ROSE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-01 published
Stanley ROSS (Johnny) ROSE
Passed away peacefully at Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga on Sunday, August 24, 2003 in his 81st year, beloved husband of Connie BAMBROUGH, loved father of Linda CUNNINGHAM of Orangeville, John and his wife Barbara of Lindsay, Ron and his wife Sandra of Cobourg, Laurie LAWSON and her husband Gord of Orangeville, and Don and his wife Susan of Orangeville, dear grandfather of Crystal, Melissa, Michael, Kimberely and her husband Neil, Emily and Emma, also sadly missed by his sister Marjorie FRY and her husband Bruce, predeceased by his brother Donald.
Friends called at the Dods and McFair Funeral Home and Chapel on Wednesday, August 27, 2003. Funeral Service was held in the chapel on Thursday, August 28, 2003. Interment in Forest Lawn Cemetery.
A tree will be planted in memory of Johnny in the Dods and McNair Memorial Forest at the Island Lake Conservation Area, Orangeville.
A dedication service was held on Sunday, September 7, 2003.

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ROSE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
ROSE
-Forever loved and missed, our very dear Brother, Mom and Dad. Brother Don, passed away November 19, 1975, Dad Warren passed away April 1, 1978 and Mom, Mildred passed away August 24, 1983.
Those we hold most dear
never truly leave us
We are blessed with
the many memories of their love,
the kindness and comfort that
they shared and brought into
each of our lives
--Remembered always by Marjorie, Bruce and family, Connie and family.

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ROSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
GINSBERG, Robert Jason
On Saturday, March 1, 2003, at The Princess Margaret Hospital. Robert GINSBERG beloved husband of Charlotte. Loving father of Karyn, Jordan, and David. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Stephen and Susan, and Joseph ROSE and the late Sandra ROSE, and Linda PELT. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles, Avenue, (1 light west of Dufferin), for service on Monday, March 3rd, at 2: 30 p.m. Interment Pride of Israel Section of Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva 18A Hazelton Avenue, #401. If desired, memorial donations may be made to The Robert Ginsberg Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3 at (416) 7780-0324.

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ROSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-31 published
Royal Canadian Air Force pilot won Distinguished Flying Cross for bombing mission
By Tom HAWTHORN Monday, March 31, 2003 - Page R7
Surrey, British Columbia -- John ROSE, who won the Distinguished Flying Cross for completing a bombing mission over Germany in a damaged aircraft, died March 9 at his home here. He was 79.
Mr. ROSE was a flight lieutenant when assigned to join an attack on Munich in January, 1945. His bomber suffered serious damage from enemy fire and became difficult to fly, although Mr. ROSE decided not to abort the mission. On his return, the port outer engine failed, causing the bomber to lose altitude rapidly. Mr. ROSE regained control at 1,000 feet and nursed his plane home. Earlier in the war, he had survived a midair collision with another bomber.
Richard John ROSE, who was born in Toronto on June 9, 1923, had been working as a clerk when he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1941. After the war, Mr. ROSE spent 32 years as a pilot and instructor with KLM Royal Dutch Airlines. Late in his career he flew for Suriname Airlines.
He died of liver failure on March 9. He leaves his wife Erica and six children.

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ROSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-01 published
EGAR, Shirley (née LEMON)
Died peacefully at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, on Monday, March 31, 2003, in her 81st year. Dear wife of Stanley. Mother of Joann (Will MITCHELL) and John (Vanessa ROSE.) Grandmother of Martha (Jaron WALDMAN,) Lauren and Shannon. Sister of the late Harris LEMON and his wife Shirley. Aunt of Cynthia (Mark LEMON) and Tim (Jackie.) A service will be held in the chapel of the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East) on Thursday, April 3rd at one o'clock. A reception will follow.

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ROSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-03 published
Valetta May ROSE
By Jim PATTERSON Thursday, April 3, 2003 - Page A22
Valetta May ROSE
Domestic worker, farmer and comic writer's muse. Born in Warsaw, Ontario, January 9, 1912. Died January 16, in Toronto, of a stroke, aged 91.
On January 16, 2003, Valetta ROSE, 91, spoke with her brother, Ken DRAIN, and her niece, Dora BARR, by phone from her home in Norwood, Ontario Then she got into a limousine to go to a large family party in Toronto, to celebrate her nephew David PATTERSON's birthday. On the way, she sat with her great-nephew Paul, his partner Cathy and their six-week-old daughter, Kira, and was delighted to have the baby beside her for the trip.
There were more than 100 people at the party, but Valetta held court, greeting family members. Then, at 7 p.m., she suffered a stroke, and died instantly in her daughter Beattie's arms.
Born on January 9, 1912, Valetta was the second child of David DRAIN and Christina EDWARDS, who farmed near Warsaw, Ontario The DRAIN household was full of fiddle, piano and song; people arrived by horse and sled for music in the parlour, food in the kitchen and children everywhere. When Valetta's mother went into labour to deliver her sister Cora, Valetta's older brother Ivan was told to take his 20-month-old sister to grandma's house. Ivan was 3 and the house was two kilometres away -- but those were different times. Off the pair toddled, perfectly capable and perfectly safe.
As teenagers, Valetta and Cora set off for Toronto to work as domestics, eventually earning a respectable $25 per month plus room and board.
In 1943, Valetta married the love of her life, Ted ROSE. They farmed together outside Warsaw for 32 years. One night just after they were married, they went to Peterborough to see a movie. Afterward, walking up George Street, Valetta mused aloud about how lovely it would be to own a bedroom suite like the one in a store's display window. The next day, Ted came home with the furniture. Valetta never did discover how he'd afforded it.
In 1975, Ted and Valetta sold the farm and retired to Norwood. Ted died in 1987.
Last year, Valetta set off for Scotland with her daughters Beattie and Judy, their husbands, Bob BECHTEL and David GORDON, and Judy and David's two sons, Ian and Paul. Valetta announced, "On this trip, I just want to enjoy being all together." For three weeks, they drove around staying at bed and breakfasts and exploring the islands off the north coast. She was planning another trip this year -- to Judy's home in Vancouver.
For 40 years, Valetta followed the advice of one Dr. JARVIS, whose book Folk Medicine taught the benefits of lecithin, and she followed his prescription for a daily teaspoon of apple cider vinegar mixed with honey in a half glass of water to keep herself free from the worst of arthritis and other afflictions. Valetta knew that the secret of caring for others was simply to enjoy their company and, as the family "Information Central," loved to share stories of their successes.
She had her own place in Canadian cultural history. Filmmaker Norman JEWISON, a cousin, mentioned Valetta to writer Don HARRON, who immediately claimed her for use as the wife of his fictional character Charlie FARQUHARSON. Soon Valetta was credited with writing down Charlie's Hist'ry of Canada on those days when it was "too wet to plough." A highlight of Valetta's 90th birthday party was a card and framed photo from her "second husband."
Valetta made the best of every minute. She spent her last night on the bed that Ted had bought for her so many years before. Her spirit will delight family and Friends for years to come.
Jim PATTERSON is Valetta's sister Cora's youngest son. He was helped by Beattie, Ken, Cora HENDREN and Stephen PATTERSON.

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ROSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-05 published
COSTA, (GREGOR) Val
The beloved wife of Tibor GREGOR died peacefully on December 3rd, 2003 after a courageous battle with cancer. She will be fondly remembered by her husband, daughters Tania, Stacy and her fiancé Nelson WHITFORD and her family in Australia. She will be missed by Jan GREGOR, Anne Gregor ROSE, Fred and Martha ROSE and by her life-long friend Val THOMAS and her numerous other Friends. Val was a member of the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Royal Ontario Museum and a ballet enthusiast. A celebration of Val's rich life will be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W. (2 stop lights west of Yonge St.) on Tuesday December 9th at 1: 00 p.m. with a reception to follow at the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital would be appreciated by the family.

