ROBBINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-22 published
ARDIEL, Ruth Winnifred (née FRANCIS) 89 years.
Died peacefully at Windsor Regional Hospital-Western Campus on Tuesday, October 21, 2003. Dearest wife of the late J.R. ARDIEL (1973.) Beloved mother of Joan DUFF, Karen MEYERS and Susan and David RUCH. Dearest sister of June and Fred ROEMMELE. Loving grandmother of Melissa MEYERS and Jim DONOHUE, Jay MEYERS and Tina ROBBINS, Allison RUCH and Ryan SMITH, Dave RUCH and Anne Marie PETTINATO, Julie SANDO, and John PECARARO, Jackie and Frank HAMILTON, Michelle and Joe GRECO and Natalie DUFF. Great grandmother of Max and Miranda PECARARO, Scott and Mathew HAMILTON and Kaity and Nicholas GRECO. Dear Aunt to her special nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews. Remembered by several cousins in London and Toronto. Born on a homestead in Marengo, Saskatchewan to the late Anne and Alfred FRANCIS; pre-deceased by brothers Lloyd (1912), Bruce (Royal Canadian Air Force, 1943) and her sister Dorothy HENDERSON (1964.) Ruth was a long-standing member of Beach Grove Golf and Country Club, Windsor and Tamarac Golf and Country Club, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Visiting in the Walter D. Kelly Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1969 Wyandotte St. East, Windsor, Ontario on Thursday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. The complete funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday, October 24, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend William GALLAGHER officiating. Cremation with interment later in Greenlawn Memorial Cemetery. In kindness memorial tributes to the charity of you choice, Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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ROBERT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-04 published
Died This Day -- 269 airline passengers, 1983
Thursday, September 4, 2003 - Page R9
All aboard Korean Air Lines flight 007 killed when plane shot down by Soviet fighter after straying into Soviet airspace; dead included nine Canadians: Mary Jane HENDRIE of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario; George PANAGOPOULOS, Marilou COVEY, Chun Lan YEH and San-Gi LIM, all of Toronto; François DE MASSY and François ROBERT of Montreal; Larry SAYERS of Stoney Creek, Ontario; and Rev. Jean-Paul GRÉGOIRE, a Tokyo resident.

