MARTEL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Theresa " Tessie" Elizabeth MARTEL
In loving memory of Tessie MARTEL, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge, Gore Bay and formerly of Little Current passed away at the Lodge on Wednesday June 4, 2003 at the age of 94 years.
She was born in The Slash, daughter of the late Thomas and Fannie McMULLEN) BONUS. She was a homemaker, and enjoyed knitting, cooking and crocheting. Tessie was a hard working wife and mother, and will be fondly remembered for her pride, love and enjoyment of her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.
Predeceased by her beloved husband Fred MARTEL in 1952. Loving and loved mother of Frances DOMICH (husband Stan,) Winnipeg, Darlene WILSON (husband Bill,) Gore Bay, Allan MARTEL (wife Flora predeceased) Collingwood, Donald MARTEL (wife Ruth), Toronto, Donna SCHEELER, Wallaceburg, Norma GREEN (husband Allan,) Bruce Mines, Wayne MARTEL (wife Mercedes,) Winnipeg and Terry MARTEL (wife Jodie), Belleville. Predeceased by two children Gerald (Sonny) and Norman (Normie).+ Dear sister of Harry BONUS and Leah PHILLIPS both of Collingwood and predeceased by
brothers Allan, John, Herman, William and sisters Cecelia and Loretta. Dear grandmother of 16 grandchildren, 9 great grandchildren. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home on Thursday, June 5, 2003. The funeral service was held on Friday, June 6 from the Wm. G. Turner Chapel of the Culgin Funeral Home with Pastor Les CRAMP officiating. Interment Mountainview Cemetery, Little Current.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-03 published
Man faces gun charge in stepson's death
By Graeme SMITH Friday, January 3, 2003, Page A3
A mother's grief was mixed with anger yesterday when her partner remained in jail on a weapons charge in the fatal shooting of her son on a hunting trip.
"I don't think it's fair at all," the tearful 30-year-old, who asked not to be named, said in a telephone interview from her home near Hagersville, Ontario
This is the second time she has mourned the death of a child over the holidays: Her younger son, Elijah JADE, died in a car crash on Christmas Eve two years ago.
Her older son, 10-year-old Aaron James MARTIN, went hunting for his first deer in Southwold Township, south of London, Ontario, on New Year's Day with his 31-year-old stepfather, Fabian ELIJAH, and Mr. ELIJAH's 12-year-old nephew.
Shortly after 1 p.m., police say, Mr. ELIJAH was crossing a creek in a ravine when he slipped and fell. The jolt set off his .22-calibre rifle, and a bullet hit Aaron in the head.
Mr. ELIJAH and his nephew ran in opposite directions, out of the woodlot and across corn fields, searching for help. Mr. ELIJAH found a farmhouse and emergency services were called.
Rescuers at first had trouble finding the boy, Ontario Provincial Police spokesman Dennis HARWOOD said: "It was difficult because of the terrain."
Emergency crews borrowed four-wheel-drive pickup trucks and tore across the rolling fields, but the distraught hunters had trouble retracing their steps.
"They were trying their best," Mr. HARWOOD said. "But they were disoriented."
An air ambulance eventually spotted the boy from above, Mr. HARWOOD said. The helicopter took him to the Children's Hospital of Western Ontario in London, where he was pronounced dead.
A police investigation later revealed that a 1993 court order had forbidden Mr. ELIJAH to own guns. He appeared in a Saint Thomas, Ontario, courtroom yesterday, was charged with illegal possession of a firearm and was denied bail.
Investigators are still examining the accident, Mr. HARWOOD said, though foul play is not suspected.
The boy's mother said Mr. ELIJAH, her partner for about three years, was an experienced hunter. She hadn't known about the 1993 court order, she said.
She has four surviving children, all girls.
Aaron had enjoyed playing on a local lacrosse team until his brother's death, she said. "He's just been trying to heal from that."
The boy was still learning to hunt, having tried it only a few times before. He was also learning to speak the Mohawk language of his ancestors.
"He was a high-spirited young boy," his mother said. "He had lots of Friends. He was always helping people with things, you know. I want the world to know how beautiful my sons were," she said. "I want everybody to remember his kind and gentle heart. He's with the Creator now, with his brother."

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
Died This Day -- Peter MARTIN, 1924
Monday, March 3, 2003 - Page R7
Physician born ORONHYATEKHA, or Burning Cloud, on Six Nations Reserve near what is now Brantford, Ontario, in 1841; took early medical training in U.S.; found support from Prince of Wales and others to go to Oxford University; received medical degree from the University of Toronto; first native Canadian to earn a degree from a Canadian university; practised in Ontario; in 1881, became head of Independent Order of Foresters; led Independent Order of Foresters to 250,000 membership and $11-million insurance fund; died in Savannah, Georgia.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-04 published
MARTIN, Anne V. (née KEMP)
On Saturday, March 1, 2003 at home peacefully of cancer surrounded by her loving family in her 67th year. Tended with skill by her loving sister Sheila RITCHEY, husband Dr. Ronald MARTIN and daughter Susan KENT who never left her side in the closing days. Also by her side sons David and Stephen and Russ KENT whose help was so much appreciated. She will be sadly missed by five grandchildren, four nieces, Colleen MARTIN and many Friends and acquaintances. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Wednesday, March 5th. Service in the chapel Thursday, March 6th at one o'clock. Interment of cremated remains Saint John's Norway Cemetery. In memory of Anne, donations to the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, 250 Bloor Street East, Suite 1000, Toronto, M4W 3P9 would be appreciated.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
He founded Readers' Club of Canada
Nationalist visionary struggled financially to publish Canadian writers
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page R7
In the early 1960s, when writers asked Peter and Carol MARTIN where to publish their manuscripts on Canada, the couple realized how few choices there were. Inspired, the Martins, both voracious readers, staunch nationalists and founders of the Readers' Club of Canada, decided to start their own press. In 1965, Peter Martin Associates came into being. Last month, Peter MARTIN died of lung cancer in Ottawa.
