MORRISON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
Jean (NORQUAY) MORRISON
On Sunday, October 5, 2003 at the Henderson Hospital. Beloved wife of John for 32 years, cherished mother of Ian and his wife Francine of Calgary, AB., Scott and his wife Sue of Ottawa. She will be sadly missed by her grandchildren Monique, Stephanie and Jason. Fondly remembered by her sisters Dorothy SUGGITT of Sunderland and Kathleen VAREY of Little Current. The family received Friends at Dodsworth and Brown Funeral Home, Ancaster. Chapel service was held on Thursday. Cremation to follow.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORRISON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
Mina Hazel VAREY
In loving memory of Mina Hazel VAREY who passed away peacefully on Wednesday, October 15, 2003 at the Manitoulin Health Centre at the age of 84 years.
Cherished wife of Clifford of Little Current. Loved mother of Janet and husband Don IRVINE of Grafton. Special grandmother of Michael and wife Doris IRVINE, Wendy and husband Jim MORRISON, Melissa Irvine, Marsha IRVINE, all of Toronto. Will be greatly missed by great grandchildren Bruce and Claire. Predeceased by brothers Elias, Cecil, Elmer, Clare, Albert and sister Lillian BUFFEY.
Visitation was held on Friday, October 17, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Funeral Service was held on Saturday, October 18, 2003 at Grace Bible Church, Little Current, Ontario with pastor John VANKESTEREN officiating. Burial in Mountainview Cemetery.
Island Funeral Home.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORRISON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-03 published
Clifford Charles VAREY
Tragically, north of Barrie on Monday, November 17, 2003, age 88 years.
Predeceased by his cherished wife Mina (née AELICK) on October 15, 2003. Loved by daughter Janet and husband Don IRVING of Grafton. Special grandfather of Michael and wife Doris IRVINE, Wendy and husband Jim MORRISON, Melissa IRVINE, Marsha IRVINE, all of Toronto. Will be missed by great grandchildren Bruce and Claire. Forever remembered by siblings Mildred VAREY, Ivy and husband Marvin COWAN, Milford (predeceased) and wife Kay VAREY, Margaret and Frank ROWE (both predeceased) and Manley and wife Frances VAREY (both predeceased.)
Visitation Thursday, November 27 at Island Funeral Home. Funeral service Friday, November 28, 2003 at Grace Bible Church. Pastor John VANKESTEREN officiated . Burial in Mountainview Cemetery.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORRISON o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2003-10-24 published
Highway crash claims two lives
Two Thornbury-area men are dead and four others seriously injured, after a two vehicle collision occurred this past stormy Monday night.
The Collingwood Blue Mountains Ontario Provincial Police said shortly before 9 p.m., they believe a 1977 Chevrolet Nova crossed the centre line of Highway 26 west of Craigleith, before colliding head-on with a 1999 Dodge Caravan.
The driver of the Nova 33-year-old Trevor SQUANCE of Thornbury, and his passenger, James SIMONEK, 42, also of Thornbury, died at the scene.
The Caravan's driver, 39-year-old Colleen MORRISON of the Town of the Blue Mountains, and passengers Allan Paul INGLESON, 50, Evan GOSTICK, 15, and Travis GOSTICK, were taken from the scene to the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital by ambulance.
Evan GOSTICK was later transferred to St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, while Travis, 13, was taken to The Hospital for Sick Children, also in Toronto.
The Ontario Provincial Police said that part of the wreckage from the crash landed in a nearby ditch, cutting a natural gas line.
The residents of a nearby home were evacuated for a short time, as a precaution, until a gas company crew capped the severed line.
The Town of the Blue Mountains Fire Department responded to assist with the removal of the victims and stood by, while the gas leak was capped.
Autopsies on both SQUANCE and SIMONEK were scheduled for Tuesday afternoon. Results have not yet been made public.
Police say crash scene investigators are trying to determine if speed or alcohol were contributing factors in the collision.
Anyone who may have witnessed the incident, or who has information about the collision, is asked to call the Collingwood-Blue Mountains Ontario Provincial Police detachment at 445-4321.
- Staff, Page 1

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORRISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-18 published
DUNCANSON, Andrew Austin (1914-2003)
Died in Toronto, on Saturday, February 15, 2003, after a courageous battle with heart and kidney disease. Andrew was predeceased by his beloved wife of 56 years, Harryette Coulson DUNCANSON (1917-1995). He is survived by his loving family, which include his brother and sister John William DUNCANSON and Anne Colhoun MORRISON; his children Daphne Duncanson HOOD and Andrew Coulson DUNCANSON; his grandchildren Signy Freyseng MARCYNIUK, Adam Duncanson FREYSENG, Caitlin Ruth DUNCANSON and Andrew Noble DUNCANSON. Andrew was a soldier with the Royal Regiment of Canada during World War 2, serving in Iceland, England and Burma. He retired from service after the war with the rank of Major and earned the Burma Star for his efforts. His distinguished business career took him through the ranks of Unilever and he finished his career as Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Thomas J. Lipton & Co. Andrew was a Knight of the Order of St. Lazarus and had the privilege of being their Grand Prior for the period of 1987-1992. His latter life was devoted to his many charitable endeavors, his family and Friends. He will be remembered for his kindness and generosity. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 6-9 p.m. on Thursday, February 20th. The Funeral Service will be held at the Chapel of St. James-The-Less, 635 Parliament Street, on Friday, February 21st at 3 o'clock. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Order of St. Lazarus, 39 McArthur Avenue, Ottawa K1L 8L7, would be appreciated. 'The character of a man is his principles drawn out and woven into himself.'