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ROBERTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
'He kept a little flame of geometry alive'
Superstar University of Toronto mathematician considered himself an artist, but his seminal work inevitably found practical applications
By Siobhan ROBERTS Saturday, April 12, 2003 - Page F11
Widely considered the greatest classical geometer of his time and the man who saved his discipline from near extinction, Harold Scott MacDonald COXETER, who died on March 31 at 96, said of himself, with characteristic modesty, "I am like any other artist. It just so happens that what fills my mind is shapes and numbers."
Prof. COXETER's work focused on hyperdimensional shapes, specifically the symmetry of regular figures and polytopes. Polytopes are geometric shapes of any number of dimensions that cannot be constructed in the real world and can be visualized only when the eye of the beholder possesses the necessary insight; they are most often described mathematically and sometimes can be represented with hypnotically intricate fine-line drawings.
"I like things that can be seen," Prof. COXETER once remarked. "You have to imagine a different world where these queer things have some kind of shape."
Known as Donald (shortened from MacDonald,) Prof. COXETER had such a passion for his work and unrivalled elegance in constructing and writing proofs that he motivated countless mathematicians to pick up the antiquated discipline of geometry long after it had been deemed passé.
John Horton CONWAY, the Von Neumann professor of mathematics at Princeton University, never studied under Prof. COXETER, but he considers himself an honorary student because of the COXETERian nature of his work.
"With math, what you're doing is trying to prove something and that can get very complicated and ugly. COXETER always manages to do it clearly and concisely," Prof. CONWAY said. "He kept a little flame of geometry alive by doing such beautiful works himself.
"I'm reminded of a quotation from Walter Pater's book The Renaissance. He was describing art and poetry, but he talks of a small, gem-like flame: 'To burn always with this hard, gem-like flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life.' "
Prof. COXETER's oeuvre included more than 250 papers and 12 books. His Introduction to Geometry, published in 1961, is now considered a classic -- it is still in print and this year is back on the curriculum at McGill University. His Regular Polytopes is considered by some as the modern-day addendum to Euclid's Elements. In 1957, he published Generators and Relations for Discrete Groups, written jointly with his PhD student and lifelong friend Willy MOSER. It is currently in its seventh edition.
Prof. COXETER's self-image as an artist was validated by his Friendship with and influence on Dutch artist M. C. ESCHER, who, when working on his Circle Limit 3 drawings, used to say, "I'm Coxetering today."
They met at the International Mathematical Congress in Amsterdam in 1954 and then corresponded about their mutual interest in repeating patterns and representations of infinity. In a letter to his son, Mr. ESCHER noted that a diagram sent to him by Prof. COXETER that inspired his Circle Limit 3 prints "gave me quite a shock."
He added that " COXETER's hocus-pocus text is no use to me at all.... I understand nothing, absolutely nothing of it."
While Mr. ESCHER claimed total ignorance of math, Prof. COXETER wrote numerous papers on the Dutchman's "intuitive geometry."
Though Prof. COXETER did geometry for its own sake, his work inevitably found practical application. Buckminster FULLER encountered his work in the construction of his geodesic domes. He later dedicated a book to Prof. COXETER: "By virtue of his extraordinary life's work in mathematics, Prof. COXETER is the geometer of our bestirring twentieth century. [He is] the spontaneously acclaimed terrestrial curator of the historical inventory of the science of pattern analysis."
Prof. COXETER's work with icosohedral symmetries served as a template of sorts in the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the Carbon 60 molecule. It has also proved relevant to other specialized areas of science such as telecommunications, data mining, topology and quasi-crystals.
In 1968, Prof. COXETER added to his list of converts an anonymous society of French mathematicians, the Bourbakis, who actively and internationally sought to eradicate classical geometry from the curriculum of math education.
"Death to Triangles, Down with Euclid!" was the Bourbaki war cry. Prof. COXETER's rebuttal: "Everyone is entitled to their opinion. But the Bourbakis were sadly mistaken."
One member of the society, Pierre CARTIER, met Prof. COXETER in Montreal and became enamoured of his work. Soon, he had persuaded his fellow Bourbakis to include Prof. COXETER's approach in their annual publication. "An entire volume of Bourbaki was thoroughly inspired by the work of COXETER," said Prof. CARTIER, a professor at Denis Diderot University in Paris.
In the 1968 volume, Prof. COXETER's name was writ large into the lexicon of mathematics with the inauguration of the terms "COXETER number," " COXETER group" and "COXETER graph."
These concepts describe symmetrical properties of shapes in multiple dimensions and helped to bridge the old-fashioned classical geometry with the more au courant and applied algebraic side of the discipline. These concepts continue to pervade geometrical discourse, several decades after being discovered by Prof. COXETER.
Prof. COXETER became a serious mathematician at the relatively late age of 14, though family folklore has it that, as a toddler, he liked to stare at the columns of numbers in the financial pages of his father's newspaper.
He was born into a Quaker family in Kensington, just west of London, on February 9, 1907. His mother, Lucy GEE, was a landscape artist and portrait painter, and his father, Harold, was a manufacturer of surgical instruments, though his great love was sculpting.
They had originally named their son MacDonald Scott COXETER, but a godparent suggested that the boy's father's name should be added at the front. Another relative then pointed out that H.M.S. COXETER made him sound like a ship of the royal fleet so the names were switched around.
When Prof. COXETER was 12, he created his own language -- "Amellaibian" a cross between Latin and French, and filled a 126-page notebook with information on the imaginary world where it was spoken.
But more than anything he fancied himself a composer, writing several piano concertos, a string quartet and a fugue. His mother took her son and his musical compositions to Gustav HOLST. His advice: "Educate him first."
He was then sent to boarding school, where he met John Flinders PETRIE, son of Egyptologist Sir Flinders PETRIE. The two were passing time at the infirmary contemplating why there were only five Platonic solids -- the cube, tetrahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron. They then began visualizing what these shapes might look like in the fourth dimension. At the age of 15, Prof. COXETER won a school prize for an English essay on how to project these geometric shapes into higher dimensions -- he called it "Dimensional Analogy."
Prof. COXETER's father took his son along with his essay to meet friend and fellow pacifist Bertrand RUSSELL. Mr. RUSSELL recommended Prof. COXETER to mathematician E.H. NEVILLE, a scout, of sorts, for mathematics prodigies. He was impressed by Prof. COXETER's work but appalled by some inexcusable gaps in his mathematical knowledge. Prof. NEVILLE arranged for private tutelage in pursuit of a scholarship at Cambridge. During this period, Prof. COXETER was forbidden from thinking in the fourth dimension, except on Sundays.
He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1926 and was among five students handpicked by Ludwig WITTGENSTEIN for his philosophy of mathematics class. During his first year at Cambridge, at the age of 19, he discovered a new regular polyhedron that had six hexagonal faces at each vertex.
After graduating with first-class honours in 1929, he received his doctorate under H. F. BAKER in 1931, winning the coveted Smith's Prize for his thesis.
Prof. COXETER did fellowship stints back and forth between Princeton and Cambridge for the next few years, focusing on the mathematics of kaleidoscopes -- he had mirrors specially cut and hinged together and carried them in velvet pouches sewn by his mother. By 1933, he had enumerated the n-dimensional kaleidoscopes -- that is, kaleidoscopes operating up to any number of dimensions.
The concepts that became known as COXETER groups are the complex algebraic equations he developed to express how many images may be seen of any object in a kaleidoscope (he once used a paper triangle with the word "nonsense" printed on it to track reflections).
In 1936, Prof. COXETER was offered an assistant professorship at the University of Toronto. He made the move shortly after the sudden death of his father and following his marriage to Rien BROUWER. She was from the Netherlnds and he met her while she was on holiday in London.
As a professor, Prof. COXETER was known to flout set curriculum. Ed BARBEAU, now a professor at the U of T, recalled that at the start of his classes, Prof. COXETER would spread out a manuscript on the desks at the front of the room. During his lecture, he would often pause for minutes at a time to make notes when a student offered something that might be relevant to his work in progress. When the work was later published, students were pleasantly surprised to find that their suggestions had been duly credited.
Prof. COXETER was also known to show up to class carrying a pineapple, or a giant sunflower from his garden, demonstrating the existence of geometric principles in nature. And he was notorious for leaping over details, expecting students to fill in the rest.
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's resident intellectual, Lister SINCLAIR, was one of Prof. COXETER's earliest students. He once recounted that Prof. COXETER would "write an expression on the board and you could see it talking to him. It was like Michelangelo walking around a block of marble and seeing what's in there."
Asia Ivic WEISS, a professor at York University, Prof. COXETER's last PhD student and the only woman so honoured, describes an incident that perfectly exemplifies Prof. COXETER's math myopia. Going into labour with her first child, she called him to cancel their weekly meeting. Prof. COXETER, who never acknowledged her pregnancy, said not to worry, he would send over a stack of research to keep her busy when she got home from the hospital.
Despite several offers from other universities, Prof. COXETER stayed at University of Toronto throughout his career.
Like his father, he was a pacifist. In 1997, he was among those who marched a petition to the university president's office to protest against an honorary degree being conferred on George BUSH Sr. Prof. COXETER recalled with disdain Robert PRITCHARD's telling him, "Donald, I have more important things to worry about."
After his official retirement in 1977, Prof. COXETER continued as a professor emeritus, making weekly visits to his office. These subsided only in the past several months. On the weekend before his death, he finished revisions on his final paper, which he had delivered the previous summer in Budapest.
In his last five years, he survived a heart attack, a broken hip (he sprung himself from the hospital early to drive to a geometry conference in Wisconsin) and, most recently, prostate cancer.
Considering his 96 years of vegetarianism and a strict exercise regime, he felt betrayed by his body. "I feel like the man of Thermopylae who doesn't do anything properly," he commented recently after an awkward evening out, quoting nonsense poet Edward LEAR.
Prof. COXETER died in his home, with three long last breaths, just before bed on the last day of March.
His brain is now undergoing study at McMaster University, along with that of Albert EINSTEIN. Neuroscientist Sandra WITELSON is tryng to determine whether his brain's extraordinary capacities are associated with its structure.
Prof. COXETER met with her at the beginning of March and learned that the atypical elements of Einstein's brain, compared with an average brain, were symmetrical on both right and left sides.
Prof. WITELSON said she wondered whether there might be similar findings with Prof. COXETER's brain. "Isn't that nice," he said. "I suppose that would indicate all my interest in symmetry was well founded."
Prof. COXETER leaves his daughter Susan and son Edgar. His wife died in 1999.
Siobhan ROBERTS is a Toronto writer whose biography of Donald COXETER will be published by Penguin in 2005.