In an industry overshadowed by American companies, Peter MARTIN Associates was among the first in a wave of independent publishing houses to open during a time of rising Canadian nationalism.
Launched in a downtown Toronto basement on a shoestring budget, skeleton staff, idealism and enthusiasm, the company flew by the seat of its pants. Its employees were often young and new to the business. But many, including Peter CARVER, Michael SOLOMON and Valerie WYATT, went on to become Canadian mainstays.
"It really was a time of Canadian nationalism and those of us who believed in that cause could see what Peter and Carol were doing," said Ms. WYATT, a children's editor who spent four years with the company in the seventies.
During the 16 years before its sale in 1981, Peter Martin Associates published approximately 170 works, mainly non-fiction. Its presses put out I, Nuligak, the autobiography of an Inuit man; The Boyd Gang by Marjorie LAMB and Barry PEARSON; Trapping is My Life by John TETSO; and the Handbook of Canadian Film by Eleanor BEATTIE. Others who came through their doors included Hugh HOOD, Robert FULFORD, John Robert COLOMBO, Douglas FETHERLING and Mary Alice DOWNIE -- all to have their works published.
Started with small amounts of seed money from private investors and no government funding, Peter Martin Associates constantly struggled financially. At one point, for a bit of extra cash, the office became the designated nuclear-fallout shelter for the street. Pat DACEY, once the firm's book designer, lugged suitcases of books up the street to sell at Britnell's bookstore with summer employee Bronwyn DRAINIE.
Working at Peter Martin Associates was always fun, Ms. WYATT said. "You went in to work happy and you stayed happy all day."
Still, in a time when Canadian works received little recognition, she remembers finding it difficult to get media interviews for the author of Martin-published book.
Yet another title caused trouble with its subject. The company was putting out a collection of previously published sayings of former prime minister John DIEFENBAKER, called I Never Say Anything Provocative, edited by Margaret WENTE. Mr. DIEFENBAKER heard about the project, called Mr. MARTIN and threatened to sue. Mr. MARTIN stood firm.
"He handled it with such élan," said writer Tim WYNNE- JONES, then in the art department. "He was suitably dutiful, but not in awe. Mr. DIEFENBAKER was just over the top, as was his wont."
The book went to press and Mr. DIEFENBAKER did not go to court.
Once listed along with Peter GZOWSKI in a Maclean's magazine article on "Young Men to Watch," Mr. MARTIN was born on April 26, 1934 in Ottawa to a dentist father and a mother who drove an ambulance in the First World War. The younger of two sons, he attended Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario and the University of Toronto, where he earned a degree in philosophy.
During a year in Ottawa as the president of the National Federation of University Students, Mr. MARTIN met his first wife Carol. They married in 1956 and moved to Toronto. Three years later, they founded the Readers' Club in Featuring one Canadian book a month, it distributed works by Mordecai RICHLER, Irving LAYTON, Morley CALLAGHAN and Brian MOORE among others, and supplied its members with coupons. While continuing to run the Readers' Club (sold in 1978 to Saturday Night Magazine and closed in 1981), the MARTINs started Peter Martin Associates.
Throughout his career, Mr. MARTIN spoke out for Canadian publishing. Alarmed by the sale of Ryerson Press and Gage Educational Press in 1970 to American firms, he called a meeting of publishers to discuss problems in the industry. Named the Independent Publishers Association, the group started in 1971 with 16 members and with Mr. MARTIN as its first president. In 1976, it was renamed the Association of Canadian Publishers and continues today with 140 members. As a result of the group's efforts, Canadian publishing began to receive federal and provincial funding.
In the late 1970s, the MARTINs went their separate ways. Afterward, Mr. MARTIN published a small newspaper, The Downtowner, and owned a cookbook store with his second wife, Maggie NIEMI. In 1983, they moved near Sudbury, Ontario, where Mr. MARTIN did freelance book and theatre reviews, then moved to Ottawa in 1985 to work as president for Balmuir Books, publisher of the magazine International Perspectives and consulting editor for the University of Ottawa Press.
After a spinal-cord injury in 1997, Mr. MARTIN was left a quadriplegic, except for limited use of his left arm. Even so, he remained active, maintained a heavy e-mail correspondence and spent time in the park reading while seated in a bright-yellow wheelchair.
