RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-10 published
Civil servant moonlighted as a master of municipal politics
From global matters to local logjams, he excelled at finding common ground
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, January 10, 2003, Page R11
David BARTLETT wasn't comfortable in front of a stove, and couldn't carry a tune or run a hockey practice. But he excelled at most other pursuits, whether he was drafting memos to cabinet ministers, mediating disputes between neighbours at township council, or square dancing at a local community centre.
Of local politics, he once told his wife, Betty, "I can't coach sports teams, bake cakes or sing in a choir, but I can do this."
Mr. BARTLETT, a career civil servant in the federal government and also a long-serving municipal politician, died of cancer at his home in Manotick, Ontario, on November 8, aged 76.
During a career that began in Ottawa in 1948, the Toronto native was secretary-general at the Canadian Commission for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, which advises the government on its relations with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, and coordinates its activities in Canada.
He was also secretary of the Canada Council for the Arts, the arm's-length funding agency, and was acting commercial secretary in the office of the High Commissioner for Canada in Pakistan.
He was active in municipal politics for two decades, including eights years as a member of the board of trustees of the Police Village of Manotick, and six years as mayor of Rideau Township, both south of Ottawa. During and after his mayoralty, Mr. BARTLETT was easy to locate in the community: His licence plates read "RIDEAU."
"One of the most striking things about David was that he could turn his hand to almost anything and do it well," said close friend Douglas SMALL.
Friends, family and colleagues said another of Mr. BARTLETT's strong suits was an ability to understand complicated issues and then come up with solutions satisfactory to all sides.
Bill TUPPER, a former Ottawa-area Member of Parliament and also a past mayor of Rideau Township, remembers how Mr. BARTLETT once settled a dispute between two farm families over drainage.
"The issue was who would keep the drain clear. Both parties were almost foaming with venom but David, who was mayor at the time, listened to both sides and said, 'I think I see a solution and with a little luck, it might work.' He told them his plan and the farmers looked at one another and asked, 'Is it that simple?'
"They shook hands on the way out of the meeting."
Mr. BARTLETT graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in political science and economics. He worked with the federal Civil Service Commission for two years before winning a scholarship at the London School of Economics, where he earned a master's degree. He married Betty PEARCE in 1950.
Prior to working with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Canada Council, he was chief of the Technical Co-operation Service, Colombo Plan Administration, in Canada, precursor to the Canadian International Development Agency; and he was executive officer to the federal deputy minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources. He retired in 1986 after seven years as assistant director and secretary at the Canada Council, but continued to do contract work.
His government jobs were administrative in nature, says Mrs. BARTLETT, "but not in a routine sense. He had a variety of interesting projects," including the task of helping Governor-General Georges VANIER and his wife, Pauline, tour northern Canada.
In the early 1990s, he conceived a plan to rescue the World University Service of Canada from receivership. At the time, he was interim executive director of the organization, which is a network of individuals and institutions that foster human development and global understanding through education and training. From 1991 to 1998, he sat on World University Service of Canada's board of directors.
Mr. BARTLETT entered municipal politics in 1965 while still working for the government, which meant he often came home from work after 6 p.m., grabbed a bite to eat, and was off to a meeting that could last until after midnight. He bowed out of politics in 1985 after losing an election.
"His motivation was that he loved the work," said Mrs. BARTLETT. "He never fretted about things, there was never any tossing and turning at night. He had this talent for dealing with all things in a balanced way and coming up with a fair solution."
Mr. BARTLETT also contributed his time to a local Scout troop, and the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, and wrote columns for a local newspaper. After retiring, he was appointed to a number of task forces that studied taxi services at Pearson International Airport in Toronto, the ward boundaries in Ottawa and the workings of regional governments.
In retirement, he and his wife spent part of each year on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick. Mr. BARTLETT leaves his wife, Betty, and sons Michael and Peter.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-22 published
She danced on tabletops of Ottawa
Former reporter with capital connections hosted parties for the powerful and waged a spirited campaign to save railway cabooses
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, January 22, 2003, Page R5
Most who knew her have a story to tell about Starr SOLOMON, a journalist and public-relations practitioner who for years hosted glamorous parties in Ottawa that attracted a who's who of cabinet ministers, bureaucrats and media people.
Ms. SOLOMON, the widow of Hy SOLOMON, former Ottawa bureau chief for The Financial Post, has died in Toronto. She was 64.
Long-time friend and colleague Walter GRAY/GREY remembers the time Ms. SOLOMON convinced former Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY and Liberal Member of Parliament Sheila COPPS -- for years Mr. MULRONEY's nemesis -- to sing together at the National Press Club in Ottawa in the mid-1980s, following the annual Parliamentary Press Gallery dinner.
"They sang a duet. The song was You Made Me Love You," says Mr. GRAY/GREY, a former Globe and Mail bureau chief in Ottawa, who played the piano while the two politicians crooned in tandem. Ms. COPPS is now Canada's heritage minister.
Edna HAMPTON, one of Ms. SOLOMON's closest Friends, said acquaintances, colleagues and politicians always looked forward to dinner parties at the SOLOMON home in Ottawa's trendy Glebe neighbourhood. Trouble was, you never knew when the meal would be served.
"I always used to eat first because the parties would zip along and she would let dinner go. You might eat at 8, you might eat at 11 . . . but you always knew the food would be good," said Ms. HAMPTON, a retired journalist.
Ms. SOLOMON was born in Ottawa and moved to North Bay, Ontario, as a child, where she attended elementary and high school. In the late 1950s, she landed a reporting job with The North Bay Nugget, where Ms. HAMPTON was a senior reporter at the time. Later, The Ottawa Citizen hired her as a reporter and she wrote under the byline Starr COTE, the surname of her first husband.
"She was always full of energy and fond of fun assignments," recalls Ms. HAMPTON. " She would cover anything from a royal tour to a St. Patrick's Day event up the Ottawa Valley."
Among her plum assignments was the visit to Ottawa by U.S. president John F. KENNEDY and his wife, Jacqueline. She also wrote restaurant reviews for The Citizen, where she developed a reputation as a lively writer who was quick-witted, entertaining and personal. Ms. SOLOMON often fought it out for the big local stories with Joyce FAIRBAIRN, a reporter with the now-defunct Ottawa Journal. Ms. FAIRBAIRN later became a Senator.
Ms. SOLOMON left The Citizen in the mid-1960s and moved to Toronto, where she worked with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a writer/producer. She married Mr. SOLOMON on January 23, 1966. The couple lived in Toronto until Mr. SOLOMON was transferred to Washington to open a bureau for The Financial Post.
When the SOLOMONs returned to Ottawa, Ms. SOLOMON and a partner formed a public-relations firm. She quickly became a fixture in the city's media and political circles, a move Mr. GRAY/GREY calls "networking at its best. She had a wide range of Friends and she used these connections to her greatest advantage. I wish I had her Rolodex."
For about 10 years in the 1980s, Ms. SOLOMON and Mr. GRAY/GREY worked at the same public-relations firm, where they teamed up on a variety of projects.
"There was the day the African chief Butelezi arrived in Ottawa as a front for a group of Canadian businesses trying to develop business relations with South Africa. I was assigned to shepherd the chief around town," says Mr. GRAY/GREY. " Starr was to accompany his lady, the lovely Princess Irene, whose sole interest was to shop -- especially at Zellers. As they made their departure laden down with Zellers bags. I think the princess gave Starr a tip for her services."
The pair also worked together on an unsuccessful campaign to stop the Canadian National Railway from eliminating railway cabooses. "The cabooses disappeared, but to this day, the Save the Caboose sweatshirt has been the most comfortable sweatshirt in our respective wardrobes," says Mr. GRAY/GREY.
Over the years Ms. SOLOMON volunteered her public-relations skills for many campaigns. She was a founding member of the Legal Education and Action Fund, which was established to advance women's equality rights, and served on the board of directors of the Ottawa Civic Hospital.
As a couple, the SOLOMONs were known in Ottawa for throwing glamorous parties, some planned, some spontaneous, that attracted the leading cabinet ministers, writers and journalists of the day. Ms. SOLOMON entertained and amused guests with her wit and political insights, while her husband was an engaging conversationalist whose business and political insights held the attention of politicians and bureaucrats.
Those who attended their soirees remember Ms. SOLOMON as a welcoming hostess and terrific cook, whose specialty was Greek and Mediterranean dishes. When guests arrived, she was always beautifully dressed and "the records were on the turntable," recalls Mr. GRAY/GREY. " Patsy Cline was her favourite. But also lots of jazz -- her friend Brian Browne, Oscar Peterson, Oliver Jones." Often guests would sing and dance around the SOLOMONs' dining-room table.
"We did have serious discussions on serious subjects, from time to time," adds Mr. GRAY/GREY.
Former Ottawa Citizen food editor and restaurant reviewer Kathleen WALKER remembers Ms. SOLOMON as "literally . . . the kind of person who danced on tabletops. She was just wonderful and wild. We had a ball together. Great sense of humour. A terrific lady."
She will also be remembered as a great friend "who was there in thick and thin if you had a problem," says Mr. GRAY/GREY.
After her husband died in 1991, Ms. SOLOMON moved back to Toronto, where she did volunteer consulting and public relations work for various organizations, including Legal Education and Action Fund and a Greek nursing home. She was also a trustee of the Hyman SOLOMON Award for Excellence in Public Policy Journalism, established to honour her husband's legacy.
Ms. SOLOMON leaves her two sons, Adam and Ben, two grandchildren and two brothers. A celebration of her life is to be held at the National Press Club in Ottawa on January 29 at 5: 30 p.m.
Starr SOLOMON, journalist, public-relations specialist; born Ottawa, February 27, 1938; died Toronto, January 3, 2003.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-27 published
Jet pilot helped hold North American Air Defence Command fort
Career military man proud how command handled Russian false alarm
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, January 27, 2003, Page R7
Lieutenant-General Robert MORTON became interested in flying as a youngster in the Ottawa Valley community of Almonte, where he often spent long hours gluing photographs of aircraft into his scrapbook.
"He wanted to be a fighter pilot, he was always talking about airplanes," recalled his wife Pat. "Later in life, he once told me: 'I can't believe they are paying me to fly.' He loved it so much."
