never tried to be the minister and he was a straight shooter, which many of us appreciated when we realized that this was the exception and not the rule.
"I worked with a lot of great public servants, but he was certainly right up at the top," she said.
Anne Marie DOYLE, who worked extensively with Mr. SHANNON in various government departments, recalls that he would go out on a limb for employees when he thought that they were in the right, and he possessed "iron in his spine" that made his superiors respect him as steadfast and trustworthy.
"He had this phenomenal gift -- the ability to take a very complex problem, see to its core and express it in just two or three very articulate sentences so that someone like a minister or prime minister would have found him just invaluable," she said. "They would have his complex briefing and he would say, 'Well, Minister, what it boils down to is just this, ' and it would be just brilliant."
Mr. SHANNON was "one of the giants of Canadian trade policy of the '80s and '90s," said Bill DYMOND, executive director of the Centre for Trade Policy and Law at Carleton University. "The politicians trusted him because he was blunt, honest and loyal to the government."
Known for his enthusiasm and for being indefatigable on the job, Mr. SHANNON performed an astonishing array of official duties while in Geneva from 1989 to 1995. As Canada's chief negotiator for the Uruguay Round, he developed a binding dispute-settlement system that was hailed as a major breakthrough. He was Canada's first ambassador to the World Trade Organization as he had been to its predecessor, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.
As an occasional ambassador to the United Nations, he gave to its committee on disarmament the " SHANNON mandate," a significant negotiating protocol still in use today.
Mr. SHANNON was known as a loyal defender of Canadian interests. Soon after leaving government in 1995 to work as an international trade policy consultant, he wrote an article for The Globe and Mail on Canada's seemingly never-ending softwood-lumber dispute with the United States.
"We always get roughed up in dealing alone with the Americans on issues they deem to be critical to them," he observed. "They simply have too many guns and they persevere until they win."
Mr. SHANNON enjoyed hiking, gardening, opera, travelling, dogs, crossword puzzles and playing hockey.
He and his wife moved from Ottawa to Victoria about a year ago with the intent of retiring there. He was sick only a few weeks before he died on April 26.
He leaves his wife, Anne Park SHANNON, and sons Michael and Steven from a previous marriage. He also leaves a sister, Carol SCHWARZ, of Ottawa.

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SHANTZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-07 published
A close-knit community mourns death of National Hockey League player
Anthony REINHART visits the hometown of Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, a kid who just wouldn't quit.
By Anthony REINHART Tuesday, October 7, 2003 - Page A3
Elmira, Ontario -- On the main street of Elmira, three slabs of polished black granite rise from a fountain in Gore Park.
The monument, erected in 2001 after a string of car accidents, bears the names of those taken too young. The name Dan Snyder will now join a list that's grown too long, too quickly for this bucolic town of 9,600, better known for its maple syrup and Mennonites.
Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, a 25-year-old forward with the Atlanta Thrashers of the National Hockey League, died Sunday night, six days after teammate Dany HEATLEY lost control of his speeding Ferrari and crashed on a narrow Atlanta street.
In the wider world of sport and celebrity, Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER will be remembered, perhaps only briefly, as the latest professional athlete to die in the fast lane.
But it's different here in his hometown, a short country drive north of Kitchener-Waterloo, where community ties are drawn tight by blood and strengthened by sidewalk familiarity.
Here, Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER will be remembered as a scrappy, hard worker who refused to listen when they said he was too skinny, too small, too whatever to play mid-level junior hockey, let alone in the National Hockey League.
"He just kept proving people wrong," his uncle, Jeff SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, said yesterday outside the old brick house where Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER had lived with his parents.
"And we were hoping that he'd be able to do that again this week, but that's one battle he couldn't overcome, I guess."
The fight of Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's life began on the night of September 29, after he and Mr. HEATLEY, the Thrashers' 22-year-old scoring sensation, left a social gathering with the club's season-ticket holders.