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORRISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
DALGLEISH, Gordon John
Peacefully in his son's arms, at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, on March 4, 2003. Dear husband and best friend of Suzanne (née MORRISON) and devoted father of Cameron and Suzanne Jane. Beloved brother-in-law of Sheila COLLINS and dear uncle of Catherine and Julie CIEPLY. Best buddy to MacTavish. Gord cherished the many Friends he made throughout his life. Gord's family deeply appreciates the care, love and Friendship of cardiologist Dr. Donald PEAT, Dr. Bruce MERRICK, Dr. Tom STANTON and nurses Nancy DAHMER and Patti FRANKLIN gave him so generously. For many years Gord was an enthusiastic member of the Canadian Ski Patrol, Canadian Ski Instructors Alliance and he was a ski instructor at Mansfield Skiways. Friends will be received at Saint John's United Church, 262 Randall Street, Oakville, (905) 845-0551, on Saturday, March 8, 2003 at 11 a.m. until the time of the funeral service at 12 p.m. Reception to follow the funeral service. Burial to take place at Trafalgar Lawn Cemetery, Oakville. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Heart Function Clinic at the Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORRISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
Willard Adrian JACKSON
By Andrew LINDELL, Donna MORRISON Friday, March 7, 2003 - Page A18
Engineer, adventurer, grandfather. Born July 19, 1912, in Sudbury, Ontario Died February 8, in Toronto, of congestive heart failure, aged 90.
Willard Adrian JACKSON was cremated in a pine box, with no funeral, arrangements you might think were for a man without family or Friends. Yet, Willard was one of most loved men I've ever known, deeply loved by his wife of 68 years, three daughters, eight grandchildren and 17 great grandchildren.
Born the son of a funeral director, he did not believe in excess or unnecessary extravagances and rituals, including funerals. He called cars "necessary evils" and did not pretend to understand the generation controlled by computers. His strong attitudes were often offensively opinionated and even politically incorrect. Still, what most warmed to in him was his belief in the simple joys of life: family, love, and good old-fashioned hard work.
Willard lived a good life and a long one -- one longer than you might expect after a life of work-related injuries and mishaps. A plane crash in 1954 during Hurricane Hazel left him with a torn ear, crushed left forearm and broken neck (he broke it twice in his lifetime; his back once, in another incident), that put him in a plaster cast from head to waist for six months. The doctors told him he would likely be paralyzed. Helped by his wife Jane by playing Scrabble for hours, forced to pick up the tiny letter pieces with his mangled hand, he fully recovered.
A graduate of Queen's University science class of 1939, as a civil engineer, Willard began his career working in the underground mines, first with Inco and then at Falconbridge, both in Sudbury. In 1940, he tried to join the war effort overseas, but wasn't accepted because, as an engineer, he was needed in his own country to help build airstrips in Goose Bay, Labrador. After the war, he worked at Canadian Pacific Railway in Sudbury for five years. He joined Clarke Steamship Co. of Montreal in the construction department and was later lured to join Caswell Construction where he helped build Highway 401. He left to set up his own business in Toronto, Consul Consultants, where, as crane specialist, he travelled all over North America investigating large construction and mining accidents for insurance companies.
Willard was a master storyteller, and loved to tell tales of his adventures hunting, building or travelling. He once had to eat raw porcupine after his food and dry-match supply ran out on a moose-hunting trip. He had a special place in his heart for Canada's Arctic, where in 1978 he befriended many of the local residents at his (now late) grand_son's wedding to (now) federal Member of Parliament for Nunavut, Nancy KARETAK- LINDELL. A week before Willard died, he was paid a visit by his longtime friend from Iqaluit, Abraham. It was one of the final highlights of his life.
My grandfather was an extraordinary male role model for seven boys growing up in divorced marriages. He taught us to work hard at everything we do. When we were teenagers, he had us blasting rocks and felling trees to build roads at his farm in Lafontaine, Ontario He was always our biggest fan, praising our accomplishments and encouraging us to take risks into fields that filled our hearts, not necessarily our wallets.
When he turned 90 last July, it became obvious that Willard himself thought he was done. Living became a necessary evil. He became crippled with arthritis and his breathing became very laboured. In November, he called the entire family together for Christmas day, knowing -- he told us -- it would be his last. With my video camera rolling, I asked him what advice he could pass on. "Be true to your values, " he said.