Gen. MORTON, who received his pilot's wings in 1960 and went on to become deputy commander-in-chief of the North American Air Defence Command in Colorado, died on December 7 in Ottawa. He was 65.
He attended Almonte High School, which, despite having 360 students, turned out a handful of Canadian Armed Forces air-force generals, including Major-General B.R. CAMPBELL and Don STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and Murray RAMSBOTTOM, both brigadier-generals. They jokingly referred to themselves as the Almonte Mafia.
Prior to graduation, Gen. MORTON toyed with the idea of becoming a pharmacist but opted for a career in the military, which would pay his way through university and cater to his interest in flying. After Grade 13, he joined the air force and spent two years at Royal Roads Military College in Victoria, before finishing his studies at the Royal Military College in Kingston. It was the beginning of a 37-year career. He learned to fly during the summers and received his wings when he graduated from Royal Military College with a B.Sc.
"He was bright, energetic and full of life," recalls Gen. RAMSBOTTOM, retired and living in Cumberland, Ontario "In our high-school days, I'd say his interest in flying was not all apparent. We were more interested in basketball, academics and socializing."
After pilot training, Gen. MORTON was posted to France where until 1963 he served as a fighter pilot with 421 Fighter Squadron in Grostenquin, flying CF-86 Sabres, the Korean War-era jet.
During his career, he flew many different types of aircraft, including the CF-101 Voodoo twin-engine interceptor, the T-39 Saberliner and the T-33 Shooting star, which was Canada's main advanced fighter trainer for decades. He also flew the CF-104 Starfighter, a tricky supersonic plane nicknamed the "widow maker" by German pilots.
He returned to Ottawa in 1963 and was assigned to air-force headquarters, holding several administrative jobs. From 1966 to 1968, he was a flying instructor in Gimli, Manitoba His first posting to Colorado Springs was in 1968 as a major, his second in 1978 as colonel and his third as lieutenant-general in 1989. In between, he held a number of posts, including commander of the North American Air Defence Command base at North Bay, Ontario, chief of staff operations of Fourth Allied Tactical Air Force in Hiedelberg, Germany, and base operations officer and flight commander, 416 Squadron at Canadian Forces Base in Chatham, New Brunswick.
He was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general in 1982, major-general in 1984 and lieutenant-general in 1989.
During one of his stints with North American Air Defence Command, which was established to protect Canada and the United States from surprise attacks, Gen. MORTON was command director inside Cheyenne Mountain, the bunker carved out of a Colorado mountain that was designed to withstand a direct hit from a nuclear warhead.
On a number of occasions during his career, there were false alarms, including a burst of solar energy during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan that set off radar stations in Alaska and across the Canadian Arctic. This put North American Air Defence Command and Strategic Air Command systems on a heightened state of alert while the command and control network worked quickly to assure it was not a real attack.
"This was a significant thing when you consider the consequences of a bad decision," said Gen. MORTON's son Bruce. "In the post-event analysis, after the mountain had made the ultimate decision that it was not an attack and our forces were ordered to stand down, my father, his people and North American Air Defence Command, were proud that they had all done their jobs properly."
While working with North American Air Defence Command, Gen. MORTON knew the Soviet Union tested North American defences by sending flights along the Arctic and Labrador coasts. On one such trip, he ordered CF-18 fighters into the air to photograph the Canadian fighter shadowing the Soviet plane, proving to the North American public that the defence system had a real job to do.
Gen. MORTON retired in 1992 to become a member of the Air Command Advisory Council, a body set up to advise Canada's air-force leadership. He also served as honorary national president of the Air Force Association of Canada from 1994 to 1999 and under his leadership it grew to 20,000 members from 12,000, said executive director Bob TRACEY. The association is a lobby group with the goal of improving Canada's military.
Mr. TRACEY, who worked for Gen. MORTON in Colorado, remembers his former boss as a commander who understood the needs and wants of his troops. "He could get an awful lot of work out of people with him."
Gen. MORTON, a devoted family man, met his wife in Grade 5; they started going steady at age 15, and married at 23. They had two children, Bruce and Jennie. Gen. MORTON also leaves his father Stanley.
Robert MORTON, air force officer; born in Almonte, Ontario, March 23, 1937; died in Ottawa, December 7, 2002.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-11 published
The nurse and the little princess
The Dutch royal family, sheltering in Ottawa during the Second World War, never forgot the Ottawa nurse who helped deliver Princess Margriet
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, February 11, 2003, Page R7
For years, an autographed photograph of the Dutch royal family was one of Janet JONES's most prized possessions. Another was a picture of Princess Margriet of the Netherlands.
Both were given to Mrs. JONES, an Ottawa nurse, for helping deliver the Dutch princess, who was born during the royal family's stay in Canada during the Second World War.
The last of three surviving nurses who assisted with the delivery at the Ottawa Civic Hospital on January 19, 1943, Mrs. JONES has died in Ottawa after a struggle with Alzheimer's disease. She was 91.
She was a young nurse at the hospital when Princess Juliana sought refuge with her two daughters in Ottawa to escape the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands.
Princess Juliana, who later became Queen Juliana, delivered her third daughter during her stay and three special nurses, including Mrs. JONES, were appointed to care for her.
A four-room suite and a sun room were cordoned off for the royal mother and were guarded by Dutch security officers.
So that the child could be born on Dutch territory, Canada declared the delivery room a part of the Netherlands. At the time, and for the first and only time in Canadian history, a foreign flag flew on the Peace Tower on Parliament Hill.
"It was rather fun to be in the midst of it," Mrs. JONES said in a 1995 interview.
On the day of the birth, Mrs. JONES ran to alert the princess's husband, Prince Bernhard, of the imminent delivery, but when they arrived in the suite, Princess Margriet, dubbed "Canada's Princess," had already been born. She was named after the marguerite, the flower worn by the Dutch during the war as a symbol of the resistance to Nazi Germany.
Mrs. JONES is remembered as a loving nurse and tireless volunteer whose career began in the early 1930s when she was determined to leave the family dairy farm near the Eastern Ontario community of Maxville, her son Eric JONES says.
"On the farm back then, it was said you could do one of three things: Marry a farmer, be a teacher or become a nurse," says Mr. JONES, an Ottawa police officer. "She had nursing in mind as a teen, and nursing is what she decided to do."
At 18, she left Baltics Corners and trained at the Ottawa Civic Hospital, where she worked as a nurse for many years. In 1977, at age 66, she retired as head nurse at the hospital's cancer clinic but continued to do volunteer work at the clinic and the Ottawa Heart Institute until she was 83.
"She only gave up the volunteering because her hearing was bad," Mr. JONES says. "She had trouble pronouncing the names of new Canadians and it embarrassed her."
Mr. JONES said that for many years the Dutch continued to thank his mother for helping deliver Princess Margriet.
In the mid-1990s, when the princess visited Ottawa to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of the liberation of the Netherlands by Canadian soldiers, Mrs. JONES was invited to the event as a guest of honour. For years, she kept a pass that would allow her to enter the royal family's palace in the Netherlands.
"All she had to do was present the card at the front gate of the palace and she could get in -- but she never went," Mr. JONES says.
When the royal family returned to the Netherlands after the war, Mrs. JONES was given the autographed photograph of the family, which hung in her bedroom, as well as a decorative plate from the Royal Dutch Historical Society, which featured a map of the Netherlands. The plate was displayed on a wall in her dining room for many years.
On several occasions over the years, a large limousine arrived at Mrs. JONES's home and out would jump a representative of the Dutch embassy in Ottawa with a vase full of tulips.
"He'd tell her exactly how to keep them looking fresh," Mr. JONES recalls.
Ottawa's and Mrs. JONES's connection to tulips began when Princess Margriet's mother gave Ottawa thousands of Dutch tulip bulbs to thank Canada for its hospitality while the royal family lived here from 1940 until the end of the war in 1945. The gift led a few years later to the launch of the Canadian Tulip Festival in Ottawa. The original gift was part of a lifetime bequest, and every year since, the capital receives new bulbs from the Netherlands.
The gift was to acknowledge the wartime sanctuary the family had experienced in Rockcliffe, a suburb of Ottawa. The long and dangerous journey there began on May 9, 1940, the night before the German invasion. The palace received its first warnings and plans to relocate to England swung into action. Early the next morning, the whole family, including Prince Bernhard and Queen Wilhelmina, were taken to a secret hiding place for three days and from there they were escorted to the only Dutch port not in German hands and spirited aboard a British frigate.
Prince Bernhard returned briefly to the Netherlands but within four days the Dutch forces, faced with overwhelming German superiority, surrendered and the Prince again escaped to England. The Queen and Prince Bernhard remained in Britain to keep in contact with the Dutch government-in-exile, but Princess Juliana and her children, along with a nurse, boarded a Dutch warship and headed for Canada. Prince Bernhard, who remained in London with Queen Wilhelmina, visited his family in Canada on several occasions during the war.
Although the royal family returned to the Netherlands soon after the war in Europe ended, Princess Margriet reinforced her links to Canada over the years. In 1980, her mother abdicated and her sister Princess Beatrix ascended to the throne, an event that saw an increase in Princess Margriet's palace duties. Her last royal visit to Canada occurred in May when she opened the 50th anniversary of the tulip festival. She stayed at Government House, a stroller ride from the house in Rockcliffe that had been her home as a young child.
Sadly, Princess Margriet's festival visit went unnoticed by Mrs. JONES, who was ill. After her death, her family received a letter of condolence from a representative of the Dutch embassy in Ottawa.
Mrs. JONES leaves her husband Chris and son Eric.
Janet JONES, nurse; born Baltics Corners, Ontario, February 11, 1912; died, Ottawa, January 14, 2003.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
Politician, chef, farmer cooked for presidents
He first came to Canada after the Second World War at the invitation of the Dutch ambassador
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, March 5, 2003 - Page R9
Ottawa -- Anton WYTENBURG was a proficient chef who had little time to prepare meals for his wife and 10 children because he was often too busy cooking for others, including presidents and other dignitaries.
"He was never a chef at home, because he was always working in a hotel somewhere or at the bakery, " says his son Rudy of Ottawa, who says his father's specialties were Dutch pastries and cakes.
