MARADIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-17 published
Hit by bus, bicycling student killed
Police attempting to reconstruct events that led to tragedy in front of high school
By Ken KILPATRICK Wednesday, September 17, 2003 - Page A18
Burlington -- An 18-year-old student was struck by a school bus and killed while riding her bike outside her high school yesterday morning.
Jesica Marie GREEN, a Grade 12 student, was riding her bicycle across a driveway just 30 metres from the front door of Lord Elgin High School when she was struck by a school bus that had just delivered its students and was exiting on to the street.
She was pronounced dead at the scene.
The area in front of the school was busy with students and motorists when the accident occurred just after 8 a.m.
"We all freaked out," said a student who was part of a group standing in front of the school at the time.
"Someone said a person had been hit. She was kind of sprawled out under the bus. A passing car driver ran over and told us to call the police. We all stayed back... no one wanted to go any closer to see what was really going on."
He said it didn't look as if the victim had been wearing a bicycle helmet.
Three hours later, a truck safety officer and staff from the Ontario Ministry of Transportation repeatedly drove the bus from a parking spot in front of Lord Elgin to the New Street entrance. At one point, a woman stood behind the driver and videotaped the view through the windshield.
Dan MARADIN, general manager for Laidlaw Transit Ltd., said he and the company "are deeply saddened by the incident and our thoughts go out to the victim's family and Friends."
The woman driving the bus -- who has not been identified -- was traumatized by the accident, he said, and the company is offering her counselling. "She was a good driver and had been with us for 1½ years."
Mr. MARADIN said the driver had been trained by Laidlaw. Training to operate a school bus comprises 40 hours of classroom and behind-the-wheel lessons.
The Halton District School Board immediately sent its Tragic Event Response Team into the school to offer counselling to those who witnessed the accident.
Students who needed help immediately were called to the school's conference room where the response team waited with cookies and drinks.
One student, in Lord Elgin as the event unfolded outside, said they were told to stay in their classrooms and away from the front of the school.
"The mood inside the school was very sad and there were some tears," she said.
Marnie DENTON, communication officer with the school board, said the response team "is there to help students who witnessed the accident and those who were Friends of Ms. GREEN. They will be at the school for as long as they are needed. They have specialized training and help our students deal with the shock associated with tragedy."

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MARAGHI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-20 published
EL-MARAGHI, Dr. Nabil
Died after a long illness on September 10, 2003 and was buried with Muslim rites on Friday September 12, 2003. Visitors will be welcome at 29 Valley Drive, Barrie from 11: 00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. on Saturday September 27, 2003. Refreshments will be served. Donations to Royal Victoria Hospital Foundation Regional Cancer Centre Fund.

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MARCHAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
Deborah FLETCHER
By Blaine MARCHAND, Monday, July 21, 2003 - Page A14
Sister, daughter, friend. Born December 31, 1948, in Ottawa. Died February 11, of cancer, aged 54.
Dear friends," the e-mails began, although most had never met one another. Their common element was Friendship with Deborah FLETCHER.
The intimacy of e-mail brought testimonials of Friendship across decades, articulations of grief that someone so filled with the spirit of the world should pass away. One e-mail thanked her family: "You nurtured and encouraged and polished a wonderful spirit, and then generously gave her to the world. You helped make her an idealist with feet planted firmly on the ground."
Deborah was the eldest child, born to Jack and Doris. Two brothers, Randy and Dennis, followed her. The FLETCHERs instilled in their children wit, kind-heartedness, and fidelity to family. The extended FLETCHER clan reached from the Ottawa Valley down into the United States.
Following high-school, Deborah, interested in journalism, went to Algonquin College. Upon graduation in 1971, encouraged by her Aunt Elsie to go to Europe and "get it out of your system," Deborah marshalled Friends in the course to go along. The power of that visit stayed with her. She returned repeatedly, often with those Friends, to Provence and Tuscany.
After the first trip, she headed to the West Kootenays. Drawn to the beauty of British Columbia, yet also back to her childhood city, she shaped a career in Vancouver and Ottawa, maintaining apartments in both cities. These she filled with objets d'art: she was the one who searched for beauty and bought the best, the one who made every moment a celebration.
Always self-employed, Deborah was a prototypical "new age" worker. An e-mail read: "I try to recap her careers in my mind: journalist, food critic, teen drop-in-centre co-ordinator, children's bookstore owner, events promoter, media co-ordinator, video writer and producer." Underlying these choices were her curiosity, creativity and a commitment to challenge and change the world. A global villager, she worked for (to name a few): Canadian International Development Agency, Foreign Affairs, the Aga Khan Foundation. Personal travel took her all across Canada. No matter where she was, she nourished Friendships. As one e-mail stated: "There was that magical spark of Friendships among her Friends, many of whom moved in separate orbits around Deb and didn't know each other."
Her reach extended to the younger generation. When in Ottawa, she frequently had her two nieces over for sleepovers. The daughter of longtime Friends wrote "I knew I was on the right track to womanhood when Deborah was so taken with the colour of my lipstick, she directed us straight to the nearest drugstore and bought it." More recently, she had received a note praising a childhood drawing Deb had come across. "She wrote that I was unconcerned with neat printing and careful outlines, I was just caught up in creating and it showed. It is with the spirit of Deborah that I hope to continue to use bold colour to paint the experience of this life..."
In February, 2002, Deb was diagnosed with cancer. Determined to defeat the disease, family and Friends encouraged and assisted her. Six years earlier, she had met Paul WALSKE, who became the love of her life. "In the beginning it was probably the sound of her laugh... we all know that sound. I think I knew at the very start that I could love her just for that alone." In January of this year, they married in her hospital room decorated with giant peach-coloured roses Paul had bought.
As someone wrote: "In the end, family and Friends are everything. Family can be Friends and Friends can be family." No one exemplified this more than Deb.
Blaine is Deborah FLETCHER's friend.

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MARCHANT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
MARCHANT, Douglas Macleod
Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, 69 years ago and died on July 20th, 2003, while holidaying at Mermaid Beach, Queensland, Australia. For 35 years a loving husband and friend of Juleen, wonderful father and father-in-law of Warwick (Toronto) and Ainslie and James AITKEN (London, England,) proud son-in-law of Jean HUMPHRIES (Brisbane, Australia.) Loved younger brother of Canon Iain MARCHANT, Colonel Kenneth MARCHANT and Anne PATERSON and their families in England and Scotland. Doug was a special and energetic man, who radiated life and inner strength. He was always there for his family and gave his enthusiastic support in all their endeavours. After 40 years living and working around the world with Bata International, Doug's passion for life, be it in work or in retirement, was an inspiration to all who knew him. He was a champion golfer, a skier, windsurfer, sailor, tennis and squash player, surfboarder, motorcycle enthusiast and Bridge player. With his love of nature, sports, music and reading there were never enough hours in each day. He will be greatly missed and forever in our hearts. A funeral service and cremation took place in Brisbane on July 25th, 2003. A Memorial Service will be held at 3: 30 p.m. on Thursday October 9th at Kingsway Lambton United Church, The Kingsway and Prince Edward Drive in Etobicoke, with a reception following. Doug's final resting place will be in the hills of Scotland. With interests in a number of organizations, Doug was also on the Board of the Bethany Hills School. If desired, donations may be made to the Douglas M. Marchant Endowment Fund, to benefit the students through an academic scholarship, at the Bethany Hills School, P.O. Box 10, Bethany, Ontario. L0A 1A0. Phone (705)-277-2866. www.bethanyhills.on.ca

