ROBINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
LAMONT, Jean Annette (ROBINS)
Jean died peacefully, on Tuesday, October 14, 2003 in Toronto, with her children Doug and Anne at her side; in her 84th year. Predeceased by her loving husband and friend of 53 years, Bruce Maitland LAMONT, a former senior international executive with Royal Bank of Canada. Survived by son, James Douglas and his wife Kathy, stepchildren Melissa and August and step-great granddaughter, Elizabeth; and daughter Anne and husband Christopher JAMES and their daughter, Kathleen. Cherished sister of Joan BAILEY and her children, Robin (Marie,) Joanne (Ken HOLT,) John (Clare) and Janet (Heino CLAESSENS) and their families. Remembered by sisters-in-law Pauline FLYNN (Hank) and Meribeth LAMONT and their families and the extended LAMONT clan. Special thanks to cousin Joanne HOLT for all her support and help over the last few years. Thank you to the staff and Mom's new Friends at the Kingsway Retirement Residence, Etobicoke for their Friendship and support in making the Kingsway her home away from home. A graduate of MacDonald Hall, Guelph University (1940) and Toronto Western Hospital School of Nursing (1943) she was always proud of her accomplishment as one of Canada's first female nursing flight attendants with Trans Canada Airways. Mom was an avid bridge player and golfer, a social dynamo who cherished her wide circle of Friends. A celebration of her life will be held on Saturday, October 18, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 89 Dunn Street (at Lakeshore Road), Oakville. If desired, in lieu of flowers, donations in Jean's memory to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.
Mom, a Grand Slam and a hole-in-one to you. Love always.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Captain Lynn Gerald FREEMAN, 1930-2003
"We all must sail sometimes with the wind and sometimes against it, but we must sail and not drift nor lie at anchor"
It is with sadness and regret that we announce the passing of our dad, Lynn Gerald FREEMAN, after a lengthy illness, on Saturday, January 11, 2003, with his family at his side, at the Hotel Dieu hospital in St. Catharines. Lynn was born in Tehkummah, the son of the late Mildred (RUSSELL) and Ernest FREEMAN.
Lynn is survived by: the mother of his children, Sandra FREEMAN and his kids, Jerry, Cindy, Mark, Angela and Kim, his grandchildren who he loved very much: Sandra, Christa, Natacha, Mark Jr. and Jake, his brothers and sisters: Earl (Effie,) Gelena HOPKIN, Lorraine EADIE (Ted), Marion CASE (Harold), Dick (Lois), Betty LAWSON, Margaret DIBONAVENTURA, Conrad (Judy), Myrna BEATON (Ken) and Brenda ROBINSON. Lynn was predeceased by his brother Larry.
Besides his family, Lynn's passion in life was sailing on the Great Lakes. He was at home on the water and took great pride in the ships he sailed for some 45 years. He will be remembered and missed by those who sailed with him during those years. Until Lynn became ill he was current with all traffic in the Welland Canal. At Lynn's request, cremation will take place with a private family service. A memorial service will take place on Manitoulin Island at a later date.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Orma "Laureen" ROBINSON
In loving memory of Orma "Laureen" ROBINSON who passed away peacefully at the Manitoulin Health Centre on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 at the age of 74 years.
Predeceased by dear husband Seward (Nov. 9, 1998). Loving mother of Beverly MONTGOMERY of Sudbury, Larry and Debra of Manitowaning, Jimmy and Mary of Little Current, Perry and Angela of Manitowaning. Cherished grandmother of David (wife Jenny), Danny (fiancée Catherine), Devon, Amanda, Crystal, Paige and Taylor. Special great grandmother of Jarred, Joshua and Eric. Will be missed by brothers and sisters Glenna and (husband Raymond predeceased) Wilkin, Harold and Marion CASE, Effie and Earl FREEMAN, Thelma, Harry and Jean CASE, Lyman (predeceased) and Gretta CASE, Les and Pat CASE and Albert and Margaret CASE.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
ROBINSON
-In loving memory of a wonderful aunt, great aunt and friend, Laureen.
We are going to miss you so much, your Friday night greetings, our
morning coffee, and the many meals we shared.
You were a ray of sunshine, with your wonderful smile, and your many jokes.
We all have wonderful memories of you that we will treasure always.
We love you, thank you for being a part of our lives, we will never forget
you.
-With all our love, Cathy, Glen, Chris, Sean and Aaron.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Margaret Ann (FREEMAN) DI_BONAVERNTURA
Peacefully at Mindemoya Hospital on Tuesday, June 3, 2003 at the age of 67 years.