Mr. HEATLEY, according to Atlanta police, was driving his 2002 Ferrari 360 Modena at about 130 kilometres an hour when he lost control and struck a fence made of brick and wrought iron.
The car was sheared apart, and both men were thrown to the pavement. Mr. HEATLEY, who suffered a broken jaw and torn knee ligaments, faces several charges. Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER suffered a fractured skull and died of brain injuries without regaining consciousness.
People who knew him said he would have never driven so recklessly himself, that he preferred his pickup truck to the flashy cars that a fat paycheque affords.
"That's not Dan," said Bob CUMMINGS, who taught Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER in grade school and helps manage the Junior B Elmira Sugar Kings, for which Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER, his father and his uncle all played.
"He enjoyed life, but he respected life."
Standing in the Sugar Kings dressing room yesterday afternoon, Mr. CUMMINGS described a career rife with hints why Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER took so little for granted.
Even the Sugar Kings, one rung down from the level where the National Hockey League drafts most of its talent, had their doubts when he arrived for the 1994-95 season.
"By the end of the season, he was probably one of the best players we had," Mr. CUMMINGS said.
His hard work caught the eye of the Junior A Owen Sound Platers (now the Attack,) but just barely; they drafted Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER in the seventh round.
"He beat those odds and became the captain," Mr. CUMMINGS said, "probably the best captain they ever had."
Still not deemed good enough for the National Hockey League, Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER became a free agent and landed with the Thrashers' farm teams in Chicago and Orlando, where he helped both win league championships.
Atlanta finally called him up in the latter half of last season. He scored 10 goals and four assists in 36 games. "That isn't bad for a kid at the National Hockey League level who wasn't supposed to play Junior B," Mr. CUMMINGS said.
An ankle injury, resulting in surgery last month, was expected to delay Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's start with the Thrashers this season. Still, he was excited, just five days before the crash, when team officials told him to find a place to live in Atlanta, his uncle said.
"He had really earned the respect of the people at the highest level of hockey in the last half of last year," Jeff SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER said.
The people of Elmira shared in that excitement, as they have several times since the SEILING brothers (Rod and Ric) and Darryl SITTLER from nearby St. Jacobs, made the big time decades ago.
Now, they are left mourning yet another one of their young.
Matthew SHANTZ, 13, paid his respects yesterday by walking into Central Source for Sports on the main street to order a Thrashers jersey, complete with Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's name and number.
Matthew, who hopes to play for the Toronto Maple Leafs one day, said he met Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER a couple of times, since his father knows the SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER family.
"It's bad," he said simply, standing in front of the store, where plastic letters spelled out "We Remember Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER" in the window, beneath a Thrashers jersey.
Mr. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER's funeral will be held in Elmira on Friday.

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SHAPIRA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Moms always liked him best
The Happy Gang's popular lead singer had a good reason for saying hello to his mom whenever the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio classic was on air
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, July 12, 2003 - Page F10
The double knock on the door occurred every afternoon at 1.
"Who's there?"
"It's the Happy Gang."
"Well, come on in!"
Then Eddie ALLEN, Bert PEARL, Bobby GIMBY and the rest of the cast of Canada's most popular radio program would break into "Keep happy with the Happy Gang."
Mr. ALLAN, the show's main singer, accordion player and sometimes emcee, died last week, leaving Robert FARNON as the gang's sole surviving member.
Every day as many as two million Canadians tuned in The Happy Gang, which led the national ratings for most of its run on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation from 1937 to 1959. Until television came along in 1952, Mr. ALLEN and his cast mates were among the most famous people in the country.
The show was the creation of Mr. PEARL, who'd come to Toronto from Winnipeg (his real name was Bert SHAPIRA) to study medicine. To pay for his education, he started playing piano on radio with a band that included violinist Blain MATHE, organist Kay STOKES and Mr. FARNON, a trumpet player who would go on to be the most successful of them all.