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MARCYNIUK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-18 published
DUNCANSON, Andrew Austin (1914-2003)
Died in Toronto, on Saturday, February 15, 2003, after a courageous battle with heart and kidney disease. Andrew was predeceased by his beloved wife of 56 years, Harryette Coulson DUNCANSON (1917-1995). He is survived by his loving family, which include his brother and sister John William DUNCANSON and Anne Colhoun MORRISON; his children Daphne Duncanson HOOD and Andrew Coulson DUNCANSON; his grandchildren Signy Freyseng MARCYNIUK, Adam Duncanson FREYSENG, Caitlin Ruth DUNCANSON and Andrew Noble DUNCANSON. Andrew was a soldier with the Royal Regiment of Canada during World War 2, serving in Iceland, England and Burma. He retired from service after the war with the rank of Major and earned the Burma Star for his efforts. His distinguished business career took him through the ranks of Unilever and he finished his career as Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Thomas J. Lipton & Co. Andrew was a Knight of the Order of St. Lazarus and had the privilege of being their Grand Prior for the period of 1987-1992. His latter life was devoted to his many charitable endeavors, his family and Friends. He will be remembered for his kindness and generosity. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 6-9 p.m. on Thursday, February 20th. The Funeral Service will be held at the Chapel of St. James-The-Less, 635 Parliament Street, on Friday, February 21st at 3 o'clock. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Order of St. Lazarus, 39 McArthur Avenue, Ottawa K1L 8L7, would be appreciated. 'The character of a man is his principles drawn out and woven into himself.'

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MARGOLIAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-22 published
Champ didn't tell his mother
Toronto fighter was talked into boxing by his brothers during the Thirties as a way to make more money
By Barbara SILVERSTEIN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, March 22, 2003 - Page F11
When Leon SLAN became Canada's champion heavyweight boxer, he didn't tell his mother. She disapproved of the sport, so he kept the news to himself -- though not for long. Mr. SLAN, who died last month at the age of 86, had for years fought under another name and managed to escape his mother's wrath until 1936, when he won the national amateur title and the irresistibility of fame upset his comfortable obscurity.
The modest Mr. SLAN went on to become a successful Toronto businessman who had so allowed boxing to settle into his past that in 1986 most of his Friends were surprised when he was inducted into the Canadian Boxing Hall of Fame. It astonished everyone that the man they knew as the co-owner of a luggage-making company was known in boxing circles as Lennie STEIN, holder of the Canadian amateur heavyweight title from 1935 to 1937.
A quiet and unassuming giant of a man, his wife described him as invariably soft-spoken. "I never heard him raise his voice once in all the years we were married, Isabel SLAN said.
By all accounts, Mr. SLAN's mild demeanour belied his prowess in the ring, said his son, Jon SLAN. " For a man who was a champion at a blood sport, he was the gentlest person you ever met."
Born in Winnipeg to Russian immigrants on June 28, 1916, Mr. SLAN was the second of three sons. In 1922, the family moved to the Annex area of Toronto where he attended Harbord Collegiate Institute. His father, Joseph SLAN, was a struggling tailor with interesting ideas about the garment industry. In 1931, he headed a co-operative called Work-Togs Limited. It consisted of a small band of tailors who were to share in the profits. The project suffered from poor timing: It came on the scene at the height of the Depression and failed dismally.
In 1934, Joseph SLAN died in poverty and Leon and his two brothers Bob, who was born in 1914, and Jack, born in 1918 -- had to provide for their mother. Bringing home meagre paycheques from what little work they could find, the three decided to find a supplement.
At the time, boxing was a popular spectator sport and one of the few that was open to Jewish athletes. Bob and Jack knew that a good fighter could earn a decent living in the ring. Their eyes fell on Leon. At 17, their 6-foot-2, 200-pound, athletic brother towered over most grown men.
"Leon was big and strong and Bob and Jack thought he should be boxing, Mrs. SLAN said. "The family needed the money."
They persuaded him to give it a try and promised their support, she said. "They took him to over the gym. There they were, the three boys walking down the street arm-in-arm with Leon in the middle. They all walked over together to sign Leon up."
They didn't consult their mother. In fact, the brothers decided to enter the fight name Lennie STEIN, so she wouldn't read about Leon in the papers and worry.
As it turned out, the new Lennie STEIN was a natural. Mr. SLAN won his first major fight in a Round 1 knockout over the Toronto Golden Gloves title holder. " STEIN is durable and exceptionally fast for a heavyweight, " The Toronto Star reported in 1935. "He has the ability to rain punishment on his opponents with both hands."
In this way, he won almost all of his major fights. It helped, too, that his coach happened to be Maxie KADIN, a legend in Ontario boxing. Out of 40 bouts, Mr. SLAN netted 34 wins, 22 by knockout, and six losses.
A fighter who possessed a dogged and implacable manner, he was popular with the fans.
"He was known for not staying down on the canvas, Jon SLAN said. "On those rare times when he was decked, he always refused the referee's outstretched hand and picked himself up."
Yet, for all his success, Mr. SLAN rejected the opportunity to go fully professional. A manager and promoter from New York had seen him in a bout with a certain German boxer and saw possibilities.
"He wanted to promote him as the Great White Jewish Hope, " Jon said.
The German boxer happened to be the brother of Max SCHMELING, the Aryan protégé of Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich, who in 1936 had defeated the otherwise invincible Joe LOUIS in the upset of the century. To make it even more interesting, the manager proved to be the famous John BUCKLEY, who called the shots for Jack SHARKEY, a heavyweight who had beaten SCHMELING four years earlier.
"The promoter got so interested in this meeting of German and Jew that he offered my father a contract, but he didn't offer enough money, " Jon said.
The problem, it turned out, was that Mr. SLAN couldn't afford to turn professional, he once told a Globe and Mail reporter. "I was making good money then, $25 a week, and I was supporting my mother, " he said in 1988. "I asked him [Buckley] to put up $5,000 [and] he just laughed at me. He said he had hundreds of heavyweights."
Negotiations ended right there. "He was [only] interested in me because I was Jewish and that would go over big in New York."
It wasn't the only time that race emerged as an issue. Mr. SLAN had boxed under the auspices of the Young Men's Hebrew Association until 1936 when it was blackballed by the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada for withholding a portion of its proceeds. The money was earmarked for the Canadian Olympic effort, but the Young Men's Hebrew Association had refused to support the upcoming 1936 Berlin Games because of Germany's poor treatment of Jews. In the end, the Amateur Athletic Union permitted Mr. SLAN to enter as an independent and he went on to fight unattached to win the Toronto and national titles.
"It seemed so easy at the time, " he said in 1988. "I was a very quiet kid, but when I won, I became such a hero."
That glory turned out to be the undoing of Lennie STEIN, the fighter -- though it was all something of an anticlimax. The one thing Leon SLAN had feared on his way up through the ranks came to nothing: his mother finally found out that he boxed and then failed to react -- at least, not that anyone in the family can remember.
"She just took it in her stride, said Isabel SLAN. " She was a Jewish mother from the old country. I don't think she really understood what boxing was all about."
Perhaps, too, it helped to smooth matters that her son's secret endeavours had ended in triumph. She can only have felt a mother's pride.
In 1937, Mr. SLAN retired from boxing and found a job at a produce stall in Toronto's old fruit terminal on Colborne Street and was later hired by his brother Bob, a proprietor of Dominion Citrus Ltd. It was tough work with long hours, Mrs. SLAN said. "Leon would have to get up at 2 o'clock in the morning to go unload the fruits and vegetables off the trucks."
Even so, he still had some time for boxing. After working long days at the market, he taught athletics at the Young Men's Hebrew Association and it was there that he met Isabel MARGOLIAN. A concert pianist newly arrived from Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, she happened to take one of his boxing classes for women.
"We were all lined up in a row, punching bags, " she remembered. "Leon came up to me and told me I wasn't punching hard enough. Then he took my hand and hit it into the bag to show me how to do it. I felt my bones crunch, but I didn't say anything."
As it turned out, he had broken her hand. When he learned what had happened, he phoned her and thus began a different relationship. They married in 1942 and later that year Mr. SLAN enlisted in the army where he ended up in the Queen's Own Rifles. While in the army, he returned to boxing and won the 1942 Canadian Army heavyweight title.
After the war, the SLAN brothers founded Dominion Luggage in Toronto's garment district, a company that started small with eight workers and grew into a successful enterprise employing 200. Each brother had a different responsibility -- Jack was the designer, Bob took care of the administration and Leon was the salesman.
"It was a job that really suited him, Mrs. SLAN said. "He was very personable [and] sold to Eaton's, Simpsons, Air Canada -- all the big companies. He became good Friends with many of the buyers."
The three brothers enjoyed a comfortable relationship built on affection and loyalty, Jon said.
"Bob liked to fish, so he took Thursdays and Fridays off to go to his cottage. My father took Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoons off to golf."
Jack, the creative force among them, rarely left the business but never begrudged his brothers their leisure time.
"They had the perfect partnership, " said Jon, a relationship anchored by their mother. "They were her surrogate husbands. I don't think there was a SLAN wife who felt that she wasn't playing second fiddle to my grandmother."
The brothers went to her house every day for lunch until she was 90. "She made old-time Jewish food. Her definition of borscht was sour cream with a touch of beets, " Jon said. "She cooked with chicken fat and the boys loved it."
Sophie SLAN died in 1984 at the age of 93.
In 1972, the SLANs sold Dominion Luggage to Warrington Products, a large conglomerate. "Warrington made them an offer they couldn't turn down, " Isabel said.
Even so, the brothers' relationship continued into retirement. "They called each other every day, even when their health was failing, " Jon said. "Bob died in 2000 and Jack in 2002. My father took their deaths very hard."
Although he never boxed again, Mr. SLAN played sports well into his 70s and could still show his mettle. He had taken up tennis at about the age of 40 and, when he couldn't get a membership at the exclusive Toronto Lawn Tennis Club in Rosedale, he co-founded the York Racquets Tennis Club. It opened in 1964, directly across the street from the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club.
Mr. SLAN died of heart failure in Toronto on February 11. He leaves his wife Isabel, son Jon and daughters Elynne GOLDKIND and Anna RISEN.