Margaret was born in Tehkummah to Ernest and Mildred FREEMAN (both predeceased). She moved to Toronto in 1955. She owned her own flower shop on Eglington Avenue in Toronto for several years. In 1973 she started working at the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce and retired from there in 2001. Margaret enjoyed traveling, shopping for bargains, good food and her family and Friends. Dear sister of Gelena (husband Morley predeceased) HOPKIN of Tehkummah, Earl and wife Effie FREEMAN of Little Current, Marion and husband Harold CASE of The Slash, Lorraine and husband Ted EADIE of Little Current, Dick and wife Lois FREEMAN of Goderich, Conrad and wife Judy FREEMAN of Merickville. Betty (husband Ed predeceased) LAWSON of Deseronto. Myrna and husband Ken BEATON of Toronto, Brenda (husband Randy predeceased) ROBINSON of Tehkummah. Predeceased by two brothers Larry and Lynn FREEMAN. Will be missed by many nieces and nephews and great great nieces and nephews. Memorial Funeral Mass will be held on Saturday June 14, 2003 at 3: 00 p.m. in the Mindemoya Catholic Church. Burial of ashes in Hilly Grove Cemetery.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-25 published
ROBINSON-
-In memory of "PA" (Randy ROBINSON) who passed away June 27, 2002.
It's been a very long year
Since you said good bye
We miss you very much PA
And wished you hadn't died.
We thought of making Maple Syrup
The way we thought you might
But without you here to show us how
It just wouldn't have turned out right
In December, I had a little boy
We named him after you
I could feel you with me that day
And the joy that he brought you.
Mom, she sure does miss you
I can see it in her eyes
She talks about you often
And sometimes even cries.
We planted you a tiny garden
Where you now do rest.
In hopes that it would grow as green as your garden did
Just know we did our best.
The house is very quiet
The shop is sits quite still
And I still expect to see you standing there
With your tractor and your till
Missy B and Nick ask why you got so ill
I try to comfort them, tell them you just couldn't stay
I let them know
That you watch over them each and every single day.
And even though it's been a year
I still pray you heard me
When I whispered in you ear.
"I love you, PA"
And even though you may have not been my father
A Dad you were to me.
-With love, Mel and Kevin.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-25 published
ROBINSON-
-In loving memory of my best friend, lover and husband, Randy, who passed away June 27, 2002.
Yellow is for Friendship
Steadfast and sure
White is for love
Tender and pure.
Red is for passion
That will endure.
You sent me roses of these colours
When our journey was beginning
Explaining each colour to me
and that we would have no ending.
Today it is my wish
To hold you close in my memory
and place these flowers on your grave
For I'll love you for eternity.
-Love from you "B"

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-25 published
ROBINSON-
-In memory of Poppa, (Randy) who passed away June 27, 2002.
It seems you were part of our lives for such a short time. There has been an empty place in our hearts and lives since you had to leave us. Memories are not enough to fill the void. As we continue with our day to day lives, your spirit is with us always. We miss you and wish you could be here to share our triumphs and disappointments. We are thankful for the time we had with you, the laughs and the tears...and especially the time with Tony. -With love, Stephanie, Tom and Tony

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-25 published
ROBINSON-
-In memory of our papa, Randy, who left us June 27, 2002.
Dear Papa:
I had a feeling last year you were going to die. I really miss you.
You know what I miss the most? Is running through the corn patch and
planting the garden every spring.
-Love Missy B (Brianna), Nickman and baby Travis.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-24 published
Lawrence Raymond BOUSQUET
In loving memory of Lawrence Raymond BOUSQUET on Saturday, September 20, 2003 at Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 92 years.
Beloved husband of Irene (née LEHMAN.) Loving father of Marion and husband Andrew BUTELLA of Brantford, Laurine and husband Harold LOOSEMORE of Killarney, James and wife Joanne of Little Current. Cherished grandfather of Catherine BUTELLA and husband Don ROBINSON, Robert BUTELLA and wife Kim SONNET, Debra LOOSEMORE, Sheri LOOSEMORE, Lauri LOOSEMORE and husband Brian WALL, Cheryl BOUSQUET, Marsha BOUSQUET, Chistopher BOUSQUET and wife Kristen JACKLIN. Great grandfather of nine. Brother of James and wife Ann, Wilber and wife Marie and sister Florence and husband Arnet THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, all predeceased. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, September 23, 2003 at Island Funeral Home with burial in Mountainview Cemetery.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
Vernon Oscar ROBINSON
In loving memory of Vernon Oscar ROBINSON, June 7, 1927 to November 11, 2003, who
passed away at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Little Current. at the age of 76 years.
Vernon was a great advocate of self-government for First Nations, helping many reserves in Northern and Southern Ontario to accomplish this. He retired from the Department of Indian Affairs after 30 years. He then was a consultant for them the following 11 years. Vern had a great appreciation and love for the outdoors, his work and his church, ministering to others.