Andrew is Willard's grand_son. Andrew and his fiancée Donna collaborated on this essay.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORRISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-17 published
SPIRA, Joan
Joan Wilhemina SPIRA (née MORRISON) died peacefully, surrounded by her children and grandchildren, on Wednesday, May 7, 2003 in Surrey Memorial Hospital. She will be deeply missed by her three sons and daughters in-law, Arthur and Elaine, Peter and Valerie, and Ian and Amanda, her nine grandchildren, three great-grandchildren and her brother, Rolfe. Joan was predeceased by her husband, William (Bill). Born and raised in Montreal, Joan was an honour student and outdoor enthusiast. She gained respect from peers as an educator at several universities, and teacher in various community settings. Joan will be especially remembered as a woman with integrity, not afraid to stand up for her convictions. Deeply committed to community concerns, global issues, and environmental causes, she was particularly active in the Burke Mountain Naturalists, the Riverview Land Use Committee, Amnesty International and The Council of Canadians. A determined letter writer to politicians and news editors, she expressed her strong convictions based on thorough researching of the issues. Joan was a tireless worker and always on the go, organizing and planning the next meeting or event. A quote from one of Joan's last articles, 'We are ever vigilant and will not give up' sums up her life's philosophy. Joan also believed in life-long learning and took courses regularly in many subject areas. Throughout her life she shared her passion for literature, music and travelling with family and Friends. An open house celebrating Joan's life will be held at her home on Saturday, May 17, 2003, from 2 - 5pm. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Joan's memory to the Burke Mountain Naturalists, Oxfam Canada, the Council of Canadians, or Amnesty International.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORRISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-02 published
Lobbyist was an aviation 'visionary'
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, September 2, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- It was a case of boredom that helped propel Angus MORRISON into a flying career and saw him become the aviation industry's top lobbyist for nearly a quarter of a century.
"Frankly, I was bored. I had been a regimental officer, and I wasn't really interested in what was going on. The war was over, so I decided I was going to learn to fly," Mr. MORRISON said in a 1989 interview.
The Toronto native's interest in flying and his expertise at representing the interests of Canadian airline operations and manufacturers through the Air Transport Association of Canada, earned him a spot in Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame.
Mr. MORRISON, a resident of Almonte, Ontario, near Ottawa, died on June 30 after a brief illness. He was 84.
"My uncle, Brigadier General Arthur MORTIMER, spent his whole career in the military and that wasn't for dad," says Mr. MORRISON's son Jamie. "He had a lust for flying, he wanted to spread his wings, so to speak, and not be a career military man. He felt he was built for more than that.'' When his father, a stockbroker, died during the market crash of 1929, Mr. MORRISON, who was born on April 22, 1919, moved to Ottawa and spent much of his childhood with the family of Mr. MORTIMER. Eventually, he returned to Toronto and was educated at Upper Canada College and Bishop's College, before joining the military.
"He enlisted in the navy but uncle Arthur would not have it. He hauled him out and said he had to enlist in the proper form of the military, which was the army," says Jamie MORRISON.
During the Second World War, he served with the 21st Canadian Armoured Regiment, Governor-General's Footguards, serving in North Africa and Italy, advancing to the rank of captain.
In 1946, shortly after earning his wings, Mr. MORRISON formed Atlas Aviation, based at Ottawa International Airport and five years later, sold his share in the company to join the Air Industries and Transport Association, as executive secretary. The association later split, to form the new Air Transport Association of Canada, which represents most airline companies, from the smallest flying school in Canada to Air Canada.
He became president of Air Transport Association of Canada in 1962 and held the job until he retired in 1985.
"Angus was a visionary, as were many of his board," Don WATSON, former president of Pacific Western Airlines said in a statement read at Mr. MORRISON 's funeral. "Many of the plans for the future of our air transport were near to impossible but Angus would smile and say, 'If we can dream, we can do it.' Angus fully represented [the] air transport industry not only to our government but also to the governments of many countries around the world.'' In 1986, Mr. MORRISON was given the C.D. Howe Award by the Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute, for planning and policy-making. He was inducted into Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame in 1989.
On its Web site, the hall of fame cites Mr. MORRISON for his work in convincing the federal government to liberalize flying rules and standardize training. He also helped federal officials negotiate the first bilateral air agreement with the U.S., says Jamie MORRISON, who is a pilot and vice-president and general manager of Montreal-based Execaire Inc., which manages aircraft on behalf of corporations.
After retiring, Mr. MORRISON began working by correspondence courses toward a degree in naval architecture at the Boston Institute of Naval Architecture in Massachusetts to further his lifelong love of the sea and boats.
Mr. MORRISON, who was also an Almonte town councillor during the 1960s, leaves sons Jamie, Christian and Mark and daughter Sandra. His wife died in the fall of 2002.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORRISON - All Categories in OGSPI

MORRISSEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
MORRISSEY, Professor Emeritus Frederic