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MARIEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-15 published
GENDRON, Jacqueline (Jackie)
Jacqueline GENDRON (née COOPER) was born 18 September 1909, Toronto and died peacefully at Avalon Nursing Home, Orangeville, Ontario on Thursday, 13 February 2003 in her 94th year. She was predeceased by her husband 'Vince' and son Jim, her sisters Blanche PITMAN and Glad GILLEN, brother Jim COOPER and recently her daughter-in-law Margaret (Mrs. Michael GENDRON). She is survived by her sons Peter (Judy), Owen Sound and Michael, Brockville; grandchildren Greg, Steven, Mark (Shaune) and Andrea (Anthony); sisters Audrey IRWIN and Alma WILLIAMS (Al;) sister-in-law Barb COOPER; many nieces and nephews and several close Friends. Jackie lived life her way. She was a responsible stay at home wife and mother, roles of which she was proud. She was a good mom. She loved New Year's parties with Friends, played golf, curled, skied, volunteered and travelled in Europe, East Asia and Africa into her 80's. Her Friends meant a great deal to her. She will be remembered for her flair and skill in cooking, carpentry, ceramics, wood carving, sewing, millinery and home decorating. Jackie was awarded a life membership in the Lord Dufferin Chapter of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire after 35 years of dedicated service. She was a member of Westminster United Church. At Jackie's request she was cremated and a memorial service, for immediate family, will be held during the summer, followed by burial in the family plot at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Orangeville. Special thanks to the staff of both Lord Dufferin Centre and Avalon Nursing Home, Dr. MARIEN and Dr. VEENMAN. Your care and sensitivity were much appreciated. Arrangements by Egan Funeral Home Baxter and Giles Chapel, 273 Broadway, Orangeville L9W 1K8 (519-941-2630).

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MARION o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-03 published
Charles "Rodney" SALLOWS
In loving memory of Charles "Rodney" SALLOWS at his residence in Tehkummah on Thursday, August 14, 2003 at the age of 55 years.
Loving husband of Dianne SALLOWS. Cherished son of Rene and Charlie (predeceased) SALLOWS. Will be missed by siblings, Sharon (Carl) WOODS, Karen (Ollie) RIPLEY, Jamie (Shirley) SALLOWS, Heather (Robert) MARION, Holly SALLOWS, Cindy SALLOWS, Shane SALLOWS. Remembered by many nieces and nephews. Will be missed also by cousins of the CRONIN Family in Sudbury. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home

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MARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-18 published
William Turner CROWE
By Danielle BOCHOVE Wednesday, June 18, 2003 - Page A24
Father, grandfather, husband and friend. Born September 16, 1911, in Toronto. Died May 24, 2003, in Toronto of pneumonia, aged If life were fair, its length would be a function of how well it was lived. For William Turner CROWE, 91 years was not nearly long enough. He embodied the claim that age is a state of mind. Family often joked that he was "just a big kid," but it was true. Throughout his life, he somehow managed to hold on to the very best qualities of childhood. A clear-eyed enthusiasm for the world, the expectation that each day would hold something to enjoy, the drive to learn anything: astronomy, history, Formula One trivia, mechanics, archeology, snooker.
I remember him commenting, as an old man, on the colour of a stone: how smooth it was, and flat, before skipping it across the water with a fluid vigour. Tobogganing one perfect Christmas Day - he was in his 80s -- he took on a giant. When the toboggan finally flipped, three-quarters of the way down, he was briefly airborne before landing in a heap of laughter and powder. Later, while the younger riders moaned over their aches, he crowed that he hadn't had so much fun in such a long time.
His life seemed to have a disproportionate amount of fun -- and yet it wasn't easy. The Depression and the Second World War were among its defining events. His mother, accepting the threat of disinheritance, had severed all ties with England by marrying a pub owner and moving to Canada. Money was tight. My grandfather remembered spending days staring through a shop window as a boy at a model train he could never afford. Perhaps that's why, as an adult, he sought out chances to fill the needs of children. Money was given to all of us for university, college and first houses.
My grandmother told me another story recently about a lunch with my grandfather just a few years ago. At a nearby table some young men were laughing and joking and he watched them with pleasure, commenting that they seemed like "such nice boys." When it came time to leave, he quietly paid for their meal and left the restaurant before they could find out. A small gesture, but typical of hundreds delivered over 91 years with a generosity of spirit unmatched by anyone except his wife.
His marriage to Edith Dorothy MARK was the most important event of his life. He would pick her up for dates on a motorcycle, much to the shock of the neighbours, but was always a gentleman. He proposed on a ski hill one frosty evening; she says she couldn't wait to get inside to see the ring. In 63 years of marriage, no one ever saw them treat each other with anything but tenderness and respect; each always put the other first.
He was born in Toronto and lived there his entire life. His elder brother Clifford married my grandmother's sister Jo and the four of them were inseparable, traveling together often after their children were grown. A "methods man," he was forced into early retirement -- a blow his family feared would kill him -- but rallied back, focusing his skills on rearranging my grandmother's kitchen for optimum efficiency, along with most of the other systems in the house. At the age of 72 he underwent a triple bypass and amazed the doctors with his determination to recover. I still remember trotting beside him on his daily walk; he could do five kilometres in under an hour. The surgery bought him almost 20 more precious years.
I can say unequivocally that he is the most extraordinary man I've ever known. To have lived 91 years, fully. Participating, giving, with an enthusiasm and crackling curiosity that defied even Alzheimer's until the end. When memory failed, he still commented on his great-granddaughter's blue eyes. In the end, William was extraordinary in the example he set of how an ordinary man can live.
Danielle BOCHOVE is William CROWE's granddaughter.