The band morphed into the Happy Gang and Mr. PEARL was the driving force behind it. Eddie ALLEN was hired as the fifth member of the troupe and stayed with the program until it went off the air.
He was born Edward George ALLEN on December 24, 1920, in Toronto, and came from a family of musicians. His father, Bill ALLEN, played the trombone and was in a military band in France during the First World War. When Eddie was 10, his father asked him what instrument he wanted to play. The boy thought about it for a while and made up his mind after seeing a huge piano accordion in a music-store window.
"It was bigger than I was," Mr. ALLEN remembered, "but dad bought it anyway."
In a couple of years, he was entertaining at small events with his accordion, making $5 or $10 a week. Better than a paper route. He also won some local singing contests. When he was 17, he started singing and playing three nights a week on a radio program called The Serenader. Bert PEARL heard it and called him in.
"I auditioned him with Bert PEARL, and we liked him right away," Mr. FARNON says from his home on Guernsey in the Channel Islands. "He looked about 12 years old and could barely see over the top of his accordion. He was terribly shy, no self-confidence like the rest of us. He was very popular with the ladies, a very good-looking little chap."
What impressed most was his voice. "There really wasn't a singer in the Happy Gang until he came along. I really liked his voice."
Mr. FARNON remembers an incident from a Happy Gang rehearsal. "Eddie was about to sing a song called, I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen, and I came up behind him and said, 'If you bring the gasoline.' He laughed so much he couldn't sing it when we went on the air."
The Happy Gang was old Canada, when the country was more rural and white skinned. It is impossible to imagine the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation mounting something so corny and wholesome. How corny was it? The host, Mr. PEARL, was known as "that slap-happy chappy, the Happy Gang's own pappy."
He also knew that sentiment sold. Mr. ALLEN would sing The Lord's Prayer on the program, two or three times a year, such as Good Friday, and during the war he sang it as an inspiration for mothers and their boys overseas.
By that time, the show's "appeal was enormous," wrote Ross MacLEAN, the late Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer and media critic who began listening as a child. "During the war years... its influence on the nation was profound. Its almost daily performance of There'll Always Be An England helped maintain home-front resolve and stirred at least this school kid into a frenzy of tinfoil collection, war certificate sales and the knitting of various items for the navy."
Among the cast, Mr. ALLEN was the kid. He was slight, about 5-foot-6, and looked as though he were too young to shave. A newspaper reported that while he was on his honeymoon in 1942, a hotel clerk in Hamilton didn't believe he was old enough to be married and refused to rent him a room. Even some of his fans were quoted by writer Trent FRAYNE as saying, "Oh my goodness, don't tell me that little boy's married."
On air, he always sang old-fashioned ballads. "Every mother would love the stuff he sang," said Lyman POTTS, a retired broadcaster who crossed paths with some of the gang. He recalled that one of the songs Mr. ALLEN performed on a Happy Gang recording was I'm a Lonely Little Petunia in an Onion Patch. It was popular on the program, maybe because it was the perfect example of the Happy Gang's sort of cornball humour.
Another example is the line Mr. ALLEN used almost every day in the early years of the program. Mr. PEARL had told him not to let fame go to his head -- "Don't ever get the idea that you're too big to say hello to your mother." So, for his first six years, Mr. ALLEN's opening words were "Hello mom."
During the war, they dropped the shtick for fear of hurting the feelings of mothers with sons in uniform. It sparked a letter-writing campaign. "Don't let Eddie stop saying 'Hello mom,' " Liberty Magazine reported in May, 1945. "He reminds me of my own boy overseas. I wonder if he could think of all of us mothers when he says hello."
Over the years, the show appeared 195 times, always live (tape had yet to come into use when it began), in the course of an annual 39-week season, most of the time with the same cast. Its time slot was moved when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation began running a 1 p.m. newscast, but the shift to 1: 15 EST didn't hurt the ratings. At first, it was produced in a studio on Davenport Road in Toronto and later in front of an audience of 700 to 800 on McGill Street near College and Yonge.