Mr. MARTIN leaves his children Pamela, Christopher and Jeremy and his wife Maggie NIEMI. He died on March 15.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
HALL, Louise Mary
Born Rainham, Kent, England, 22 June, 1911; died Victoria British Columbia, 30 April, 2003. Predeceased by her beloved husband Alfred (d. 2001) and survived by their two children Patricia (Ted WILSON) of Ancaster, Ontario, and Roger (Sandra MARTIN) of Toronto. She will be missed by all, especially her grandchildren Michael (Judy), Timothy (Susan), Laurie (Edwin), Jeffrey and Louisa; and her great-grandchildren, Ann, Matthew, Jackie and Madelyn. Lou was an original. She came to Canada with her war-widowed mother after World War 1, and settled in Regina, where she began a career as a legal secretary and bookkeeper. In 1933 she married musician Al HALL, a fact that had to be concealed because of social strictures at the time that frowned on the employment of married women. Her quick mind and analytical skills helped build a career lasting more than half a century that was capped by successful business ventures in partnership with her husband first on the prairies and later in Victoria. Lou was a voracious reader. Well into her nineties she followed complex social, economic and political issues with a clear eye and firm criticism of those who did not live up to her high standards. A skillful writer, she particularly liked good prose, and was a fierce defender of individual talents. In retirement, she was a founding member of the Fairfield New Horizons Senior Centre and was much looking forward to the celebration of their 25th anniversary later this month. In lieu of flowers please send donations in her memory to the British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals or the Cowichan Cat Hospital. A funeral service will be held at First Memorial Funeral Services, 1155 Fort Street, Victoria, on Monday, 5 May at 12: 00 Noon. All of her many Friends are welcome.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
JOHNSON, Eleanor Jean, née CAMPBELL (October 17, 1915 - May 9, died peacefully after 3 weeks of acute illness. She grew up in Ottawa, travelled and worked in Canada and then in Washington as part of the war effort. Inspired by the work of the Saint John Ambulance, she joined as a volunteer and went to England in 1945 where she met her beloved Arthur Norman JOHNSON, her lifetime partner, whom she married in 1946. She was a community volunteer her whole life. For 35 years she worked with High Horizons, an organization she credits with her continued good health through years of battling a variety of conditions. She was a bird watcher, cottage lover, trusted friend to many people and an adored wife, mother, grandmother and great-grand-mother. The daughter of the late Ida M. CAMPBELL and Donald L. CAMPBELL, she is survived by 'Johnny' JOHNSON, her husband, her 2 daughters Jennifer BROOKS and Barbara THOMAS, her sons-in-law Bruce BROOKS and D'Arcy MARTIN, her grandchildren Karen ELLIS, Debbie FAULDS, Janette THOMAS and Geoff BROOKS, and their partners Shawn ELLIS, Sean FAULDS, Sean KONDRA and Thach-Thao PHAN. Her great grandchildren are Devon and Shanice ELLIS. Friends are invited to meet the family at the West Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 150 Woodroffe Avenue at Richmond Road on Tuesday May 13 from 6 to 8 p.m. and to celebrate her life at a Memorial Service to be held in the Chapel on Wednesday May 14 at 2 p.m. The Chapel is wheelchair accessible. In lieu of flowers donations in her name would be welcomed at High Horizons, c/o Mackay United Church, 39 Dufferin Avenue, Ottawa, K1M 2H3.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-27 published
POWLESS, Alex Ross September 29, 1926 - May 26, 2003.
Peacefully, surrounded by his loving family, at the Willett Hospital, in Paris, Ontario, at 5: 00 a.m., on Monday, May 26, 2003, Alex Ross POWLESS, in his 77th year, went to meet his creator after several months of illness. Ross was born in Ohsweken on the Six Nations Reserve on September 29, 1926. Ross was a devoted husband and loving father and was married to Margaret Wilma POWLESS (nee BOMBERRY) for 55 years. Together they raised 14 children, 27 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. Ross was predeceased by his sons: Victor in 1955, Gaylord in 2001 and Gregory in 2002, his parents: Chauncey and Jessie, and his siblings: Mary Ella and Alice Maracle, Amy and Maude Martin, and Raymond and Jean Powless.
Ross is survived by his loving wife Margaret Wilma POWLESS (nee BOMBERRY) and sister Vernice Maizie JONATHAN, and his children, including daughter in law Patti, Gail (Mark AYRES,) Gary, Audrey (Jim BOMBERRY), Harry, Arlene (Dan MARTIN), Richard (Effie PANOUSOS), Darryl (Naansii JAMIESON,) Karen (Jerry MARTIN,) Tony (Cheryle GIBSON,) Jeffery, and Jacqui baby (Ron LYNES.) Ross is a cherished uncle to many nieces and nephews.
Ross had a passion for hunting and also loved fishing, pool and playing cards. He demonstrated his love for his grandchildren in many ways. He's fondly remembered for making up nicknames for them. Ross' sense of humour and storytelling was renowned and he was often asked to speak at public functions because of it.
Ross POWLESS distinguished himself in lacrosse both as a player and a coach. He was a member of the Ontario and Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame and won four Mann Cups (Canadian Lacrosse Championships) with the Peterborough Timbermen from 1951 to 1954, including an Most Valuable Player award in 1953. Ross coached the Brantford Warriors to the Canadian Senior B Championship in 1968 and the Rochester Chiefs to a Can-Am Lacrosse League Championship in 1969. In 1974, Ross coached six of his sons on the Ontario First Nations Team, which captured the All Indian Nations Championship Cup.
The family will honour his life with a visitation at Styres Funeral Home, Ohsweken after 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 27. Evening prayers 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 28 where Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Thursday, May 29, 2003 at 2 p.m. Interment: St. Paul's Anglican Cemetery, Sour Springs Road. Memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association, the Iroquois Lodge or the Canadian Cancer Society can be made in lieu of flowers.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
Hockey coach who changed the game
'Captain Video' introduced new teaching tools in more than 25 years with the National Hockey League
By William HOUSTON Monday, June 23, 2003 - Page R5
The morning after Roger NEILSON was fired from his first of seven head coaching jobs in the National Hockey League, he returned to his office at Maple Leaf Gardens.
He viewed and edited the videotape of the Toronto Maple Leafs' loss to the Montreal Canadiens the night before. When a replacement didn't show up, he put the Leafs through a practice. Later, he was asked by a reporter why he was still hanging around.
"Somebody had to run the practice," he said. "Whoever comes in will have to look at the tapes."
The next day, Mr. NEILSON was reinstated when the club could not find a replacement, but Maple Leafs owner Harold BALLARD, always looking for publicity, wanted to make his return behind the bench a surprise. Mr. BALLARD tried to talk him into wearing a ski mask or bag over his head, and then dramatically throwing it off at the start of the game. Numbed by the three-day ordeal of not knowing his status in the organization, Mr. NEILSON almost agreed, but ultimately declined.
"He hated that story," said Jim GREGORY, who hired Mr. NEILSON to coach the Leafs in 1977 and was fired along with the coach at the end of the 1978-79 season. "I hated that story."
The incident reflected poorly on Mr. BALLARD, but in a smaller way it helped create the image of Mr. NEILSON we have today, that of a coach who put the team ahead of his ego, who was loyal to his players and dedicated to his job.
Mr. NEILSON, who died Saturday after a long battle with cancer, will be remembered not just as a man who loved hockey, but also as a skilled strategist and innovator. He stressed defensive play and systems, and also physical fitness. In Toronto, he was given the nickname "Captain Video," because he was among the first to use videotape to instruct his players and prepare for games.