Born in Sheguiandah to Samuel and Edith (WILLIS) ROBINSON. Will be dearly missed by his loving wife Barbara and their children Loree of California, Richard of Pentanguishene, Elizabeth of Arizona, Laura and husband Arther SMITH of Tahiti, Christopher and wife Heather HORNING of Florida. Will be remembered by grandchildren Sahara, Alannah, Sebastian, Eric, Elizabeth, Erik, Emily, and Erin. Dear brother to Marjorie SHEPPARD (predeceased), Leighton and wife Irene, Jean and husband John BRADLEY, Shirley and husband Ed BOTTING, Erma and husband Jim BRADY, Calvon and wife Betty and Merlin (predeceased).
Visitation was held on Thursday, November 13, 2003 at the Island Funeral Home. Funeral service was held on Friday, November 14, 2003 at Community of Christ Church, Little Current, Ontario with Elder Humphrey BEAUDIN officiating. Cremation.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-28 published
Hilda PERSAUD
By Carrol VERASAMY and Jennifer CHAITON Tuesday, January 28, 2003, Page A20
Mother, wife, businesswoman, survivor. Born July 3, 1931, in Guyana. Died May 4, 2002, of esophageal cancer, in Toronto, aged Hilda was the ultimate survivor. Born to hardworking parents, our mom was orphaned at 3 and drifted from one relative to another over the years, doing housework and working in rice fields for pennies a day. She watched with envy as other girls went off to school and enjoyed a normal childhood. For her, school was just a dream.
She grew up and married a handsome accountant, our dad Joe, and they had 10 children, the youngest a set of twins. She wanted to provide us with everything she lacked as a child, and our education was her top priority. There never seemed to be enough money to go around, yet mom always found the money for our textbooks and tuition fees. At night she would hand-wash our school uniforms, white socks, and sneakers, and hang them under light bulbs to dry, so we could have clean uniforms to wear every morning. Although these years were difficult, mom remembered them as the best years of her life.
After dad retired, they bought a struggling hotel-and-restaurant business, but it barely kept the family afloat.
In 1971, mom faced her biggest challenge when dad died suddenly, leaving no savings or life insurance. She was left on her own, with 10 children to raise. Well-meaning relatives offered to take some of the children, but mom adamantly refused to split up her family. Her survival instinct went into high gear and she found within herself incredible strength and wisdom that even she hadn't known she possessed. She built up a struggling hotel business, and despite her inexperience and lack of education, it became a thriving success within a short time. She became financially independent and was able to build a big house in the country; we lived there comfortably.
In 1974, one of mom's beloved twins, Donna, died tragically in a car accident. Mom survived this as she had the many previous adversities in her life: with extraordinary strength and spirit.
In 1982, the family emigrated to Canada to begin a new life. It was an enormous adjustment as mom was past 50, but she worked as a day-care provider, and finally got the chance to attend school, fulfilling her childhood dream. This wasn't easy for her but she refused to quit, and her perseverance paid off. What an accomplishment it was for mom to finally be able to read her beloved Bible! She was thrilled when she could write her own letters and cards to her grandkids. She began volunteer work at Warden Woods Community Centre, Bendale Nursing Home, and Agincourt Pentecostal Church. She was always willing to help anyone in need. Even when her health started to deteriorate, she refused to slow down.
Mom took great pride in watching her children grow into successful adults. She became a grandmother of 22 and great-grandmother of six. Her happiest times were with her family, and she eagerly looked forward to our large family gatherings. When she turned 70, in July, 2001, we held a big birthday party in her honour. That night, mom was the happiest we had ever seen her.
Just three months later came the devastating diagnosis of cancer. Although in great pain, mom remained optimistic to the very end, her faith in God never wavering. She believed that God was going to cure her as she had so much work left to do! But God had other plans. After a heroic battle, she died on a crisp spring morning, all her children at her bedside, a peaceful look on her face.
Mom will always be remembered for her fierce independence, determination, and courage: a phenomenal matriarch.
Carrol and Jennifer are Hilda's daughters.
Died This Day
Friday, January 31, 2003, Page R15
John Beverley ROBINSON, 1863
Lawyer, Family Compact leader, born on July 26, 1791, in Berthier, Quebec; Attorney-General of Upper Canada and later Chief Justice stalwart of the Family Compact that ruled the colony; favoured imperial unity against "pernicious American influences"; died in Toronto.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-14 published
Thomas MacDONALD
By Joan ROBINSON Friday, March 14, 2003 - Page A24
Father, husband, caterer. Born November 12, 1915, in Liverpool, England. Died January 25, in Ottawa, of a stroke, aged 87.