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ROBERTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-30 published
BROWN, Rosemary
It is with profound sadness that we announce the sudden passing of the Honourable Dr. Rosemary BROWN, P.C., O.C., O.B.C. She died peacefully at home on April 26, 2003. She is survived by her loving husband, Dr. William T. BROWN; three children, Cleta, Gary and Jonathan; seven grandchildren, Katherine, Ashton, William, Giselle, Jonathan, Jackson and Louis and many other cherished relatives and Friends. Born in Kingston, Jamaica on June 17, 1930, she graduated from Wolmer's School and then came to Canada in 1951 to study at McGill University in Montreal where she completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1955. After moving to Vancouver, Rosemary completed Bachelor and Masters degrees in Social Work at the University of British Columbia. Rosemary BROWN was a member of the Privy Council, Officer of the Order of Canada, Commander of the Order of Distinction of Jamaica, Member of the Order of British Columbia, the recipient of 15 honourary doctorates, and was a Member of the Legislative Assembly in British Columbia from 1972 to 1986. She was also President of her favourite charity MATCH International, an organization dedicated to the empowerment of woman in developing nations. Rosemary was a founder of a number of socially progressive organizations including the National Black Coalition, the British Columbia Association for the Advancement of Coloured People, the Vancouver Status of Women, Multilingual Orientation Service Association for Immigrant Communities, the Canadian Women's Foundation, The Vancouver Crisis Centre and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. Donations may be made to MATCH International. Funeral Service will be held at St. Andrew's Wesley United Church, Burrard and Nelson, Vancouver on Monday, May 5th at 1: 30 p.m., Bishop Michael INGHAM, Dean Peter ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, and the Reverend William ROBERTS officiating. Kearney Funeral Services 604-736-0268.

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ROBERTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-22 published
SOLAJIC, Zoran
Zoran died peacefully at home with his loving wife Maja and daughter Ana by his side on Wednesday, May 21, 2003 at the age of 53 years. He is loved and will be greatly missed by his father-in-law Mirko RISTIC of Belgrade, Jeff ROBERTS and many relatives, Friends and colleagues. The family will receive Friends at First United Church, 397 Kent St. Ottawa on Saturday from 12: 30 until time memorial service at 2 p.m. Those wishing may make memorial donations to the Cancer Research Society, 305-200 Isabella St. Ottawa, K1S 1V7. Condolences, donations or tributes may be made at www.tubmanfuneralhomes.com.

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ROBERTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-24 published
ROBERTS, Carol (née Carol Henrietta HINGST)
Died early Saturday morning at Princess Margaret Hospital due to complications related to cancer. She died peacefully in her sleep with her three children at her bedside. A memorial service will be held on Thursday, June 26, 2003 at 3: 00 p.m. at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue. Please do not send flowers. Donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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ROBERTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Elizabeth Aleen AKED, late of the City of Toronto, Ontario, deceased, who died on or about March 21st, 2003, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before August 18th, 2003. Thereafter, the Estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, Ontario, on June 26, 2003
Catherine A. ROBERTS and Kerry I.J. WATT,
Estate Trustees by their solicitors:
McMillan Binch LLP (Catherine A. ROBERTS)
200 Bay Street, Suite 3500
Toronto, Ontario, M5J 2J7
Page B7

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ROBERTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims including claims made by Yvonne ROBERTS and Terri-Anne ROBERTS against the estate of Peter Frank ROBERTS, born February 26, 1940, late of Toronto, Ontario who died on or about the 16th day of February, 2003, must be filed with the Solicitors for the representative on or before the 19th day of July, 2003, after which date Cheryl THOMAS the daughter of the late Peter Frank ROBERTS, will be applying to be appointed Estate Trustee and once appointed the estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustee then shall have notice
Dated at Toronto, this 24th day of June, 2003
Cheryl THOMAS
Proposed Estate Trustee without a Will
By: Paul A. DINEEN
Chapnick and Associates
Barristers and Solicitors
228 Carlton Street
Page B7

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ROBERTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-19 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the Estate of Elizabeth Aleen AKED, late of the City of Toronto, Ontario, deceased, who died on or about March 21st, 2003, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before August 18th, 2003. Thereafter, the Estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, Ontario, on June 26, 2003
Catherine A. ROBERTS
Kerry I.J. WATT,
Estate Trustees by their solicitors:
McMillan Binch LLP (Catherine A. ROBERTS)
200 Bay Street, Suite 3500
Toronto, Ontario, M5J 2J7
Page B5