Resident of El Cerrito, California, and long time member of the Faculty of Berkeley's Haas School of Business, died February 27 at John Muir Hospital of complications from a brain aneurysm. He was 82 years old. Professor MORRISSEY is survived by his wife and best friend of 59 years Eileen, his son John (Kathy) of Ridgefield, Connecticut and daughter Patricia CAHILL (Brent) of Oakville, Ontario. He is also survived by ''the best grandchildren in the world'' Bob and Kelly MORRISSEY, Jonathan and Anne SEALEY, his sister Margaret BOURASSA (Rene) and numerous nieces and nephews. Professor MORRISSEY was born in Brantford, Ontario Canada and attended the University of Toronto as an undergraduate and graduate student. He then was awarded the Granville Garth Fellowship and attended Columbia University where he earned his Ph.D. in Economics. He joined the Berkeley Business School faculty in 1949, progressing through the academic ranks to full Professor of Business Administration. In addition to lecturing he served in a number of administrative positions including two separate terms as Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. As a nationally recognized expert in finance and regulation of Public Utilities he was called upon by Governor Reagan to serve on the California Public Utilities Commission, which he did for 2½ years. Upon leaving the Commission he resumed his teaching career and served as a consultant and expert witness in utility regulation cases. Upon his retirement from the University in 1985, he was awarded the Berkeley Citation for Distinguished Achievement and Notable Service to the University. In lieu of flowers the family request a donation to a charity of personal choice. A celebration of his life is planned in Oakville in May.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORRISSEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-19 published
DRISCOLL, Father Joseph Vincent Philip Mary "Jakie"
The Jesuits of Winnipeg and the rest of Canada both mourn the loss and celebrate the life and Faith of Father Joseph Vincent Philip Mary (Jakie) DRISCOLL, S.J., who died suddenly at St. Ignatius Parish Rectory on Sunday, December 14th in his 71st year of religious life. The third son of William Francis DRISCOLL and Elizabeth (Lilly) Frances MORRISSEY, he was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A. in 1916, Father DRISCOLL first encountered the Jesuits at Boston College High School where he graduated in 1933. Experiencing and responding positively to a call to be a Jesuit priest himself he entered the novitiate in Guelph, Ontario immediately after completing his high school studies. As a young Jesuit he followed the long and thorough academic program at Guelph and Toronto, taught at Regiopolis college in Kingston, Ontario and was ordained a priest in 1946. He returned to work in Regiopolis in 1974 as well as served as the chaplain of the Royal Military College in Kingston. From 1954-58 he was a Director of the Jean Mance School of Nursing at the Hotel Dièu Hospital in Kingston which was followed by a brief period of Jesuit administration duties in Toronto. With the exception of summers spent in graduate studies at Catholic University in Washington, D.C., and three years in charge of a retreat house near Montreal (1963-66,) from 1959 on until his death Father DRISCOLL devoted his time, talent and spirit to the people of Manitoba. He served in a variety of capacities including university chaplain, fundraiser for St. Paul's High School and St. Paul's College, and a member of the Board of Directors of the St. Boniface Hospital School of Nursing. He was appointed pastor of Saint John Brebeuf Parish in Winnipeg in 1972, serving in that capacity until 1980, was Rector of both St. Paul's High School (1966-72) and of St. Paul's College (1981-84). He played an active role in organizing the 1984 papal visit to Manitoba and assisted the wider community as a member of the B'Nai Brith, Mayor Norrie Award Committee in 1985 and as the Honorary Vice-President of the Canadian Bible Society in 1986. Towards the end of his life he worked in the marriage tribunal of the Archdiocese of Winnipeg and as the Archivist of the Archdiocese. As well, he was actively involved in both the College and the High School, including assignments as alumni chaplain to both, and archivist to the High School.
In addition to the Jesuits of Winnipeg and the rest of Canada, Jakie will be missed by many others including Dr. Donald and Rosemary (niece) CHEW of Niagara Falls, Ontario and Charles CRESINO (cousin) of Ashburn, Virginia. Friends who will mourn the loss of Fr. DRISCOLL come from every generation and sector of life in Winnipeg and beyond. Active until the very end of his life, he brought to all those who knew him a personal integrity and commitment to the Catholic Church and to other faith communities that will be missed.
Prayer services and Funeral Mass were celebrated in Winnipeg. Those wishing to do so may make a donation in Fr. DRISCOLL's memory to the Father Driscoll Legacy Endowment Fund of St. Paul's College, 70 Dysart Rd., Winnipeg, R3T 2M6 or to the Fr. Driscoll Founders' Fund, St. Paul's High School, 2200 Grant Ave., Winnipeg, R3P 0P8.
'God Bless'

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORRISSEY - All Categories in OGSPI

MORROW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-30 published
A man of uncommon passion and drive
Despite hints of scandal, the scrappy former Liberal member of parliament, who spent a lifetime fighting for social safety nets, earned a reputation as a tireless crusader for the working people
By Ron CSILLAG Special to the Globe and Mail; With a report from staff Saturday, August 30, 2003 - Page F8
He died with his boots on.
John MUNRO, a Trudeau era Liberal warhorse once described as a rumpled fighter who had gone too many rounds, had just put the finishing touches to a barn-burning speech, to be delivered to a Rotary Club, on the evils of concentration of media ownership when he suffered at heart attack at his desk in his Hamilton home on August 19. He was 72.
It was almost just as well that he went suddenly, his daughter, Anne, said in a eulogy, for her father could not stand suffering. Rather, he would not abide it. Suffering had no place in Canada, he reasoned, which is why his name is so closely associated with such social safety nets as medicare, the Canada Pension Plan and improvements to Old Age Security.
More than 500 well-wishers, including old political pals, steel-workers, artists, business people and labourers, packed the James Street Baptist Church last Saturday to laud Hamilton's favourite son, a scrappy lawyer who earned a reputation as a tireless crusader for working people, despite the recurring taint of scandal.
As the Member of Parliament for Hamilton East from 1962 to 1984 and through five cabinet posts, he was proudly on the left of the Liberal Party, alongside people such as Allan MacEACHEN, Judy LAMARSH, Lloyd AXWORTHY, Eugene WHELAN -- and probably Pierre TRUDEAU himself -- fighting for medicare, against capital punishment and in favour of a guaranteed annual income. As minister of national health and welfare, he didn't win the battle for a guaranteed annual income, but he did get the Guaranteed Income Supplement that has made life easier for many seniors. He was also known and often ridiculed -- for being a chain-smoking health minister.
Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN, who entered Parliament a year after Mr. MUNRO, mourned the death of his former cabinet colleague. "We were very good Friends, and I'm terribly sorry that he passed away. He was a very good member of Parliament, and he was a very good minister and a guy who worked very, very hard in all the files that were given to him."