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ROSEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-11 published
Reid BELL
By Harry ROSEN Friday, July 11, 2003 - Page A20
Art director, company founder, husband, father, handyman, gardener. Born March 22, 1931, in Newmarket, Ontario Died Feb 26, of cancer, aged 71.
Reid BELL was a very special person; our relationship started in 1961 when Reid was an art director at Young and Rubicam and, working with the creative director, came up with the "Ask Harry" ads for my Harry Rosen store. Today, 42 years later, that campaign still influences our advertising.
Reid studied at the Ontario College of Art and then worked with McCann Erickson, Maclaren, and Young and Rubicam agencies. When Doyle Dane Bernbach opened in Toronto, Reid was appointed their first creative director. To learn their way of doing things, he went to New York. After a year, he returned to the Doyle Dane Bernbach Toronto office. However, Reid really wanted his own agency where he could set his own standards, choose his own clients and work with them personally.
In the late 1960s, Reid opened his own agency, Reid Bell Associates Advertising. I was happy to give him space for an office in the tailor shop of our store on Richmond Street -- sometimes ads were created on the ironing board. A few years later, Reid moved into his own quarters up the road.
Our business relationship lasted more than 35 years. Reid contributed an enormous amount to the success of Harry Rosen, and to other companies such as the Toronto Dominion Centre, Sutton Place Hotel and its Stop 33 lounge, Daks Shoes, the Fairweather and Calderone stores, Cambridge Clothes, Cadillac Apartments, and Millmar Magnesium Buckets.
I was a novice when it came to marketing but Reid and his associates were excellent teachers. The qualities that were evident in Reid were that he was extremely ethical and would not compromise his standards. He worked tirelessly to make certain every ad worked hard at entertaining the reader as well as selling the product.
He was trusting, loyal and always there when needed. For example, we had a fire at the store and as I surveyed the mess, the first person I thought to call was Reid. After listening to me, he immediately went to work on an ad to replace the current one and kept the momentum going through the whole clean-up period. In fact, we never claimed business interruption insurance because we never closed the doors - we actually made money.
At his memorial service a long-time associate said: "Reid was an important person in the ad business and the only reason his name was not famous is that he wouldn't play the big-agency, big-egos, award-grabbing game. But he was among the select few of real greats."
Another associate put it this way: "Stubborn. Collector of old toys. Lover of good food. Hater of Awards. Adviser. Loather of stuffed shirts. Serious commuter. Incomparable ethics. Fan of old movies. Driven. Painstaking horticulturalist. Very poor sufferer of fools. Mentor. Proud father. Loving, loyal husband."
When he retired in 1999, we kept in close touch. So did other clients who valued his input so much they insisted on having lunch with him every month.
More than being a remarkable advertising and business counsellor, Reid was a Mr. Fixit perfectionist at home, a keen gardener and loving husband for Barbara, caring father for Sandra, Jennifer and Jeffrey and a most valued friend to me and countless others.
He was born in Newmarket and lived there all his life. He never wanted to move and disliked travelling -- apart from 50 years of commuting to Toronto.
Through his recent illness (fighting a remorseless cancer for more than a year), he demonstrated an indomitable spirit that was the essence of Reid.
Harry ROSEN is a close friend of Reid BELL.

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ROSENBERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
KIZELL, Sonia (née GITKIN)
Peacefully in Toronto, on March 5, 2003, 2 Adar 2nd 5763, beloved Mother of Gita and Gerald PEARL, Dorothy and George ROSENBERG, Rachel and Gerald SCHNEIDERMAN, loving Bubby of Gina and Mikey, Sandy and Susan, Lizzy and Stewart, Elliott, Ari and Sagit, Jordan and Sharon, Daphna, Jed and Ariel, Liza and Gary, loving Great-Grandmother of Sigal, Edi, Einav, Dana, Remi, Marlin, Allegra, Zoey, Sonny, Jasmin and Nitai. Service at the Jewish Community Chapel, 1771 Cuba Ave., in Ottawa, on Friday, March 7, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Bank Street Cemetery. Shiva Hillel Lodge, 10 Nadolny Sachs Private, Ottawa. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Norman and Sonia Kizell Foundation (613) 798-4696.

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ROSENBERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-22 published
LANG, Patricia Eileen (née LEDDY)
Died of natural causes in her 87th year, at Haliburton, Ontario, on December 15th, 2003. Born in Saskatoon in 1917, Pat was the fouth of seven children who grew up in a big rambling house on Saskatchewan Crescent. Their home served as the unofficial hub of the city's social scene from the children's formative years to adulthood, when Pat left to marry Rudy LANG in 1950. She met Rudy sight unseen by teletype, communicating between her job at Trans-Canada Airlines in Saskatoon and his at Canadian Pacific Airlines in Regina. They enjoyed a long, happy life together until Rudy's passing in 2002.
Pat and Rudy moved to Toronto in 1950 and started a new family. In the East for the first time, Pat dedicated herself to raising her son, Gerry and daughter Kathleen. She was an avid bridge player and generously volunteered her time throughout her life serving the Red Cross, the Catholic Women's League and the Mississauga Hospital Auxiliary.
With the exception of four years in Ottawa, Pat spent the rest of her life in the Toronto/Mississauga area, until her 12 year affliction with Alzheimer's Disease required her to move to extendicare facility in Haliburton in 2001 where she received the most perfect, loving care of the professionals and fellow residents. The family is profoundly grateful to Jane ROSENBERG and her enlightened staff and to Dr. HARTWICK for the good physical health and quirky vigour she enjoyed in her last years.
Patricia LANG is survived by Kathleen LANG and Andrew HACKETT, Gerry and Colleen LANG and grandchildren Geoffrey and Meghan LANG, and brothers Murray LEDDY and Brian LEDDY. Her feisty energy and wit touched everyone.
A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at the Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, Minden on Friday, January 9, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment to take place in the spring at Ingoldsby Pioneer Cemetery. Reception to follow in the family centre at the Gordon A. Monk Funeral Home Ltd.
Memorial donations to the Extendicare Proud Pioneers would be appreciated and can be arranged through the Gordon A. Monk Funeral Home Ltd., 127 Main Street, Minden (1-888-588-5777).