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MARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-11 published
The crash of a Canadian hero
Lest we forget, Roy MacGREGOR traces the spectacular feats and the sad fall of a flying ace
By Roy MacGREGOR, Tuesday, November 11, 2003 - Page A1
Ottawa -- Here is as good a place as any to lay a small poppy on Remembrance Day.
It is nothing but a concrete dock ramp on the Ontario shore of the Ottawa River, not far downstream from the Parliament Buildings.
There is nothing here to say what happened that cold March day back in 1930, and on this, a fine brisk morning in November, 73 years later, there is only a lone biker, a man walking two setters along the path that twists along this quiet spot, and a small, single-engine airplane revving in the background as it prepares to take off from the little Rockcliffe airstrip.
Seventy-three years ago, another small plane took off from this airfield, turned sharply over the distant trees, flew low and full-throttle over the runway and went into a steep climb that eventually cut out the engine and sent the new Fairchild twisting toward this spot -- instantly killing Canada's most-decorated war hero.
Will BARKER, 35, of Dauphin, Manitoba
Perhaps you've heard of him. Likely not. He is, in some ways, the test case for Lest We Forget.
Lieutenant-Colonel William George BARKER won the Victoria Cross for what many believe was the greatest dogfight of the First World War.
He was alone in his Sopwith Snipe over Bois de Marmal, France, on October 27, 1918, when he was attacked, official reports say, by 60 enemy aircraft -- Mr. BARKER, who rarely talked of his war experience, always said 15 -- and he shot down three before passing out from devastating wounds to both legs and his arm, only to come to again in mid-air, turn on the fighter intending to put an end to him and bring down a fourth before he himself crash-landed in full view of astonished British troops, who were even more amazed when they got to the plane and found him still alive, if barely.
The four that one day took Mr. BARKER's list to 50 downed aircraft. He returned to Canada as Lt.-Col. William George BARKER, V.C., D.S.O. and enough other medals to lay claim to being Canada's most honoured combatant -- if he'd ever cared to do so. As British Air Chief Marshal Sir Philip JOUBERT wrote, "Of all the flyers of the two World Wars, none was greater than BARKER."
He came home and went into the aviation business with another Canadian Victoria Cross winner, Billy BISHOP. He married Mr. BISHOP's wealthy cousin, Jean SMITH, and had a miserable next dozen years. The business failed, the marriage teetered, he suffered depression and terrible pain from his injuries, and the previous non-drinker soon became a drinker.
It seemed life was taking a turn for the better in January of 1930 when Fairchild hired him to help sell planes to the Canadian government. A test pilot had been sent to show off the plane at Rockcliffe, but the veteran fighter unfortunately insisted on taking it up himself for a run.
Some say he committed suicide here; some say he was showing off for an 18-year-old daughter of another Rockcliffe pilot; his biographer believes he was just being too aggressive with a new, unknown machine and "screwed up."
They held the funeral in Toronto, with a cortege two miles long, 2,000 uniformed men, honour guards from four countries and 50,000 people lining the streets. As they carried the coffin into Mount Pleasant Cemetery, six biplanes swooped down, sprinkling rose petals over the crowd.
"His name," Sir Arthur CURRIE announced, "will live forever in the annals of the country which he served so nobly."
His name, alas, is not even on the crypt -- only " SMITH," his wife's snobbish family who never really accepted the rough-hewn outsider from Manitoba.
Somehow, he became all but forgotten. Though Mr. BISHOP called Mr. BARKER "the deadliest air fighter that ever lived," it is Mr. BISHOP who lives on in the public imagination. Often, if Mr. BARKER is mentioned at all, "Billy" BARKER, as he was known to his air colleagues, is confused with "Billy" BISHOP.
A request for a government plaque to commemorate his Manitoba birthplace was rejected the first time, but there is now some small recognition thanks in large part to the work of Inky MARK, the Member of Parliament for Dauphin-Swan Lake and the excellent military biography, BARKER VC, produced a few years back by Wayne RALPH.
Mr. RALPH, a Newfoundlander now living in White Rock, British Columbia, thinks Mr. BARKER was simply too much "the warrior" for the Canadian appetite.
"He was an international superstar," says Mr. RALPH. " BARKER had all the traits of the great Hollywood heroes. He was disobedient, gregarious, flamboyant. He was a frontier kid, a classical figure in the American style of hero. Born in a log cabin, went on to fame and fortune, and died tragically at 35.
"Now he is basically buried in anonymity. To me, it's the perfect metaphor for Canada, where we bury our past."
Today, though, even if it is only a poppy dropped at the end of a concrete boat ramp, we will remember.

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MARLOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-24 published
GAUL, Kevin Joseph
A native son of Australia who embraced Canada as his home at the age of 23, died in Toronto on November 20, 2003, surrounded by his wife, Madeleine, and his children Alison and Philip. Kevin's life was centred in his family, his Friends, his church and his community. His support to his community was life-long. It ranged from his service in the Reserve Army in the Royal Canadian Ordinance Corps component of the Toronto Service Battalion and his leadership of the Metro Toronto Housing Authority to his countless hours of charitable work, in roles such as Director and President of the Credit Counseling Service of Toronto, and a key facilitator of the Employment Resources Group, an outreach project of the Anglican Church. In addition, he consulted on housing and education extensively throughout the Caribbean, an area that was dear to his heart. Twenty- five years ago, when Kevin's illness was first diagnosed, he was expected to live only a few years. However, his love of life and commitment to the people, causes, and things he loved gave him the strength to exceed all expectations. Until almost the end, few understood the severity of his illness, so strong and relentless was his pursuit of life. Dr. Michael BAKER was with Kevin from the initial diagnosis until the last minutes of his life. The family gives their heartfelt thanks for the last 25 years to Michael and his team, and to the Transfusion team at the Princess Margaret Hospital. They also thank Dr. Marcella MESENSKY, our family physician and friend, the Toronto East General Hospital, 2 special paramedics and a compassionate Emergency team at Mount Sinai. Predeceased by his parents, John and Theresa Clair GAUL, Kevin leaves a part of himself in the hearts and minds of all who knew him, especially his beloved family, Madeleine, Alison and Philip, his brothers Tony, Greg (Carol), Brian (Anne) GAUL, his sister-in-law, Judy (Mike) MARLOW, and his uncles, aunts, nieces, nephews, and cousins and Friends here, in Australia, the United Kingdom Fenelon Falls and Coboconk. Visitation will be at Heritage Funeral Centre, 50 Overlea Blvd. (416-423-1000) on Thursday, November 27th from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service on Friday November 28th at 11: 00 a.m. at St. Columba and All Hallows Anglican Church, 2723 St. Clair Ave East. In lieu of flowers, donations may sent to the Princess Margaret Hospital Leukemia Research Fund or to St. Columba and All Hallows Anglican Church, Toronto.
''And now we see as through a glass darkly, but then we shall see face to face.''