At one point, Mr. WYTENBURG was a cook at the venerable Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York, where he helped prepare meals for U.S. presidents Dwight EISENHOWER and Harry TRUMAN, and president-to-be John F. KENNEDY. In 1945, he worked as a chef for General Henry CRERAR at a Canadian Officers' Club in Holland.
Mr. WYTENBURG, a native of Delft, the Netherlands, died in Ottawa on January 30. He was 83.
The son of a Dutch tailor, Mr. WYTENBURG completed Grade 8 in Delft and landed a job at a bakery. Later, he moved to Scheveningen to work as a sous chef in an oceanside hotel.
While working there, he learned to speak German, French and English and, during the Second World War, used his language skills as part of the Dutch resistance in its fight against the invading Germans.
Later, while working for Gen. CRERAR, Mr. WYTENBURG was asked by Dr. Jan VAN ROYEN, the Dutch ambassador to Canada, to come to work for him as a chef at the Dutch embassy in Ottawa.
"Anton gladly accepted the opportunity. The Dutch were and are forever grateful for the support of the Canadians during the war, " said Rudy. In 1947, he came to Canada to work at the embassy in Ottawa.
In 1950, when the Dutch ambassador was transferred to Washington, Mr. WYTENBURG worked as a chef at the French embassy in Ottawa before buying a bakery in Ottawa that became the first Dutch pastry shop in the city. The business, renamed Anton's Select Pastries, later expanded to include five outlets.
In 1952, he married Catharina VAN VUGT, also a native of the Netherlands, whom he met when she was a nanny for the secretary to the Dutch ambassador. That year, Dutch Queen Juliana paid a visit to one of Anton's bakeries.
While running their bakeries, the WYTENBURGs made many Friends, including some who farmed outside Ottawa and spoke highly of life in the country. This led them to buy a small farm west of Ottawa in 1962 and in 1964 would see the family give up its bakeries in favour of full-time agriculture on larger Ottawa Valley spreads, first in Richmond and later in Renfrew, where dairy farming would become the family's bread and butter.
As a farmer, Mr. WYTENBURG took a keen interest in agricultural organizations and committees. "He had a way with people, he could diffuse tense situations and always find a solution, " says Rudy.
Over the years, Mr. WYTENBURG's sons took on more of the farming responsibilities, leaving their father with more time for the many organizations he worked with, including the Ottawa-Carleton Safety Council and the Richmond Agricultural Society. In the late 1970s, Friends and neighbours urged him to consider politics.
In 1978, he won a councillor's seat in the rural ward of Goulbourn in 1980, he ran for mayor but lost; he tried again in 1982 and was successful, sitting as Mayor of Goulbourn Township from 1982 through to 1991. He was also on the council of the former Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton.
Moving a large family around the community and the farm was difficult, until Mr. WYTENBURG bought a used, fully stretched Cadillac limousine.
"It sure raised a few eyebrows when we were being chauffeured to the hay fields in a black limo, " recalls Rudy. "It often made for a bit of fun when the boys would ask an unsuspecting gal out on a date."
Mr. WYTENBURG left politics and farming in 1991 at age 72. After retiring, he continued to volunteer his time to help out on committees and task forces and as a strong supporter of the church. At the age of 75, he was the oldest participant in a walkathon for a local charity.
Mr. WYTENBURG leaves 10 children who live in California, Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, Renfrew, Ottawa and in England. Two of them continue to operate the family's 440-hectare farm near Renfrew.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
Journalist and musician was at centre of smalltown life
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page R9
Ottawa -- It's a wonder Steve FORSTER wasn't late for every appointment he ever made.
Whether he was strolling along the main drag in Perth, Ontario, where he lived and once ran the weekly newspaper, or cruising the corridors at Algonquin College in Ottawa where he taught journalism, Mr. FORSTER often bumped into someone he knew.
Inevitably, he'd crack a joke, tell a story or initiate a conversation about music, politics or work.
"He was probably one of the most well-known citizens in Perth, says Ralph WILLSEY, a Perth resident and Ottawa Citizen copy editor, who was best man at Mr. FORSTER's wedding in 1992. "He couldn't walk down the street without someone yelling 'hello.'"
He was also a popular figure at Algonquin College.
"He was a big guy... you couldn't help but notice him and he certainly knew lots of people both inside and outside the journalism faculty, says Abla SHERIF, dean of the school of media design at the college, where Mr. FORSTER was on staff for 14 years.
Mr. FORSTER, who was diagnosed with cancer in May, 2001, died at his home in Perth last month. He was 53.
For the better part of his life, journalism and music were Mr. FORSTER's passions. These, as well as his gregarious nature, deep voice, love of storytelling and physical stature -- six-foot, three inches and 290 pounds -- gave him a presence wherever he went.
Mr. FORSTER was born in England into an air force family and came to Canada at age six, living for a time on a military base near the southwestern Ontario community of Centralia where his father Alan was a firefighter.
He spent his teen years in Ottawa and studied journalism at Algonquin before landing his first journalism job in 1970 at The Courier, a weekly newspaper in Perth, about an hour west of Ottawa. He left briefly to work at The Windsor Star and The Ottawa Citizen, but returned to Perth to become editor of the Courier. He joined Algonquin College in 1989 and remained there until illness forced him to take leave in 2001. He also served four years on Perth town council.
"Nobody will ever fill Steve's shoes -- they don't make them like that any more, says Mr. WILLSEY, who met Mr. FORSTER in 1979 when both were reporters covering the Perth area.
Mr. WILLSEY feels his friend's greatest achievements may have been as a musician. Mr. FORSTER, who played bass and guitar, was well-known in the Perth area as the lead singer of rhythm-and-blues groups Powersnooze, and later, Big Steve and the Mudcats, both of which helped him win a wide following in Perth and recognition on the streets of the community. He also played in a band with staff at Algonquin.
He loved rhythm and blues and was a great admirer of James Brown and Smokey Robinson. Musically his work resembled Long John Baldry.
"He could really belt out a song... not everybody can make an arena full of people dance. That was quite an achievement, " said Mr. WILLSEY, who for years jammed with Mr. FORSTER and other musicians, often playing R&B standards such as In the Midnight Hour by Wilson Pickett and Sweet Little Angel by B. B. King. The bands he fronted played the bar scene in Ottawa, Kingston, Ontario, and Lanark County and often appeared at the Crown and Thistle and the Red Fox, both popular nightspots in Perth.
"Other than writing, I would have to say music was right up there as one of his favourites, says Mr. FORSTER's wife Rachel, who sang with Big Steve and the Mudcats. "He was involved in music from his days as a young teen until he passed away."
Mr. FORSTER was also a fiercely dedicated journalist and teacher. As editor and columnist with the Perth Courier, he had a nose for news and distaste for politicians who wasted public money, said Mr. WILLSEY.
After being diagnosed with cancer, Mr. FORSTER wrote several columns about his illness and the treatment he was receiving.
"You can't measure success by money, power or prestige, " said one column. "Success is measured in personal fulfillment, in the joy of life and in the goodness found in Friends, neighbours and family."
In May, 2002, he received the Silver Quill Award from the Ontario Community Newspapers Association for 25 years of service in community journalism.
Mr. FORSTER leaves his wife Rachel, daughter Natasha, father Alan, mother Beatrice and sister Susan.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-26 published
Lumber king of the Ottawa Valley
For 75 years, he dominated logging in the region and provided all the wood for Inco mineshafts
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, March 26, 2003 - Page R9
Ottawa -- Hector CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER never let his age stand in the way of a day's work. In 1928, at age 12, he was working full-time for his father's logging company in the Ottawa Valley near Pembroke, Ontario, and by 14 was running his own operation.
On a cold February morning 73 years later, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER, who was known as Hec Sr., drove 150 kilometres to his family's lumber camp near Mattawa. He toured the site and chatted with his sons and two of his grandchildren who run the family owned business, before driving home in his pickup truck, accompanied by his spaniel. Three days later, on February 9, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER suffered a heart attack and died at his Pembroke home. He was 87.
"To the day he died, he was an integral part of the company, said his son Hector CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER Jr.
During his 75-year association with the logging business, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER operated lumber operations in the Ottawa Valley and as far north as Sturgeon Falls and Blind River, Ontario For a time, Hector CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER and Sons was one of the largest local employers.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER also built the Northwood Hotel near Pembroke and owned Northwood Stables, which bred, trained and raced pacers and trotters. At one point, he had 150 horses.
Born in Petawawa in February 1, 1916, his beginnings as an Ottawa Valley success story began in the early 1920s when a shortage of money in his family forced him to leave elementary school to work at his father Thomas's lumbering operation. Within two years, he bought a horse and started his own business, delivering logs to the Pembroke Splint Lumber Co.
In his first year in business, the red and white pines felled by Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER's company produced 400,000 board feet of lumber, double his father's production.
"He said his father's operation was nice and neat and tidy but that it wasn't making enough money, " said Hector Jr., who is a former Member of Parliament for the riding of Renfrew-Nipissing-Pembroke and is now an adviser to Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN.
In the 1930s and 40s, the diminutive Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER expanded the business and modernized his equipment. His operation prospered during the Second World War. In 1945, he married Molly SMITH, a nurse from the Ottawa Valley community of Pakenham. The couple raised 10 children on their 375-acre farm located between Pembroke and Petawawa.
His company continued to operate in Renfrew County until about 1950 when he moved north to the Sturgeon Falls area to launch a new operation that employed 160 workers and cut enough trees to yield 10 million board feet of lumber a year. Later, he opened a second near Elliot Lake, Ontario, employing an additional 140 employees and producing another 10 million board feet of lumber annually. For many years, his company provided all of the pine for the shafts at the Inco mines in Sudbury. Eventually, the company diversified into pulpwood and, in the 1980s, provided kits for building log homes.
In 1960, the family returned to Pembroke so that the children would have easier access to schools. Sadly, 11 years later, Molly CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER died, leaving her husband to raise their children. He never remarried.
"We used to tease him about that and he'd say: 'Are you crazy? I couldn't find a woman crazy enough to look after you kids, ' " Hector Jr. said.
During his years in the logging industry, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER saw horses, broad axes and crosscut saws replaced by trucks, power saws, skidders and tree fellers that could cut and delimb trees in a matter of minutes. Over time, technology reduced crews from 200 to 30.