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ROSENBERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
'The lovable rogue' who made and lost fortunes
One of Canada's most successful real-estate salesmen threw famous parties, especially during the 1980s boom, when he brokered property deals worth more than $10-billion
By James McCREADY, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- His Friends called him a lovable rogue. His enemies left out the lovable. Eddy COGAN was a love-him or hate-him kind of guy, a brash real-estate salesman, maybe the most successful real-estate salesmen of his era in Canada. He sold more than $10-billion of real estate in the 1980s, by far his most successful decade.
When Eddy COGAN died in late October, people remembered two things about him straightaway: He was the one who brokered the huge Greymac apartment deal. And he was also the greatest party-giver of the 1980s in Toronto, spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on a three-day bash, when he would take over the entire Windsor Arms Hotel -- rooms, restaurants and bars -- and open them to his Friends.
Mr. COGAN brokered a deal in 1982 to sell 10,931 apartment units belonging to Cadillac Fairview to a group led by Leonard ROSENBERG of Greymac Trust. The sale was worth $320-million but Mr. COGAN found out a couple of hours later that Mr. ROSENBERG and his partners had flipped the buildings, selling them for $500-million to what turned out to be a fictitious Saudi Arabian consortium. Mr. ROSENBERG eventually went to jail, but Mr. COGAN was clean since he didn't have any part in the illegal flip.
Edwin Aubrey COGAN was born on October 5, 1934. His father had fled Ukraine after the Russian Revolution. It was a sound decision, since Stalin starved the Ukrainian peasants in the 1930s and Hitler's death squads killed almost all the Jews in Kiev during the Nazi occupation.
Eddy's father was a professional boxer and waiter who changed his name from COHEN to COGAN to get work at Toronto's Park Plaza Hotel, which didn't hire Jews in the 1930s. Eddy went to Palmerston Public School but wasn't much of a student and dropped out of school in Grade 9. At 15, he went west and worked in the woods in British Columbia.
A few years of manual labour had him thinking about a change, and he returned to school and qualified as a land surveyor. After many years working surveying properties, he decided to move into real estate. In the 1950s, when Mr. COGAN started doing property deals, most of the action was in what is called "assembling" land, which means buying up huge tracts of land, not just in the country but also in the city.
Mr. COGAN would do things such as go door-to-door asking people if they wanted to sell their houses or buildings. He was working for developers such as Cadillac Fairview, which in turn would put up a strip of high-rise apartment buildings once the land had been assembled. Probably more than any town planner, Mr. COGAN changed the face of Toronto from the 1950s to the 1980s.
"After rent control came in, in 1975, there was less demand for buildings," says Larry COGAN, who worked with his father for more than 20 years. "It was the main reason Cadillac Fairview decided to sell off those properties."
It was that deal that made Eddy COGAN rich and allowed him to launch the famous parties of the 1980s. The parties ended with the real-estate crash of 1989-90. Mr. COGAN had invested in a 6,000-acre property called the "jail lands" just north of the city. It was an old prison farm that was to be turned into a residential development. When the property boom went bust, so did Mr. COGAN. It was the end of one big fortune and the start of a decade spent rebuilding his wealth. In the 1990s, perhaps his most successful transaction involved Terminal 3 at Toronto's Pearson Airport.
Mr. COGAN was a slender man with a wiry build and movie-star good looks. Women found him attractive, and his Friends said that women were his weakness. He enjoyed spending time in Los Angeles and New York in the company of models and actresses -- some famous, some not.
"When he saw an opportunity to be with a high-profile, beautiful woman, he would approach it like a real-estate project," his son Larry said. "He would network and use all his skills to close the deal."
Like many people who work on deals for a living, Eddy COGAN had an unconventional business day, in particular in the latter part of his career. He loathed gadgets. He didn't like cellphones or computers and never had an e-mail address of his own. Rather than offices, he preferred to meet in restaurants, though he was a light eater and didn't drink much. After the Windsor Arms and its restaurants closed, he switched to Prego, a restaurant in Yorkville.
Mr. COGAN lived his work. He was always working on a deal, micromanaging it to make sure the project came off.
"He was a big thinker. He was very fit and he liked to walk and think," said Diane FRANCIS, the journalist who became a close friend after doing a few stories on him in the mid-1980s. "The last big deal he was working on was in Niagara Falls, New York."
When he first looked at Niagara Falls, the town on the Ontario side was a success, with a casino and a diversified tourist trade. Niagara Falls, New York was a dump, with an empty centre, shuttered factories and a neighbourhood that was a household name for environmental catastrophe, Love Canal. Mr. COGAN spent the better part of a decade trying to develop the New York side into a place as successful as the Ontario side. At the time of his death, a casino had opened on the New York side and he was closer to putting his dream together.
He lived in downtown Toronto in a huge penthouse in the Colonnade on Bloor Street, a rental apartment with a small swimming pool inside the unit. Mr. COGAN was a generous man, always willing to help his Friends. Once, when promoters were trying to put together a race between American and Canadian superstar sprinters, Mr. COGAN helped bankroll it. It lost money.
Mr. COGAN married once and divorced. He leaves his six children.

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ROSENBERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
LANG, Patricia Eileen (née LEDDY)
Died of natural causes in her 87th year, at Haliburton, Ontario, on December 15th, 2003. Born in Saskatoon in 1917, Pat was the fouth of seven children who grew up in a big rambling house on Saskatchewan Crescent. Their home served as the unofficial hub of the city's social scene from the children's formative years to adulthood, when Pat left to marry Rudy LANG in 1950. She met Rudy sight unseen by teletype, communicating between her job at Trans-Canada Airlines in Saskatoon and his at Canadian Pacific Airlines in Regina. They enjoyed a long, happy life together until Rudy's passing in 2002.
Pat and Rudy moved to Toronto in 1950 and started a new family. In the East for the first time, Pat dedicated herself to raising her son, Gerry and daughter Kathleen. She was an avid bridge player and generously volunteered her time throughout her life serving the Red Cross, the Catholic Women's League and the Mississauga Hospital Auxiliary.
With the exception of four years in Ottawa, Pat spent the rest of her life in the Toronto/Mississauga area, until her 12 year affliction with Alzheimer's Disease required her to move to extendicare facility in Haliburton in 2001 where she received the most perfect, loving care of the professionals and fellow residents. The family is profoundly grateful to Jane ROSENBERG and her enlightened staff and to Dr. HARTWICK for the good physical health and quirky vigour she enjoyed in her last years.
Patricia LANG is survived by Kathleen LANG and Andrew HACKETT, Gerry and Colleen LANG and grandchildren Geoffrey and Meghan LANG, and brothers Murray LEDDY and Brian LEDDY. Her feisty energy and wit touched everyone.
A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at the Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, Minden on Friday, January 9, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment to take place in the spring at Ingoldsby Pioneer Cemetery. Reception to follow in the family centre at the Gordon A. Monk Funeral Home Ltd.