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MARQUETTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-09 published
Last fighter pilot of the Great War
Canadian aviator, a bankteller in peacetime, was 'just doing his duty'
By Allison LAWLOR Thursday, January 9, 2003, Page R7
Henry BOTTERELL, the last of the fighter pilots that fought in the First World War, has died in Toronto. He was 106.
Mr. BOTTERELL, who up until in his late 90s was swimming almost every day, died peacefully at the Sunnybrook Veterans Hospital, now part of Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, on Friday, less than two months after celebrating his 106th birthday.
One of 16 surviving Canadian veterans of the First World War profiled in a Globe and Mail series in November, Henry BOTTERELL was believed to be the last fighter pilot from the 1914-1918 conflict, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Mr. BOTTERELL declined to take part in the series of interviews, but at a special air-force celebration four years earlier he recalled his days as a fighter pilot.
"I had good hands," he said then. "I didn't have the fighting acumen of some, like Billy BISHOP. I was just a bank clerk. I wasn't one of the very best, but I had my share of action."
On August 29, 1918, Flight Lieutenant BOTTERELL flew his Sopwith Camel over Vitry, France. After dropping four bombs on a railway station, he was heading back to his airfield when he encountered a German observation balloon. He fired 400 rounds into the balloon with his aircraft machine gun.
With the balloon ablaze, the soldier leaped from the basket and opened his parachute. As the flaming remains of the balloon fell to the ground, Mr. BOTTERELL had enough time to swing around and shoot his enemy, but didn't. Instead, he snapped him a chivalrous salute before heading back to base. The moment was captured by aviation artist Robert TAILOR/TAYLOR, in his painting Balloon Buster.
"He was an adventurer," said Jon STRAW, a friend and former director of the Great War Flying Museum in Brampton, Ontario Mr. STRAW is also working on a book on Canadian pilots who served in the First World War with Allan SNOWIE, a retired naval aviator who is now a pilot with Air Canada.
Like many of the veterans from the First World War, Mr. BOTTERELL didn't consider his war efforts to be heroic.
"He didn't think it was any big deal, he thought he was just doing his duty," Mr. STRAW said.
In 1916, Mr. BOTTERELL was working for the Bank of North America (now the Bank of Montreal) when his older brother Edward, who played football for the Toronto Argonauts, was killed overseas by a sniper. A few months later, Henry, then 20, enlisted with the Royal Naval Air Service and was sent to England to train as a fighter pilot.
His sister, Edith, who worked as a secretary for an admiral at the time, had helped him get what she thought would be a safer assignment in the war. But that didn't prove to be true. At one point in the war, new pilots had a life expectancy of three weeks.
Mr. BOTTERELL's flying career got off to a difficult start. Engine failure caused him to crash on only his second takeoff in September, 1917, at Dunkirk, France. He suffered head injuries, a fractured leg, and broken teeth and spent six months in hospital. He was eventually demobilized as disabled and discharged. But he later re-enlisted and qualified as a fighter pilot again and returned to France in early 1918.
His flight log reveals that he was attached to the 208th Squadron serving in France from May 11 to November 27, 1918. His records show that during that time, he flew patrols and fought over places including Serny, Estrées and Arras. He then transferred to Belgium, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Wing Commander Neil MEADOWS, the commanding officer of Royal Air Force 208 Squadron, said in his condolences to Mr. BOTTERELL's family that Henry "remains, an inspiration to our trainee pilots. I do feel that we have lost a tangible part of what we are, and what we aspire to be.
"Undoubtedly, he did not view his actions as out of the ordinary, but his courage and dedication to duty are an example that I hope our trainees will emulate in their own flying careers," he wrote on behalf of the squadron. "I am sure, therefore, that his spirit will live on with the young pilots that continue to serve on 208 Squadron."
During his war service, Mr. BOTTERELL flew a variety of planes, but the Camel, which got its name from the hump created by two machine guns imbedded under its cowling, was his favourite. He had one particular close call, when on a flight a bullet ripped through his ear and smashed his goggles.
"I went out like a light for a few minutes, and I recovered just before I crashed," he once said.
Henry John Lawrence BOTTERELL was born in 1896 in Ottawa to Henry and Annie BOTTERELL. His mother raised him after his father died of pneumonia when Henry was a young boy. Henry attended Lisgar Collegiate Institute in Ottawa. An athletic young man, he played football like his older brother and remained physically active throughout his life.
"He was a loner," said his son Edward BOTTERELL, adding that his father enjoyed sports he would do alone such as swimming, cross-country skiing and sailing. In 1919, he returned to Canada and to banking as an assistant chief accountant. He remained with the Bank of Montreal until his retirement in the 1960s. As a souvenir from the war he brought back a Belgian fence post that had snagged the wing of his Camel on a low-level flights. It is now in the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.
In 1929 he married and moved with his wife Maud to Montreal. They raised two children before his wife died in 1983 after suffering several strokes. During the Second World War, Mr. BOTTERELL commanded an Air Cadet Squadron, in Quebec, though he himself never took to the air. After returning home in 1919, he gave up flying.
In 1999, Mr. BOTTERELL was the guest of honour at a mess dinner commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Royal Canadian Air Force. That same year he celebrated his own 102nd birthday at a hotel in Lille, France, where he and other Canadian veterans were marking the 80th anniversary of the end of the War.
Despite his failing memory, his son Edward said his father was "moved by the experience."
Mr. BOTTERELL is survived by daughter Frances MARQUETTE of Houston, Texas, and son Edward BOTTERELL of Mississauga, Ontario
Henry BOTTERELL, aviator and banker; born in Ottawa on November 7, 1896, died in Toronto on January 3, 2003.

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MARQUEZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-01 published
HURLEY, Dr. David Richard
Died peacefully, in London, Ontario with his family, on Friday, October 31, 2003, after a long and courageous battle. Loved father of Alison and her fiancé Steve BOURNE. Much loved son of Tena and the late Ed HURLEY. Loving partner of Divina Devera MARQUEZ. Survived by his brother John and family. Fondly remembered by his many Friends, colleagues and patients. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (South of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday, November 4th. A service to celebrate David's life will be held in the chapel on Wednesday, November 5th at one o'clock. If desired, memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, 20 Holly Street, Suite 101, Toronto M4S 3B1, or the London Regional Cancer Centre, 790 Commissioners Road East, London N6A 4L6, would be appreciated.