"The mechanization saddened him because he always felt the bush was kept cleaner with horses, and he felt good about employing so many people, " Hector Jr. said.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER Sr., a skilled log driver, was known as an innovator. Among his inventions was a device he nicknamed the "submarine." Using a winch, a generator and a floating wooden platform, it replaced dynamite as a way of breaking up logjams that blocked rivers. The submarine was soon adopted by competitors after premature detonations had killed log drivers.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER also had a passion for horses that stemmed from a love for the hard-working animals that for years had pulled his logs out of the bush.
He bought his first horse in 1951 for $100 and raced it at the Perth Fair where he got into an accident and broke his arm. He began breeding horses in 1955 and at one point had more than 150 racehorses. Among his most noted pacers was Barney Diplomat, which raced successfully for trainer Keith WAPLES in the mid 1950s and JJ's Metro, which won purses totalling $350,000.
His Northwood Stables and the Northwood Hotel were located across from each other on what is now County Road 17 west of Pembroke. His daughter Sandra and Hector Jr. drove horses for their father's stable.
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was a past president of the Quebec Harness Horseman's Association, was one of the longest serving directors of the Canadian Standardbred Horse Society and helped found the Ontario Harness Horse Association, which in 1961 began representing the interests of horse owners, drivers, trainers, grooms and their families on matters such as track conditions, pension plans, disability insurance and purses.
"Hec Sr. was one of the founding fathers of organized horsemen in Ontario who helped negotiate purses so that people could have a career in horse racing, said Jim WHELAN, president of the Ontario Harness Horse Association in Mississauga. "He was a pioneer.
A strong secondary interest after racing was fishing. When he was not working, Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER often disappeared to fish favourite lakes with a favourite dog.
Mr. HIGGINSON, who knew Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER for 35 years, said his friend had a soft spot for children who loved sports but couldn't afford the equipment.
"If a kid needed new skates, all of a sudden there would be a pair of skates for that child and nobody ever said where they came from. That side of him developed from what went on in his own family that was not well off at the start. Hec knew what it meant to be scratching out an existence -- he was interested in what was going on around him."
Mr. CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER was predeceased by his wife, four sisters and seven brothers. He leaves five sons and five daughters. Sons Tom, Willy and Jimmy, plus grandchildren Clyde and Shannon, run the family logging company.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-04 published
'Gentle Ben' town mayor transformed his community
When first elected in 1970, Nepean, Ontario, was $22-million in the red but 30 years later his careful leadership had eliminated the entire debt
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, April 4, 2003 - Page R13
Ottawa -- For Ben FRANKLIN, there was no such thing as a two-minute drive to the corner store for a newspaper or a quick trip to a local supermarket for groceries. Inevitably, the former mayor of Nepean, Ontario, now amalgamated with Ottawa, would meet people along the way, and what started as a quick errand would extend to several hours of mingling and chit-chat with those he'd encounter along the way.
"He'd often say he was popping out for two minutes to go to the store and six hours later he'd come home," says Mary PITT, who recalled how his wife, Sherry, remembers her husband.
Ms. PITT, who worked as Mr. FRANKLIN's administrative assistant for 18 years before succeeding him as mayor in 1997, said Mr. FRANKLIN never put on any airs with his constituents, and for that, he was universally well liked. "He wasn't one to go around saying 'I'm Ben FRANKLIN and you've got to pay attention to me.' He was just Ben, Gentle Ben as some called him."
Mr. FRANKLIN, Nepean's longest-reigning mayor, died on March 22 at age 60, while awaiting a heart transplant. "Gentle Ben, " as he was known for his engaging and friendly personality, had been at the Ottawa Heart Institute since February 1, and had an artificial heart implanted March 3. He died from bleeding in the skull, caused by a weakness of blood vessels in his brain.
Mr. FRANKLIN was born on August 15, 1942, in Elgin, Ont, a community near Smiths Falls, south of Ottawa. Like his mother, he became a teacher. While teaching high-school geography in Ottawa in the early 1970s, he began writing a column for a weekly newspaper in Nepean and eventually developed an interest in politics.
He won a seat on Nepean's council in 1972 and took office in January, 1973. At the time, it was a part-time job, and Nepean was a township.
"One day he decided that if change was to happen he would have to get into politics," says Ms. PITT, who campaigned door-to-door for Mr. FRANKLIN the year he was first elected. He became mayor in 1978 and Ms. PITT joined his staff as administrative assistant two years later when he gave up his teaching job.
He left the mayor's office in 1997 because of his heart disease, his dwindling energy, and concern that continuing stress might lead to further problems.
Al LONEY, a former Nepean councillor who entered politics the same year as Mr. FRANKLIN, said Mr. FRANKLIN leaves a legacy of sound fiscal management and plenty of parks and recreational facilities in Nepean, which became part of Ottawa in January, 2001, when 11 municipalities were amalgamated to become the new city of Ottawa.
When Mr. FRANKLIN took over as mayor in 1978, Nepean was $22-million in debt, and its taxes were higher than the regional average. Thanks to Mr. FRANKLIN's pay-as-you go philosophy, the debt was eliminated and by the time Nepean was absorbed into the amalgamated Ottawa-Carleton in 2001, it also had the lowest taxes in the region.
"He emphasized the need to put more money into reserve funds, so when the time came to buy a fire truck or put up an arena, the money was there," says Mr. LONEY, who often played golf with Mr. FRANKLIN. " When we built the new city hall in 1980, it cost $24-million and we had all the money we needed to pay it off."
The former city hall building, which also houses a theatre and a public library, is now known as Ben Franklin Place. A park now under construction in the former Nepean will also bear Mr. FRANKLIN's name.
Mr. FRANKLIN's frugal bent extended to his dress, which was usually casual. His casualness "may have contributed to the fact that nobody felt intimidated by him," says Mr. LONEY.
A well-known story about Mr. FRANKLIN's lack of concern for appearances occurred when Mr. LONEY and the mayor went to California on city business. Because most of his clothes were being cleaned, Mr. FRANKLIN brought along only one pair of dress pants and Mr. LONEY had to stand in front of him at most of the meetings they attended because the mayor had dripped ketchup on his pants on their first day out.
Around the Nepean council table Mr. FRANKLIN was known as a consensus builder, who rarely let issues or political opponents get under his skin, adds Mr. LONEY. " He'd have six of the seven votes he needed and I'd say 'That's all you need.' He'd say, 'Give me a few days and I'll get that last one.'"
For two days after his death, Mr. FRANKLIN's body lay in state at Ben Franklin Place where he had presided over dozens of council meetings and where his funeral service was held on March 26. Appropriately, his casket was green, the official colour of the former city of Nepean.
He leaves his wife, Sherry; son, Brent; daughter Suzanne; brother Bill and sister Anita.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-15 published
Radio pioneer built network
He founded Ontario's first French-language radio station in 1951 when his local station denied francophones airtime.
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, June 16, 2003 - Page R7
He started in business as a butcher, and later was a soldier and a hotelier, but Conrad LAVIGNE's first love was show business. Whether he was operating the television stations in Northern Ontario that became the largest privately owned television broadcast system in the world, appearing at the staid proceedings of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, or at conventions, Mr. LAVIGNE often delighted those within earshot with jokes, stories, witty comments -- even singing.
Like the time he sang grace during the annual meeting of the Association for French Language Broadcasters in the 1970s.
"Members of the head table, including myself and Premier Bill DAVIS, walked into the room and stood behind our chairs," recalls Pierre JUNEAU, chairman of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission from 1968 to 1975.
"Mr. LAVIGNE, who was chairman of the French-language broadcasters group, began singing grace in French, and with his very strong voice. People felt sort of strange with this."
When he was done, Mr. LAVIGNE looked at Premier DAVIS and quipped: "Well, Mr. Premier, this is to show you that when you are chairman, you can do whatever you like."
J. Lyman POTTS, former vice-president of Standard Broadcasting, remembers the time in the early 1960s when Mr. LAVIGNE appeared before the Board of Broadcast Governors -- predecessor of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission -- in support of a radio or television station licensing application.
At the beginning of his presentation, Mr. LAVIGNE expressed his regrets that Board of Broadcast Governors member Bernard GOULET had died at few days earlier. Then, without skipping a beat, he looked toward the ceiling and said: "If Bernie were here today, I think he would vote for my application."
"It broke up the room," says Mr. POTTS. "If ever a meeting got dull he'd liven things up. It was a joy to find him at meetings. He was a unique personality."
Mr. LAVIGNE, who was born in the small town of Chénéville, Quebec, on November 2, 1916, and raised in Cochrane, Ontario, died in Timmins, Ontario on April 16 following a lengthy battle with emphysema. He was 86.
Friends, family and business associates say Mr. LAVIGNE had show business in his blood in his late teens. On many evenings, the young man who moved to Timmins from Cochrane at age 18 to open a small grocery store and butcher shop with his uncle would act in plays in the hall of a local church. But he didn't get into the entertainment business in a big way until after he helped Canada's war effort, got married and started his life as an entrepreneur in the hotel business.
In 1942, he sold his butcher shop and enlisted in the Canadian infantry. He became a commando training officer while stationed at Vernon, British Columbia, and in 1944 headed overseas. While on a furlough from Vernon he returned to Timmins and married Jeanne CANIE. The couple raised seven children.
Mr. LAVIGNE returned to Canada in 1946 and bought the Prince George Hotel in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, which at the time was a booming gold-mining town. He sold the business in 1950.
He entered the world of media and entertainment by founding CFCL, the first French-language radio station in Ontario in 1951, in what, essentially, was his way of ensuring the area's large French-speaking population had a voice in the North.
Michelle DE COURVILLE NICOL of Ottawa said her father launched the station after a group of francophones that he was part of in Kirkland Lake was told by the manager of an English-language radio station that they would no longer be given regular air time to discuss issues of interest to French people.
"He was very proud of being a francophone," says Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL. " When he was told that his compatriots would no longer be welcome on the local station he said, 'Oh, ya!' and got the idea of starting a French-language radio station. He moved to Timmins, applied for a licence and got it."
CFCL soon attracted a faithful audience, especially in Northwestern Quebec, where it could be heard more clearly than French stations in Montreal.
In a 1988 interview with Northern Ontario Business, Mr. LAVIGNE remembered the time he hired a relative unknown named Stompin' Tom CONNORS to perform live on CFCL. The radio station was located above a jewellery store and the pounding from Mr. CONNORS's size-11 boots caused china to fall off the shelves in the store below.