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ROSENBERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-31 published
Slain man was central to case that altered confession rule
By Christie BLATCHFORD, Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - Page A7
The late Kirk Alexander SWEENEY, who was buried just this week, may be best remembered by the general public as one of a number of young black men gunned down over the Christmas holidays.
Toronto homicide detectives may think instead of how crude street justice got Mr. SWEENEY in the end: He was, they say, essentially executed at the G-Spot nightclub in the early-morning hours of December 22.
The handsome 26-year-old allegedly had been a witness, four years ago, to a double murder that took place at another crowded club.
But Mr. SWEENEY, like dozens and dozens of others who were within an arm's length of the victims, refused to tell police what he knew of the shooting of Godfrey (Junior) DUNBAR and Richard BROWN.
The result of their collective silence has been that those two slayings remain unsolved, the killer or killers still at large.
And now, of course, the same hear-, see-, and speak-no-evil rule appears to be applying to the investigation of Mr. SWEENEY's slaying. Detectives find few people who were within eyeshot, among the crowd of 150, willing to co-operate.
But Mr. SWEENEY made a rather more lasting contribution to Canadian criminal law -- aside, that is, from compiling a not unimpressive record of his own on various weapons-related offences.
In the fall of 2000, he was the person at the centre of an important legal case, the outcome of which made it far more difficult for police to get suspects to talk and virtually impossible for prosecutors to take any resulting confessions to court if even a hint of a whiff of a threat had been used to obtain them.
The background goes like this.
On December 31, 1996, a taxi driver -- a hard-working new immigrant picked up two men and drove them to a townhouse complex in Toronto.
One man, allegedly Mr. SWEENEY, was in the front passenger seat, the other in the rear. Once they reached their destination, the man in the front switched off the ignition, while the rear passenger purportedly put his arm around the driver's neck.
The man in the front then allegedly pointed a gun at the driver, threatened to kill him, and demanded his money.
As the driver was reaching to get it, he told police later, the man in the front pistol-whipped him about the head.
The two men fled with the money; the police were called, and within an hour, a police dog was tracking a scent from the cab to the rear entrance of the townhouse of Mr. SWEENEY's family.
As Mr. SWEENEY left the home, he was arrested, along with another suspect.
Mr. SWEENEY subsequently made two statements to police.
One officer said if Mr. SWEENEY could tell them where the gun was, they would not have to execute a search warrant on his mother's home.
Mr. SWEENEY told the detective he had thrown the weapon out a window, but police still couldn't find it.
At Mr. SWEENEY's original trial, Judge David HUMPHREY disallowed the statement on the grounds that it was the product of "an inducement" by the detective.
But Mr. SWEENEY gave another statement.
A second officer said police had prepared a search warrant for the house -- this was true -- and told Mr. SWEENEY that officers would "trash" the house, looking for the gun, if he didn't tell them where it was. Mr. SWEENEY apparently hesitated, and the officer added, "Your mom is already upset. Just be a man and make this easier for her." Mr. SWEENEY told the officer the gun was in a box in his mother's closet, and even drew a little diagram for him.
The police executed the warrant and, as sure as cats like litter, found the gun, right where Mr. SWEENEY said it was.
At trial, Judge HUMPHREY concluded -- sensibly, I'd argue, to the average Joe -- that this statement was also the result of an inducement, and thus involuntary, but found it admissible under what's called the St. Lawrence rule. That rule, taken from an old case of the same name, held that even involuntary statements are admissible if they are reliable -- if, in other words, the suspect is proved to have been telling the truth. In this way, those who make false confessions are still protected.
As Judge HUMPHREY wrote with considerable understatement of the purported inducement, "There was no aura of oppression, no torture it was almost a gentlemen's agreement, if you will."
Mr. SWEENEY was duly convicted by a judge and jury of robbery, assault while using a weapon and two other weapons offences, and sentenced to six years in prison.
Fast forward to the Ontario Court of Appeal, where Mr. SWEENEY's new lawyer, Howard BORENSTEIN, successfully argued that his client's Charter right to remain silent had been violated by the police having held over his head the "threat" of the raucous search.
In a September 25, 2000, decision, Mr. Justice Marc ROSENBERG, writing for the unanimous court, threw out the involuntary confession, thundered that "a threat to destroy the property of a family member by abusing the authority given to the police by the search warrant is not properly characterized as a technical threat" and said that if the confession were allowed, "it would be condoning the use of threats to abuse judicial process" and would "raise serious concerns for the administration of justice."
More broadly, Judge ROSENBERG said that the old St. Lawrence rule was now so undermined by the Charter that it "would only be in highly exceptional circumstances" that a trial judge would be entitled to admit a confession like Mr. SWEENEY's.
And because the poor cab driver -- remember him? -- had had only a glimpse of his attacker, and there was virtually no other evidence against Mr. SWEENEY, the Court of Appeal set aside the conviction and entered an acquittal.
Mr. SWEENEY went on to compile his lengthy criminal record, allegedly witness a double murder about which he remained mute, and die on the floor of the G-Spot. I wonder what all that does for the glory of the administration of justice.
Clarification Due to my inability to read my own notes, I wrote the other day that Adrian BAPTISTE, gunned down last Saturday in a North York parking lot and only eight days out of jail after being acquitted of second-degree murder, had been talking of straightening out his life, and thinking of going into law enforcement. In fact, as his lawyer David BAYLISS told me, Mr. BAPTISTE had dreamed of becoming a lawyer.

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ROSENMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
CHANDRAN, Beverley Anne
On Friday, March 7, 2003, in her 50th year, Beverley was called to, once again, be one with the Creator of Creation. She went with a blazing smile of glory in her soul, while giving her unselfish, unstoppable gratitude in peace, tranquility, and a twinkle in her eye. At home in Erin, Ontario with her loved ones. In their 29th year of marriage, ever beloved part of Clarence; eternally loving mother of sons Justin (23) and his wife Jennifer; Liam (21) and Keddy (19.) Only daughter of Ambrose and Theresa CARROLL and sister of Gary (Marlene), D'Arcy (Pam) and Paul (Harriet). Only daughter-in-law of Geoff and Lena CHANDRAN and sister-in-law of Brinda McLAUGHLIN (John.) Permanent thanks to dearest and giving Friends, old and new. And special thanks to: Dr. Alan FRIEDMAN and staff, Dr. Henry FRIEDMAN of Duke University Medical Center; Dr. Stephen TREMONT and staff of Rex Hospital Cancer Clinic Dr. Julian ROSENMAN and staff of University of North Carolina Radiation Oncology Clinic; Dr. Lew STOCKS and staff, Dr. Mike DELISSIO and staff, Dr. Robert ALLEN and staff, Dr. Donald BROWN, all of Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina, U.S.A. Dr. Peter COLE of Orangeville, Ontario, and the nursing staff of Robertson and Brown of Kitchener, Ontario. Visitation and a Celebration of Beverley's life will take place at her home: #4998, 10th Sideroad of Erin, Ontario (north of Ballinafad Road, south of 5th Sideroad). Visitation for family and Friends will be held on Sunday, March 9, 2003, from 2 pm to 8 pm. On Monday, March 10, 2003, there will be a private family Funeral Mass, after which, Friends and family are invited to participate in a Celebration of Beverley's life from 3 pm. to 8 pm. In lieu of flowers, the family respectfully requests donations be made to the American Cancer Society (P.O. Box 102454, Atlanta, Georgia 303068-2454) or The Canadian Cancer Society (Wellington County Unit, 214 Speedvale Avenue, W. Unit 4A, Guelph, Ontario N1H 1C4) Arrangements entrusted to Butcher Family Funeral Home, 5399 Main Street, South, Erin, Ontario, Canada. For more information call 519-833-2231.

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ROSS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-01 published
Stanley ROSS (Johnny) ROSE
Passed away peacefully at Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga on Sunday, August 24, 2003 in his 81st year, beloved husband of Connie BAMBROUGH, loved father of Linda CUNNINGHAM of Orangeville, John and his wife Barbara of Lindsay, Ron and his wife Sandra of Cobourg, Laurie LAWSON and her husband Gord of Orangeville, and Don and his wife Susan of Orangeville, dear grandfather of Crystal, Melissa, Michael, Kimberely and her husband Neil, Emily and Emma, also sadly missed by his sister Marjorie FRY and her husband Bruce, predeceased by his brother Donald.
Friends called at the Dods and McFair Funeral Home and Chapel on Wednesday, August 27, 2003. Funeral Service was held in the chapel on Thursday, August 28, 2003. Interment in Forest Lawn Cemetery.
A tree will be planted in memory of Johnny in the Dods and McNair Memorial Forest at the Island Lake Conservation Area, Orangeville.
A dedication service was held on Sunday, September 7, 2003.

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ROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-15 published
LUCAS, Muriel May (née ROSS)
Died peacefully, at her home in Toronto, on Wednesday, February 12, 2003, in her 97th year. She was born in Brighton, Ontario on December 15, 1906. The ROSS family were early settlers from Ireland in the Brighton region. Muriel's parents were Robert James ROSS and Elva WAITE. Elva WAITE's parents, Sarah Jane and William WAITE, were of United Empire Loyalist background and owned a farm between Brighton and Colborne. Muriel was a Registered Nurse and graduated from The Wellesley Hospital. During World War 2, she volunteered for the Red Cross Blood Donor Clinic and nursing assignments at The Wellesley Hospital to free up nurses for war duty. Muriel devoted much of her time and energy to her church, Deer Park United. Her many years of service included being president of the United Church Women. She was a longtime member of the Philanthropic Educational Opportunity and continued to attend meetings into her last year. Her service to her community also included Board membership of Saint Christopher House and the Toronto Children's Aid Society. Muriel enjoyed spending every summer with family and Friends at her cottage on Lake Scugog. She was the loving wife of J.D. LUCAS, former Solicitor for the County of York, who predeceased her in 1986. Her love was endless for her daughters Jane GORDON, who predeceased her in October 2002, and her husband Ian of Burlington, Ontario, Carol BOTTERELL and her husband Frank of Claremont, California, her grandchildren Bruce GORDON, who predeceased her in December 2002, Sarah LEIKKARI and her husband Rick of Ottawa, Douglas BOTTERELL and his wife Audra, and Kate BOTTERELL, all of California, and great-grand_son Ian LEIKKARI of Ottawa. Funeral Services will be held at Deer Park United Church, 129 St. Clair Avenue West, on Tuesday, February 18th at 2: 30 p.m. If desired, donations in Muriel's memory to the Canadian Cancer Society, 20 Holly Street, Suite 101, Toronto M4S 3B1, would be appreciated.