When Mr. NEILSON, a soft-spoken man famous for his dry sense of humour, was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame last year, he was asked about the late, controversial Leafs owner.
"I'm sure he's looking up rather than down," he said, with a smile, before saying Mr. BALLARD did some "good things for hockey."
Mr. NEILSON was also named to the Order of Canada in January.
Roger Paul NEILSON was born in Toronto on June 16, 1934, and went as far as Junior B hockey as a player. While earning a degree at McMaster University in Hamilton, he started coaching kids baseball and hockey.
After graduating, he taught high school in Toronto and his passion by then was coaching. In hockey, he won Toronto and provincial titles at different levels. In 10 years, his Metro Toronto midget baseball teams won nine championships, once defeating a team that included pitcher Ken DRYDEN, who would later become a Hall of Fame goaltender with the Montreal Canadiens.
Mr. NEILSON scouted for the Peterborough Petes of the Ontario Major Junior Hockey League before moving to Peterborough in 1966 to coach the team. During his 10 years behind the bench, the Petes never finished below third place and won the league championship once.
By the time Mr. NEILSON moved to the National Hockey League to coach the Leafs in 1977, his reputation for creativity and also mischief was firmly established. In baseball, he used, at least once, a routine involving a peeled apple, in which the catcher threw what appeared to be the ball wildly over the third baseman, prompting the runner to race home. As the apple lay in the outfield, the catcher met the runner at home plate with the real baseball in his glove.
Always looking for a loophole in the rules, Mr. NEILSON's ploys instigated rule changes in hockey. On penalty shots against his team, he used Ron STACKHOUSE, a big defenceman, instead of a goalie. Mr. STACKHOUSE would charge out of the net and cause the shooter to flub his shot. The rule was subsequently changed to require the goalie to stay in his crease.
Over an National Hockey League career that lasted more than 25 years, Mr. NEILSON holds the record for most teams coached (seven.) He also held four assistant coaching positions. But he never won the Stanley Cup. He didn't coach great teams. He seemed to enjoy the challenge of taking an average group of players, making them into a solid, defensive unit, and seeing them succeed.
In his first year with the Leafs, he moulded a previously undisciplined group of players into a strong unit that upset the New York Islanders in the 1978 playoffs.
In 1982, Mr. NEILSON's playoff success with the Vancouver Canucks underscored his skill as a tactician and manipulator.
When Canuck head coach Harry NEALE was suspended late in the season, Mr. NEILSON, his assistant, took over. The Canucks weren't expected to advance past the first round of the playoffs. But backed by strong goaltending from Richard BRODEUR, they defeated the Calgary Flames and then the Los Angeles Kings to advance to the semi-finals against Chicago.
The Canucks won the first game, but with Chicago leading 4-1 late in the second game, Mr. NEILSON, unhappy with the officiating, waved a white towel from the bench, as if to surrender to the referee. He was fined for the demonstration, but the white towel became a symbol of home-fan solidarity. In the Stanley Cup final, the Canucks were swept by the powerhouse Islanders.
In addition to Toronto and Vancouver, Mr. NEILSON's journey through the National Hockey League consisted of head coaching jobs with the Buffalo Sabres, the Kings, New York Rangers, Florida Panthers and Philadelphia Flyers. He worked as a co-coach in Chicago, and as an assistant coach with the Sabres, St. Louis Blues and Ottawa Senators.
Ottawa, where he was hired in 2000, was his final destination. In the 2001-02 season, head coach Jacques MARTIN stepped down for the final two games of the regular season to allow Mr. NEILSON to coach his 1,000th regular-season game.
Frank ORR, who covered hockey for The Toronto Star for more than 30 years, said, in 2002, "Roger is one of the few people I've met in any line of work who never had a bad word to say about anybody."

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
A remarkable life, and a friend to all
By Eric DUHATSCHEK Monday, June 23, 2003 - Page S1
Nashville -- Roger NEILSON's legacy in hockey will endure because he coached 1,000 games among eight National Hockey League teams, because he was an innovator and because he served as a mentor and a tutor to others during a Hall of Fame career.
But the contributions of NEILSON, who died Saturday in Peterborough, Ontario, at 69 after a lengthy battle with cancer, contain a vibrancy matched by few others because of the countless Friendships he developed during his lifetime.
The proof of that came in June of last year when a dozen of his closest Friends organized a tribute to NEILSON. It was held in Toronto, a day before the National Hockey League awards dinner, to make it easier for people to attend, which they did. More than 1,300 people were there.
NEILSON was responsible for helping several players and coaches get to the National Hockey League, including Bob GAINEY, Craig RAMSAY and Colin CAMPBELL, players on the Peterborough Petes junior team that NEILSON coached in the 1970s.
Among those who benefited from NEILSON's guidance was Florida Panthers coach Mike KEENAN. Scotty BAUMAN/BOWMAN, the Hall of Fame coach, recalled Saturday how NEILSON talked him into hiring KEENAN, who had also coached the Petes, into running the Buffalo Sabres' minor-league affiliate in Rochester, New York in the early 1980s.
"Roger didn't have any enemies," KEENAN said. "He lived his life in a principled way. He had a great deal of respect for people and found goodness in all of them. He was very unique and all of us were blessed to know him.
"I'm saddened by his passing, but to me, this is a life to be celebrated, a life that was so influential to many of us."
NEILSON had an endless fascination with the rulebook that forced the powers in whatever league he happened to be coaching in to revise and clarify each loophole he probed. For a penalty shot, he would put a defenceman in the crease instead of a goaltender, instructing the defenceman to rush the shooter as soon as the latter crossed the blueline, to hurry him into a mistake.