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ROBERTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-31 published
Peg ROBERTS
By Pat ROBERTS Thursday, July 31, 2003 - Page A24
Wife, mother, theatre director and founder. Born May 27, 1919, in Brandon, Manitoba Died April 2 in Toronto, of cancer, aged Peggy DORAN grew up in Brandon, Manitoba, and graduated from Brandon College before training as a nurse at Montreal's Royal Victoria Hospital during the Second World War. She did not like being a nurse, however. She had wanted to purse a career in the theatre and to study it at university. Her parents would not allow that; acting and theatre were seen as beneath the dignity of the only child of a well-to-do dentist from United Empire Loyalist stock. Nonetheless, her first theatrical success came at age 20, when she directed the Brandon Little Theatre production of Send Her Victorious, winning top honours in the Manitoba Drama Festival.
Peg worked as a nurse for just over a year. In 1945, she married Dennis ROBERTS, whom she had met in high school. They then moved to a tiny apartment in Toronto while he completed his psychology degree at the University of Toronto. In 1950, they moved to Sudbury, Ontario where Dennis became the city's first psychologist. As a couple, they played an active role in the city's educational and cultural life until Dennis' death in 1985.
The Sudbury Little Theatre Guild, founded in 1948, gave Peg the opportunity to "do theatre," and she made the most of it. Between 1950 and 1956, she gave birth to two children, directed four plays, acted in a fifth, and was twice president of the guild. Plays she directed include Blithe Spirit, The Importance of Being Earnest, The Glass Menagerie, and Antigone, which won the Edgar Stone Trophy for Direction at the Dominion Drama Festival in Toronto in 1955. That play coincided with her final pregnancy. The cast reportedly encouraged her to name the baby Antigone, if it was a girl.
Her production of The Importance of Being Earnest also made it to the national Dominion Drama Festival finals. Although it did not win, the adjudicators reviewed it quite favourably, noting that the colours for the production -- white, black and yellow were playwright Oscar Wilde's favourites. Peg's production of that play might have been the world (or at least Canadian) premiere of a recently discovered scene, cut from the final text of the play, which Peg obtained after reading of its discovery.
A frequent leading man in those early days, Al HEMREND, recalls that Peg was "ahead of her time. She took risks and chose plays that were very difficult."
As president of the Sudbury Little Theatre Guild in the 1956-57 season, Peg successfully petitioned the Dominion Drama Festival to create a new region. Thus, in 1957, the Quebec-Ontario Theatre Association region was formed, with Peg as its first regional chair.
As Sudbury grew, Peg was one of those who saw a need for a professional theatre company in the city. She was instrumental in the founding of the Sudbury Theatre Centre as a member of the planning study group and of the first board of directors (known as "the Five Fools").
Peg was also enthusiastic about bringing theatre to young people, and was a drama consultant for the Sudbury Secondary School Board in the 1970s.
She loved to entertain, and our house was often filled with guests. Each party was "staged," complete with costumes and sets (furniture arranged and rearranged, flowers, candles, crystal, linen or lace table cloths). She often served dishes she had never made before, with sometimes dubious, sometimes wonderful results.
Diagnosed with breast cancer in 1997, Peg moved back to Toronto in 1998. Cancer was something she could not stage-manage, direct, or control. Her motto until her death became: "rage, rage against the dying of the light."
She is survived by her three children: Judy, Steve, and Pat, and granddaughter, Charlotte.
Pat (not Antigone) ROBERTS is Peg's daughter.