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ROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-17 published
David S. (Tim) BEATTY
Loving husband, father and grandfather died peacefully, on February 13, 2003, in Toronto. A well respected entrepreneur and businessman, Tim was former president of Burns Bros. and Denton. Among his many accomplishments in life were: Honourary Colonel in Chief of the Royal Regiment of Canada, Chairman of the Board of Upper Canada College, President of the Investment Dealer's Association of Canada, Chairman of the national fundraising committee for the erection of the Prince of Wales Theatre at Upper Canada Village, and helping in the development of Spar Aerospace. In 1984, Tim was honoured to receive the Order of Canada for his contribution to Canadian figure skating. Most of all, Tim will be remembered for his sense of humour, his love of life and his selflessness. Tim is survived by his wife Eugénie (Pete,) son David R. BEATTY and his wife Debby, daughter Barb TAILOR/TAYLOR and her husband Douglas REID, grandchildren Andrew, Ken, Charlie and Deb BEATTY, Briare, Caley, Heather and Brendan TAILOR/TAYLOR, Michael and Peter REID. He was predeceased by his first wife, Ann Elise BEATTY (née ROSS.) The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Thursday, February 20. The funeral service will be held at Grace Church-on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale Road, on Friday, February 21 at 11 o'clock. In lieu of flowers, donations to Belmont House, 55 Belmont Street, Toronto M5R 1R1, would be appreciated. 'He left this world a better place.'

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ROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
NAUSS, Hazen ''Bill''
Died peacefully at home, on Saturday, April 5, 2003, after a lengthy bout with Parkinson's. Beloved husband of Elinor (nee ROSS) of 64 years. Loving father of Janet BIBERDORF (Donald,) John (Esperanza), Katherine SIMBIRSKI (Dennis) and Robert. Cherished grandfather of Ann (Tim), Lynn (Kenneth), Michlyn, Mark and Spencer (Heather) and great-grandfather of Nolon. Bill will be lovingly remembered by brother-in-law John ROSS and his wife Romayne, other family and many Friends. Bill was a retired employee of Falconbridge Ltd., a longtime member of All Saints Kingsway Anglican Church as well as the Kiwanis Club of Islington. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West, Etobicoke (between Islington and Kipling Avenues), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday. Funeral Service will be held at All Saints Kinsway Anglican Church, 2850 Bloor Street West, Etobicoke (northeast corner of Bloor and Prince Edward), on Wednesday, April 9, 2003 at 2 p.m. Cremation to follow. If desired, memorials to All Saints Building Campaign or the Parkinson Society would be appreciated.

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ROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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ROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-24 published
Ian ROSS
By David ROSS Thursday, July 24, 2003 - Page A18
Son, brother, uncle, friend, wildlife biologist. Born December 16, 1958, in Goderich, Ontario Died June 29, near Nanyuki, Kenya, in a light-aircraft accident, aged 44.
Ian ROSS died at the peak of his career, doing what he loved.
Born in Southern Ontario, he was a true outdoorsman from the beginning, running a trapline even during high school. He graduated from the University of Guelph with an honours degree in wildlife biology in 1982. There being few jobs in his chosen profession at that time, he was a lost soul when he drove his pickup truck, packed with all of his possessions, out to Alberta looking for work. A short stint working as a beekeeper in Peace River was followed by his being hired as a wildlife biologist by a small private consulting firm in Calgary. His joy was quickly, and prophetically, short lived when his mentor died in a plane crash while conducting a wildlife survey in the Rockies shortly after Ian started work.
Ian and a colleague continued the firm, conducting environmental impact studies in Western and Northern Canada for government, the oil industry and, latterly, Canada's fledgling diamond industry. While rapid expansion of human activities in these areas had put his services in great demand lately, it was not always so. In the early years, Ian and his partner filled their spare time conducting a non-funded study of cougars in the area southwest of his home in Calgary. His work on the cougar project received national recognition as he appeared on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Morningside with Peter GZOWSKI. Arthur BLACK followed along while the partners radio-collared a cougar and recorded the event for an episode of Basic Black. Last year, he did a Discovery Channel show on the great bears.
A true, committed conservationist, Ian did not fit the typical mode. He hunted, legally, deer and moose for his own table. One never knew what to expect for dinner at Ian's and usually didn't ask. At the same time, he vigorously opposed the senseless trophy killing of wolves, bears and cougars. He was a major researcher on the eastern slopes grizzly-bear project currently underway in Alberta and British Columbia. His work with cougars led the Alberta government to introduce a conservation plan for these animals.
At one time a bit of a loner, Ian had grown to become a committed and emotional friend and family man. Having no children of his own, he was a hero to his young nieces, nephews and children of Friends who thought that his was the most important job of all. What uncle could match Ian when he produced the perfect fossilized albertasaurus tooth found on one of his Alberta expeditions?
Last year, Ian was approached to lead a study of large African predators, funded partly by the University of California and the National Geographic Society. Ian's time was largely volunteered. The purpose of the study was to learn how to reduce the number of domestic livestock killed by these magnificent animals so that the local farmers, some of the poorest on Earth, would not have to kill the lions, leopards and hyenas. Ian understood that if these predators were to survive in the long run they had to be able to exist outside of the national parks or face extinction due to inbreeding.
Ian's dry sense of humour was famous. We will never forget the letters describing the goat stew (scavenged from a lion kill) or the haircut performed by his mechanic.
Two days before his death he was on top of the world having collared his first leopard and was busy planning for our families' upcoming trip to visit him at the research station in August. On the evening he died, Ian was tracking a radio-collared lion from a light aircraft. Its wreckage was located by searchers the next morning. As he wished, he was cremated and his ashes dispersed in Kananaskis country where he had spent so much time with his cougars.
David ROSS is Ian's brother.