Once, when his team was already two players short with less than two minutes remaining in the game, NEILSON kept sending players over the boards, getting penalties for delaying the game. The strategy worked, taking time off the clock and upsetting the other team's flow. At that stage of the game, it didn't matter how many penalties NEILSON's team was taking. If a coach tried that tactic today, the opposition would be awarded a penalty shot.
NEILSON, whose last job was as an assistant coach with the Ottawa Senators, coached his 1,000th National Hockey League game on the final night of the 2001-02 regular season, temporarily filling in for Senators head coach Jacques MARTIN. NEILSON was involved with a dozen National Hockey League teams in a series of different capacities, including his eight different turns as a head coach. In 1982, he took the Vancouver Canucks to the Stanley Cup final, his one and only appearance in the championship series as a coach. The Canucks were swept by the New York Islanders.
It was during that playoff run that NEILSON placed a white towel on the end of a stick, a mock surrender to the on-ice officials.
In 1999, NEILSON was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a form of bone cancer, and needed a bone marrow transplant. He also developed skin cancer, the result of a lifetime of being outdoors, in the sun, usually in raggedy old shorts and T-shirts, with a well-worn baseball cap perched on his head.
"He put in an incredible, inspiring fight with an insidious disease," said KEENAN, who added that NEILSON kept in constant contact with his mother Thelma, after she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.
"They found strength in each other. That's the type of individual Roger was. He'd reach out and touch somebody who needed help. He was deathly in pain the last few times we spoke, but he would not let it influence his life."
The high regard for NEILSON was clear during the tribute for him last year. Former coach and Hockey Night in Canada analyst Harry NEALE, who worked with NEILSON in Vancouver, was the master of ceremonies. But he was so overcome by emotion so many times that he let his good friend Roger steal the show.
NEILSON's self-deprecating sense of humor surfaced when he scanned the crowd and suggested that everyone he'd ever said hello to in his lifetime had turned up for the event. He quipped that at $125 a ticket, it must be an National Hockey League production. What other organization would set the price so outrageously high?
NEILSON's health was deteriorating this spring, but he managed to accompany the Senators on the road for their second-round series against the Philadelphia Flyers. The Senators pushed the eventual Stanley Cup champions, the New Jersey Devils, to seven games in the Eastern Conference final before being eliminated.
NEILSON's speech to the team before Game 6, with the Senators trailing 3-1 in the series, was cited by the players and the coaching staff as the inspiration for their comeback against the Devils.
"The only sad part is we weren't able to win a Stanley Cup for him this year," Martin said.
With his health failing, NEILSON asked BAUMAN/BOWMAN to be the keynote speaker at his annual coaching clinic in Windsor earlier this month.
"I talked to him only a week ago," BAUMAN/BOWMAN said. "I said, 'The coaches in the National Hockey League are getting blamed a lot for the [defensive] style that teams are playing.' I said, 'You should blame Roger NEILSON because he's the one training all these coaches.'
"Roger was a special person. The people that follow hockey know what he went through. I truly think he battled it right to the end and it was hockey that probably kept Roger going." eduhatschek@globeandmail.ca
Remembering Roger NEILSON
"The coaches in the National Hockey League have been getting blamed a lot for the style of game the teams are playing. I said, 'You should blame Roger NEILSON because he's training all these coaches.' "He battled right to the end. Hockey and life for Roger were intertwined. That probably kept him going to the end. He never got married. He was married to hockey."
Scott BAUMAN/BOWMAN
"All the awards he won this year tell you about his hockey career's innovativeness and what kind of person he is. Some people are going to remember Roger for nothing to do with hockey just because of what a humanitarian he is. He put up an unbelievable battle. From when he found out how sick he was, if had happened to most people, they would have had their demise many months ago. He fought hard."
Jim GREGORY
"I know I haven't met a person who could equal Roger's passion for hockey. The honours bestowed on him in the past year, the Hockey Hall of Fame and the Order of Canada, did not come by accident. He has done so much for so many kids and I will always remember that legacy."
Harry NEALE
"He's an individual we can all be inspired by, by his ability to deal with some difficult situations in his own life. He has such a high level of respect for human beings. "He was fortunate in way he lived his life. It was impacted by his faith and his religion. He observed those principles on a daily basis, things most of us have a hard time dealing with. He saw the goodness in everyone else."
Mike KEENAN
"He did a lot of work at the grassroots level with his hockey camps, coaches' clinics, his baseball teams, his summer programs. He wasn't really in it for himself very much. "It's a word you use too often to make it special but in his case he was unique, he really was."
Bob GAINEY
"Hockey has lost a great mind, a great spirit, a great friend. The National Hockey League family mourns his loss but celebrates his legacy -- the generations of players he counselled, the coaches he moulded, the changes his imagination inspired and the millions of fans he entertained."
Gary BETTMAN
Life and times
Born: June 16, 1934, in Toronto.
Education: Roger NEILSON graduated from McMaster University in Hamilton with a degree in physical education.
Nickname: Captain Video because he was the first to analyze game videos to pick apart opponents' weaknesses.
Coaching career: NEILSON coached hockey teams for 50 years. He was a National Hockey League coach for Toronto, Buffalo, Vancouver, Los Angeles, the New York Rangers, Florida, Philadelphia and Ottawa. The Senators let him coach a game on April 13, 2002, so he could reach 1,000 for his career. He was an National Hockey League assistant in Buffalo, Chicago, St. Louis and Ottawa.
Major Honours: Elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in the builders category last year. Invested into the Order of Canada in May.
Tributes: ESPN Classic Canada will air a 24-hour tribute to NEILSON beginning today at 6 p.m. eastern daylight time. The programming will include a profile, footage from the famous white towel game during the 1982 Stanley Cup playoffs and his 1,000th game behind the bench.