The program's mainstay was not talk or jokes but music, and the signature double knock on the door was an old-fashioned radio sound effect provided by Blain MATHE, who would move up to the mike and rap twice on the back of his violin.
Working together so closely did create some personality conflicts. There were practical jokes, usually aimed at the most uptight cast member: Mr. PEARL, a control freak who loved to plan the program in detail and had his own small office at the McGill Street studio.
One day, Mr. ALLEN and the other Happy Gang members set all the clocks forward by a few minutes. "We're late," they announced to Mr. PEARL, who raced into studio. After the opening, a couple of performers started to whine: "I don't want to do this."
Thinking they were actually on air, Mr. PEARL was shocked -- and didn't feel much better when he learned it was all a joke. It might have been one of the reasons he suffered a nervous breakdown (called "nervous exhaustion" for public consumption) and left the show in 1950 after 18 years and moved to the United States.
Eddie ALLEN took his place as emcee, but the incident rated an article in Maclean's by June CALLWOOD, the country's top magazine writer at the time, entitled: The Not So Happy Gang.
By then Mr. FARNON was long gone. During the war, he had joined the Canadian Army Show's band, and later led the Canadian band with the Allied Expeditionary Force, just as Glen MILLER led its U.S. ensemble. After the war he became a top arranger, working on Frank Sinatra albums and scores for such movies as Horatio Hornblower starring Gregory Peck.
Sinatra, however, was a little too flash for Eddie ALLEN, who preferred Bing Crosby. He was a sharp dresser, but his style was understated, almost always a conservative suit and muted shirt in a business where the shirt easily could have been orange.
His love of clothes gave him something to do when he left show business. Eddie ALLEN owned a men's clothing store in the west end of Toronto after he left the program. He later retired and moved to London, Ontario

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SHAY/SHEA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-02 published
An active life of kindness and empathy
The wife of former Globe and Mail editor and senator always reached out to others
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, April 2, 2003 - Page R7
In Florence DOYLE, Friends and family saw someone who throughout her life actively lived her Catholic faith and embodied the qualities of kindness and compassion.
"My mom was always very concerned about the people in her immediate reach," said her daughter Judith DOYLE. " Her sense of empathy and concern for others guided her. People felt safe near her."
Whether it was chauffeuring her family around or taking an elderly neighbour on an outing to the horse races, Mrs. DOYLE, wife of former Globe and Mail editor and senator Richard (Dic) DOYLE, was always conscious of others. Mrs. DOYLE died on March 20 in a Toronto hospital after suffering a stroke. She was 78.
Known as Flo to family and Friends, Mrs. DOYLE also earned the affectionate nickname of "Sarge" from her family for her knack of keeping watch over their schedules and well-being. At one point, she was the only family member with a driver's licence and would faithfully drive her husband to work and their children to various places. She also kept track of the family's money matters and would ensure at tax season that everyone filed on time. Later, she nursed her husband through a bout with throat cancer and with diabetes.
"Her family was the centrepiece of her life," said Colin McCULLOUGH, a former Globe reporter and newspaper publisher.
Sharing in her husband's professional life, Mrs. DOYLE travelled with him, attended functions and opened their home to Friends and colleagues. "I didn't enjoy myself without her," Mr. DOYLE said.
Aside from her responsibilities at home and at church, where she helped with various charitable works, Mrs. DOYLE enjoyed a good game of cards. Her bridge club met regularly for 40 years. One favourite memory was from a trip she and Mr. DOYLE took to China in the early 1980s, when she travelled down the Yangtze River playing cards with their guides.
Florence Barbara CHANDA was born on November 30, 1924 in Lynedoch, Ontario, the youngest of six children to farmers Frank and Franis CHANDA. Her early ancestors had cleared the land in this southwestern part of the province using workhorses. They grew turnips and later tobacco. Mrs. DOYLE was very close to her mother, who considered her last child "a gift" because she had her later in life, Judith DOYLE said.