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MARR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-07 published
Desire impressed scout
By Tim WHARNSBY Tuesday, October 7, 2003 - Page S11
Toronto -- Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER had a twinkle in his eye and an eye for beating the odds. Nobody knew this better than Atlanta Thrashers scout Dan MARR, who took a chance on Snyder.
The first time MARR sat down to have breakfast with SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER at the Boot and Blade Dining Lounge in Owen Sound, Ontario, seven years ago, the initial impression SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER made was good enough.
"Snydes had this twinkle in his eye that said he was going to get there no matter what the odds were," MARR recalled yesterday, a day after the 25-year-old hockey player died of fatal injuries suffered in a car accident with teammate Dany Heatley last week.
The odds were stacked against SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER making it to the National Hockey League. He was a scrawny teenager. He didn't possess a grand scoring touch. He lacked the impressive speed that smaller players need. But MARR couldn't cross SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER off his list of prospects.
"When you watch a game as a scout, you look at the basics," MARR said from his Toronto home yesterday. "You look at skating ability, size and strength. Dan didn't score high in the basics. But then you make a list of the best players on each team and he was the best player on his junior team [the Owen Sound Platers]."
MARR, who was a Toronto Maple Leafs scout at the time, simply used common sense and invited SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER to the Leafs' rookie camp in 1998. When SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER wasn't offered a contract, he returned to Owen Sound for a fourth season.
MARR, who joined the expansion Thrashers a few weeks later, told SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER not to give up. MARR wanted SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER for the Thrashers.
"I know this sort of thing is said all the time, but you wish some of the players you see with more talent had the heart, courage and determination of Dan SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER," MARR said. "He played like his personality. He was an honest performer, whose work ethic and attitude were infectious.
"Everything you saw with this guy is that he gave it his all. That's why a superstar like Dany HEATLEY took him in as a roommate last summer and the two trained together...... He fit in everywhere."

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MARSH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
BARR, The Honourable Mr. Justice John Roderick (Rod), Q.C., L.L.D.
Born in Toronto on September 9, 1921, died in St. Catharines, Ontario May 30, 2003. Devoted and loving husband to the late Rhoda Marshall BARR. Predeceased by infant daughter Jane. Dearly loved by his son Peter, daughter Elizabeth and their spouses, Sharon BRODERICK and Stephen PERRY. Adoring grandfather to John BARR and Nicholas, James and Christopher PERRY. Brother and great friend of his sisters, Margaret RHAMEY and the late Isabelle MARSH. As dear as a brother to sisters-in-law, Helen CAUGHEY and Nellie MARSHALL.
Rod was grateful for a full and happy life. He grew up in Hamilton, Ontario and enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force at the outset of World War 2. Rod first served as a Flight Instructor in Trenton, Ontario, where he met his future wife Nursing Sister Rhoda MARSHALL. Obtaining the rank of Flight Lieutenant, he served in 426 Squadron as a pilot with Bomber Command at Linton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire.
At the end of the war, Rod studied law at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto and was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1948. At that time, he and Rhoda established their home in St. Catharines where he enjoyed many years practicing civil litigation and where as a trial lawyer he earned the respect of his colleagues. Rod served as a Bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada and was a member of the American College of Trial Lawyers and the Advocates Society. He was appointed to the Supreme Court of Ontario, Trial Division in 1983.
Rod received an Honourary Doctorate of Laws from Brock University. He was an active member of the St. Catharines Flying Club and proud member of the St. Catharines Rowing Club. He took up sculling at the age of 52 and participated in Masters Rowing in Canada and the United States.
He supported a large range of charities. No one less fortunate was ever turned away. Rod's insight and kindness was matched only by his wonderful, inimitable sense of humour. Above all, he loved and was loved by his family.
The family is deeply grateful to Dr. R. MacKETT, Dr. F. MacKAY, Dr. J. WRIGHT, Dr. FERNANDES and Dr. W. GOLDBERG, and to gentle caregivers Virgie PEREZ, Marylou and Risa.
''Pray for me, and I will for thee,
that we may merrily meet in heaven.''
The family will receive Friends at the Hulse and English Funeral Home, 75 Church Street, St. Catharines, on Sunday, June 1, from 7-9 p.m. and Monday, June 2, from 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held at Knox Presbyterian Church, 51 Church Street, St. Catharines, on Tuesday, June 3, 2003 at 11 a.m. A service will also be held in St. Paul's Presbyterian Church, Amherst Island, on Wednesday, June 4, 2003, at 3 p.m. Interment to follow.
Donations may be made in Rod's memory to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Knox Presbyterian Church.