Tom MacDONALD was the third of nine children born to William and Mary Ellen MacDONALD. The family emigrated from England to Canada in 1924 and settled in Kingston, Ontario With the outbreak of the Second World War, Tom and his four brothers joined the Armed Forces. Tom enlisted in the Canadian Army on January 25, 1940. He was assigned as batman/driver to Lieutenant-General H. D. R. CRERAR. In 1944, the Kingston Whig Standard featured a photo of "Cpl. T. McDONALD" sewing an extra pip on CRERAR's uniform, marking his promotion to full General; CRERAR was then Commander of the First Canadian Army. During those war years, Tom served with the general in Italy, Sicily, the Netherlands, Belgium, North Africa, France and Germany. One of his duties was to prepare the general's meals; he became proficient at obtaining and preparing reasonable meals with scant resources. It was during this time that he developed a keen interest in food preparation.
After the war, Tom remained in the army. Although he had no professional training, his natural flair for food preparation and presentation led to his employment in Ottawa by National Defence Headquarters as organizer and caterer of official banquets and what was known as "the cocktail party circuit." On a private basis, the United States Embassy also employed him in this capacity.
Among his effects are letters of appreciation from Ambassador Livingston MERCHANT of the U.S. Embassy and one from then-president Dwight EISENHOWER, thanking Tom for his efforts during the Second World War, as well as his contributions during two presidential trips to Ottawa. It concludes: "With best wishes to a former comrade-in-arms."
During this time he also accompanied General CRERAR on official business trips, wherein his role was to assist in the personal needs of the CRERAR family. Many of these trips were to major Canadian cities but in 1947, Tom accompanied General CRERAR on a trade development mission to Hawaii, Hong Kong, Tokyo and Manila. His last international trip took place in the 1960s when, in a similar role, he travelled to Cyprus with a delegation headed by Minister of Defence Paul HELLYER.
In 1965, he was honourably released from the army. He then assumed the position of steward at 24 Sussex Drive. He served with Prime Minister Lester PEARSON from 1965 to 1968 and with Prime Minister Pierre TRUDEAU from 1968 to 1975. He was again responsible for the organization of formal banquets and other entertainment. On one such occasion, a photo much prized by Tom's English mother shows him in formal dress, standing ready to serve the Queen Mother.
Although officially retired in 1975, he maintained his interest in cooking both in his private catering business and at home. He was a lively, fun-loving man and with his wife, Verena, hosted many memorable parties wherein his love of people and sense of humour had full rein.
Tom was proud of his country, his city and his war service. He could be moved to tears by memories of his war years and every year that he was physically able he marched in the Veteran's Day parade wearing his war medals.
In his declining years, he was comforted by the care and companionship of his family and Friends. At Uncle Tom's funeral they volunteered their special memories of him. There was much laughter and few tears as befitted the man. The music of his favourite song We'll Meet Again concluded the ceremony -- sung, of course, by Vera LYNN. He will be missed by many, including nieces, nephews, Friends and surviving comrades-in-arms.
Joan is Tom MacDONALD's niece.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-21 published
ROBINSON, May Elizabeth (Tracy) née TRACY- GOULD
Born November 18, 1914 Newcastle (Miramachi City), New Brunswick, died March 17, 2003 at Crofton Manor, Vancouver, British Columbia. Predeceased by her husband James Emerson (Robbie), the love of her life. She is survived by her three daughters, Susan (Mike NICHOLS), Zora (Alf SIMON), and Alice (Allan HALLDORSON), her grandchildren Jesse and Tracy, her brother Perley TRACY- GOULD (Hester) and sister Zora KEDDIE (Ray) and their families. Tracy graduated as a nurse from the Montreal General Hospital and joined the Canadian Army as an operating room nurse in 1939. She served from 1939-1945 following the troops through Europe. She met Robbie in Italy and they were married in the town hall of Brussels, Belgium on April 10, 1945. While raising her three daughters she was active in her community. In Winnipeg this included the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, Deer Lodge Veterans Hospital, the Children's Hospital Book Market and working in the canteen in her local community centre. In Toronto she worked in the gift shop of the North York General Hospital and has been a generous donor to the foundation. In White Rock she worked at the Peace Arch Hospital's Superfluidy Shop. She belonged to and worked with a hospital guild in every city she lived in and remained a member of the Royal Canadian Military Institute until her death. She was an active member of the Nursing Sisters Association of Canada, contributing in many ways over the years. Her hobbies included baking for her family, Friends and charities, travelling, gardening and corresponding with old Friends. Tracy had a real love of life, with a wry sense of humour and a smile that could win anyone's heart. It was such a pleasure to share time with her; she will be sadly missed by family and Friends. Cremation has taken place. A Memorial Service will be held and details will be announced at a later date. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to: Ghurka Benevolent Fund or the Heart and Stroke Foundation or a charity of your choice.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-01 published