After her father was killed in a car accident when she was about eight years old, Florence was put to work in the tobacco fields and remained on the farm until her older brother took over and she and her mother moved to nearby Chatham. In town, she attended a Catholic high school but soon suffered another tragedy when her mother died. Left without parents, she moved into a local boarding house run by a generous woman remembered as Mrs. Con SHAY/SHEA.
After high school, she found work at Libby's Foods and rose to the rank of office manager. Around that time, she met Dic DOYLE, a young reporter at The Chatham Daily News. The couple married in Chatham in January, 1953.
Not long after they were married, Mrs. DOYLE moved to Toronto, where her husband was by that time at The Globe and Mail. Hired as a copy reader on the news desk in 1951, Mr. DOYLE became editor and then the paper's editor-in-chief from 1963 to 1983.
Judith DOYLE remembers her parent's house as an open and welcoming place. Late at night after Mr. DOYLE and his colleagues left The Globe's office, they would often venture over to the house to talk and unwind from a busy day.
Cameron SMITH, a former editor at The Globe, said of Mrs. DOYLE: "She was one of the most welcoming people that I've known. She made me feel good about whatever I was doing."
Judith will never forget the only Christmas she experienced away from her mother. It was the early 1980s and Judith was in Nicaragua to make a documentary. Mrs. DOYLE managed to track her down and sent a Christmas cake. When the cake arrived, Judith remembers the joy of slicing it into slivers for a group of foreign journalists.
Years later when Judith made another documentary about an Ojibway reserve in Northern Ontario, Mrs. DOYLE befriended some of the people from the reserve when they visited Toronto.
Mrs. DOYLE extended her kindness to animals. Working in the garden of her Toronto home, Mrs. DOYLE could be heard chattering away to the birds and animals, Judith said. The family has photographs of her feeding foxes in the backyard.
"She was the kind of person who had raccoons following her around, " Judith said.
After Mr. DOYLE was appointed to the Senate in 1985, the couple moved to Ottawa. Their years in the capital were among their happiest. They made close Friends and Mrs. DOYLE enjoyed heading across the river to Hull with a friend and a few rolls of quarters to do some gambling. "She had the capacity for developing Friendships that went on throughout her life," Mr. DOYLE said. "She was interested in people."
Florence DOYLE leaves her husband Richard, sister Clara HILLIARD, son Sean and daughter Judith.

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SHARGAL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-26 published
CARTER, Thomas Kenneth
Died of respiratory failure late Wednesday, April 23rd, 2003, at Toronto General Hospital, surrounded by his family, after a brave struggle to survive a recurrence of lung cancer. Dearest husband of Marguerite for 50 years. Beloved father of Melissa Anne GRAY/GREY (née CARTER,) Michael (wife Suzanne,) and Scott (wife Kelly). Loving grandfather to Alex, Caitlin and Cameron, and great-grandfather to Sarah and Erika. Dear brother of Sylvia CLEMENTSON (née CARTER) (husband John) and Jim (wife Jean.) Cremation has taken place. In lieu of flowers, any donations to Habitat for Humanity, Guelph Humane Society, or charity of choice, would be greatly appreciated. Heartfelt thanks to Dr. Andrew PIERRE, Dr. SHARGAL, Dr. JUGNAUTH, Dr. KAPALA, and thoracic team, for their care and support, as well as to all the wonderful nurses on 7 Eaton Wing. Funeral Mass at St. Gabriel's Parish, 650 Sheppard Avenue East, Willowdale, Ontario, at 11 a.m. on Monday, April 28th.

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SHARKEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-22 published
Champ didn't tell his mother
Toronto fighter was talked into boxing by his brothers during the Thirties as a way to make more money
By Barbara SILVERSTEIN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, March 22, 2003 - Page F11
When Leon SLAN became Canada's champion heavyweight boxer, he didn't tell his mother. She disapproved of the sport, so he kept the news to himself -- though not for long. Mr. SLAN, who died last month at the age of 86, had for years fought under another name and managed to escape his mother's wrath until 1936, when he won the national amateur title and the irresistibility of fame upset his comfortable obscurity.