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ROBERTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
Diplomat shaped cultural policy
Art-loving ambassador to Moscow and Bucharest also served as Trudeau's press secretary and as a director of the Canada Council
By Bill GLADSTONE, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - Page R7
Peter ROBERTS, a former press secretary to Pierre Trudeau who served as Canada's ambassador to Moscow and Bucharest and as director of the Canada Council, is being remembered as a major shaper of Canadian cultural policy and a late representative of an older generation of broadly based, multitalented diplomats that has all but vanished from the scene.
A native Albertan, Mr. ROBERTS died in Ottawa on November 21 after a varied career that stretched over four decades and included stints in Washington, Hong Kong, Saigon and Brussels. He was 76.
As assistant undersecretary of state responsible for cultural affairs from 1973 to 1979, he helped Ottawa develop protective policies toward the domestic film and book-publishing industries, and was instrumental in drafting the government's nationalistic Bill C-58, which applied tariffs to American magazines sold on Canadian newsstands. He also helped to establish the National Arts Centre.
"He was a superb civil servant because he had a capacity to listen to ministers, understand their viewpoints and help them achieve what they wanted to achieve," said John ROBERTS (no relation,) who was Secretary of State when Peter ROBERTS was undersecretary. "But at the same time, he had an extraordinary passion for the arts and for culture. So he did have his own ideas about things that should be done. He stimulated you to think and to adapt your thinking."
As ambassador to the Soviet Union, Mr. ROBERTS took a keen interest in George COSTAKIS, a former junior employee of the Canadian embassy who had spent a lifetime amassing an outstanding but illegal collection of modern art, both Russian and international. Mr. ROBERTS helped arrange a major exhibition of the collection at the Musée des beaux-arts in Montreal and later wrote a full-length biography, George Costakis: A Russian Life in Art, published by Carleton University Press in 1994.
Raising Eyebrows, a book of memoirs and character sketches, was published in 2000. He also wrote a book-length profile of former Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, whom he met often during his posting in Bucharest from 1979 to 1983, and who was executed in 1989. The book, Revenge on Christmas Day: Fact and Fiction in Bucharest, is slated for publication in 2004.
"Peter was a multifaceted person who bridged the cultural world, the literary world, the academic world and the world of the foreign service," said Allan GOTLIEB, a former ambassador to Washington. "If you go back to the golden age of Canadian diplomacy, you find examples of these very broadly engaged minds. Peter joined a little later, in the 1950s, but he still seemed a part of that era."
Peter McLaren ROBERTS was born in Calgary on July 5, 1927, and grew up in Lethbridge, Alberta. His father was a locally stationed federal tax official, his mother a schoolteacher. A brilliant student, he earned an M.A. in English literature from the University of Alberta in 1951, as well as a Rhodes scholarship that enabled him to study for three years at Oxford.
Afterward, he went down to London with a group of Friends, including Mr. GOTLIEB, who convinced him to write the Canadian foreign-service exam. He did so on a whim -- and passed. He taught English literature for a year at Bishop's University in Lennoxville, Quebec, and joined the foreign service in 1955.
Initially stationed in Ottawa, Mr. ROBERTS began studying German in anticipation of a posting in Bonn or Vienna. "The department had just then begun to realize that it was an advantage for a foreign-service officer, and for Canada, if the officer knew the language of the country where he or she was working," he noted in Raising Eyebrows.
"I hear you're learning German," the personnel manager remarked to him one day.
"Yes."
"You must be interested in languages."
"Yes."
"How'd you like to learn Russian?"
Several months later he travelled by ship and train to Moscow, where he served as third-in-command of the Canadian embassy from 1955 to 1958. He was posted to Hong Kong and Vietnam in the early 1960s and to Washington for the rest of that tumultuous decade.
In 1970, the Prime Minister's Office essentially borrowed him from the Department of External Affairs, as it was then known, so he could serve as assistant press secretary to Prime Minister Pierre TRUDEAU. Returning to Canada after a nine-year absence that had included a dreary stint working for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Brussels, Mr. ROBERTS showed up for his first day of work -- just as the Front de libération du Québec hostage crisis was erupting. Marc LALONDE, Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary, asked him to represent him at a strategy-planning meeting with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
"I had been long enough in diplomacy to know that this was a situation in which one did not speak without instructions," Mr. ROBERTS would recall. "I had no instructions, and I hadn't the faintest idea what the prime minister's views were on this abrupt development. I promised I would listen, make notes, report, and phone everyone. That I did, but I was glad that I had not ventured to predict which way TRUDEAU would jump. It was only a few days later that the troops were in Montreal, suspects rounded up and in jail, the War Measures Act proclaimed, and the prime minister saying to the press, 'Just watch me.' By that time I was veteran and expert."
After that baptism by fire, Mr. ROBERTS became full press secretary and met daily with Mr. TRUDEAU, often advising him on issues that the Prime Minister may have considered unimportant, and sometimes having the sobering thrill of hearing his words repeated verbatim to reporters later in the day. It was Mr. ROBERTS himself who announced the Prime Minister's marriage to an "incredulous" press gallery on March 4, 1971, and the birth of a son on Christmas Day.
External Affairs reclaimed Mr. ROBERTS in 1972 and parachuted him into the cultural division of the Department of the Secretary of State. The new assistant undersecretary awoke at 4 every morning and studied for three hours before going to work, but even with a "marvellous staff" who "filled in for me when I was stupid or ignorant," he sometimes found the learning curve excessively steep.
"Gradually my diplomatic experience came into play," he would write. "Diplomacy is partly a matter of faking. If you don't know the answer, if you don't know who someone is, don't let on. Smile enigmatically, and change the subject to the situation in Peru. I did a lot of that at the Secretary of State."
Mr. ROBERTS learned Romanian before becoming that country's ambassador in 1979, and found that the effort had been worthwhile because it gave him exceptionally good access to Mr. Ceausescu, who seemed flattered that a Canadian could speak his language; the leader would dismiss his retinue of advisers and translators and meet with Mr. ROBERTS alone to discuss a variety of political issues ranging from the situation in Poland to the situation in Quebec. Mr. ROBERTS enjoyed the meetings but understood that he was dealing with "the most desperate dictator and tyrant in Europe" and one who was becoming increasingly unhinged.
Among the visitors to Bucharest during that time was Allan GOTLIEB, by then undersecretary of state for External Affairs, who recalled being feted with Mr. ROBERTS by their Romanian hosts at a deluxe and crowded restaurant, where they washed down wonderful steaks with equally wonderful wines. The next evening, seeking a place for dinner, he suggested they return to the same establishment. "He told me, 'It's not there any more -- it's not real,' " Mr. GOTLIEB recalled. "He said, 'They opened it just for you.' He took me back there and it was all boarded up. There wasn't a soul there. It was like one of those Russian Potemkin villages you hear about."
As Soviet ambassador, Mr. ROBERTS joined Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY's entourage for the funeral of general secretary Konstantin Chernenko in Moscow in 1985. Like most other world leaders present, Mr. MULRONEY was keenly interested in meeting the incoming general secretary, Mikhail Gorbachev, and so was "predictably enraged" when the appointment was abruptly cancelled because an inept bureaucrat had overfilled Mr. Gorbachev's daybook with appointments. Persuading Mr. MULRONEY to be patient, Mr. ROBERTS quickly convinced the Soviets to rectify the error, and the meeting occurred in the Kremlin as originally planned.
Six months later, Mr. MULRONEY expressed his gratitude to Mr. ROBERTS by summoning him back to Ottawa to head the Canada Council. Fascinated as always by the Soviets, Mr. ROBERTS was reluctant to go, but realized he could not refuse.
"He was sad because Gorbachev had just come to power, and things were just beginning to show signs of change," recalls his wife, Glenna ROBERTS.
"He left with a great deal of regret, because he was really interested in seeing those changes."
Mr. ROBERTS retired from the Canada Council in 1989 and was an adjunct research professor of political science at Ottawa's Carleton University from 1990. He was diagnosed about 10 years ago with the cancer that increasingly incapacitated him over the past year.
He leaves his second wife Glenna, children Frances and Jeremy and their families, sister Mary, stepchildren Graham, Brendan and Hannah REID.