The political bug bit early. At 18, Mr. MUNRO ran for president of the Tribune Society at Westdale Secondary School in Hamilton. Mark NEMIGAN, a lifelong friend, remembers his resourcefulness: "He went to a local bus stop and festooned all the park benches with banners reading, 'Vote for John.' It worked too. He had uncommon drive and passion, even then."
Born in Hamilton on March 26, 1931, to lawyer John Anderson MUNRO and Katherine CARR, a housewife, John Carr MUNRO became a municipal alderman at the age of 23 while attending law school at Osgoode Hall in Toronto.
"I have no idea how he did that," Mr. NEMIGAN says. "The guy didn't sleep."
Mr. MUNRO took his first run at federal politics in the seat of Hamilton West in 1957, but was beaten by Ellen FAIRCLOUGH, who went on to become Canada's first female cabinet minister. In 1962, he switched ridings, and won the seat he would hold for the next 22 years.
With the election of Mr. TRUDEAU in 1968, a string of cabinet positions followed for Mr. MUNRO: minister without portfolio, amateur sport, health and welfare, labour and Indian affairs and northern development, the last earning him the hard-won respect of aboriginal groups.
In the 1968 general election, an aggressive young poll captain named Sheila COPPS worked on Mr. MUNRO's re-election bid. She would go on to replace him in the seat in 1984.
Tom AXWORTHY, who was Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary, recalled that the prime minister often turned to Mr. MUNRO for support on progressive positions at the cabinet table: "When we had those kind of debates, he would kind of look over to MUNRO when he wanted to hear the liberal perspective on the issue."
Mr. MUNRO's support for the decriminalization of marijuana led to a perk in December, 1969: A 90-minute chat about drugs with John LENNON and Yoko ONO, fresh from the duo's "bed-in" at Montreal's Queen Elizabeth Hotel. Documents unearthed this spring by a researcher for an Ottawa Beatles Web site revealed that Mr. LENNON joked that while Mr. TRUDEAU and Mr. MUNRO, then health minister, were members of the "establishment," they were both "hip."
"Mr. MUNRO's speech [on the decriminalization of marijuana] was the only political speech I ever heard about that had anything to do with reality that came through to me," Mr. LENNON is quoted as saying in the 12,000-word document.
Contacted by a reporter in May, Mr. MUNRO recalled that the incident, and his stand on cannabis, didn't go over well. "Yeah, I was in a little hot water at the time," he laughed. "Everybody thought I wanted to give the country to the junkies."
Mr. LENNON and Ms. ONO made a distinct impression, he said. "The more I think about it, the more I remember he and his wife were very polite and committed people."
In 1974, the water became considerably hotter when the Royal Canadian Mounted Police raided Mr. MUNRO's campaign headquarters during a probe into kickbacks and bid rigging on Hamilton Harbour dredging contracts.
Around the same time, Mr. MUNRO was criticized for accepting a $500 campaign donation from a union whose leaders were under investigation.
In 1978, he was forced to resign from the cabinet when it was revealed that he had talked to a judge by telephone to give a character reference for a constituent on the day of the person's sentencing for assault. But he bounced back with a tenacity that Mr. TRUDEAU was said to have admired and in 1980 won reappointment to the cabinet.
Mr. MUNRO's stamp on Hamilton was legendary, from the reclamation of land that gave the city Confederation Park, to the Canada Centre for Inland Waters, to the fundraising of more than $50-million for the local airport, renamed in his honour in 1998. "Without a doubt, he was the feistiest, most stubborn person I knew in public life," former mayor Bob MORROW remarked. "I don't think we will ever meet his equal of scaring up funds for Hamilton."
When Mr. TRUDEAU retired in 1984, Mr. MUNRO ran for the Liberal leadership and prime minister. He finished a poor fifth in a field of six. There began what his daughter called the "decade from hell," starting with a four-year Royal Canadian Mounted Police investigation so vigorous, the Mounties even considered using a helicopter to track Mr. MUNRO because the officers assigned to tail him couldn't keep up with his car.
That investigation killed a re-election bid in 1988 and scuttled his marriage to Lilly Oddie MUNRO, a minister in the former Ontario Liberal government. It eventually produced 37 flimsy charges of breach of trust, conspiracy, corruption, fraud and theft stemming from his years as Indian affairs minister. After a trial that dragged on for most of 1991, the judge threw out nearly all the charges without even calling for defence evidence. The Crown later withdrew the rest.
Mr. MUNRO welcomed the verdict as "complete exoneration" but was left with legal bills estimated at nearly $1-million and a reputation in ruins. Swimming in debt (he had to rely on Ontario Legal Aid), he filed a civil suit in 1992, claiming malicious prosecution and maintaining he had been targeted by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to embarrass him. He attempted a political comeback in 1993, only to have Mr. CHRÉTIEN refuse to sign his nomination papers. Mr. MUNRO responded by filing an unsuccessful court challenge seeking to strip Mr. CHRÉTIEN of his power to appoint candidates.
Mr. MUNRO, who had returned to an immigration law practice in Hamilton, felt betrayed by the government's refusal to pay his legal bills, and it took an emotional toll.
"I'm not mad at the world," he said in 1996. "I realized this could totally destroy me if I didn't live a day at a time. You have to impose discipline, or you're finished. The motivation to carry on is voided. There's nothing to look forward to except endless grief."
He finally won nearly $1.4-million in compensation from Ottawa in 1999, but most of the money went to pay taxes, legal bills and other expenses. He could have avoided problems by declaring bankruptcy, but insisted on clearing his debts.