The modest Mr. SLAN went on to become a successful Toronto businessman who had so allowed boxing to settle into his past that in 1986 most of his Friends were surprised when he was inducted into the Canadian Boxing Hall of Fame. It astonished everyone that the man they knew as the co-owner of a luggage-making company was known in boxing circles as Lennie STEIN, holder of the Canadian amateur heavyweight title from 1935 to 1937.
A quiet and unassuming giant of a man, his wife described him as invariably soft-spoken. "I never heard him raise his voice once in all the years we were married, Isabel SLAN said.
By all accounts, Mr. SLAN's mild demeanour belied his prowess in the ring, said his son, Jon SLAN. " For a man who was a champion at a blood sport, he was the gentlest person you ever met."
Born in Winnipeg to Russian immigrants on June 28, 1916, Mr. SLAN was the second of three sons. In 1922, the family moved to the Annex area of Toronto where he attended Harbord Collegiate Institute. His father, Joseph SLAN, was a struggling tailor with interesting ideas about the garment industry. In 1931, he headed a co-operative called Work-Togs Limited. It consisted of a small band of tailors who were to share in the profits. The project suffered from poor timing: It came on the scene at the height of the Depression and failed dismally.
In 1934, Joseph SLAN died in poverty and Leon and his two brothers Bob, who was born in 1914, and Jack, born in 1918 -- had to provide for their mother. Bringing home meagre paycheques from what little work they could find, the three decided to find a supplement.
At the time, boxing was a popular spectator sport and one of the few that was open to Jewish athletes. Bob and Jack knew that a good fighter could earn a decent living in the ring. Their eyes fell on Leon. At 17, their 6-foot-2, 200-pound, athletic brother towered over most grown men.
"Leon was big and strong and Bob and Jack thought he should be boxing, Mrs. SLAN said. "The family needed the money."
They persuaded him to give it a try and promised their support, she said. "They took him to over the gym. There they were, the three boys walking down the street arm-in-arm with Leon in the middle. They all walked over together to sign Leon up."
They didn't consult their mother. In fact, the brothers decided to enter the fight name Lennie STEIN, so she wouldn't read about Leon in the papers and worry.
As it turned out, the new Lennie STEIN was a natural. Mr. SLAN won his first major fight in a Round 1 knockout over the Toronto Golden Gloves title holder. " STEIN is durable and exceptionally fast for a heavyweight, " The Toronto Star reported in 1935. "He has the ability to rain punishment on his opponents with both hands."
In this way, he won almost all of his major fights. It helped, too, that his coach happened to be Maxie KADIN, a legend in Ontario boxing. Out of 40 bouts, Mr. SLAN netted 34 wins, 22 by knockout, and six losses.
A fighter who possessed a dogged and implacable manner, he was popular with the fans.
"He was known for not staying down on the canvas, Jon SLAN said. "On those rare times when he was decked, he always refused the referee's outstretched hand and picked himself up."
Yet, for all his success, Mr. SLAN rejected the opportunity to go fully professional. A manager and promoter from New York had seen him in a bout with a certain German boxer and saw possibilities.
"He wanted to promote him as the Great White Jewish Hope, " Jon said.
The German boxer happened to be the brother of Max SCHMELING, the Aryan protégé of Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich, who in 1936 had defeated the otherwise invincible Joe LOUIS in the upset of the century. To make it even more interesting, the manager proved to be the famous John BUCKLEY, who called the shots for Jack SHARKEY, a heavyweight who had beaten SCHMELING four years earlier.
"The promoter got so interested in this meeting of German and Jew that he offered my father a contract, but he didn't offer enough money, " Jon said.