Funeral: Services for NEILSON will be held at 2 p.m., Saturday at North View Pentecostal Church in Peterborough, Ontario (705-748-4573). The church is at the corner of Fairbairn Street and Tower Hill Road.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-01 published
STAMFORD, Ross
Died peacefully, on Friday, June 27, 2003, at York Central Hospital. He is survived by his wife Joan, children Cynthia (McCORMACK,) Brenda (BREWER,) Scott (Diana MARTIN,) Pamela, and grandchildren Kristin, Kimberlee, Jamie, Laurel, Veronica, Nicole, Lindsay and Christine. The family would like to thank the staff on the 3rd Floor at York Central Hospital for all their care and support. Donations may be made to the Childrens' Wish Foundation or the Herbie Fund, c/o The Hospital for Sick Children.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-02 published
INGHAM, Albert
Ab died suddenly on Sunday, June 29, 2003 in his 86th year, on a fine summer day at the family cottage at Lime Lake, a bright and active man. Beloved husband of Anne (KUZ) and father of Paula BUTTERFIELD and husband David, Dyan JONES and partner Randy MARTIN, Thomas INGHAM and daughter-in-law Janet WHITE/WHYTE. His grandchildren Isaiah WALTERS, Rachel WALTERS, Adam BUTTERFIELD, Jonathan BUTTERFIELD and Samuel INGHAM will always cherish their Friendship with him. Survived by his brother Robert INGHAM and brother-in-law Walter KUZ and dear nieces and nephews.
A fine man of jovial spirit, he embodied so much to be admired. May we all live such a full and loving life. Family and Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.) Weston, from 6-9 p.m. Thursday. Funeral Service in the Ward Chapel on Friday, July 4, 2003 at 11 a.m. Interment Prospect Cemetery. Donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, Breast And Gynecology Research Teams, would be appreciated.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
Died This Day -- Paul Joseph James MARTIN, 1992
Saturday, September 13, 2003 - Page F11
Politician and statesman born on June 23, 1903, at Ottawa; 1935, first elected to House of Commons; 1943 appointed parliamentary assistant to minister of labour; 1945, entered cabinet as secretary of state; 1946, became minister of national health and welfare forced prime minister SSAINTURENT to accept national health insurance 1963, appointed secretary of state for external affairs; 1968-74, served as government leader in Senate; 1975-79, served as high commissioner to Britain; made three failed attempts at Liberal Party leadership (in 1968, lost to Pierre TRUDEAU;) died at Windsor, Ontario; two-volume memoirs, A Very Public Life, published in 1983 and 1986.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-10 published
FULTON quietly kept the Canadian Football League in running order
By Stephen BRUNT, Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - Page S8
Less than a month back, during Grey Cup week, Greg FULTON picked up his phone to answer a few questions from a reporter.
Frail health had kept him from making the trip to Regina, but in conversation he was sharp as a tack and again proved himself to be a one-man encyclopedia of Canadian football history.
Paul MARTIN, the prime minister to be, was going to make a much publicized pregame appearance at Taylor Field, fresh from the Liberal leadership convention.
Aside from Pierre TRUDEAU, FULTON was asked, did he remember any other prime minister taking the time to attend the Grey Cup? "Well," he said, "I don't remember Mackenzie KING being there. Or Louis SSAINTURENT."
Of course, he knew because he was there. It seemed he was always there -- a player beginning in Winnipeg in 1939, a statistician and treasurer for the Calgary Stampeders from 1950 to 1966, a fixture in the Canadian Football League office from 1967 on, and, finally in his last job, the Canadian Football League's honorary secretary and official historian, a title surely unique in all of pro sports.
The National Football League still has a few owners with connections to the game's early days, and in hockey and baseball there are at least a handful of sportswriting elders who still remember when. But only the Canadian Football League actually employed someone who had an inside view extending back more than 60 years.
Considering how tumultuous some of those seasons have been and considering the game's highs and lows and the cast of strange and wonderful characters who came and went, what a tale FULTON could tell.
He was 84 when he died on Monday, and with him, sadly, is lost much of the anecdotal story of the league. (Commissioner Tom WRIGHT, who during his relatively short term on the job had come to appreciate FULTON's special role, planned to have FULTON's memories committed to tape and transcribed. Sadly, that didn't happen before FULTON fell ill.)
FULTON's tenure with the league office was perhaps the only significant legacy of Keith DAVEY's 54-day reign as commissioner in 1967. Davey lured FULTON to Toronto from Calgary to act as the league's treasurer. When Jake GAUDAUR took over from DAVEY, he decided to keep FULTON on.
"It would be the most important decision I would make," GAUDAUR says now, which, given the events of his 16 years in office, is quite a statement. Every subsequent commissioner -- and there have been a bunch -- endorsed and echoed that original decision.
Not that anyone on the outside would really understand. "All of those beneficial things he did for the league were all out of public view," GAUDAUR said. "He never received any sort of media credit, nor did he want any. Clearly, it was a labour of love for him. That's kind of corny to say that, but I really believe it was."
In those early days, the league was a two-man, two-secretary operation. FULTON, an accountant by profession, kept the books, kept an eye on club finances and kept the minutes during league meetings -- all during a period when the game grew into a multimillion-dollar sports business. He was also charged with producing the schedule every year, a trickier proposition than it might seem, given the uneven number of teams, the east-west split and the importance of certain dates in certain places.
At one point, GAUDAUR remembers, they turned the task over to a computer. And then, after the computer coughed out its work, they handed it to FULTON, who fixed it. "He had what I consider to be a computer mind," GAUDAUR said. "It was an incredible mind."
The Canadian Football League took a turn for the worse after GAUDAUR left the post. Commissioners came and went, the league at times teetered on the brink of insolvency, the disastrous U.S. expansion played itself out and the owners at times resembled a bag of mixed nuts.
But there was always FULTON, quietly keeping things in running order, breaking the tension with his wry, quiet sense of humour, loyal first and foremost to the game he loved.
"He was a remarkable person," GAUDAUR said. "It really was a pleasure to be around the guy."