Radio was his first love until the mid-1950s when, on a business trip to southern Ontario, he saw his first television broadcast, on WHAM from Rochester, New York He fell for the concept of television and he and an engineer friend drove to Rochester and learned everything they could about the magic medium of television.
Back in Timmins, Mr. LAVIGNE bought a hill in the north end of the town, named it Mont Sacré-Coeur, built a road to the foot of his hill, and began blasting rock and working in earnest to put a television station on the air. By 1956, CFCL-television was a reality.
"There was always the fear of failure because of the sparse population," Mr. LAVIGNE said at the time. "But we had an engineer with us named Roch DEMERS, who later became president of Telemedia, and together we started putting up rebroadcasting stations between 1957 and 1962."
Kapuskasing's rebroadcasting station was the first such facility in Canada, and it added another portion of the sparsely populated northeastern Ontario market to the growing station's network. Eventually, Mr. LAVIGNE built rebroadcasting stations in Chapleau and Moosonee, Ontario and Malartic, Quebec, and by the time expansion was completed, CFCL-television served 1.5 million people. Eventually, he built the station into the world's largest privately owned system.
For many years he appeared on a very popular CFCL program known as the President's Corner, during which he would sit on camera in a comfortable chair and read and respond to letters from viewers.
Between 1962 and 1970, Mr. LAVIGNE's television network entered the world of high technology with its own microwave network. Mr. LAVIGNE had the northeastern Ontario television market virtually all to himself for about 20 years until the Canadian Television Network (CTV) arrived on the scene. He reacted by building new stations in North Bay and Sudbury with a rebroadcasting station in Elliot Lake to serve Manitoulin Island. Expansion continued in 1976 with the purchase of a bankrupt television station in Pembroke, in the Ottawa Valley. Eventually, Mr. LAVIGNE's private network stretched from Moosonee to Ottawa, and from Hearst to Mattagami, Quebec
"When we first started we had the market all to ourselves," he told Northern Ontario Business. "We had 20 hours a week of local programming, and it was beautiful. We gave the North a unified voice. One time, during a forest fire near Chapleau, our messages arranged for accommodations for 1,000 people in Timmins."
Mr. LAVIGNE divested himself of his broadcasting holdings in 1980, primarily because he was refused permission to operate a cable television service in the North. He remained a director of Mid-Canada Television, the network that grew from his little Timmins station in 1956, and was chairman of the board of Northern Telephone Ltd. For a number of years, he served on the board of the National Bank of Canada, and for 10 years served on the board of ICG Utilities (formerly Inter City Gas.)
His life after broadcasting also included 20 years as a property developer in the Timmins area.
"He was always a physically active person," says Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL. "In the years he was setting up his television stations he would often go out with the engineers. He was not as happy sitting behind his desk."
Mr. LAVIGNE was elected to the Canadian Broadcasting Hall of Fame in 1990. His wife died in 1995. He leaves Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL and six other children, Marc, Andrée, Nicole, Jean-Luc, Pierre and Marie-France.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-14 published
Philanthropist extraordinaire
Francophone students were among the many beneficiaries of her generosity
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, July 14, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- Before he died in February, 1993, millionaire Baxter RICARD urged his wife Alma to spend the couple's fortune wisely. ''Put it back into the community, " he told her. ''Spend it well.'' Mrs. RICARD did not let her husband down.
In the 10 years following the death of Mr. RICARD, who owned a chain of radio, television and cable stations in Northern Ontario, she earned a reputation as one of Canada's most generous philanthropists, highlighted by a $23-million donation in 1998 to a fellowship fund that promotes higher education to francophone students across the country.
Mrs. RICARD, who was born in Montreal on October 4, 1906, died at her home in Sudbury on June 2. She was 96.
To date, the Ottawa-based Fondation Baxter and Alma Ricard has given 81 students a total of $4.2-million to further their postsecondary education. Other beneficiaries of the couple's generosity have included colleges, hospitals, church groups and universities in Sudbury and Toronto.
''Mrs. RICARD is one of the biggest philanthropists in Canada," said Alain LANDRY, executive director of the foundation, which was formed in 1988 to distribute the RICARDs' money to various charitable causes. The fellowship fund was set up a decade later.
Mrs. RICARD, formerly Alma VÉZINA, moved to Sudbury in 1931 after responding to a job advertisement from a hardware store run by Félix RICARD, father of Baxter RICARD. She was trained as a secretary at the time.
''She took the train and arrived at 4 a.m.," says Mr. LANDRY. ''In those days, a young lady was not to be seen with a man going to a hotel, so she and Baxter went to a church where they sat until daylight, and she fell in love with him.'' She worked as an administrative assistant to the elder Mr. RICARD and eventually married Baxter, who in later years inherited his father's hardware store and ran it with the help of his wife.
In 1947, the RICARDs left the hardware business and began building a broadcasting empire in Northern Ontario, starting with two radio stations in Sudbury and growing to include numerous radio and television stations. Radio stations established by the couple included CHNO, the first bilingual radio station in Ontario, CFBR and CJMX-FM.
In 1974, when cable television started to expand, Baxter RICARD and some colleagues obtained a licence for cable distribution in northern and eastern Ontario and created Northern Cable Holdings Ltd., which served the greater Sudbury area and areas as far north as Hearst, Ontario In 1980, the company acquired two television stations to serve the same areas and gave it the name Mid-Canada Television. Mr. RICARD also had an interest in a Toronto cable-television company.
Alma RICARD was her husband's ''right-hand person" and took an active part in the broadcasting business and all other ventures he was involved in, including the city-planning committee in Sudbury, the board of directors at Sudbury General Hospital and the Central Canada Broadcasting Association. ''They were inseparable in all those activities," says Mr. LANDRY.
Like Felix RICARD, Baxter and Alma RICARD were strong believers in a Canadian mosaic that included French-speaking citizens. In an era when Ontario's francophones were not permitted to study in French, Felix RICARD didn't have the financial means to promote the francophone culture and lobby for French schooling, so he became an outspoken trustee on the local school board.
As a trustee, he was ''a defender of the rights of francophones in matters of French education... [who] made significant gains for the francophone population of that region. A school in Sudbury bears his name," says a document obtained from Fondation Baxter & Alma Ricard. Baxter and Alma RICARD, on the other hand, made millions in the broadcasting industry and had the financial wherewithal to further the francophone cause, including the struggle for a quality education for French-speaking Ontarians.
''Baxter had no family and the couple had no children so they had to think of who would inherit their money," says André LACROIX of Sudbury, a lawyer, business associate and long-time friend of the RICARDs. ''Fairly early in the game they realized most of their assets should be used for charitable purposes. That's when they developed the idea of a charitable foundation.'' In its initial years after Mr. RICARD's death, the foundation donated $600,000 to Cambrian College and $1-million each to Sudbury General Hospital, the University of Sudbury, and Laurentian University, all in Sudbury, and a total of more than $4-million to the University of Toronto and St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto.
In the early 1990s, the RICARDs and their associates sold their radio and television stations to Baton Broadcasting and their cable distribution company to CFCF Ltd. In 1998, on the strength of money reaped from the sale, the fellowship fund was started and aimed specifically at francophone Canadians living permanently in a minority situation outside of Quebec who need money to advance their studies beyond a bachelor's degree.
Based on Baxter RICARD's idea, the fund was created jointly by businessman Paul DESMARAIS Sr., now chairman of the executive committee of management and holding company Power Corporation of Canada. Mr. DESMARAIS and Mr. LACROIX, plus Paul DESMARAIS Jr., are members of the board of directors of Fondation Baxter & Alma Ricard.
It was launched with the original $23-million donation from Ms. RICARD and despite many disbursements, today sits at $25-million thanks to interest earned on the principal, says Mr. LANDRY.
Until her death, Mrs. RICARD was president of the board and until three months ago, continued to sign cheques, says Mr. LACROIX, who remembers Mrs. RICARD as a ''generous and kind person who helped people with problems.''
''Baxter's father would be proud of what Alma has accomplished since Baxter died. It is well along the way to what he had promoted for many years," says Mr. LACROIX.
In addition to donations in the millions of dollars over the years, Mrs. RICARD once helped out a person who couldn't handle her mortgage payments and was about to lose her home; she also donated to a religious group that raised money for the poor.
Mr. LACROIX remembers Mrs. RICARD as a woman who loved to have fun.
''From age 70 onward she didn't mind going on until 1 a.m. or 2 a.m. She enjoyed going out at night, she loved to dance," he says. ''She was also quite religious, church attendance was sacred.'' Mrs. RICARD also loved to collect hats: ''She had hundreds of hats and they were attention-getters," says Mr. LACROIX, who knew the RICARDs for more than 30 years.
Of all the recognition she received over the years, Mrs. RICARD cherished most the Officer of the Order of Canada bestowed on her in 2000, says Mr. LACROIX. Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON travelled to Sudbury to present the honour to Mrs. RICARD in her sick bed, at her home, in September, 2002.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
Canadian Football League wide receiver 'was always there' and rarely missed a pass
All-round athlete was also a prolific artist who amused teammates and Friends with his skillful caricatures
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, July 21, 2003 - Page R5
Ottawa -- Kelvin KIRK was an artist on and off the football field.
On the gridiron, the former Canadian Football League wide receiver was known as an all-round athlete with tremendous breakaway speed who rarely missed a pass within his grasp; in the locker room, at home and in his second career in the advertising department at an Ottawa newspaper, he was skilled with pen, pencil and paintbrush.
His humorous caricatures often left his teammates and fellow employees grabbing at their sides with laughter.
Mr. KIRK, who was born on December 13, 1953, died on July 2 of an apparent heart attack while playing pickup basketball in Ottawa.
The 49-year-old native of Mt. Pleasant, Florida, began his football career at Dunbar High School in Ohio where he caught 13 touchdown passes in two years for the Dunbar Wolverines.
In 1973, the 5-foot-11 (1.79 metre), 175-pound (65-kilogram) receiver joined the Dayton Flyers at the University of Dayton in Ohio, where he was the Flyers' top pass receiver for three straight years and was voted the team's most valuable player in 1975.