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ROBERTSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-05 published
George Eli Amos PICKARD
February 12, 1921 - January 30, 2003
George PICKARD, a resident of Gore Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Thursday, January 30, 2003 at the age of 81 years. He was born at Ice Lake, son of the late Robert and Elizabeth BRANDOW) PICKARD. George had worked for 7 years at INCO, then returned home and farmed for 46 years, retiring to Gore Bay in 1989. He was a member of the United Church, and had many interests including gardening, fishing, and doing crossword puzzles. His greatest love was his family. He thoroughly enjoyed spending time with all his family, especially his grandchildren and great grandchildren. he was a kind and caring husband, father, grandfather and great grandfather, and will be sadly missed, but many memories will be cherished. Dearly loved husband of Margaret (McARTHUR) PICKARD of Gore Bay. Loved and loving father and father-in-law of Ken and Carol PICKARD of Espanola, Sheila and Joe BRANDOW of Ice Lake and Marilyn PRIOR and friend Hector of Ice Lake. Proud grandfather of Mike and Kendal, Wendy and Steven, Patti and Maurice, Jason, Diane and Oliver, Connie and Chadwick and Sherry and great grandchildren Kyle, Matthew, Carly, Shelby and Christian. Dear brother of Alvin PICKARD of Silver Water and Elizabeth ROBERTSON of Gore Bay. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sister Laura and brothers Robert, Norman, Earl, John and Cecil.
Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home after 7: 00 pm on Friday. The funeral service was conducted in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel on Saturday, February 1, 2003 at 11: 00 am with Geraldine BOULD officiating. Spring interment in Gordon cemetery.

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ROBERTSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-05 published
Marcel Alexander GORZYNSKI
In loving memory of Marcel Alexander GORZYNSKI, born January 16, 1925 in Poland, died February 23, 2003 at his residence on Manitoulin Island.
He married in 1948 in Germany to Lena (KAPPLER,) and they came to Canada in 1949 to Montreal. In 1950 he came to Sudbury and was hired at INCO. He was a millwright retiring in 1985. In 1975 he went camping on Manitoulin Island. While he was there he and his wife went out looking for waterfront property. They bought one on Lake Manitou and started building a camp. In 1986 he moved to Manitoulin Island permanently. Marcel enjoyed his life on Manitoulin Island to the fullest. He grew everything in the garden. He planted trees all around, Chestnut, Walnut, Apple, Pear and Grape. The flower garden was started too. Roses were his favourite. He had a green thumb for gardening and took great pride in his flowers and fruit. He was predeceased by his canine friend, Lady. Marcel battled non-Hodgin's lymphoma for two years. He died peacefully in his beloved home. We all miss him. Beloved husband of Lena (KAPPLER) GORZYNSKI of Sudbury. Loving father of Madeline (husband Terry BUCKMAN,) Patricia (husband Norm BODSON,) and Raymond (partner Debbie ROBERTSON) all of Sudbury. Cherished grandfather of Andrea and Stephanie. The Memorial Service was held in the R. J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street Sudbury on Thursday, February 27, 2003. Cremation at the Park Lawn Crematorium.

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ROBERTSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
Marion Isabel Patricia MacLEA (née ROBERTSON)
Peacefully on February 24, 2003 at Belmont House in her 91st year. Born in Toronto on July 1, 1912. Predeceased by her devoted husband, Wid, in December 1975. Much loved mother of Pat KING (Doug,) Linda THEODOROU (Nick) and Bob MacLEA. Survived by her beloved sister Ruby COWLING. Wonderful grandmother to Andrew, Edward, Peter, Tania, Malcolm (deceased), Michael and Jenna. She led an active and full life. There were annual trips to Greece and several to the Far East, England and New York to be with her family. She grew up in Riverdale and moved to the Beach as a young adult where she met Wid. A long time member of Kew Beach United Church Women's Group, lawn bowler at Balmy Beach and active social and community member. After a stroke in 1995 she was slowed down. She was alert and contented until a week before her death. Many thanks to the wonderful staff, volunteers and Friends at Belmont House. Friends will be received at Kew Beach United Church (Wineva and Queen Street) on Thursday, March 6, 2003 from 1: 00 p.m. until service time at 2: 00 p.m. A reception will be held in the church parlour following the service. In lieu of flowers, please send a donation to Belmont House, 55 Belmont Street, Toronto, Ontario M5R 1R1, or a charity of choice. Arrangements in the care of Sherrin Funeral Home (416-698-2861).

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ROBERTSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-18 published
PEART / LEE, Margaret Eileen (née HEALY)
Died peacefully, on March 17, 2003, at St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, at the age of 86. Dearly beloved wife of Fred PEART. Loving mother of Mary Catherine O'BRIEN (Mike,) and Rosemary DUNNING (Michael,) and Fred's children: John, Mary Lou ROBERTSON (Clyde), Peter (Marjorie), and Gord (Marianne). Grammy of 22 grandchildren, and 24 great-grandchildren. Survived by her brother Frank HEALY. Predeceased by Gerry LEE, her grand_son Matthew O'BRIEN, and her brother Wilf HEALY. A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at St. Gabriel's Church (650 Sheppard Avenue East), on Thursday morning at 10 o'clock. Reception to follow service at the family home. The family wish to thank the doctors and staff of St. Michael's Hospital.