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ROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-28 published
He had a passion for big cats
Canadian wildlife biologist pioneered long-running cougar project, radio-tracked lions in East Africa
By Allison LAWLOR Monday, July 28, 2003 - Page R7
Ian ROSS, a Canadian wildlife biologist whose love of big cats took him deep into the bush in East Africa, has died after his small plane crashed in central Kenya. He was 44.
Mr. ROSS was radio-tracking lions in Kenya's Laikipia district as part of a research study aimed at improving the conservation of large carnivores in Africa, when the two-seater Husky aircraft he was a passenger in crashed and burned.
The plane, which was flying at a low altitude in order to allow him to track the animals, crashed in the early evening of June 29. Mr. ROSS and the American pilot who was flying the plane were killed instantly, said Laurence FRANK, director of the Laikipia Predator Project and a research associate at the University of California at Berkeley.
Mr. ROSS, who arrived in Kenya from Calgary in January, had intended to stay there working on the project for at least a year.
"He had this real passion for big cats. He wanted to study them around the world," said Vivian PHARIS, who sits on the board of directors at the Alberta Wilderness Association, of which Mr. ROSS was a member for close to 20 years.
"Large carnivores are interesting because their populations tend to be the first to suffer from human activities," Mr. ROSS said a few years ago in a short article written on the occasion of a high-school reunion. "They require huge land areas and some of their characteristics are very similar to and conflict with our own."
Although Mr. ROSS had spent considerable time in the field researching several wild animals, including lions, grizzly bears and moose, Mr. ROSS was best known for his expertise on cougars.
In the mid-1990s, he and colleague Martin JALKOTZY, with whom he ran a small Calgary-based consulting firm called Arc Wildlife Services, completed a 14-year study on cougars.
The study, considered the longest-running cougar project and the most intensive of its kind, looked at everything from cougar population dynamics, to the effects of hunting, to food and habitat use.
The intensive fieldwork took place in the winter in the foothills of Alberta. Winter allowed the researchers to follow a cougar's tracks in the snow. Once a cat was tracked, with the help of dogs, the animal would be tranquillized before it was radio-collared and its measurements were taken.
"We worked really well as a team," Mr. JALKOTZY said. "It was something Ian did quite well."
The cougar project received wide public attention when Mr. ROSS appeared on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's Morningside with Peter GZOWSKI and Arthur BLACK, the former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio host, followed along with Mr. ROSS and Mr. JALKOTZY while they radio-collared a cougar. Mr. BLACK recorded the event for his program Basic Black.
In the mid-1980s, not long after Mr. ROSS became involved in the study, he lost his friend and mentor Orvall PALL. Mr. PALL was killed in a plane crash while tracking bighorn sheep in Alberta. At the time of his death he was working with Mr. ROSS and Mr. JALKOTZY on the cougar project.
Over the years, Mr. ROSS, who was described as quiet and unassuming, made a number of public presentations on the cougar study. He was especially in demand in 2001 after a woman was killed by a cougar while cross-country skiing near Banff, Alberta.
"Ian really believed in public education," believing it was the first step toward conservation, Mr. JALKOTZY said. Speaking publicly also helped to raise money, from individual donors, corporations and other sources, for the independent study.
Mr. ROSS also did a lot of work with Alberta Fish and Wildlife and was instrumental, along with Mr. JALKOTZY, in getting the province to adopt a new cougar wildlife management plan to control hunting.
Ian ROSS was born on December 16, 1958, in Goderich, Ontario He was the third of four children born to Burns and Ruth ROSS. Childhood was spent in the fields of Huron County near his home, climbing through muskrat swamps and collecting pelts and animal skulls.
After high school, Mr. ROSS left Goderich for Guelph, Ontario, where he studied wildlife biology. In 1982, he graduated from the University of Guelph with an honours degree. Soon after, he packed up his pickup truck with all his possessions and drove west to Alberta. After a short stint working as a beekeeper in the Peace River area, he was hired by a small private consulting firm in Calgary as a wildlife biologist and started studying grizzly bears and moose.
In 1984, he married Sheri MacLAREN, also from Goderich. The couple separated in January, 2002.
Over the course of his career, Mr. ROSS figured he had captured and released more than 1,000 large mammals including bighorn sheep, cougars and grizzlies, for research. Not afraid of large animals, he captured and collared his first leopard two days before he died.
Andrew ROSS recalls one time his older brother was injured by a moose when it kicked him in the face after being sedated. He was left bruised and with a cracked cheekbone.
"He was extremely meticulous and careful," Dr. FRANK said, referring to Mr. ROSS's work.
Through his consulting firm, Mr. ROSS conducted numerous environmental impact studies in western and northern Canada for the oil industry and government. The work required Mr. ROSS to spend a lot more time at his office desk instead of in the field where he felt his true talent was.
"Working with these large animals is very exciting and also very dangerous," Dr. FRANK said.
Mr. ROSS loved being in the field but hated what he had to do to the animals. He knew that by capturing the large predators he was causing them trauma, but he strongly believed that what he was doing was for the benefit of research and in the end the benefit of the animals, Dr. FRANK said.
"He was just so aware of the animal's experience, the animal's dignity, if you can put it that way," Dr. FRANK said.
Mr. ROSS spent the spring of 2002 working in northern British Columbia capturing grizzly bears for research. The job meant Mr. ROSS, a man small in stature but strong and wiry, and a pilot would fly low over an area in a helicopter trying to spot bears. Once they had, Mr. ROSS's job was to lean out of the plane, secure in his harness and dart the animal with a tranquillizer. After the animal was sedated, they would circle back, land the plane and eventually radio collar the animal.
"He had great capture skills," Mr. JALKOTZY said.
Aside from being a committed conservationist, Mr. ROSS was also an avid hunter and enjoyed hunting elk, moose and deer. But he vigorously opposed the trophy killing of wolves, bears and cougars.
Andrew ROSS recalls that when his brother went moose hunting, deep in the woods, he would only bring three bullets with him. He figured that if he couldn't kill an animal with those, he didn't deserve to get one.
"He would often get the moose with one bullet," Andrew ROSS said.
While he loved to hunt, he never went out in an area he was studying, considering that to be a conflict of interest, his brother said.
"Ian cared passionately about wildlife and wild country," and tried to do what he could to conserve it, Mr. JALKOTZY said.
Next month, Mr. ROSS's ashes will be dispersed in Alberta's Kananaskis country, where he had spent so much time with the cougars.

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ROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-30 published
LITTLE, Alexander Ross
Ross died peacefully at home on July 25, 2003. Born November 15, 1908 in Woodstock Ontario, he is predeceased by parents Henry Alexander LITTLE and Emily Christina (née ROSS,) and his only brother Jim LITTLE (Lillian) of London, Ontario. Ross is survived by his wife of 65 years, Helen and their children: Christy; Peter (Noreen) of Owen Sound and their children Marion (Ted HODSON,) Martha (Eric TIISLER,) Alexander (Kim STARK,) Heather and Christopher Andrew of Calgary; and Ron (Cath) of Calgary and their children Jane and Jim; and by five great-grandchildren.
Childhood at Altadore, his family home in Woodstock and many years at Lakefield Preparatory School were followed by Ridley College School, Trinity College (U of T), (Beta Theta Pi) Osgoode Hall, membership in the Law Society of Upper Canada and work with the Canada Permanent Trust Company. Ross married Helen (SHUTTLEWORTH) on April 14, 1938 in London, Ontario then served as an Royal Canadian Air Force Wing Commander during World War 2. Rejoining the Permanent, he became Winnipeg Branch Manager from 1945 until his retirement in 1972.
Volunteer commitments: The Canadian Disaster Relief Fund, Trustee of the Winnipeg School Board District 1, Save the Children Canada, figure skating judge, the Crescentwood Home Owners Association, the Men's Musical Club, Kiwanis and St. George's Anglican Church - Building Committee, Warden, Vestry and 50 year member of the Choir.
Favorite pastimes: singing, piano, painting with Helen and Canadian history through the Champlain Society and Hudson's Bay Record Society, travels with Helen and Christy, a life time of golf including many years at St. Charles Golf and Country Club and ice dancing at the Winnipeg Winter Club with Helen.
An exemplary citizen, wonderful father and truly gentle man, he will be dearly missed.
Memorial service: Saturday August 2 at 11:00 a.m., St. George's Anglican Crescentwood, 168 Wilton Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3M 3C3.
In lieu of flowers: the St. George's Memorial Fund c/o the Church, Kiwanis Club of Winnipeg Foundation Inc. 430 Webb Place Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 3J7, the Winnipeg Art Gallery 300 Memorial Blvd., Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 1V1 or Save the Children Canada, 4141 Yonge Street, Suite 300 Toronto, Ontario M2P 2A8.

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ROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-09 published
WOOTTON, Marjorie Irenee
Marjorie WOOTTON, cherished wife of the late Frank WOOTTON died peacefully, at Saint Mary's of the Lake Hospital, on Thursday, August 7, 2003. Beloved mother to Jane SHERWOOD and Ned WOOTTON (Amy ROSS,) and grandmother to Kate, Will and Jamie. In keeping with Marjorie's wishes, there will be no funeral service. Arrangements entrusted to the Kingston Cremation Services (613) 634-0463.