When he left after three seasons, he held the school's record for receiving yardage, with 1,676 yards. In the Flyers' record book, he continues to hold fourth place in career receiving yardage, says Doug HAUSCHILD, director of media relations and sports information at the University of Dayton.
After being selected by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 17th round of the 1976 National Football League draft, Mr. KIRK walked out of training camp when he sensed he wasn't getting a legitimate opportunity to make the club.
He was named "Mr. Irrelevant" because as the 487th selection, he proved to be the last player taken in the draft, says Shawn LACKIE, a public-relations spokesman for the Canadian Football League.
He signed with the Canadian Football League's Toronto Argonauts in 1977 and led the team in pass receptions.
He also played for the Calgary Stampeders, Saskatchewan Roughriders and the Ottawa Rough Riders. He was Ottawa's most valuable player in 1981 when the Rough Riders made it to the Grey Cup that year but lost 26 - 23 to the Edmonton Eskimos.
His quarterback that year was J.C. WATTS, who would later become an Oklahoma congressman.
During his Canadian Football League career he caught 153 passes for 2,942 yards and 16 touchdowns. He returned 163 punts for 1,678 yards and 82 kickoffs for another 1,922 yards. His runbacks produced seven touchdowns.
"When the ball was thrown to him, he was always there. He had great breakaway speed," says Rick SOWIETA, a teammate of Mr. KIRK's when both broke into the Canadian Football League with the Argonauts.
"He had good speed, great hands -- he was our deep threat," says Jeff AVERY, one of Mr. KIRK's former Ottawa Rough Riders teammates, and now a radio commentator for the Ottawa Renegades of the Canadian Football League. "I remember one game when he caught three touchdown passes to help us whip the Montreal Concorde." Most of his former Rough Riders' teammates remember Mr. KIRK's biggest missed pass, though the failed reception wasn't his fault.
"It was the 1981 Grey Cup game in the third or fourth quarter and Kelvin was streaking down the sidelines in the clear. J.C. [WATTS] overthrew him by about six inches. Had he made the catch, it was a touch-down and we would have won the cup," says Mr. SOWIETA, now a restaurant owner in Ottawa.
A professional artist and trained art teacher, Mr. KIRK joined the advertising department at The Ottawa Citizen in 1989 in an order entry position and eventually worked on layouts and processing copy for advertisements, before moving into desktop publishing, which involved the creation of ads.
"There was nothing you could put on his desk that he couldn't handle," says Rejéan SAUMURE, manager of advertising services at the Citizen.
"Kelvin never complained. He took it all on with a smile that was worth a million bucks.
"He was the kind of guy who, as soon as he walked into the office, everyone liked. He had a magnetism about him. He warmed a room." Besides staying in tip-top shape, Mr. KIRK kept involved in football by helping coach the Ottawa Sooners of the Ontario Football Conference. He was also a prolific artist, one of his specialties being caricatures that amused his former teammates and Citizen colleagues.
During his years as a player, he would often sneak into the locker room prior to practice and draw cartoons on a chalk board, usually poking fun at teammates, coaches and various on-field happenings, says Mr. AVERY. He continued his antics as a coach with the Sooners as a way of keeping the mood light, adds Mr. SOWIETA.
"Before practice, players always checked the board to see who was being picked on that day by this mystery drawer. His work could be hilarious," says Mr. AVERY.
At the Citizen, where one of his dreams was to become a newsroom artist, Mr. KIRK often drew caricatures of co-workers and members of his own family.
His drawings often appeared on the birthday cards that circulated around the office.
"People would be quite amused," says Mr. SAUMURE. " His work was not always flattering but it always captured those he was drawing." Mr. KIRK leaves his 20-year-old son, Jonathan, and his wife Joann LARVENTZ, from whom he was separated.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-02 published
Lobbyist was an aviation 'visionary'
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, September 2, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- It was a case of boredom that helped propel Angus MORRISON into a flying career and saw him become the aviation industry's top lobbyist for nearly a quarter of a century.
"Frankly, I was bored. I had been a regimental officer, and I wasn't really interested in what was going on. The war was over, so I decided I was going to learn to fly," Mr. MORRISON said in a 1989 interview.
The Toronto native's interest in flying and his expertise at representing the interests of Canadian airline operations and manufacturers through the Air Transport Association of Canada, earned him a spot in Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame.
Mr. MORRISON, a resident of Almonte, Ontario, near Ottawa, died on June 30 after a brief illness. He was 84.
"My uncle, Brigadier General Arthur MORTIMER, spent his whole career in the military and that wasn't for dad," says Mr. MORRISON's son Jamie. "He had a lust for flying, he wanted to spread his wings, so to speak, and not be a career military man. He felt he was built for more than that.'' When his father, a stockbroker, died during the market crash of 1929, Mr. MORRISON, who was born on April 22, 1919, moved to Ottawa and spent much of his childhood with the family of Mr. MORTIMER. Eventually, he returned to Toronto and was educated at Upper Canada College and Bishop's College, before joining the military.
"He enlisted in the navy but uncle Arthur would not have it. He hauled him out and said he had to enlist in the proper form of the military, which was the army," says Jamie MORRISON.
During the Second World War, he served with the 21st Canadian Armoured Regiment, Governor-General's Footguards, serving in North Africa and Italy, advancing to the rank of captain.
In 1946, shortly after earning his wings, Mr. MORRISON formed Atlas Aviation, based at Ottawa International Airport and five years later, sold his share in the company to join the Air Industries and Transport Association, as executive secretary. The association later split, to form the new Air Transport Association of Canada, which represents most airline companies, from the smallest flying school in Canada to Air Canada.
He became president of Air Transport Association of Canada in 1962 and held the job until he retired in 1985.
"Angus was a visionary, as were many of his board," Don WATSON, former president of Pacific Western Airlines said in a statement read at Mr. MORRISON 's funeral. "Many of the plans for the future of our air transport were near to impossible but Angus would smile and say, 'If we can dream, we can do it.' Angus fully represented [the] air transport industry not only to our government but also to the governments of many countries around the world.'' In 1986, Mr. MORRISON was given the C.D. Howe Award by the Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute, for planning and policy-making. He was inducted into Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame in 1989.
On its Web site, the hall of fame cites Mr. MORRISON for his work in convincing the federal government to liberalize flying rules and standardize training. He also helped federal officials negotiate the first bilateral air agreement with the U.S., says Jamie MORRISON, who is a pilot and vice-president and general manager of Montreal-based Execaire Inc., which manages aircraft on behalf of corporations.
After retiring, Mr. MORRISON began working by correspondence courses toward a degree in naval architecture at the Boston Institute of Naval Architecture in Massachusetts to further his lifelong love of the sea and boats.
Mr. MORRISON, who was also an Almonte town councillor during the 1960s, leaves sons Jamie, Christian and Mark and daughter Sandra. His wife died in the fall of 2002.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-14 published
The 'godfather' of Ottawa's retail auto industry
After more than three decades of hard work, he went on to become the first full-time executive director of the Ottawa New Car Dealers Association
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, October 14, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- During a career in the auto industry that spanned more than 50 years, Don MANN was tagged with his share of complimentary nicknames. As a Datsun dealer in Ottawa in the 1960s, 70s and 80s, he was known as "Don Mann, your Datsun Mann," a phrase used in his dealership's advertising.
Later, as executive director of the Ottawa New Car Dealers Association, he was often referred to as the "godfather" of the city's retail auto industry and an "ambassador" for Ottawa's new-car dealers.
When he first started in the automotive business, working with Industrial Acceptance Corporation to help dealers finance their inventory of vehicles, he had a reputation as hard-working, honest and friendly. Mr. MANN died in Ottawa on August 12. He was 76.
Born in Toronto on October 16, 1926, he spent about 15 years working for Industrial Acceptance Corporation in Sudbury, Sarnia, London and Ottawa before deciding to go into the car business for himself. In 1969, he opened Don Mann Datsun Limited in Ottawa. He sold out to an Ottawa General Motors dealer in 1983 and after a brief retirement, joined the Ottawa New Car Dealers Association, becoming the first full-time executive director of the group, which was formed in 1957 with about 25 dealers and now has more than 60 members.
"He was a great ambassador for new car dealers in Ottawa," said Pat McGURN, president of Surgenor Pontiac Buick GMC. "He was the guy who lobbied with a local college to establish training programs for our employees when there was a shortage of qualified people." Over the years, he secured more than $250,000 in dealership training dollars from government, said Mr. McGURN.
"I determine a need, find a trainer, agree upon a program, then I go to the dealers," Mr. MANN once told an interviewer, adding that dealers pay for the programs because there's less training money available from government.
In his capacity as executive director of the car-dealers association, Mr. MANN also worked with the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board to ensure dealers provided healthy and safe working conditions. He worked closely with Algonquin College in Ottawa and Georgian College in Barrie, Ontario, to set up financial awards for top graduates. In 2002, a local apprenticeship committee established a Don Mann Award, given yearly to a major contributor to Ottawa's apprenticeship program.
"Don was the glue that kept things together," said Mr. McGURN. "He made decisions that have made dealers in Ottawa stronger and made things better for consumers." Mr. MANN, who worked as a police officer in Toronto for six years before switching to the automobile business, helped launch the Ottawa-Hull International Auto Show about 20 years ago and over the past two decades built its profile to the point that it now attracts 35,000 visitors. Money raised through the show helps fund training programs, said Mr. McGURN.
Mr. MANN was known for his solid grasp of issues that affect the auto industry at the dealers' level and at the legislative level where laws are constantly changing, said Mr. McGURN, who notes that Mr. MANN's leadership and organizational skills kept local dealers working as a coherent group.
Ever the diplomat, at one point he convinced Ottawa's fiercely competitive car dealers to close on Saturdays during summer long weekends so staff could enjoy a holiday like everyone else. It was also his job to keep dealers current on legislation and guidelines dealing with used-car sales, consumer protection and advertising.
"His forte as executive director of the Car Dealers Association was his access to politicians, and on the education side, his contact with car dealers," said his son Brian of Ottawa. "He knew little about cars when he first started... It took long hours of hard work to build that knowledge.
"He was a great one for the job, he saw his role as an ambassador."
Mr. MANN was also known as someone who could bring people together to get a job done, said his son, whether it was organizing dealers to speak with one voice to governments, or to pull together a golf tournament at the Ottawa Hunt and Golf Club.