"He was no saint, but he was dedicated and hardworking," said his daughter Susan. "He was deeply hurt."
Mr. MUNRO had no interest in the personal trappings of wealth, she said, adding that he had a weakness only for Chevy Chevettes and homemade muffins. Good thing too, for a proposal for bankruptcy he filed in 1995 showed a monthly living balance of $476.
His last political gasp came in 2000 when he ran unsuccessfully for mayor of Hamilton. Asked in 1996 about writing his memoirs, he said: "I'm not ready. There's no last chapter yet."
Mr. MUNRO leaves his third wife, Barbara, and four children.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORROW - All Categories in OGSPI

MORSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-18 published
Died This Day -- Eric MORSE, 1986
Friday, April 18, 2003 - Page R13
Canoeist and outdoorsman born in Naini Tal, India, on December 27, 1904; in 1942, served with Royal Canadian Air Force; named National Secretary of the United Nations Association in Canada became national director, Association of Canadian Clubs; introduced influential Ottawa Friends to canoe voyaging; in 1966, accompanied by Pierre TRUDEAU, retraced fur-traders' and explorers' routes traversed Barren Lands from Hudson Bay to Alaska; wrote Fur Trade Routes of Canada and posthumously published memoir Whitewater Saga; died in Ottawa.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORSE - All Categories in OGSPI

MORTIMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-02 published
Lobbyist was an aviation 'visionary'
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, September 2, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- It was a case of boredom that helped propel Angus MORRISON into a flying career and saw him become the aviation industry's top lobbyist for nearly a quarter of a century.
"Frankly, I was bored. I had been a regimental officer, and I wasn't really interested in what was going on. The war was over, so I decided I was going to learn to fly," Mr. MORRISON said in a 1989 interview.
The Toronto native's interest in flying and his expertise at representing the interests of Canadian airline operations and manufacturers through the Air Transport Association of Canada, earned him a spot in Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame.
Mr. MORRISON, a resident of Almonte, Ontario, near Ottawa, died on June 30 after a brief illness. He was 84.
"My uncle, Brigadier General Arthur MORTIMER, spent his whole career in the military and that wasn't for dad," says Mr. MORRISON's son Jamie. "He had a lust for flying, he wanted to spread his wings, so to speak, and not be a career military man. He felt he was built for more than that.'' When his father, a stockbroker, died during the market crash of 1929, Mr. MORRISON, who was born on April 22, 1919, moved to Ottawa and spent much of his childhood with the family of Mr. MORTIMER. Eventually, he returned to Toronto and was educated at Upper Canada College and Bishop's College, before joining the military.
"He enlisted in the navy but uncle Arthur would not have it. He hauled him out and said he had to enlist in the proper form of the military, which was the army," says Jamie MORRISON.
During the Second World War, he served with the 21st Canadian Armoured Regiment, Governor-General's Footguards, serving in North Africa and Italy, advancing to the rank of captain.
In 1946, shortly after earning his wings, Mr. MORRISON formed Atlas Aviation, based at Ottawa International Airport and five years later, sold his share in the company to join the Air Industries and Transport Association, as executive secretary. The association later split, to form the new Air Transport Association of Canada, which represents most airline companies, from the smallest flying school in Canada to Air Canada.
He became president of Air Transport Association of Canada in 1962 and held the job until he retired in 1985.
"Angus was a visionary, as were many of his board," Don WATSON, former president of Pacific Western Airlines said in a statement read at Mr. MORRISON 's funeral. "Many of the plans for the future of our air transport were near to impossible but Angus would smile and say, 'If we can dream, we can do it.' Angus fully represented [the] air transport industry not only to our government but also to the governments of many countries around the world.'' In 1986, Mr. MORRISON was given the C.D. Howe Award by the Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute, for planning and policy-making. He was inducted into Canada's Aviation Hall of Fame in 1989.
On its Web site, the hall of fame cites Mr. MORRISON for his work in convincing the federal government to liberalize flying rules and standardize training. He also helped federal officials negotiate the first bilateral air agreement with the U.S., says Jamie MORRISON, who is a pilot and vice-president and general manager of Montreal-based Execaire Inc., which manages aircraft on behalf of corporations.
After retiring, Mr. MORRISON began working by correspondence courses toward a degree in naval architecture at the Boston Institute of Naval Architecture in Massachusetts to further his lifelong love of the sea and boats.
Mr. MORRISON, who was also an Almonte town councillor during the 1960s, leaves sons Jamie, Christian and Mark and daughter Sandra. His wife died in the fall of 2002.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORTIMER - All Categories in OGSPI

MORTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-27 published
Jet pilot helped hold North American Air Defence Command fort
Career military man proud how command handled Russian false alarm
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, January 27, 2003, Page R7
Lieutenant-General Robert MORTON became interested in flying as a youngster in the Ottawa Valley community of Almonte, where he often spent long hours gluing photographs of aircraft into his scrapbook.
"He wanted to be a fighter pilot, he was always talking about airplanes," recalled his wife Pat. "Later in life, he once told me: 'I can't believe they are paying me to fly.' He loved it so much."
Gen. MORTON, who received his pilot's wings in 1960 and went on to become deputy commander-in-chief of the North American Air Defence Command in Colorado, died on December 7 in Ottawa. He was 65.