The problem, it turned out, was that Mr. SLAN couldn't afford to turn professional, he once told a Globe and Mail reporter. "I was making good money then, $25 a week, and I was supporting my mother, " he said in 1988. "I asked him [Buckley] to put up $5,000 [and] he just laughed at me. He said he had hundreds of heavyweights."
Negotiations ended right there. "He was [only] interested in me because I was Jewish and that would go over big in New York."
It wasn't the only time that race emerged as an issue. Mr. SLAN had boxed under the auspices of the Young Men's Hebrew Association until 1936 when it was blackballed by the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada for withholding a portion of its proceeds. The money was earmarked for the Canadian Olympic effort, but the Young Men's Hebrew Association had refused to support the upcoming 1936 Berlin Games because of Germany's poor treatment of Jews. In the end, the Amateur Athletic Union permitted Mr. SLAN to enter as an independent and he went on to fight unattached to win the Toronto and national titles.
"It seemed so easy at the time, " he said in 1988. "I was a very quiet kid, but when I won, I became such a hero."
That glory turned out to be the undoing of Lennie STEIN, the fighter -- though it was all something of an anticlimax. The one thing Leon SLAN had feared on his way up through the ranks came to nothing: his mother finally found out that he boxed and then failed to react -- at least, not that anyone in the family can remember.
"She just took it in her stride, said Isabel SLAN. " She was a Jewish mother from the old country. I don't think she really understood what boxing was all about."
Perhaps, too, it helped to smooth matters that her son's secret endeavours had ended in triumph. She can only have felt a mother's pride.
In 1937, Mr. SLAN retired from boxing and found a job at a produce stall in Toronto's old fruit terminal on Colborne Street and was later hired by his brother Bob, a proprietor of Dominion Citrus Ltd. It was tough work with long hours, Mrs. SLAN said. "Leon would have to get up at 2 o'clock in the morning to go unload the fruits and vegetables off the trucks."
Even so, he still had some time for boxing. After working long days at the market, he taught athletics at the Young Men's Hebrew Association and it was there that he met Isabel MARGOLIAN. A concert pianist newly arrived from Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, she happened to take one of his boxing classes for women.
"We were all lined up in a row, punching bags, " she remembered. "Leon came up to me and told me I wasn't punching hard enough. Then he took my hand and hit it into the bag to show me how to do it. I felt my bones crunch, but I didn't say anything."
As it turned out, he had broken her hand. When he learned what had happened, he phoned her and thus began a different relationship. They married in 1942 and later that year Mr. SLAN enlisted in the army where he ended up in the Queen's Own Rifles. While in the army, he returned to boxing and won the 1942 Canadian Army heavyweight title.
After the war, the SLAN brothers founded Dominion Luggage in Toronto's garment district, a company that started small with eight workers and grew into a successful enterprise employing 200. Each brother had a different responsibility -- Jack was the designer, Bob took care of the administration and Leon was the salesman.
"It was a job that really suited him, Mrs. SLAN said. "He was very personable [and] sold to Eaton's, Simpsons, Air Canada -- all the big companies. He became good Friends with many of the buyers."
The three brothers enjoyed a comfortable relationship built on affection and loyalty, Jon said.
"Bob liked to fish, so he took Thursdays and Fridays off to go to his cottage. My father took Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons off to golf."
Jack, the creative force among them, rarely left the business but never begrudged his brothers their leisure time.
"They had the perfect partnership, " said Jon, a relationship anchored by their mother. "They were her surrogate husbands. I don't think there was a SLAN wife who felt that she wasn't playing second fiddle to my grandmother."
The brothers went to her house every day for lunch until she was 90. "She made old-time Jewish food. Her definition of borscht was sour cream with a touch of beets, " Jon said. "She cooked with chicken fat and the boys loved it."
Sophie SLAN died in 1984 at the age of 93.
In 1972, the SLANs sold Dominion Luggage to Warrington Products, a large conglomerate. "Warrington made them an offer they couldn't turn down, " Isabel said.