WEIR, E. Marie
Born July 26, 1923. Died March 27, 2003 at Richmond Hospital. Born in Banff, Marie grew up in Calgary. A graduate of the University of Alberta, she became a professional secretary working in many locations including New York, Chicago, Toronto and Vancouver. In Vancouver, Marie worked with The Arthritis Society and later with Dr. Barry KOSHLER in Richmond. Throughout her long productive life and despite her final illness she was always sunny, witty, a great raconteur and a joy to be with. Marie is survived by many loving cousins, Dr. Alex ROBINSON, Dr. Harold and Jean ROBINSON, Peggy and Hubert MILLARD and families. She will be missed by her friend and colleague Marylin CHOY. A Memorial Service and Celebration of her life will be held on Saturday, April 5th at 4 p.m. at Ryerson United Church, 2195 West 45th Avenue, Vancouver, Rev. G. PATERSON officiating. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made, in her memory, to the British Columbia Cancer Foundation.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-08 published
ROBINSON, Catherine Margaret
Died in Toronto at Thompson House on May 5th, 2003, five days short of her 91st birthday. Catherine, known to her many Friends as Cae, was born May 10, 1912 in Winnipeg, the eldest and only surviving child of the late Col. Clifford Maxwell ACKLAND and his wife Agnes. She will be sadly missed by her four children John, Nancy (Jeff), Sandy and Jane. She was married in 1939 to John MacCallum ROBINSON who predeceased her in 1973. Cae had a busy and vibrant life raising her four children, performing a wide range of voluntary services in Edmonton, Winnipeg and Toronto and developing a wide circle of Friends. She was a keen golfer and a bridge player until her health deteriorated. Friends may call at the Trull ''North Toronto'' Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence), and Friday from 6-8 p.m. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, May 10 at 2 o'clock at the Anglican Church of St. Clement, 59 Briar Hill Avenue, Toronto. In memoriam, donations to the Don Mills Foundation, 1 Overland Drive, Toronto M3C 2C3 or the Alzheimer Society, 500-2323 Yonge Street, Toronto M&Y 4R1, would be appreciated.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
McCUSKER, Theresa Maria, R.N. (née ROBINSON) Born 31 May 1925, Died 9 May 2003
Wife of Thomas McCUSKER. Mother of Pauline (Tom,) Charles (Catherine,) Elizabeth (Gord), Patricia and Christine (Ron). Grandmother to Lauren, Karen, Mary, Margaret, Angus, Aidan, Tommy and Ewan. Immigrated to Canada in 1952. Nursed in St. Michael's, Women's College, and The Clarke Institute of Psychiatry. Friends may call at the Trull 'North Toronto' Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence) on Monday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at Our Lady Of Perpetual Help, (St. Clair Avenue East, West of Mt. Pleasant Road) on Tuesday morning at 9: 30 a.m. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations to your favorite charity would be appreciated.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-23 published
Artist focused on geometric shapes
Sculptor helped to design precast concrete panels that sheathe the University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, August 23, 2003 - Page F8
Robert DOWNING thought that he needed lessons in order to become an artist. Entering a storefront studio in his hometown of Hamilton, he paid the $1 fee and was asked what he wanted to make. When he replied that he didn't know, the studio owner told him to come back when he did and gave him back his buck.
Turning to the door, Mr. DOWNING realized that whatever he did was in his own hands. Deciding upon this as the subject of a sculpture, he paid again and, in clay, fashioned a hand with a spike through it. Upon seeing the sculpture, the studio owner returned Mr. DOWNING's dollar, saying, "You don't need me. You know what you want to do."
A creator of sculptures, paintings, prints, photographs and digital art, Mr. DOWNING has died at the age of 67.
His work appeared in the Ontario Centennial Art Exhibit, the National Art Gallery of Canada Sculpture '67 Exhibit and at Habitat during Expo 67. In partnership with sculptor Ted BIELER, Mr. DOWNING designed the precast concrete panels that sheathe the University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building and, on his own, designed two of its interior concrete-sculpted walls.
In 1969, he was the first Canadian to have a solo exhibition at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London.
His work is also found in the National Art Gallery of Canada, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the University of Saskatchewan's gallery and the Singapore National Museum among many others and were included in 77 exhibitions in seven countries. As well, he completed 16 commissions in three countries.
Largely self-taught, Mr. DOWNING, a one-time police officer, burst onto the scene during the late '60s with his Cube Series in aluminum and Plexiglass. A highly intellectual artist, who often explored sophisticated mathematical concepts in his work, he created 108 cube-related sculptures for the series. Seventy-four appeared in the Whitechapel show and the British Arts Council purchased one, The Cube Turned Inside Out Revealing the Relationship of the Sphere.