He attended Almonte High School, which, despite having 360 students, turned out a handful of Canadian Armed Forces air-force generals, including Major-General B.R. CAMPBELL and Don STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and Murray RAMSBOTTOM, both brigadier-generals. They jokingly referred to themselves as the Almonte Mafia.
Prior to graduation, Gen. MORTON toyed with the idea of becoming a pharmacist but opted for a career in the military, which would pay his way through university and cater to his interest in flying. After Grade 13, he joined the air force and spent two years at Royal Roads Military College in Victoria, before finishing his studies at the Royal Military College in Kingston. It was the beginning of a 37-year career. He learned to fly during the summers and received his wings when he graduated from Royal Military College with a B.Sc.
"He was bright, energetic and full of life," recalls Gen. RAMSBOTTOM, retired and living in Cumberland, Ontario "In our high-school days, I'd say his interest in flying was not all apparent. We were more interested in basketball, academics and socializing."
After pilot training, Gen. MORTON was posted to France where until 1963 he served as a fighter pilot with 421 Fighter Squadron in Grostenquin, flying CF-86 Sabres, the Korean War-era jet.
During his career, he flew many different types of aircraft, including the CF-101 Voodoo twin-engine interceptor, the T-39 Saberliner and the T-33 Shooting star, which was Canada's main advanced fighter trainer for decades. He also flew the CF-104 Starfighter, a tricky supersonic plane nicknamed the "widow maker" by German pilots.
He returned to Ottawa in 1963 and was assigned to air-force headquarters, holding several administrative jobs. From 1966 to 1968, he was a flying instructor in Gimli, Manitoba His first posting to Colorado Springs was in 1968 as a major, his second in 1978 as colonel and his third as lieutenant-general in 1989. In between, he held a number of posts, including commander of the North American Air Defence Command base at North Bay, Ontario, chief of staff operations of Fourth Allied Tactical Air Force in Hiedelberg, Germany, and base operations officer and flight commander, 416 Squadron at Canadian Forces Base in Chatham, New Brunswick.
He was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general in 1982, major-general in 1984 and lieutenant-general in 1989.
During one of his stints with North American Air Defence Command, which was established to protect Canada and the United States from surprise attacks, Gen. MORTON was command director inside Cheyenne Mountain, the bunker carved out of a Colorado mountain that was designed to withstand a direct hit from a nuclear warhead.
On a number of occasions during his career, there were false alarms, including a burst of solar energy during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan that set off radar stations in Alaska and across the Canadian Arctic. This put North American Air Defence Command and Strategic Air Command systems on a heightened state of alert while the command and control network worked quickly to assure it was not a real attack.
"This was a significant thing when you consider the consequences of a bad decision," said Gen. MORTON's son Bruce. "In the post-event analysis, after the mountain had made the ultimate decision that it was not an attack and our forces were ordered to stand down, my father, his people and North American Air Defence Command, were proud that they had all done their jobs properly."
While working with North American Air Defence Command, Gen. MORTON knew the Soviet Union tested North American defences by sending flights along the Arctic and Labrador coasts. On one such trip, he ordered CF-18 fighters into the air to photograph the Canadian fighter shadowing the Soviet plane, proving to the North American public that the defence system had a real job to do.
Gen. MORTON retired in 1992 to become a member of the Air Command Advisory Council, a body set up to advise Canada's air-force leadership. He also served as honorary national president of the Air Force Association of Canada from 1994 to 1999 and under his leadership it grew to 20,000 members from 12,000, said executive director Bob TRACEY. The association is a lobby group with the goal of improving Canada's military.
Mr. TRACEY, who worked for Gen. MORTON in Colorado, remembers his former boss as a commander who understood the needs and wants of his troops. "He could get an awful lot of work out of people with him."
Gen. MORTON, a devoted family man, met his wife in Grade 5; they started going steady at age 15, and married at 23. They had two children, Bruce and Jennie. Gen. MORTON also leaves his father Stanley.