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ROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-16 published
ROSS, Dr. James Leger
Died peacefully, at the Sherbrooke Hospital, surrounded by his family, on August 13, 2003. Jim was born in Montreal on September 12, 1929. He is survived by his wife Mary Lynn, his children Tony (Julie Anne), Heather, Andy and Peter, his grandchildren Jessica, Rebecca and Vanessa, his sister Christine, his sisters-in- law Ruth and Barbara. A graduate of McGill University, Jim worked for many years as a surgeon at the Sherbrooke Hospital in Sherbrooke, Quebec. Throughout his life he was very active in the community, serving on the school board, the regional health council and on the Corporation of Bishop's University. Jim was one of the founding members and president of the Townshippers Association. A lifelong outdoorsman, Jim lived the last years of his life in North Hatley, Quebec and served as President of the Massawippi Water Protection Association. There will be visitation at St-Mark's Chapel, Bishop's University, Lennoxville, Quebec, on Friday, August 15, 2003 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Funeral Service will be held at St-Mark's Chapel on Saturday, August 16, 2003 at 3 p.m. followed by interment at the Reedsville Cemetery, North Hatley, Quebec. Donations, in memory of Jim, may be sent to Bishop's University Foundation, Alumni and Development Office, Lennoxville, Quebec, J1M 1K7 or to Massawippi Water Protection, Box 599, North Hatley, Quebec J0B 2C0.

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ROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-10 published
Allan QUINN
By Bev QUINN and Arch RITTER, Monday, November 10, 2003 - Page A16
Veteran, Mason, jeweller, piper. Born November 27, 1916, in Ottawa. Died March 3 in Ottawa, of stomach cancer, aged 86.
One might have thought that Allan was born with bagpipes in his hands. Instead, he started taking chanter lessons from his uncle, Alex McBAIN, at 6, moved up to the pipes at 8, and by the age of 11, won a gold medal for piping in Banff, Alberta.
Allan's father, George, was born in China but became a restaurateur, first in Montreal, and then in Ottawa. Here he met Margaret Helen, from Moose Creek, Ontario They had six sons and one daughter. All the children worked in the St. James Café, George's fish-and-chip shop in Ottawa. As a boy, Allan also delivered candy by wagon for Short's Candy Store, worked as paper boy for the Ottawa Citizen, delivered for a drug store, and worked in a radiator shop and garage.
In 1931, Allan joined the Ottawa Highlanders (later the Cameron Highlanders) as a piper. He went on active duty in 1939 when the "Camerons" were mobilized, then moved to Camp Borden; later to Iceland and Scotland in 1941. From 1943 to 1944, he studied piping at Edinburgh Castle with the renowned Pipe Major Willie ROSS. He was posted in England until D-Day when he went to France, Belgium and Germany. He was released from the army in 1945.
Allan met his first wife, Sophia, in a social club the troops would frequent in Edinburgh while on leave. They were married in 1944 and she came to Canada as a war bride. Allan and Sophia had four children, George, Allan, Margaret and Heather, and eight grandchildren, one of whom predeceased him. Sophia passed away in 1986 from breast cancer.
Allan entered watch-making coincidentally, when a fellow soldier threw his broken Timex against the Nisson hut wall. Allan picked it up and repaired it in a day or two. Soon everybody, including a brigadier general from 3rd Division Headquarters, was bringing him watches for repair. This led to a watch-making course in 1943 in Brighton, England, courtesy of the military.
Following the war, Allan worked for Jack Snow Jewellers in Ottawa, then acquired Elgin Jewellers. In 1974, Allan handed Elgin Jewellers over to his son, Allan, who still operates it.
Allan was an excellent piping instructor, referred to by some as a "student's teacher." He taught hundreds of students, some up until one month before he was diagnosed with cancer. He was an inspiring mentor, a demanding musician, and a good friend.
One of Allan's best students was Bev FEDORCHUK from Dauphin, Manitoba They met at a chanter practice with the Sons of Scotland pipe band in Ottawa in 1991. Bev fell in love with his laugh, his beautiful smile, his sense of humour and his quality as a true gentleman. Two years later, they were happily married.
Allan formed two pipe bands, the Sons of Scotland in 1980, and the Highland Mist Pipe Band in 1993 where he was pipe major until 1995 and music director until 2000. In 1996, Allan won the "Over 50" Champion Supreme award in the Ontario Highland Games circuit in "Open Solo" piping -- in the same event (march, strathspey and reel) he had won some 60 years earlier.
During his last hospital stay, on New Year's Day, 2003, Allan was visited by three Cameron pipers who gave him a "levee" since he was the oldest living Cameron. It was during this period in hospital that Allan remarked that his biggest regret was that people don't realize the sacrifices that he and his fellow soldiers made for them in the Second World War.
Lest we forget.
Bev is Allan's wife, best friend and piping student; Arch his student and friend.

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ROSSEM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
The day the music didn't die
Beloved Toronto trumpeter credited with helping preserve a unique form of New Orleans jazz
By Sarah LAMBERT Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- The tightly knit world of New Orleans traditional jazz has lost one of its greats with the death, last month, of Cliff (Kid) BASTIEN, leader of Toronto's treasured Happy Pals.
The trumpeter is credited as having nothing less than single-handedly kept alive the unique, raw, New Orleans style of jazz, through his leadership and mentorship of hundreds of musicians.
Saddened fans and musicians filed into the city's Grossman's Tavern all week last month to pay tribute to Mr. BASTIEN at the long-time home of the Happy Pals, where the walls are lined with photos of his fans and musicians. It was a send-off worthy of New Orleans, birthplace of the kind of jazz Mr. BASTIEN played with his seven-piece bands, the Camelia Jazz Band and later the Happy Pals, during the 30 or so years he played at the Toronto landmark.
"He was never late. Never, never ever, said Christine LOUIE, whose family inherited Mr. BASTIEN's Saturday-afternoon gig when Al GROSSMAN sold the bar in 1975.
So it was with sinking hearts on February 8 that his loyal audience and band members watched the minute hand tick past 4 o'clock, waiting for him to arrive, brass trumpet in hand.
When he was found later that afternoon still sitting in his armchair, apparently looking up a new song in his hymn book, the Happy Pals played on and raised a glass in tribute to their leader who died as he lived, surrounded by music. He was 65 years old.
Noonie SHEARS, a long-time friend and leader of the traditional impromptu parade that would inevitably snake through Grossman's as Saturday afternoon wound down, said she thought Mr. BASTIEN was looking up I'll Fly Away, the old gospel song recently dusted off in the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou?
The band played it for the first time at Mr. BASTIEN's official memorial at Grossman's the Saturday following his death.
Born in 1937 in London's East End, Mr. BASTIEN emigrated to Canada in 1962 after a stint in New Orleans. It was there that he heard trumpeter (Kid) Thomas VALENTINE play and, experiencing a kind of epiphany, Mr. BASTIEN followed him from club to club and studied his style. It ultimately inspired a lifelong ambition to keep alive New Orleans-style traditional jazz.
A purist who drew a distinction between his chosen genre of music and the more popularized Dixieland Jazz, Mr. BASTIEN once said: "Had I never heard that music, I wouldn't have become a musician. I wouldn't play anything else."
I Like Bananas, Caledonia, All of Me and Louisiana Vie en Rose were just a few of his standards. But, as Happy Pals' trombonist Roberta TEVLIN explained, Mr. BASTIEN wasn't content to simply recycle the old chestnuts.
"Cliff kept adding songs. I've probably played 1,000 different tunes with him. He was particularly notorious for finding songs outside the standard jazz list, said Ms. TEVLIN, who joined the band 20 years ago, along with her saxophonist husband, Patrick.
Bob Dylan, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Western Swing numbers, Nigerian folk songs and Dean Martin could all tumble out during a set, said drummer Chuck CLARKE.
Mr. BASTIEN's Friends and peers point out that he was known for three primary qualities: His love of music, his scorn for fame or publicity and his mentoring of local musicians.
During the memorial at Grossman's, Downchild Blues Band headman Donny WALSH arrived from Florida to sit in with his harmonica, as he had done regularly with Mr. BASTIEN in the 1970s. Juno-nominated bluesman Michael PICKETT was there, as well as jazz singer Laura HUBERT, formerly of the Leslie Spit Treeo, pianist Peter HILL, The Nationals and many more.
From the worldwide New Orleans jazz community, among those who came to pay their respects were saxophonist Jean-Pierre ALESSI of France, trumpeter Roger (Kid Dutch) UITHOVEN of Orlando, Florida, clarinetist Kjeld BRANDT from Denmark and Toronto's Brian TOWERS, Jan SHAW and Joe VAN ROSSEM.
"I cannot imagine the Toronto traditional jazz scene without Cliff BASTIEN and his raw, emotional New Orleans-style jazz, Mr. TOWERS wrote in a notice posted on the Internet shortly after he learned of the death of his friend.
"He was probably the most popular and influential figure on the Toronto traditional jazz scene. He taught many others to play their instruments in the style and introduced thousands to the joys of New Orleans traditional jazz.
"We went to Grossman's after our own gig and Jan and I played some hymns with the Happy Pals. A sadder and more emotional scene I have rarely seen."
Toronto musician Joanne MacKELL, leader of the Paradise Rangers, wonders how things might have been if she had not met Mr. BASTIEN when she was just starting out.
"Though I was young and inexperienced, Kid would always invite me up to sing, Ms. MacKELL said, recalling how the band took her under its wing when she discovered them in the early 1970s.
"Kid didn't care about money or popular opinion. He filled Grossman's Tavern every Saturday for some 30 years because he played great music with honesty and integrity and he inspired me to try and do the same."
Until just last year, Mr. BASTIEN, who feared flying, avoided the lure of the road, taking only an annual sojourn to New Orleans for the French Quarter Festival. Finally, in the fall of 2002, he accepted an invitation to tour Scandinavia with the Danish/Swedish band New Orleans Delight, playing with George BERRY on tenor sax. A new Compact Disk is due to be released this spring.
His official recordings are few, numbering about a dozen, as Mr. BASTIEN preferred to play to an audience. Though, as Ms. TEVLIN pointed out: "There are bootleg tapes all over the place."
His legacy, the band says, is keeping the New Orleans style of jazz alive.
"Kid Thomas VALENTINE was one of the greats, and when he was gone, Kid BASTIEN carried on. Kid BASTIEN was one of the greats, and now Kid's gone. So who's going to carry the music on now? We will, said saxophonist Mr. TEVLIN on behalf of the Happy Pals, who intend to continue the Saturday-afternoon tradition at Grossman's.
In another side to his life, Mr. BASTIEN was an accomplished commercial artist whose hand-crafted signs, woodwork and acid-etched glass can be seen in many local pubs, including Toronto's Wheat Sheaf Tavern. His work can be found across Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia and California, as well as in Europe.
Mr. BASTIEN's wish was to be buried in New Orleans.