Mr. DOWNING's work remained centred on geometric shapes throughout his career. "I am one of those people who views geometry as a divine expression of integration between the physical and the spiritual," he wrote in a brochure. He attributed his interest in organic geometry to the works of sculptors Eli Bornstein and Tony Smith, and the Art and Technology Movement.
Despite his intellectual bent, spirituality figured large in Mr. DOWNING's art and provided his inspiration to pursue it. When he was a Hamilton policeman, he was relaxing after a shift. "I suddenly became conscious of the warm glow of a transparent rose-coloured light completely surrounding me," he wrote in his memoirs, Feeling My Way.
"I was still aware of my body, but I felt myself to be extended into and penetrated by this light, which simultaneously caused me to feel radiant pulsations of pure love. It was as though I, somehow, had transcended the physical plane and, for a brief moment of time, experienced a cosmic level of infinite bliss."
Thereafter, Mr. DOWNING felt a new sensitivity to life and found himself in an almost trance-like state when observing the world around him. He left the police force -- and his family -- to become an artist. He maintained, "I've been given to make art in celebration of life as a humble song of praise to the Divine Creator of All."
Mr. DOWNING was born on August 1, 1935, in Hamilton, one of two children of a Canadian Westinghouse labourer and a housekeeper. When he was young, the family lived in a tent while waiting for housing.
In early adolescence, bedridden with a bout of rheumatic fever, Mr. DOWNING discovered that he enjoyed working with his hands by threading macaroni and constructing lilac-shell pictures.
Leaving school at 15 with a Grade 8 education, Mr. DOWNING delivered telegrams before joining the Canadian navy for five years. There he worked in food stores and as a photographer. After the service, Mr. DOWNING joined the Hamilton Police Force.
Early in his art career, Mr. DOWNING became discouraged by his attempts to sell his work in Toronto. He hit the road, travelling to Montreal and then to Vancouver, where he sold his first sculpture in 1962.
Still seeking a direction, he moved with his second wife to California, where they ran an antique shop. Mr. DOWNING experimented with d-Lysergic Acid Diethylamide and yoga, and participated in a couple of shows.
Returning to Toronto, Mr. DOWNING approached Mr. BIELER, who taught at the University of Toronto, for instruction. With Mr. BIELER's encouragement, he began his exploration of the cube. "He used whatever was available to dig into this and then came up with some quite interesting stuff," said Mr. BIELER, now a professor at York University in Toronto.
Selling his house to pay for shipping his sculpture to Whitechapel Art Gallery, Mr. DOWNING ended up after the show emotionally and financially exhausted. To recover, he spent a year studying the sitar.
After the bubble of government funding for art during Canada's centennial period burst, Mr. DOWNING and other Canadian artists found themselves short of work and money.
"By the end of 1972, my commissions and sales of art had completely evaporated," he wrote in a preamble to his Fibonacci Series. The only job he could find was teaching at an Ontario private school.
Throughout his career, Mr. DOWNING taught at several institutions, including U of T, the Ontario College of Art and the Banff School of Fine Art, all the while living a hand-to-mouth existence. Still, despite a lack of money and critical attention, he created prolifically, in series that often overlapped, carefully recording his creative process and organizing his works.
During the '70s, influenced by Mr. Bornstein's work, Asian philosophy, crystals and numerology, he explored the hexagon, producing a trial printing set for children and his I'Ching Series, a notebook in which he placed a diary-like record beside a tangram (a Chinese puzzle consisting of five triangles, a square and a rhomboid) based on a computer printout.
While in hospital in 1974 with a heart attack, Mr. DOWNING worked with construction paper and scissors and formed a three-dimensional shape that led to the Fibonacci Series, also called the Nothing Series. The 24 solid-steel castings and eight metal powder and fibreglass life-sized sculptures reflect a system Mr. DOWNING said he discovered, of combining squares, equilateral triangles and pentagons. Some of the works' proportions contained the Fibonacci ratio. (In the Fibonacci sequence -- 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 etc. -- each successive number is equal to the sum of the preceding two numbers.)
When discharged from the hospital, Mr. DOWNING was unable to pay his mortgage. He sold the house and moved with his third wife and family to California, where he lived from 1974 to 1978. He taught at California State College in Long Beach and continued with the Fibonacci Series.
Entering the '80s, Mr. DOWNING turned to conceptual/performance art. In conceptual art, the works themselves are not considered important, but are intended to examine the language and system of art. Performance art presents actual events as art to a live audience, as opposed to the illusions of events presented by theatre.