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ROBERTSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-26 published
COLTHART, John Marshall M.D.
Born March 31, 1916 in Rodney, Ontario, died April 24, 2003 in Uxbridge, Ontario. Graduate University of Western Ontario Medicine '42, Major in Royal Canadian Army Medical Corp World War 2 overseas, family physician in East York 1946-1954, industrial physician with Bell Canada in Toronto 1954-1965, Western Electric/American Telephone and Telegraph in Chicago 1965-1969, Xerox in Rochester, New York 1969-1980 before retiring to Beaverton, Ontario and Clearwater, Florida. John was predeceased by his parents, James and Jeanie (THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON) COLTHART, and his wife, Shirley Mae (FITCH) M.D., University of Western Ontario Medicine '42. Father (father-in-law) of Jim of San Diego, California, Doctors Carol (Bob) BROCK in North York, Ontario, Peggy (Bob) McCALLA in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Alice (Rick) DANIEL in Calgary, Alberta and Joan (Dave) ROBERTSON in Shortsville, New York; grandfather of Christie COLTHART, Lisa (Andrew) SCHNEPPENHEIM, John Michael COLTHART, Mike BROCK, Heather (Tom) WHEELER, Catherine BROCK, Andy McCALLA, Matt (Jen) McCALLA, Jen (Dan) BEDETTE, James ROBERTSON, Shirley and Sarah DANIEL and great-grandfather of Christie's son, Kyle BURGESS. He was loved, respected and treasured by family, Friends and patients alike. A celebration of his life will be held at Markham Bible Chapel, 50 Cairns Drive, Markham, Ontario, west of McGowan Road, south from 16th Avenue, on Monday, May 5, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. In remembrance, donations can be made to the Shirley M. Colthart Fund (c/o John P. Robarts Research Institute, P.O. Box 5015, London, Ontario N6A 5K8), or the Trans-Canada Trail Foundation or a charity of your choice. Arrangements by Mangan Funeral Home, Beaverton, Ontario (705) 426-5777.

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ROBERTSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-22 published
J. Grant MAXWELL
June 6, 1922 - May 16, 2003.
Grant died peacefully in Victoria on May 16th, 2003 in the presence of loved ones. He is survived by his his loving and supportive family; his devoted wife of 56 years, Vivian (née MITCHENER) five children; Anne, Victoria; Mary (Bill ROBERTSON,) Saskatoon James (Marjory PORTER), Victoria; Kathleen (Darrel ANDERSON), Victoria; and, Gregory (Carrie HOLMQUIST,) Saskatoon, eight grandchildren: Joshua and Katie PENDLETON; Maxwell BRANDEL; Kristin, Melissa, and Adam MAXWELL; and, Emily and Michael MAXWELL; Vivian's surviving siblings Eileen and Cecil; and, numerous Friends across Canada, U.S.A., and Holland. Grant was predeceased by his children Thomas John, Christopher, and Christine, and by his parents Gilmour and Bridgette (ZETTA) MAXWELL of Plenty, Saskatchewan.
Grant had a dignified and distinguished career and life. He was born and raised on a farm near Plenty. After he finished high school in Plenty, he attended Saint Thomas More College, at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. While at university, he met Vivian and many life-long Friends. Grant graduated from the U of S in 1944.
From 1944-45, he served in the Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve on the Atlantic Seaboard. After completing his national duty, he and Vivian married and he began his media career and family.
A print, radio, and television, journalist for over fifty years, Grant's extensive career reflected his social conscience and ecumenical beliefs. He began his career as a radio news reporter and assistant news director with CFQC Radio (1946-48.) Moving on to newspaper journalism with the Saskatoon Star Phoenix (1949-59), he was a senior reporter and feature writer, and then the chief editorial writer for the newspaper.
Grant's deep religious faith guided him down a path that utilized his journalistic expertise while nurturing his spirit. From 1960-68, he was the Lay Director at the Saskatoon Catholic Centre. He was also a regular columnist with several Catholic newspapers, including the Prairie Messenger, Canadian Register, Western Catholic Reporter, and Our Family, between 1959-69. In the same time period, Grant and Vivian were the Canadian couple on the international writing committee of the Christian Family Movement based in Chicago. In 1967 Grant with Vivian were the Canadian delegates to the International Lay Congress of the Catholic Church. Between 1962-68, Grant was a regular panelist on the CFQC-television show ''In the Public Interest,'' and a Saskatchewan correspondent to the Globe and Mail.
In 1969 Grant and Vivian and family moved from Saskatoon to Ottawa where Grant had accepted a position as Co-Director, and later Director, of the Social Action Office, Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops. While working at this position from 1969 - 77, Grant researched, advised, and prepared draft policy statements on national, social and religious issues, including Project Feedback, a qualitative ''sounding at the grassroots'' of religious beliefs and church concerns across Canada. Also during this time (1972-75), Grant was a Canadian consultant with the International Pontificial Commission for Justice and Peace, Vatican City: Grant and Vivian met Pope Paul 6th while in Rome.
From 1977-81, Grant worked in Ottawa as a freelance journalist and consultant for numerous and varied clients such as the Department of the Secretary of State, the Canadian Human Rights Commission, the Conserver Society Project of the Science Council of Canada, the Vanier Institute of the Family, and the Committee of National Voluntary Organizations. During this time, he wrote the book Assignment in Chekiang detailing the 1902 - 54 experience of the Scarborough Foreign Mission Society in China.
In 1981, Grant and Vivian moved from Ottawa to Toronto. From 1981-86, Grant served as founding editor of ''Compass, '' a national magazine published by the Jesuits of English-speaking Canada. During this time, he was also a member of the writing team for ''Living with Christ, '' a monthly missalette of scriptural texts and commentary circulated to most Catholic parishes across Canada.
In 1986, Grant and Vivian left Toronto and semi-retired in Victoria, British Columbia. Grant's faith and desire to write kept him involved in several projects. In 1987 - 88 Grant wrote At Your Service: Stories of Canadians In Missions. From 1989-91, he co-edited Forward in the Spirit, a popular history of the ''People Synod'' published by the Catholic Diocese of Victoria. From 1992 - 94 he co-wrote and edited a book entitled Healing Journeys: The Ka Ka Wis Experience, which described the history of the Aboriginal residential counseling centre for the Ka Ka Wis Family Development Centre, Meares Island, B.C.
Throughout his life, Grant was also actively involved in his communities. He was an executive member of the Saskatchewan Association for Human Rights; the Saskatchewan Association for Adult Education a founding member of the Downtown Churches' Association of Victoria an occasional commentator on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio, Western Region; and a speaker at national, regional, and local events on both civic and religious topics.
Grant spent over twenty happy summers at Emma Lake with Vivian, his family, and many visiting Friends.
A respected journalist and community volunteer, Grant always made time for family and Friends. He was a loving husband, intellectual companion, and graceful dance partner to Vivian; a gentle, fair and compassionate teacher to his children; an affectionate, singing, cartoon-drawing storyteller to his grandchildren; and was warm and accepting of his relatives. He was a stimulating conversationalist and a loyal friend. Grant will be greatly missed by all until we meet his gentle soul again.
There will be a prayer service in Saskatoon at St. Philip's Church at 1902 Munroe Avenue (at Taylor Street) at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 22, 2003.
The funeral and celebration of Grant's life will be held in Saskatoon at St. Philip's Church at 1902 Munroe Avenue at Taylor Street at 10 a.m. on Friday, May 213, 2003. A memorial celebration will be held in Victoria in the fall of 2003, and prior notice will be provided in this paper. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Development and Peace and/or the Friendship Inn, Saskatoon. Arrangements are entrusted to the Saskatoon Funeral (306-244-5577).