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ROSSI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
Gordon Kenneth FLEMING/FLEMMING
By Jack FORTIN Thursday, February 13, 2003, Page A30
Musician, husband, father. Born August 3, 1931, in Winnipeg. Died August 31, 2002, in Scarborough, Ontario, following a stroke, aged 71.
Gordie FLEMING/FLEMMING was a remarkable music talent, known internationally as a master of the accordion, especially in the jazz idiom. He was a life member of Local 149 of the Toronto Musicians' Association.
In show-business vernacular, Gordie was "born in a trunk." He began playing accordion when his older brother gave him lessons. His musical ability was such that he began performing publicly at the age of five. His schoolteachers often saw him being whisked away in a taxi to perform at theatres and radio stations in Winnipeg. By the age of 10, he was a working member of various bands in that city.
In 1949, Gordie lost his accordion in a fire at a Winnipeg hotel. With the insurance money, he headed for the bright lights of Montreal where he soon became an important part of that city's musical life. His accordion ability was complemented by the fact that he was also a gifted arranger and composer.
He had a marvellous ability to improvise and could string out complex bebop lines, leaving his listeners in awe. He often slipped a jazz phrase into ballads or commercial tunes, confirming that jazz was indeed his first love.
One of Montreal's busiest musicians, he wrote for local orchestras, shows, radio and television. He had perfect pitch and often wrote without reference to a keyboard. He was at home in every type of music from classics to jazz. For several years, he worked at the National Film Board as a composer and musician.
In Montreal, Gordie performed with many show business headliners: there was a wealth of home-grown talent in Montreal, such as Oscar PETERSON and Maynard FERGUSON, as well as other jazz musicians who were beginning to be noticed.
Gordie had said that when when he first heard bebop it was like entering another world. As his career indicates, he had no trouble in that world. He worked with many personalities including: Charlie PARKER, Mel TORMÉ, Hank SNOW, Lena HORNE, Englebert HUMPERDINCK, Dennis DAY, Gordon MacRAE, Cab CALLOWAY, Nat King COLE, Cat STEVENS, Rich LITTLE, Billy ECKSTEIN, Pee Wee HUNT, Arthur GODFREY and Buddy DEFRANCO.
He also performed with Tommy AMBROSE, Allan MILLS, Wally KOSTER, Tommy HUNTER, Bert NIOSI, Wayne and Shuster, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation jazz shows with Al BACULIS, and many other Canadian jazz musicians.
On Montreal's French music scene, Gordie performed on radio and television with Emile GENEST, Ti-Jean CARIGNAN, André GAGNON and Ginette RENO. He was a featured soloist with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on several occasions.
Internationally, Gordie toured France in 1952 and performed with Edith PIAF and Tino ROSSI. He had the honour to perform for former prime minister Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU at a Commonwealth Conference.
He participated with other top Canadian musicians in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation tour to entertain Canadian and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Europe in 1952 and 1968.
For me, a memorable experience was playing in a group with Gordie for several winters in Florida. A popular member of the Panama City Beach family of musicians, Gordie looked forward to his winter trek south. Many of the American musicians will miss him, as will the many snowbirds who looked forward to hearing him each year.
His extensive repertoire allowed Gordie to author a book called Music of the World, in which he wrote the music to 280 songs from more than 30 countries.
Gordie leaves his wife of 47 years, Joanne, and seven children.
Jack FORTIN is Gordie's friend.

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ROSSI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
GROSSO, Dr. Roberto
Born in Rome, Italy on November 11th, 1928. Died on Tuesday, July 8th, 2003 at home surrounded by loved ones. He is survived by his loving wife Caroline (née PANCARO,) his four daughters, Cristina GAGE, Francesca GROSSO, Beth GROSSO and Sylvia RENNIE his three sons-in-law, Brian GAGE, Steve PAIKIN, and Scott RENNIE, and his four grandchildren, Alessandra and Robert GAGE, Matthew RENNIE and Giulia PAIKIN. Dear brother of Maria Grazia Grosso ROSSI (husband Filippo) of Rome, Italy and Gian Carlo GROSSO, predeceased (wife Alessandra of Rome, Italy).
Visitation to be held at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury, Sunday, July 13th from 2: 00 to 6:00 p.m. Prayers 3: 00 p.m. Sunday. Funeral Mass to take place at Christ the King Church, 30 Beech Street, Sudbury on Monday, July 14th at 10: 00 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations to the ''Dr. Roberto Grosso Memorial Fund'' for St. Joseph's Villa would be appreciated.

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ROSZEL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-15 published
Viola Gertrude VINCENT
In loving memory of Viola Gertrude VINCENT, who passed away peacefully on Friday, October 6, 2003 at the Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 99.
Born to Hector and Lena ROSZEL on April 19, 1904. Beloved wife of the late Elmer VINCENT (December 22, 1992.) Predeceased by sister Ursula and brothers Roy and Oscar. Funeral Mass was held on Friday, October 10, 2003 at St. Bernard's Catholic Church, Little Current, Ontario. Burial in St. Bernard's Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

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