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MARSH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
ROBSON, Mary Virginia (née SKILLING)
On June 27, 2003, died from natural causes at age 73. She is survived by her husband of 49 years, James Thomas, her children David and Marianne of St. Albert (Edmonton), Mark of Toronto, Andrew and Jackie MARSH of Mississauga, Marthanne and Bruce GORDON of Owen Sound, Jennifer and Reidar TRONNES of Reykjavik, and 11 grandchildren. Visitation at Fawcett Funeral Home - Collingwood Chapel, 82 Pine Street at Second Street, Collingwood, on Sunday, June 29, 2003 from 2-4 in the afternoon. Funeral Mass at St. Mary's Church, 63 Elgin Street at Ontario Street, on Monday, June 30 at 11: 30 a.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the General and Marine Hospital Foundation, John Howard Society or your favourite charity will be appreciated.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
Gerald (Jerry) Norbert LOOSEMORE, (C.D. with Bar)
The family announces with sorrow his passing on May 1, 2003 in his 64th year. He was born in Killarney to the late Norbert and Ruby (PATTERSON) LOOSEMORE and attended Saint John de Brebeuf School and Little Current High School prior to joining the Royal Canadian Signal Corps in 1959. After a 25 year career, he retired from the Canadian Armed Forces Communications Command with the rank of Master Warrant Officer and subsequently joined the Communications Security Establishment for an additional thirteen years during which he was instrumental in the modernization of the NORAD communications system. Jerry was made Scouter in 1978, a member of Royal Canadian Legion Branch #177, and he had an extensive repertoire of Newfoundland folk music. He returned to Manitoulin Island to pursue his interest in genealogy. He is survived by his wife, the former Evelyn PECK, his son Christopher (Gayelene,) and daughter Melissa (Donnie) CLARK. He will be dearly missed by his sister Patricia and brothers Peter (Vivian), Harold (Laurine), Michael (Ann), and James (Bernice). He will be lovingly remembered by his mother-in-law Erma PECK, sisters-in-law Phyllis MARSHALL, Beverly (Everett) MORPHET, and brothers-in-law Iliff (Jane) PECK and Warren (Gail) PECK. He is also survived by nieces, nephews, great nieces and great nephews. Jerry will be remembered by his family and Friends for his generosity, his storytelling, and his sense of humor. A memorial service celebrating his life will be officiated by Mr. D. J. LAROUCHE at the graveside at the St. Bernard's Catholic Cemetery, North Channel Drive, on Saturday, May 17, 2003 at 3 p.m. with Interment.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-21 published
Flora FERGUSON
In Loving Memory of Flora FERGUSON. Peacefully at Manitoulin Centennial Manor on Sunday May 18, 2003, age 94 years.
Beloved wife of John FERGUSON. Dear sister of Reta (husband William) BRAY of Hemet, California. Predeceased by siblings Wilbert (Olive) MOORE, Carmen MOORE, Violet McLENNAN (husband Bill,) Alvin MOORE, Myrtle MEREDITH, Charles MOORE. Remembered by sister-in-law Hilda MOORE. Predeceased by all her in-laws: Maine (husband William) MARSHALL, Rueben (wife Nell) FERGUSON, Floyd (wife Pearl) FERGUSON, William (wife Cecile) FERGUSON, Lena (husband Walter) MARSHALL. Loved by many nieces and nephews. Visitation 2-4 and 7-9 pm Tuesday, May 20 at Island Funeral Home. Funeral Service 2: 00 pm Wednesday, May 21, 2003. Burial Cold Springs Cemetery.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-25 published
Agnes Emma McCONAGHY
In loving memory of Agnes Emma McCONAGHY. Born December 1, 1925 in Pickeral, Ontario. Passed Away June 13, 2003 in North Bay, Ontario at the age of 77 years.
Agnes (MARSHALL) McCONAGHY is survived by her daughter Annette and grand_son Joedy, granddaughter Carol and partner, and many great grandchildren. Sister Rose (MARSHALL) and husband Joe OSHKABEWISENS of Wikwemikong and many nieces, nephews, cousins, and Friends dear to her heart. Predeceased by her husband Lloyd, son Wilfred, daughter Jeanetta, her parents Louis and Annie MARSHALL, and brothers Grant and Sonny.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Sidney William COX
In loving memory of Sidney William COX, on Saturday, September 6, 2003 at the Mindemoya Hospital at the age of 90.
Born in England in 1913. Beloved husband of the late Hollis (Nee MARSHALL) 1986. Loving father of Bill and friend Marilyn, Jack and wife Ruth Anne, Charlie and friend Norma, Anne and husband Frank HANER, Mary and husband Vance McGAULEY. Fondly remembered by 10 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren. Survived by one sister Frances BREATHAT. Predeceased by brother Arthur and sister Kathleen FERGUSON. Brother-in-law Charlie FERGUSON. Sister-in-law Mazie AELICK and Leona MARSHALL. Sadly missed by friend Mildred. Visitation was held on Monday, September 8, 2003. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, September 9, 2003 at Saint Francis of Assisi Anglican Church, Mindemoya, Ontario. Burial in Mindemoya Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-24 published
Charles Sidney FERGUSON
In loving memory of Charles Sidney FERGUSON on Saturday, September 20, 2003 at Mindemoya Hospital at the age of 76 years.
Born to William and Kathleen (née COX) FERGUSON on May 20, 1927. Beloved husband of the late Audis (née MARSHALL) 1991. Loving father of Sharleen and husband Ian VANHORN, Lori McLENNAN, all of Mindemoya. Special Poppa of Darryl VANHORN and friend Skye, Shannon and husband Marc DROUIN, Jessica McLENNAN. Cherished by great granddaughters Jamey and Taylor VANHORN. Fondly remembered by Susan LANKTREE- VANHORN. Will be missed by sisters, Monica and husband Jim CORRIGAN, Barbara and husband Caryl MOGGY, all of Mindemoya, brother William FERGUSON of M'Chigeeng and sisters-in-law Mazie AELICK and Leona MARSHALL. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, September 23, 2003 at St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church, Mindemoya.
Cremation with burial in Mindemoya Cemetery. Island Funeral Home.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
John Benjamen FERGUSON
In loving memory of John Benjamen FERGUSON who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Centennial Manor on Sunday, November 16, 2003 at the age of 97 years.
Predeceased by his beloved wife Flora (née MOORE) on May 18, 2003. Predeceased by all his brothers and sisters, Maime (husband William) MARSHALL, Reuben (wife Nell,) Floyd (wife Pearl,) William (wife Cecil,) Lena (husband Walter) MARSHALL. Brother-in-law to Reta (predeceased) and husband William BRAY, Charles MOORE (predeceased) and wife Hilda, William and wife Olive MOORE, Carmen MOORE, Violet and Bill McLENNAN, Alvin MOORE, Myrtle MEREDITH. Loved by many nieces and nephews.
Visitation was held on Tuesday, November 18, 2003. Funeral Service at 2: 00 p.m. Wednesday,
November 19, 2003 at Little Current United Church. Burial in Cold Springs Cemetery.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-26 published
Engelina Johanna (TRYSSENAAR) VELDHUYZEN
On Tuesday, November 4, 2003 at the Coleman Care Centre, Barrie, in her 93rd year.
Beloved wife of the late Benjamin, formerly of Corunna and Stayner. Loving mother of Hendrika VAN KOOTEN (Jerry) of Minesing, Benjamin (the late Elsie) of Evansville, Trudy MARSHALL (Bruce) of Bethany and Hendrik (Carol GOVER) of Pt. Claire. Dear sister of Laurens (Christina) of Listowel, Johanna BOS (John) of Elmira and the late Theodorus JACOBUS, Hendrika VAN DELFT and Pieter. Grandmother of Michele and Jerry VAN KOOTEN, Frederick, Allen, and Janet VELDHUYZEN, Krystina and Scott FIRTH. Great-grandmother of Angelina Nicole and Michael VAN KOOTEN. A Service to celebrate Engelina's life will be held on Saturday, November 29 at 1 p.m. in the Anten Mills Community Centre, 3985 Horseshoe Valley Road, Anten Mills. Arrangements and cremation entrusted to Peaceful Transition, Barrie.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-13 published
BIRD, Sheilah Hope (née MARSHALL)
died in Sydney, Australia on May 2nd 2003 after a short illness, leaving to mourn: loving husband, Howard; brothers, Spencer (Cayman) Bob (Toronto); sisters-in-law; nieces; nephews and a host of Friends.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
BARR, The Honourable Mr. Justice John Roderick (Rod), Q.C., L.L.D.
Born in Toronto on September 9, 1921, died in St. Catharines, Ontario May 30, 2003. Devoted and loving husband to the late Rhoda Marshall BARR. Predeceased by infant daughter Jane. Dearly loved by his son Peter, daughter Elizabeth and their spouses, Sharon BRODERICK and Stephen PERRY. Adoring grandfather to John BARR and Nicholas, James and Christopher PERRY. Brother and great friend of his sisters, Margaret RHAMEY and the late Isabelle MARSH. As dear as a brother to sisters-in-law, Helen CAUGHEY and Nellie MARSHALL.
Rod was grateful for a full and happy life. He grew up in Hamilton, Ontario and enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force at the outset of World War 2. Rod first served as a Flight Instructor in Trenton, Ontario, where he met his future wife Nursing Sister Rhoda MARSHALL. Obtaining the rank of Flight Lieutenant, he served in 426 Squadron as a pilot with Bomber Command at Linton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire.