Fellow club member Gordon EDWARDS remembers Mr. MANN as an adept snooker player and golfer with great patience.
"He was able to concentrate well, ... he was deliberate and careful, always calculating each shot to make sure he got it right," said Mr. EDWARDS, who played in Mr. MANN's foursome for 17 years.
Mr. MANN leaves wife Verna and children Maureen, Brian and Bruce.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-30 published
Making the world a better place
Toronto textbook publisher was a tireless community activist, environmentalist and philanthropist
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, October 30, 2003 - Page R9
From the moment he arose in the morning until it was time to lie down at night, Gage LOVE's goal as a textbook publisher, community activist and philanthropist was to make the world a better place.
"He felt his job on this planet was to make bloody well sure that the Earth was better when he left than when he found it," says son David LOVE of King City, north of Toronto.
To that end, Mr. LOVE gave a piece of himself to so many causes that he was often chided by his wife and accountant for trying to do too much.
"He was a $100 donor to between 100 and 200 charities every year. It used to drive mom crazy," says David LOVE. " His accountant used to say, 'You're giving away too much.' To which dad would reply, 'It's no big deal.' Mr. LOVE, a successful businessman and a relentless and passionate philanthropist, with a broad scope of interests including health care, education and the environment, died at his home in King City on September 5. He was 85.
Born in Toronto on September 17, 1917, Mr. LOVE graduated from the University of Toronto in 1939 with a bachelor's degree in history. While a student he worked at W.J. Gage Publishing, a Toronto company operated since 1880 by his maternal grandfather, Sir William GAGE, and later run by his father Harry LOVE. The company published a variety of textbooks for schools and was also involved in the envelope and stationary business.
"He started out as a stock boy and did most jobs, all part of a plan put in place by his dad to teach his son the ropes," Mr. LOVE says.
In 1941, he married Clara Elizabeth (Betty) FLAVELLE, whom he'd first met when he was four years old and had begun dating in his teens. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy in 1942 and served on Canada's West Coast, ending the war as an officer on a mine sweeper.
After the Second World War he became president of W.J. Gage. When he took over the company, it was a small shop on Spadina Avenue in Toronto; during his presidency, the company in the late 1950s moved to larger and more modern quarters in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough. By the time Mr. LOVE had left, it had become one of Canada's foremost educational book publishers.
With Mr. LOVE at the helm, W.J. Gage, in the mid-1940s, acquired the rights to Dick and Jane, a popular American educational book designed to make reading fun for children, and began publishing it in Canada. But his greatest legacy by far, and one of his proudest achievements, says David LOVE, was A Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical Principles, which W.J. Gage published as its centennial project in 1967.
It was the first dictionary to publish distinct Canadian words such as "inspectioneer," a whaling word, "suicide squad," from the Canadian Football League, "cradle-hole," a cradle-shaped hole left in the ground when a large tree is overturned by a gale and "keg angel," a whisky trader.
"The introduction to the book made the case that Canadians have quite a vibrant language," said David LOVE, whose first summer job was proofreading the dictionary. "The book contained words from coast to coast that no one else knew about." Faced with stiff American competition, Mr. LOVE in 1971 made the controversial decision to sell 80 per cent of the publishing company's shares, a move that made him unhappy, says his son.
"He was offered government money, but a handout was out of the question because as an old-school businessman, he did not believe the taxpayers of Canada should be made to pay for his company. He felt it should rise or fall on it own merits as a successful business." Six years later, a Canadian company bought it back, much to Mr. LOVE's delight.
After leaving publishing, Mr. LOVE turned his attention to philanthropy, a path also taken by his grandfather, Sir William GAGE, who had endowed many hospitals and charities, and for this work was given a knighthood in 1918.
"Dad used the fruits of what he earned at the publishing company to give back to the community," says David LOVE. "He wanted to make Toronto a better place to live for everybody." Over the years, he served as chair of the Gage Research Institute, which researches tuberculosis, the Ina Grafton Gage Home, an old-age home, and West Park Healthcare Centre, all in Toronto, and was president of the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Toronto. In 1981, he co-founded the Toronto Metropolitan Community Foundation, now the Toronto Community Foundation, which connects potential philanthropists with community needs.
Among his largest donations was $250,000 in June, 2001, to the West Park Healthcare Centre, which was founded by Sir William GAGE in 1904. He was also a regular donor to Pollution Probe and the World Wildlife Fund.
"Seven months after founding Pollution Probe in 1969, we needed advice and help, so we went looking for it from people in the establishment," says Monte HUMMEL, one of the founders of Pollution Probe and now president of World Wildlife Fund. "Gage was one of those. He said, 'You [Pollution Probe] have got something to say and some of us in the business community need a kick in the pants.' He supported us with money, he sat on our board and he appealed to his peers to support Pollution Probe. In those days, that was a really courageous thing for him to do."
Mr. LOVE's sons are carrying on their father's philanthropy and his work in community and environmental affairs. David LOVE has been involved in the not-for-profit sector for 30 years, including 24 years with World Wildlife Fund; Geoff LOVE is a waste-recycling expert who played a significant role in developing Ontario's blue-box recycling program and Peter LOVE is a green-energy expert. A fourth son, Gage, is a teacher.
In addition to his wife and sons, Mr. LOVE leaves grandchildren Austin, Bryce, Melanie, Jennifer, Adrian, Charmian, Colin, Gage, Gaelan, Allie, Kate, Jesse, and great-grandchildren Ava, Makayla and Olivia.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
'Nobody beats Arthur'
Victoria native left mark on Ottawa's business scene, while setting swimming records when he was over 70
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, November 5, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- When Arthur INGLIS moved to Ottawa from Victoria in the late 1960s, his goal was to leave his mark on the nation's capital. By all accounts, he succeeded, both in the world of business and in the swimming pool.
"When he arrived he thought he could make a difference," said his partner of 20 years Kimberly CROSS. " The place was a wasteland back then, but he did manage to leave an imprint."
Mr. INGLIS, who as recently as May set a world swimming record, died on September 1. He as 71.
After moving to Ottawa, Mr. INGLIS, who was born in Victoria on March 28, 1932, worked as director of store design for Hudson's Bay Co. and redesigned a handful of department stores purchased from their local owner by the Bay.
In 1976, he started two Vanilla Boutique clothing stores and later operated the Ecco Restaurant in downtown Ottawa. He founded the Mags and Fags newsstand that same year after he realized Ottawa didn't have an outlet with the variety of magazines and newspapers available in New York or London. The business also included Immigration and Naturalization Service News Service, which distributes newspapers and magazines to Ottawa's business and government sectors.
With a reputation as an innovative member of Ottawa's business community, Mr. INGLIS and a partner built Mags and Fags into one of the biggest newsstands in Canada, said Mr. CROSS, who added that local media individuals often visited the Elgin Street shop.
During the early 1980s, Mr. INGLIS and a business partner designed a bar named Shannon's in honour of Shannon TWEED, Miss Ottawa Valley of 1977 and Playboy Magazine's 1982 Playmate of the Year. TWEED, partner of Gene SIMMONS, bassist for rock band KISS, named her dog Vanilla after Mr. INGLIS's women's fashion shops.
His boutiques carried innovative lines of clothing from France and Italy that couldn't be found elsewhere in Ottawa. His Ecco restaurant and club was a downtown hotspot known for its elegant yet homey setting.
"It was hot, hot, hot with a library and outdoor terrace on the second floor, like something you'd find on 3rd Avenue in New York," Mr. CROSS said. "It was the place where all of the city's movers and shakers went, real estate people, fashion people -- you name it."
Mr. INGLIS and a partner also designed and introduced several Ottawa shopping centres to the sales kiosks that are now commonplace in most malls.
In 2000, when Mr. INGLIS was 68 and still operating the newsstand, his life took a dramatic turn because of cholesterol and blood-pressure problems. His doctors placed him on medication but instead of relying on pills, he quit drinking, adopted a healthier diet and started swimming and weight-training.
In 2002, he sold his share in Mags and Fags to concentrate on travel and competitive swimming, which he had excelled at as youngster and into his teens.
Mr. INGLIS's athletic prowess in his younger days also included skating with the Ice Capades, touring North America with his sister May in the 1950s.
To pursue his interest in swimming and to improve his fitness, Mr. INGLIS joined the Technosport masters swim and triathlon team in Ottawa and was soon setting Canadian and world swimming records in the 70-and-over age group. As his health problems eased, he challenged the best in the world in masters swimming in various locales, including New Zealand and Hawaii.
When he died, he held 17 Canadian or Ontario records in backstroke, breaststroke, freestyle and individual medley, including all Canadian backstroke records in all distances in the 70 to 74 age group, said teammate Pat NIBLETT, who keeps track of records set by members of the Technosport team. Mr. INGLIS was also a member of an Ontario swim relay team that set a world record in New Zealand in 2002.
Ms. NIBLETT, who often travelled to swim meets with Mr. INGLIS, remembers her teammate as a "tall slim man with the twinkling eyes and wonderful sense of humour. I only had the privilege of knowing Arthur for three short years. I felt as if I had known him for a lifetime. There is a saying in our house that 'nobody beats Arthur.' This is true of everything that Arthur did."
At the Canadian National Masters Swim Championships in Montreal in May, Mr. INGLIS broke his own 200-metre backstroke record and set Canadian records in the 100 and 200 individual medley events.
Technosport coach Duane JONES, who was among those shocked by the incredibly fit Mr. INGLIS's death, said the swimmer worked out about five times a week.
"When we first met, he was 30 pounds overweight, he was not a healthy eater and he was lethargic. But soon after, he was setting records; when he was 71-years-old he had the body of a 35-year-old. He paid attention to detail and did his workouts, swimming, biking and weight-training consistently.
"The first time he dove into the water I could not believe how beautiful his strokes cut the water. I've coached more than 6,000 athletes during the past 35 years and have never seen a guy like Arthur INGLIS."
Ramona FIEBIG, manager of Mags and Fags for more than 14 years, said Mr. INGLIS was a dedicated businessman who did his best to ensure the newsstand had the best selection of titles in the city. He often showed up for work on weekends as early as 3 a.m.
"There are thousands of titles in the store. It was no small chore to keep on top of what was new, to find new magazines and locate suppliers."