For the series Art Isn't? Mr. DOWNING used a Canada Council grant to solicit work from the presidents of Canada's top 500 companies. Asked by the council to reimburse the money because he had not used it to create art, Mr. DOWNING agreed to send a monthly cheque for 10 per cent of his income. The amount came to $2.
The Canada Council responded with a request for a bigger cheque and Mr. DOWNING complied. Using a photocopier, he enlarged a $2 cheque and sent it off.
"He was desperately honest and he would not put up with bullshit at all," sculptor and artist Gord SMITH said. "He stayed on top of the Canada Council.... He believed passionately in the culture and knew it was going down."
Also during the '80s, Mr. DOWNING produced many Documeditation works, which included Transentials in Space, the work he said in 1992 was the most significant of his life. Describing it as a visual literacy program, he spent two years developing the three-volume work.
Always an outspoken advocate for his calling, Mr. DOWNING helped to found Canadian Artists Representatives in 1967. Driven, brilliant, often difficult and prickly, he was frustrated by his inability to qualify for grants from the Ontario government. He lacked the formal training the government required and went to the offices of the Minister of Culture and Citizenship to state his case. Screaming, " This isn't art?" Mr. DOWNING hurled his portfolio to the ground. The minister's office called the police.
Mr. DOWNING described his Closet Art, from 1984 to 1987, as "an installation piece which outgrew the confines of two large storage closets and raised the question of how practical it was for a senior artist to continue playing the role of an unpaid custodian of earlier work that had long proven itself to qualify as legitimate cultural property."
He donated the works to the Art Gallery of Hamilton, counting the 250-page record of his negotiations with the gallery as a Documeditation. "Coming back to these [donated] works again and again one is reminded of the expansive scope of Mr. DOWNING's thinking, of the evolving nature of his practice," said the gallery's chief curator, Shirley MADILL.
Mr. DOWNING left Canada once again to make a living in the late '80s, working and teaching in Botswana and Singapore. Returning because of ill health, he spent his last years largely confined to his apartment. He found a creative outlet, producing computer-generated images, once again exploring geometric forms. In 1998, as artist-in-residence at the U of T, he developed a Web site containing a retrospective of his work.
Always outspoken, a quality that alienated many, in the spring of 2002, he published an Internet manifesto announcing his resignation as a practising Canadian artist. In it, he chastized business, government, galleries and academia for not supporting artists in general and him in particular.
At his death on July 22, Mr. DOWNING had not sold his work in Canada for the past 15 years. Still he continued to promote it, even receiving a posthumous rejection.
"Robert's first love was his art, and his life was his art, and that's the beginning and end of it," said his fourth wife, Mickey DOWNING.
Mr. DOWNING leaves his wife, Mickey, two ex-wives, children Michael DOWNING and Sara ROBINSON, and three grandchildren.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-13 published
GOODERHAM, George Kentner 1927-2003
Died at the Ottawa Heart Institute after a brief illness on Friday, October 10, 2003. Born in Calgary and raised on the Blackfoot reserve at Gleichen, Alberta where his family lived and his father worked as the Indian agent. Kent married Helen Rea CRAWFORD of Winnipeg in 1955 and then worked as a school superintendent in the Peace River, Alberta for three years before moving to Ottawa in 1966. As an anthropologist and as an educator, he focused on education for Indian people and later became Director of Indian education for the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. In addition to his 17 years in the public service, Kent was a patron of the arts and an avid traveller. After his retirement, he and Helen pursued many interests and spent the winters in Vancouver and the summers at the family cottage in Elgin, Ontario. Kent is survived by his wife, Helen; his four sons, George, Rory, Adam, and Nicholas; his daughter, Sara; his sisters, Elizabeth Gooderham ROBINSON and Eleanor Gooderham CRAWFORD; and eight grand children: Elizabeth, Rachel, Noah, Graham, David, Eilish, Maaike, and Willem. The family wishes to extend its most sincere thanks to the doctors and nurses of the Intensive Care Unit of the Ottawa Civic Hospital and the Cardiac Care Unit of the Ottawa Heart Institute for their excellent care and compassion and encourages Friends to make a donation in Kent's memory to the University of Ottawa Heart Institute Foundation at 40 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1Y 4W7.

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-21 published
HODGKINSON, Ronald Arnold
Born July 27, 1927 in Ottawa. Ron died peacefully with family by his side on November 16, 2003 at the Victoria Hospice, at the age of 76. He fought a tenacious battle with cancer, courageously and with his sense of humour intact to the end. Predeceased by mother Josephine CAVILL, father George HODGKINSON, and brother Gilbert. He will be sadly missed by his loving wife Jean Lesley (née BANCROFT,) of 46 years, his son Eric Ronald HODGKINSON, daughters Janice ROBINSON (Dan REDFORD,) Susan VIMINITZ (Mark,) grandchildren Jenna, Sam, Josh and Zack, brother Art, sisters Nora, Elsie Ann and Helen, 11 nieces and nephews, and many dear Friends. Family and Friends are invited to celebrate Ron's life at the Gordon head United Church, 4201 Tyndall in Victoria, at 3 p.m, on Saturday, November 22. Donations can be made in his memory to the Cancer Society or the Victoria Hospice.