Even so, the brothers' relationship continued into retirement. "They called each other every day, even when their health was failing, " Jon said. "Bob died in 2000 and Jack in 2002. My father took their deaths very hard."
Although he never boxed again, Mr. SLAN played sports well into his 70s and could still show his mettle. He had taken up tennis at about the age of 40 and, when he couldn't get a membership at the exclusive Toronto Lawn Tennis Club in Rosedale, he co-founded the York Racquets Tennis Club. It opened in 1964, directly across the street from the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club.
Mr. SLAN died of heart failure in Toronto on February 11. He leaves his wife Isabel, son Jon and daughters Elynne GOLDKIND and Anna RISEN.

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SHARMA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-15 published
Ishwardutt Bhururam SHARMA
By Rashid MUGHAL Tuesday, July 15, 2003 - Page A18
Athlete, intellect, husband, father, friend. Born June 22, 1926, in Mombasa, Kenya. Died June 14 at Markham-Stouffville Hospital, following a short illness after being treated for cancer, aged To his many Friends, acquaintances and relatives around the world, Ishwardutt Bhururam SHARMA of Unionville, Ontario, will forever remain a world traveller and a walking, talking encyclopedia of stories, facts and ideas.
"In African mythology," he once said, "the first baobab planted by God was an ordinary-looking tree but it refused to stay in one place and wandered round the countryside. As a punishment, God planted it back again -- upside down -- and immobilized it. Thus baobabs may live well over 2,000 years, making them among the longest-living organisms on the planet. During a severe drought, their large green pods are cracked open and the nuts made into a kind of flour. The resulting 'hungry bread' is part of the common culture of the region where I was born."
I. B. SHARMA was born in the scenic Kilifi enclave of Mombasa, Kenya, amid sisal plantations, groves of cashew trees, coconuts and the solitary baobabs. All through life "Sharmaji" demonstrated a rare courage to stand alone on the strength of his spirituality, humanitarian principles, catholic worldview and protestant work ethic.
Known to everyone as "I. B. SHARMA of Mombasa," because of his prolific letters in The Nation and other newspapers, he was a great student of esoteric philosophy.
Tall and handsome, Sharmaji was endowed with a towering personality and craggy good looks, grace and measured speech. In his younger days, he was a champion debater and played tennis and cricket like a machine. One part of him wanted to be a film actor, another a semi-classical singer and, although he spent countless hours in meditation and in practicing the classical ragas by singing the songs of Manna Dey and listening to Ravi Shankar and to the ghazals of singers such as Mehdi Hassan, Ghulam Ali and Jagjit and Chitra, the realities of daily life and the welfare of his neighbours were always his first priority.
"Life is a series of challenge and response, challenge and response," he used to say.
Upon retirement from the Ports Authority in Kenya in 1975, he moved with his family to England. For many years he worked in the American Embassy in London, where he met the rich and famous including the one big love of his life, J. Krishnamurti. In 1988, he moved with his family to Canada. In 1996, during a trip to India, he met the second big love of his life: Mother Teresa.
Swimming was a part of Sharmaji's daily routine. He attributed his good health and strength to swimming and good eating habits. He enjoyed 21 years of retired living. He always told his children: "Live with a clean heart and courage, and live for today and for the moment."
Sharmaji always conveyed a quiet dignity coupled with mental alertness and a reservoir of intellectual prowess in responding to some of the most challenging issues of the day. He spoke of asking the impossible question and listening deeply to the question "because the answer is in the question, my friend. Above all, you must have the courage to stand alone."
He died peacefully with his daughters Sheela and Mira, and son Vijay, at his side. In keeping with his wishes, he was cremated in the Hindu tradition. Sharmaji is survived by his wife, Saraswati, children Sheela, Usha, Mira, Vijay and Arti; sons-in-law Deepak and Naresh, daughter-in-law Megan and grandchildren Roshni, Priya, Vikram and Seema, and grand_son-in-law, John.
Rashid MUGHAL is a friend of I. B. SHARMA.

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