To the day he died, Mr. INGLIS was an innovator, Mr. CROSS said, adding that as his health deteriorated, he wanted to try a novel drug treatment to prolong his life.
"After his stroke, the options were paralysis on his left side or trying a new drug," Mr. CROSS said, adding that the side effect was a 16-per-cent chance he would suffer massive bleeding in his brain. "His feeling was that if he didn't survive, the next person who came down the shoot might have a better chance."

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-25 published
A world-class forensic scientist
Expert in hair and fibre analysis and DNA techniques helped revolutionized police investigations worldwide
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, November 25, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- A simple demonstration using a red pullover and an ultraviolet light during one of the United State's most infamous murder cases helped cement Barry GAUDETTE's reputation as an internationally renowned forensic scientist.
While testifying as an expert witness during the 1981 trial of Wayne WILLIAMS for the murder of several black children in Atlanta, Mr. GAUDETTE asked members of the jury to pass the sweater back and forth. Then he switched off the lights in the courtroom and shone an ultraviolet light on the jury members, revealing fibres from the pullover all over them..
His testimony made a strong connection between carpet fibres from Mr. WILLIAMS's residences and vehicles, and fibres found on several of the young victims, including some whose bodies were found submerged in water. Soon after, Mr. WILLIAMS was convicted as the first black serial killer in the U.S.
"It was a graphic, innovative and very compelling demonstration that showed how fibre transfer worked, and it led to a conviction," said Skip PALENIK, a forensic scientist and president of Microtrace in Chicago, who was involved in the WILLIAMS trial.
"Barry's demonstration helped the jury buy into the theory of fibre transfer... they were hostile to the idea that a black man could kill other blacks, but it tied WILLIAMS to the victims. It was the kind of demonstration that brought science home to a jury.'' Mr. GAUDETTE, a native of Edmonton, died in Ottawa on October 1 after a brief battle with multiple myeloma. He was At the time of the Atlanta child-murders case, Mr. GAUDETTE, a forensic scientist by training, was an expert in hair and fibre analysis. Later, he would help implement the use of DNA technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police laboratories across Canada. His findings in hair and fibre analysis and his legwork in DNA helped revolutionize police investigative tools in Canada and around the world, so much so that his work became instrumental in tracking down society's most feared criminals.
Born in Edmonton on April 2, 1947, the oldest of six children, Mr. GAUDETTE received an honours bachelor of science degree in chemistry from the University of Calgary in 1969 and that year was hired by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to work as a forensic scientist in its hair and fibre section in Edmonton. In 1971 he married Leslie Ann CLARK, whom he'd met while the pair worked at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., in Pinawa, Manitoba
He worked for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Edmonton until 1980, during which time he wrote a groundbreaking paper and published various research articles on the high probability that human scalp hair comparisons could be used to link persons to crimes. "His work proved hair comparisons were even more conclusive than blood," said Ms. GAUDETTE, an epidemiologist for Health Canada in Ottawa.
"Barry showed for the first time scientifically that human hair comparisons were a legitimate type of examination to pursue. His work put what had been conventional wisdom onto a scientific footing," adds Mr. PALENIK, whose company provides expert scientific analysis and consultation in the area of small-particle analysis.
After undergoing a year's training with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in hair and fibre analysis, Mr. GAUDETTE was accredited in 1970 as an expert witness and often testified in court cases in Edmonton and later across Canada and in the United States. In 1980, he was transferred to Ottawa to be the chief scientist for hair and fibre analysis at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's central forensic laboratory.
"Barry developed the hair and fibre field and brought it to prominence in the world arena," said John BOWEN, chief scientific officer for Royal Canadian Mounted Police Forensic Laboratory Services in Ottawa, who was trained in hair and fibre analysis by Mr. GAUDETTE in the mid-1980s.
"He was an individual with a lot of vision, a world-class expert in his field.'' In the late 1980s, Mr. GAUDETTE envisioned the potential of DNA analysis in forensic science. He helped implement the technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police labs across Canada and worked to promote the national DNA databank legislation that came into force in 1997.
"Barry did not invent DNA testing," said Mr. PALENIK, "but he saw that it was a powerful tool that could give investigators an ultimate kind of identification. Blood, semen and hair were good, but he recognized that DNA was as good as a fingerprint. He was the one who said the Royal Canadian Mounted Police should put all of its resources into developing DNA as a forensic tool. He said 'let's not waste time on our old ways.' "
It's no stretch, said Mr. PALENIK, to link Mr. GAUDETTE's work in DNA to the conviction of many criminals linked to crimes by their DNA and exoneration of others whose DNA did not match DNA samples taken from crime scenes.
"Barry GAUDETTE made a large contribution to the DNA business because it has significantly changed the investigation procedures in policing," said John ARNOLD, chief scientist for the Ottawa-based Canadian Police Research Centre, a collaboration of the National Research Council, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, which was set up to develop tools for use by police.
"Today, they are solving cases that could never have been solved before without this kind of technology."
In 1999, Mr. GAUDETTE became manager of the Canadian Police Research Centre, where his innovative ways continued. Before retiring in 2002, he helped develop a website, scheduled to be up and running next year, to provide Web-based training for police. He was also involved in developing a cross-Canada standard for protective equipment worn by police. The standard is expected to be in place by the end of 2004, Mr. ARNOLD said.
Even when he was in the twilight years of his career, Mr. GAUDETTE had an appetite for fieldwork and was never content to sit in a cushy office chair and watch his subordinates do all of the work.
"When some people get into management they don't want to work. They want to be the one who directs it. That wasn't Barry," Mr. ARNOLD said.
His stellar reputation led to a position on the U.S./Canada bilateral counterterrorism research and development committee from 1999 to 2002. He received numerous accolades for his pioneering forensic work. In 1996, he was awarded the government of Canada Public Service Award of Excellence, and in 2003 a Golden Jubilee Medal.
Friends and colleagues said that away from the job, Mr. GAUDETTE enjoyed time with his family and took part in community affairs.
Mr. GAUDETTE leaves his wife Leslie and children Lisa, 18, and Darrell, 22.

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RAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-12 published
'Galloping Ghost' of Canadian football made five halls of fame
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, December 12, 2003 - Page R17
Ottawa -- If Gordon PERRY had one regret following his illustrious career in Canadian sports, it's that he never competed as a sprinter in the Olympics.
A glance at the Moncton native's résumé clearly shows why he never ran for Canada at the Games: He didn't have time.
Mr. PERRY, who died in Ottawa on September 18 at the age of 100, competed successfully in seven sports. His extraordinary feats earned him a place in five Canadian sports halls of fame: Canadian Football Hall of Fame, Canadian Sports Hall of Fame, Quebec Sports Hall of Fame, New Brunswick Sports Hall of Fame and Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame.
Friends and colleagues have compared him to Canada's Lionel CONACHER, who played hockey and football, and American Deion SANDERS who was both a baseball and football player. Mr. PERRY, however, excelled in football, baseball, hockey, boxing, track and field, curling and swimming.
As a kid, "all he ever wanted to do was play sports," says his son Gordon PERRY Jr. of Ottawa. "It seemed like he always had a baseball glove on his hand or skates on his feet. And he could run like a deer." Born of Welsh ancestry in Moncton on March 18, 1903, Mr. PERRY went to school in Moncton and Quebec City. His father Harry, was a composer and musician who played the organ at a church in Quebec City.
Mr. PERRY, who began his working career in banking and stocks in Carleton Place, Ontario, boxed as an amateur in Quebec City and was a goaltender in the Bankers' Hockey League, a highly competitive loop in the 1920s and '30s that played at the Montreal Forum. As a sprinter, Mr. PERRY posted times of 10 seconds and under for 100 yards.
But he's best known for his role as captain of the undefeated Montreal Amateur Athletic Association Winged Wheelers that beat the Regina Roughriders 22-0 in the 1931 Grey Cup game. Small and quick, and standing at just at five foot eight and 165 pounds, PERRY was nicknamed the "Galloping Ghost" because of his elusiveness.
He was a four-time Eastern all-star in the Canadian Rugby Union, precursor to today's Canadian Football League. In 1931, he won the Jeff Russel Trophy as the player who best combined athletic ability with sportsmanship. Sir Edward BEATTY, president of the Canadian Pacific Rail, awarded PERRY the trophy, which earned him $200 on top of his football salary of $1,200.
From 1928 to 1934, the Wheelers squad was built around Mr. PERRY.
"I played both ways," he told The Ottawa Citizen on the eve of his 100th birthday. "I didn't often sit down, that's for sure." He once told the Montreal Gazette the secret to his success against bigger men was that "You can run like hell when you're scared." There was one time, however, when Mr. PERRY couldn't run fast enough.
"He was playing in Montreal against Ottawa and he laughed at a lineman," recalls his son. "When the teams came back here [Ottawa], the guy caught up with my dad and he was carried off the field with three broken ribs. He did not always get away." Mr. PERRY often said baseball was his favourite sport, a game he played with grace and skill. He was invited as a young teen to go to Boston to play but his father would not let him leave Moncton. Later, as a centre-fielder in Montreal, he helped his Atwater Baseball League team win five championships in seven seasons.
After retiring from football in 1934, Mr. PERRY, took up curling. After settling down in Ottawa in 1941, he won curling's Royal Jubilee Trophy in 1953 and 1956. At age 60, he scored a rare eight-ender while competing in a provincial event, says his son, who is president of the Ottawa Curling Club, which for 42 years has run a spring bonspiel in his father's name.
In Ottawa, he worked in several positions with the Bank of Canada. When he retired in the early 1970s, he was involved in the printing and distribution of Canada Savings Bonds -- ironically, working alongside Ron STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, who was once a fleet-footed running back with the Ottawa Rough Riders.
Mr. PERRY continued to curl until he was 90 and played his last round of golf at 98. At 100, the honours continued to pour in. In the 1903 Canadian Football League season, Mr. PERRY was named honorary captain of the Montreal Alouettes.
Mr. PERRY and his first wife, Jay KEITH, had three children, Gord Jr., Pat and Lynn. His second wife was Betty THOMAS. Ms. KEITH and Ms. THOMAS died in their 60s; at age 91, Mr. PERRY married Muriel TAGGART, then a 72-year-old widow. He leaves his wife and three children.

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