Several generations of those who spent time in the Canadian Football League orbit share those sentiments and mourn the loss.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
Party leaders pay tribute
Tories fondly remember Stanfield as best prime minister Canada never had
By Kim LUNMAN and Drew FAGAN, Thursday, December 18, 2003 - Page A10
Ottawa -- Robert Lorne STANFIELD, the former leader of the federal Progressive Conservatives, was remembered yesterday as a Canadian icon.
Political tributes were made across the country for Mr. STANFIELD, who died Tuesday at the Montfort Hospital in Ottawa. He was 89.
He had been in poor health for several years after a stroke. A private funeral will be held in Ottawa tomorrow and a family burial in Halifax.
Mr. STANFIELD led the federal Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 against Pierre TRUDEAU and was known within the party as the greatest prime minister Canada never had. In later years, he was regarded as the conscience of the Conservatives, representing their progressive side on social issues.
"Today we mourn the passing of one of the most distinguished and committed Canadians of the past half-century," said Prime Minister Paul MARTIN. "I, like other Canadians, fondly remember Mr. STANFIELD's great warmth, humility and compassionate nature, but also his intellect and humour."
Progressive Conservative Leader Peter MacKAY said Mr. STANFIELD will be remembered as an icon.
"It's a very sad and poignant day. He had a larger-than-life persona and I think he can be accurately described as an icon in Conservative politics and Canadian politics," Mr. MacKAY said.
"Conservatives across the country, and indeed all Canadians, have lost a great leader and a great Canadian," Canadian Alliance Leader Stephen HARPER said.
In an interview yesterday, former prime minister Brian MULRONEY described Mr. STANFIELD as having brought the Progressive Conservative Party into the mainstream of modern Canadian life through his support for the Official Languages Act and his openness to ethnic minorities and diversity. Mr. MULRONEY said it was appropriate that Mr. STANFIELD had been receiving treatment at Montfort Hospital, the French-language facility in Ottawa, considering how hard he had worked as leader to make the Tories comfortable with bilingualism and how much effort he himself had made to learn French. "He was a strikingly impressive, quiet, thoughtful man, but who was very resolved and determined -- and with a generous view of Canada," Mr. MULRONEY said.
When Mr. MULRONEY was prime minister from 1984 to 1993, he would occasionally invite Mr. STANFIELD to 24 Sussex Dr. for lunch. Mr. MULRONEY revealed yesterday that, in the late 1980s, when Mr. STANFIELD was almost 75, he offered him the post of Canadian ambassador to the United Nations.
"He thought it was a great honour. He wrestled with it for a little while, but decided that, though he would love to do it, he thought it would be a bit much at that stage of his life," Mr. MULRONEY said.
"He brought compassion to politics," Nova Scotia's Premier John HAMM said yesterday.
"He brought a love of his country to his politics."
Flora MacDONALD, a former federal Tory cabinet minister, first worked with Mr. STANFIELD during the 1956 provincial campaign that made him Nova Scotia premier. "He set a very high standard for himself as a politician and expected others to do the same," she said yesterday. Mr. STANFIELD supported official bilingualism and abolition of the death penalty when his other caucus colleagues were strongly opposed, she said. "He didn't do things just because they were popular. He did things because he thought they were intrinsically right."
Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON said Mr. STANFIELD "will be remembered for his integrity, his devotion to his country, his social conscience and especially for his wit and sense of humour."
Mr. STANFIELD was premier of Nova Scotia from 1956 to 1967. He was born in Truro into a family famous for its underwear business and became a lawyer before turning to politics, first provincially and later on the federal stage. But his awkward image contrasted sharply to that of the hip, telegenic Mr. TRUDEAU, costing the party every election it fought under his leadership. The 1972 election was Mr. STANFIELD's closest brush with federal power, when the Liberals narrowly defeated the Conservatives by 109 to 107 seats. Two years later, the Liberals regained their majority and Mr. STANFIELD announced his decision to step down. He remained as leader until Joe CLARK succeeded him in 1976.
After relinquishing his seat in the Commons in 1979, Mr. STANFIELD became Canada's special envoy to the Middle East and North Africa until 1980, and was chairman of the Commonwealth Foundation from 1987 to 1991.
He married three times. His first wife died in a car crash in 1954 and his second wife died of cancer in 1976. He married his third wife, Anne Henderson AUSTIN, in 1978. He had four children.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
Ottawa bids STANFIELD goodbye
'He was a sage.... He was quite extraordinary,' Charest says at funeral
By Kim LUNMAN, Saturday, December 20, 2003 - Page A9
Ottawa -- Robert STANFIELD was fondly remembered yesterday as a sage statesman.
The former Nova Scotia premier and federal Progressive Conservative leader remained one of the country's most respected politicians even years after leaving the national arena, Tory Senator Lowell MURRAY told more than 100 mourners yesterday at Mr. STANFIELD's funeral in Ottawa.
"There has survived perhaps only the kernel of something, but its essence in the Canadian consciousness -- that once, uniquely, there was STANFIELD, leader of a major party, a man of such civility, such humanity, such integrity, who adorned our national life," Mr. MURRAY said
Mr. STANFIELD, who suffered a stroke several years ago, died Tuesday in Ottawa. He was 89.
At the private ceremony at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, he was remembered as a respected politician with a dry wit. He will be buried today in Halifax's Camp Hill cemetery.
Politicians of all stripes attended the service to pay tribute. Outside the church, Prime Minister Paul MARTIN told reporters his father and Mr. STANFIELD were "great Friends. My father had huge admiration for Mr. STANFIELD. And I actually shudder to think what the two of them are doing up there right now, the amount of discussions that are going on."
Mr. MARTIN said he remembered Mr. STANFIELD for his "great sense of decency, integrity, and his deep, deep love of country." Progressive Conservative Leader Peter MacKAY said Canada has lost "one of its greatest statesmen, a person who raised the standard of politics and public service.... He was very much substance over style."
"He was a sage," Quebec Liberal Premier Jean Charest, the former federal Tory leader, said. Mr. STANFIELD "looked at life with a bit of a smile, I think. He was quite extraordinary."
Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON called Mr. STANFIELD remarkable, "a man of deep conviction, a man who was decent and fair and honest and very funny." Other political colleagues at the funeral included former Tory prime ministers Kim CAMPBELL and Joe CLARK and former Tory cabinet minister Flora MacDONALD.
Mr. STANFIELD married three times. His first wife died in a crash in 1954 and his second wife died of cancer in 1976. He married his third wife, Anne Henderson AUSTIN, in 1978. He had four children.
Even as the service was going on in Ottawa, hundreds of people filed into the Nova Scotia legislature in Halifax to sign a book of condolence next to a portrait of the former premier, who led the province for 11 years, from 1956 to 1967.
Mr. STANFIELD led the federal Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 against Pierre TRUDEAU and was known within the party as the greatest prime minister Canada never had.
In his later years, he was regarded as the Conservatives' conscience, representing the party's progressive side on social issues. He supported Mr. TRUDEAU's Official Languages Act despite a revolt by his fellow Tory members of parliament and also backed abolishing the death penalty.
He was born in Truro into a family famous for its underwear business and became a lawyer before turning to politics.
Bespectacled and known for his slow-speaking style, Mr. STANFIELD conveyed an awkward image that contrasted sharply with the youthful, charismatic Mr. Trudeau, costing the party every election it fought under his leadership.
But he came within two seats of office in the 1972 election when the Liberals defeated the Conservatives by 109 to 107 seats.
Two years later, the Liberals regained their majority and Mr. STANFIELD announced his decision to step down. He was succeeded by Mr. CLARK in 1976.

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MARTYN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
MARTYN, Ronald Hamilton
1934-2003 of Wasaga Beach, Ontario. Died suddenly on his Sea Ray boat in Port Severn, Ontario on Friday, July 18, 2003. Ron was born in Calgary, Alberta and dreamed as a young boy of becoming a pilot. He began flying with the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1951 with an aviation career spanning 42 years. He left the air force to become a bush pilot, flying into the arctic with Chevron Standard, Calgary, Alberta, remaining a reservist flying Mustangs with 403 Squadron as Squadron Leader and had honoured duty as Lieutenant Governor J. Percy PAGE's Honorary Aide de Camp. Ron began flying commercial jets in 1968 having a distinguished career highlighted as a Boeing 747 chief pilot with Wardair Canada, finishing his career with Canadian Airlines/Air Canada in Toronto, Ontario, Christmas Creek, his farm with covered bridge and waterwheel, Anson Park, The Bar, Chapel and mine with shaft kept him busy in retirement. He will be remembered as a loving husband, father, grandfather, brother, uncle, cousin and most importantly a wonderful, caring fun loving friend who loved celebrations and adventures. He is predeceased by his father Charles, mother Mabel and brothers Bill and Robert. He is survived by his wife Inez, sister Jean, daughter Shauna (Anson), son Bruce (Penny) and granddaughters Aislynn and Alexandra. Friends will be received at the Carruthers & Davidson Funeral Home, 7313 Highway 26 (Main Street), Stayner, Ontario (1-866-428-2637) Monday, July 21st from 6-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at Jubilee Presbyterian Church, 7320 Highway 26, Stayner on Tuesday at 1 o'clock. The family are requesting memorial donations to the General and Marine Hospital Foundation, 459 Hume Street, Collingwood, Ontario L9Y 9Z9 in memory of his special man if so desired. Sign the on-line guest book at www.generations.on.ca.

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MARY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
COX, Reverend Michael T., S.F.M.
Father Michael COX died peacefully, on April 9, 2003, after a lengthy battle with stomach cancer. He was the son of the late John Thomas COX and Catherine Anne MacKENZIE of Glace Bay, Nova Scotia. Born in Glace Bay, Father COX attended St. Anthony's Elementary and Saint Anne's High School, graduating in 1942. He joined the Scarboro Foreign Mission Society in September 1944 and was ordained to the priesthood in December 1950. He was assigned to mission in Japan in the summer of 1951 and worked there for 50 years, serving in various parishes. He returned to Canada in 2001 to retire. Father COX was the last surviving member of his immediate family. He was predeceased by sisters Elizabeth (who died in infancy,) Mary LAFFIN, and Sister Martha MARY, a member of the Sisters of Charity; and by his brothers Joe, Neil, George, and Father William, also a member of Scarboro Missions. Father Cox is survived by his sister-in-law Mrs. Kathleen COX of Glace Bay with whom he resided since January 2003, by several nieces, nephews, grandnieces, and grandnephews, and by members of his Scarboro Missions community. The Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated Saturday, April 12, at St. Anthony's parish in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia. Father Cox will be buried beside his parents at St. Anthony's Parish Cemetery. Memorial donations can be made to Scarboro Missions or to a charity of your choice.

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MARYCH o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Edward MARYCH
Unexpectedly on Tuesday, October 21, 2003 at the Manitoulin Health Centre age 66 years.
Fondly known on the Manitoulin as "Eddie the Pilot." He was a bush pilot here in the North in his early years and then flew for Air Canada for 28 years. Retiring to enjoy the family cottage in Sheguiandah, planning to make it home, thus moving from Holland Landing.
Beloved husband of Deanna (née VALIQUETTE,) cherished father of Philip and wife Barb of Hanmer, Nicholas and wife Terry of Stroud, Paula and wife Wendy of London. Special grandfather of Elliot, Jason, Zackary, and Joshua. Predeceased by grand_son Robert.
Will always be remembered by cousin Lydia KIT and family and in-laws Clayton (predeceased) and Betty, Aubrey and Doreen, Norris and Linda, Dennis and Sandra, Irene and Leora (predeceased). Loved by many nieces and nephews.
Visitation was from 2 - 4 and 7 - 9 on Friday, October 24. Funeral service was on Saturday, October 25 at 11 am at St. Bernard's Catholic Church. Dan LAROUCHE officiating. Island Funeral Home.

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