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ROBERTSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
BAL, Mary Evelyn (née ROBERTSON)
Wife of the late Kenan Y. BAL. Died June 17, 2003 in her 96th year at her residence in New York. Born in Stratford, Ontario to Robert Spelman ROBERTSON and Laura Gertrude (SEGSWORTH) ROBERTSON, Mary attended Havergal College on Jarvis Street in Toronto. After graduating from the University of Toronto she obtained her PhD in Food Chemistry from Columbia University in New York in 1942. She will be remembered with affection by her nieces and nephews. Interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto, Tuesday, June 24th at 3 p.m.

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ROBERTSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-02 published
ROBERTSON, Josephine Ann (née GUTTRIDGE)
Died suddenly in Penetanguishene on Monday, June 30, 2003 in her 87th year, surrounded by family. Predeceased by her beloved husband Lorn James. Devoted mother of Jo Anne and husband Ken McMATH and Gordon and his wife Linda. Proud Granny of Lori-Jo and husband Tim, Kelly and husband Darrin, Michael, Ian and wife Rosalie, Kevin and Andrea and husband Dave. Wonderful ''G.G.'' to Brennan, Daniel, McKenzie, Hannah, Harrison, Emily, Sarah, Jonathan, Tyler and Abby. Loving sister to Roberta (Bob) and husband Art NASH and sister-in-law to Gordon and (the late) Florence ROBERTSON. She will be greatly missed by extended family and many close Friends. Visitation at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles, North York), on Thursday, July 3, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at Holy Trinity Anglican Church (140 Brooke Street, Thornhill) on Friday, July 4, 2003 at 11 a.m. Interment Saint John's Cemetery, York Mills. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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ROBERTSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-29 published
KEATS, Norah Sheila
Beloved wife, mother, grandmother, great grandmother, sister and devoted friend to those in distress. Died suddenly at the Norfolk General Hospital on Friday, September 26, 2003. She leaves behind her husband John, children Stephen and his partner Laura, Linda and her husband Robert, Kevin and his friend John and Richard and his companion Cindy, grandchildren Maia and her husband Curtis, Felix and Chloe, great grandchildren Dylan and Ty, brother John and his wife Patricia, and her many Irish cousins and many Friends across the country, especially those at Trinity Anglican Church. May she rest in the peace she deserves. A service for Norah will be held at Trinity Anglican Church, corner of Colborne and Church Sts., Simcoe on Tuesday, September 30 at 1 p.m. Reverand Gord MOIR and Reverand Bryan ROBERTSON officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Rector's Discretionary Fund at Trinity Anglican Church or the charity of one's choice. Ferris Funeral Home, 214 Norfolk St. S., Simcoe (519-426-1314) in care of arrangements.

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ROBERTSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-12 published
MacNEIL, Lt.-Col. Robert Robertson, C.D., B.Sc. (Queen's,) B.Sc. (Mil.)
Died in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, on Monday, November 10, 2003. He was born in Little Harbour, Pictou County, Nova Scotia in 1919, the eldest son of the late Frank H. and Margaret ROBERTSON) MacNEIL. He was a graduate of New Glasgow High School, Royal Military College No. 2540 and Queen's University; an elder in Little Harbour Presbyterian Church; a director of the Pictou County Historical Society; former chairman of Pictou County Business Opportunities Limited; and past president of St. Andrew's Society of New Glasgow. He is survived by his wife, the former Isabelle MacLEOD; daughters Susan and Meg; son-in-law Jim BROWN; grand_sons MacNeil and Woody; brother Donald (Mardy) of Little Harbour nephews David, Graham, Bruce, Stanley and Murdo; niece Peggy. He was predeceased by his brother Frank. Jr.

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ROBERTSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
BROWN, Kenneth, M.D., C.M., (F.R.C.S.C)
Born 1924 in Montreal, Québec, died November 18, 2003, North Bay, Ontario. Lovingly remembered by his wife, Toni and his children, Susan (Don) PRIEBE of North Bay, Pam (Tom) DAWES of Thunder Bay, Ken (Rose) BROWN of Port Perry, Heather ROBERTSON of Calgary, Alison (Bruce) MILLAR of Canmore, Toni BROWN (Dick AVERNS) of Vancouver, and Meredith BROWN (Ronnie DREVER) of Montreal. Especially loved by his grandchildren, Sarah, Nik, Heidi, Kim, Lisa, Eric, Graeme, Laura, Evan, Geoff, Cam, Aidan, Riley, Nelson, Brooke, and Lily. Also survived by his brother, James (Jean) BROWN of South Carolina. Friends may call at the Martyn Funeral Home, 464 Wyld Street, North Bay, on Thursday, November 20, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday November 21, 2003, at Christ Church Anglican, Vimy Street, North Bay. If desired, donations to the Parkinson Society Canada would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.
Husband * Father * Grandpa * Friend * Surgeon
We'll miss you

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ROB surnames continued to 03rob002.htm