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ROBLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-29 published
Kenneth Fawcett COLLINS
By Alan RAYBURN Thursday, May 29, 2003 - Page A26
Husband, father, grandfather, veteran, volunteer, family historian. Born November 23, 1916, in Haverhill, Massachusetts. Died February 19, in Ottawa, of cancer, aged 86.
Ken COLLINS was born close to the New Hampshire border, into a family with very deep New England roots. His father Bernard (Bern) traced his roots back to the 1600s in that area, while his mother, Eleanor (Elly) McPHERSON, came from Grand Valley in Dufferin County, Ontario Elly's mother, Elizabeth Adaline FAWCETT, was the source of Ken's second name. Bern and Elly emigrated from the United States to Montreal in 1926, and then, in 1930, moved to North Bay, Ontario
In 1941, Ken graduated from Queen's University in Kingston with a degree in chemical engineering and worked in the Welland Chemical Works in Niagara Falls for two years. He then joined the Canadian army's Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, and rose to the rank of lieutenant-colonel. Ken's pride as a commandant of "Reemee" was revealed in his car licence plate: CREME.
Ken served overseas from 1943 to 1946, and was a Normandy veteran. After the war, he held various staff and regimental appointments, mostly in Ottawa. Upon retiring from the army in 1967, Ken was engaged by Carleton University to administer the department of planning and construction until 1982.
During his Queen's graduation week, Ken married Evalyn ROBLIN, who had been raised west of Kingston in Adolphustown Township, Lennox and Addington County. After he discovered that local historians had been mistaken about which of two ancestral Roblin roots were Evalyn's, he vigorously launched into a search of his own family roots. Over a period of some 60 years he accumulated 24 thick binders on family connections. He was able to trace back 18 generations, with King Edward 4th among his ancestors in the 1400s.
Ken and Evalyn had three children, Marianne, Bruce (a fireman who was killed in a fire in 1972), and Elizabeth; also, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Family was very important to Ken; he was very proud of his offspring.
For almost a quarter of a century, Ken was a Friday evening volunteer at the Family History Centre of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on Ottawa's Prince of Wales Drive. There he guided both experienced and novice family historians to find their ancestral records.
Recognizing the value of working with others involved in genealogy (right up there in North American hobby popularity, right after stamp collecting), Ken joined the Ontario Genealogical Society and its Ottawa Branch in 1972. After serving as the chair of the branch in the mid-1970s, he rose through the ranks to become the president of the Ontario Genealogical Society from 1977 to Ken was a prime mover of recording gravestone inscriptions in Ontario's cemeteries. As the Ontario Genealogical Society cemetery inscription coordinator from 1974 to 1992, he saw the number of recorded cemeteries rise from 1,800 to more than 5,000. A spinoff from the cemetery recordings is the much-used Ontario Cemetery Finding Aid on the Internet, which publishes the indexes of the cemetery recordings.
Ken was a member of Rideau Park United Church in the Alta Vista area of Ottawa, and had worked there for 36 years with the Boy Scouts. When his grand_son, John BAIRD (now an Ontario cabinet minister) became a teenager, he guided him to become a Queen's Scout.
Ken COLLINS was a great mentor, friend and gentleman: his contributions to family history studies, cemetery recordings and Scouting will long serve many Ottawa and Ontario generations to come.
Alan RAYBURN is a friend of Ken COLLINS; Edward KIPP contributed to the article.

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ROBSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
ROBSON, Mary Virginia (née SKILLING)
On June 27, 2003, died from natural causes at age 73. She is survived by her husband of 49 years, James Thomas, her children David and Marianne of St. Albert (Edmonton), Mark of Toronto, Andrew and Jackie MARSH of Mississauga, Marthanne and Bruce GORDON of Owen Sound, Jennifer and Reidar TRONNES of Reykjavik, and 11 grandchildren. Visitation at Fawcett Funeral Home - Collingwood Chapel, 82 Pine Street at Second Street, Collingwood, on Sunday, June 29, 2003 from 2-4 in the afternoon. Funeral Mass at St. Mary's Church, 63 Elgin Street at Ontario Street, on Monday, June 30 at 11: 30 a.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the General and Marine Hospital Foundation, John Howard Society or your favourite charity will be appreciated.

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