Robert MORTON, air force officer; born in Almonte, Ontario, March 23, 1937; died in Ottawa, December 7, 2002.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-27 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Peter Mills B.A. L.L.B. Deputy Small Claims Court Judge After a uniquely courageous battle against metastatic prostate cancer, Peter Mills THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, 58 years old, died Friday, March 21, 2003, at Oakville Trafalgar Hospital. Beloved husband and best friend for 25 years to Marlene (née ALLARD.) Fondly remembered by his Aunt Lois Enid MORTON. Predeceased by his parents Dr. George A. and Helen Connie THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Loving brother-in-law, uncle, godfather and friend. Peter graduated from Upper Canada College in 1963, received his undergraduate degree in political science from Western University, his law degree at Osgoode Hall Law School, Toronto, and was admitted to the Bar in 1971. Peter practiced family and criminal law for many years in Toronto. He became a deputy judge in 1980 working in North York and Richmond Hill. In his last years he was advice counsel at the University Ave Courts. Peter will be long acknowledged for his integrity, his peaceful quiet manner and strength in his professional and private lives. Peter was admired and respected by his peers and co- workers. He will be missed by all those who had the good fortune to call him friend. Peter enjoyed traveling and lately, cruising became his passion. Arrangements entrusted to Ward Funeral Home, Oakville. Cremation followed. A celebration of his life for all his Friends and co-workers will take place Sunday, May 4, 1: 00 ­ 6:00, at 2158 Elmhurst Avenue, Oakville. R.S.V.P. 905-842-4463, e-mail ptert@sympatico.ca. Donations may be made to Camp Oochigeas, Kids With Cancer, 60 St. Clair Avenue East, Suite 404, Toronto, Ontario M4T 1N5 or Camp Amici, 150 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 204, Toronto M4P 1E8, in Peter's memory.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
GILLESPIE, Harriet Louise (née MORTON)
Died peacefully on June 21, 2003. Harriet was born May 24, 1926 in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, daughter of Edith L. and W. Douglas MORTON. Devoted wife of John B. GILLESPIE, Q.C., Toronto, for almost 55 wonderful years. Loving mother of Joan (Andrew POTTINGER,) Jill, Jay (Lili HOFSTADER) and Susan (Paul NICHOLAS). Grandmother of Leigh and Drew POTTINGER of W. Vancouver, Ben and Claire SCOTT of Sydney, Australia, Sean and Jackie GILLESPIE of Toronto and Hattie NICHOLAS of Ottawa. Sister of Douglas B. MORTON and Scott MORTON, Nova Scotia. Service will be held on Wednesday, June 25, 2003 at 3 p.m. at St. Leonard's Anglican Church, 25 Wanless Avenue. No visitation is planned. In lieu of flowers, donations in Harriet's memory may be made to either Sunnybrook Hospital or The Canadian Cancer Society.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-23 published
MORTON, Stella (née TYSON)
Died peacefully, in her 83rd year, on Friday, August 22, 2003, at Fosterbrooke Long Term Care Facility, Newcastle, Ontario. Stella, beloved wife of Richard (Dick) MORTON of Orono. Dear mother of Amy and her husband Ed HOAD of Port Hope, and Ed MORTON of Orono. Loving Grandma to Laura and Brian HOAD. Stella taught private piano lessons for many years, was the organist at Orono United, Kingsview United, and other local churches, and was a teacher at Forest Hills West Prep for 10 years. A Memorial Service will be held at Orono United Church on Saturday, August 30 at 2 p.m. Arrangements entrusted to Newcastle Funeral Home 1-877-987-3964.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORTON - All Categories in OGSPI

MORWICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-10 published
Mary Boyle HUDSON
By Mary Jean McFALL Wednesday, September 10, 2003 - Page A24
Wife, mother, grandmother, community leader, cattlewoman, Scotch aficionado. Born January 10, 1931, in Hamilton, Ontario; died June 29 in Lyn, Ontario, of pancreatic cancer, aged 72.
For all that Mary HUDSON cultivated her Scottish roots and was a keen royalist, she loved her country well. Never one for southern beach holidays, she preferred a visit to the polar bears in Churchill, Manitoba
Mary's father, Edward MORWICK, was a Westinghouse engineer in Hamilton, Ontario; her mother, Anne HAMILTON, was a Scottish émigrée. The family brought mementoes from Scotland -- a tartan rug, a travelling trunk -- which had been handed down over the generations; Mary considered herself not the owner but the custodian of these pieces, which she has since entrusted to her children.
After Hamilton's Westdale Collegiate, Mary studied home economics at Macdonald Institute at the University of Guelph. In 1956, responding to a Globe and Mail ad for a high school home economics teacher in Brockville, Ontario, Mary set off in her Nash Metropolitan hardtop. Joe HUDSON, a local farmer and eligible bachelor took note; his nieces always said Mary seemed like a movie star. The city girl married the country boy in 1958, and traded her hardtop for a station wagon. Then she and Joe began a life that would allow Mary to make her home in the tiny village of Lyn, and to see her country and the world.
Mary and Joe raised five children, with the best fundamentals she could offer: She taught them to remember where they came from and she encouraged them to be citizens of the world. She helped found and maintain a local library; established a swimming program; and worked with her United Church, the Fulford Home for Women and the Brockville Hospital, where she not only sat on the board of governors, she also took the wagon around to bring chocolate bars and newspapers to patients.
Mary's passions included a penchant for early morning royal weddings on the television. A founding member of the Brockville An Quaiche society, a club that appreciates the merits of good single malt scotch, she had a taste for a "wee dram."
Together, Mary and Joe built Joe's business, Burnbrae Farms, into a dynamic agricultural enterprise. In 1978, her Christmas gift from Joe started her on her herd of Aberdeen Angus cattle. In 1995, several of her cows won championship ribbons at the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto.
Mary was a mother to many; privately, she lived a public life. Her door was open without the need to knock. Known as the best cook on the Lyn Road, she made jams in a copper kettle brought from Scotland. I remember Mom supervising church turkey dinners, using a three-foot masher to deal with all the potatoes.
She also produced baby quilts; the last was for Evelyn Mary Morwick ROGAN, her granddaughter who was born 16 days after Mom died.
The crowd at her funeral was so large that we had to enlist the Ontario Provincial Police to handle the traffic. After the service, we walked from the church to the cemetery, with Mary's Clydesdale horses leading the way. When Rob MILLER, the self-declared piper for the clan, reached the top of the hill by the cemetery, he stopped for a moment to talk with the Ontario Provincial Police officer, and they looked down at the hundreds of people walking in the procession. "With all this activity you'd think the Queen had died," said the officer. Rob responded, "She has."
Mary is survived by her husband, Joe, her sister, Helen MORWICK, her children, Helen Anne, Mary Jean, Ted, Susan and Margaret, their spouses, and nine grandchildren. She loved them all.
Mary Jean is Mary HUDSON's daughter.

  M... Names     MO... Names     MOR... Names     Welcome Home

MORWICK - All Categories in OGSPI