At the end of the war, Rod studied law at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto and was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1948. At that time, he and Rhoda established their home in St. Catharines where he enjoyed many years practicing civil litigation and where as a trial lawyer he earned the respect of his colleagues. Rod served as a Bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada and was a member of the American College of Trial Lawyers and the Advocates Society. He was appointed to the Supreme Court of Ontario, Trial Division in 1983.
Rod received an Honourary Doctorate of Laws from Brock University. He was an active member of the St. Catharines Flying Club and proud member of the St. Catharines Rowing Club. He took up sculling at the age of 52 and participated in Masters Rowing in Canada and the United States.
He supported a large range of charities. No one less fortunate was ever turned away. Rod's insight and kindness was matched only by his wonderful, inimitable sense of humour. Above all, he loved and was loved by his family.
The family is deeply grateful to Dr. R. MacKETT, Dr. F. MacKAY, Dr. J. WRIGHT, Dr. FERNANDES and Dr. W. GOLDBERG, and to gentle caregivers Virgie PEREZ, Marylou and Risa.
''Pray for me, and I will for thee,
that we may merrily meet in heaven.''
The family will receive Friends at the Hulse and English Funeral Home, 75 Church Street, St. Catharines, on Sunday, June 1, from 7-9 p.m. and Monday, June 2, from 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held at Knox Presbyterian Church, 51 Church Street, St. Catharines, on Tuesday, June 3, 2003 at 11 a.m. A service will also be held in St. Paul's Presbyterian Church, Amherst Island, on Wednesday, June 4, 2003, at 3 p.m. Interment to follow.
Donations may be made in Rod's memory to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Knox Presbyterian Church.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-14 published
Doris MARSHALL
By Jamie SWIFT, Paul EPRILE, Monday, July 14, 2003 - Page A18
Jamie and Paul are Friends of Doris
Homemaker, teacher, writer, visionary. Born January 4, 1911, in Killarney, Manitoba Died January 15, in Toronto, of old age, aged 92.
When we first got to know Doris MARSHALL in the mid 1970s, we encountered everyone's grandmother. She served her famous biscuits and lemon tarts accompanied by tea in delicate porcelain cups. Perhaps it would be homemade oat-cakes and cheese with sherry. A minister's widow, she seemed to fit the little-old-lady stereotype right down to the tissue tucked under her well-ironed cuff.
But that wasn't all she kept up her sleeve. Doris had a passion for social justice. Anything showing old people in isolation or robbed of dignity made her shudder. Once the tea was poured, she would extract an item she had carefully clipped: it could be any news item hinting that old people are somehow a problem to be solved.
While preparing her 1987 book on aging, Doris maintained a unique filing system involving paper clips, hundreds of clippings, and handwritten notes inscribed on the clippings themselves, to save paper. Doris knew how to stretch what she had. She was the oldest of eight children from a Manitoba farm family. Because her mother preferred outdoor work, Doris began to cook for a family of 10 plus guests -- as a young teenager. Her work as a live-in housekeeper financed her studies at Winnipeg's United College, where she met George MARSHALL. Before marrying, she spent four years in Norway House, working at a residential school.
She realized that teaching sewing and music to aboriginal children left them ill-equipped for life in either white or native society. After a stint in The Pas as the "minister's wife," she settled in Winnipeg with her husband and three daughters: Brenda, Judith, and Mary. While doing community work, she helped organize Winnipeg's first Indian Friendship Centre.
Doris became a single mother with George's death in 1959. Her new parish job at Westminster United Church led to work with the neighbourhood old ones -- she abhorred the term "seniors." This be came her passion. She soon found herself at the United Church's Toronto head office, working in the field of aging.
Doris never saw herself as a gerontology specialist. One of the lessons she drew from her Norway House experience was the way in which native culture valued and cared for elders in the community. These lessons were reinforced in her travels to China, Ghana and Mozambique.
"We must discover new family and neighbourhood relationships," she would later write. "Helping one another and fighting together for just and fair treatment for all would be the rallying point for a different kind of extended family."
Doris found a new extended family in and around the Development Education Centre, where a community of younger people shared her vision. She proceeded to organize a group of elders. Then she wrote a book, Silver Threads: Critical Reflections on Growing Old.
She used her life as a prism through which the problems of aging are reflected. Her 1988 national promotion tour, under taken at age 78, took the book into a second edition. The tour included a visit to grand_son Jama's Grade 2 class as his "show-and-tell." He was the only one with a grandmother who was also an author.
Doris lived independently in her tidy Annex apartment, with its lace doilies and family keepsakes, until 1999. Her capacities diminished, her family knew that she did not want to enter long-term care. But she was, as usual, gracious in accepting what she could not change.
She once said that she agreed with physicist Ursula FRANKLIN's vision of the ideal society. It's like a potluck supper -- everyone brings something and everyone gets something. Doris brought the best she had. And she shared it all around.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-22 published
MARSHALL, Gwendolyn May (née HALPENNY)
Died peacefully, on July 20, 2003, at Kingston General Hospital. Devoted wife of Borden and loving mother of Mary and her husband Frank PANI, Carole ''Kye'' MARSHALL and Wendy and her husband Stuart CAMPBELL. Proud grandmother of Jackie (Lawrence,) Tracy (Ken), Stephanie, Darren, Alison and Timothy and great-grandmother of Anthony and Bridget. We will always honour Gwen and remember her for her passion for life, joyful service to others, her unconditional love and immovable faith. Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (two lights west of Yonge) on Wednesday, July 23 from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service on Thursday at 10 a.m. from All Souls Anglican Church, 15 Clairtrell Road (one block west of Bayview, north from Sheppard). In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer Society would be gratefully appreciated.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-01 published
McCULLOCH, Peter Blair, M.D., Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada
On July 31, Dr. Peter McCULLOCH died peacefully at home in Hamilton, in his 65th year. Peter was the loving husband of Judith (Craig), devoted father of Peter and his financée Christine KELLY of Westport, Connecticut, Paul and his wife Daphne BONAR of Toronto, Colin and his wife Marie (Hooey) of Charlton, New York, and gentle ''Bwana'' of Ian McCULLOCH. In 1968, just after five years of marrige, he lost his first wife, Sally Ann MARSHALL, mother of Peter and Paul, in a car accident. Peter was the only and dearly loved son of the late Velma and Peter McCULLOCH, the much admired and appreciated son-in-law of the late Charlotte and William CRAIG of Cambridge (Galt) and the late Grace and Frank MARSHALL of Orillia, and dear brother-in-law of Patricia and Ross HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON of Oakville. A graduate of the University of Toronto (1964), he did his residency in Internal Medicine and Clinical Haemotology at the Montreal General Hospital, earning his Fellowship in the Royal College of Physicians of Canada in 1969. This was followed by two years in Kenya where he was seconded to the University of Nairobi by McGill University for the Canadian International Development Agency/Kenya Medical Development Program. While in Kenya, he taught medical students, served as a medical consultant, undertook various study projects for the United Nations International Agency for Research on Cancer and climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro. Dr. McCULLOCH returned to his hometown in 1972, becoming the first medical oncologist and establishing his systemic treatment program at the Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre. He cared skilfully and compassionately for his patients, collaborated on research projects, coordinated provincial clinical trials, mentored colleagues and inspired students until April 2003 when his own cancer was diagnosed. He was a Professor of Medicine at McMaster University and over the years served on many committees locally and nationally. He was particularly proud of his work as Chair of the Research Ethics Board of McMaster University/Hamilton Health Sciences. Peter was an enthusiastic skier, fisherman, photographer and student of history, science and world affairs, and he travelled extensively in pursuit of these interests. He will be sorely missed by his family, Friends, colleagues and patients, and by people whose lives he touched around the world. A funeral service will be held at Central Presbyterian Church, 165 Charlton Avenue West (at Caroline), Hamilton on Tuesday, August 5 at 11 a.m. The family will receive visitors at Dodsworth and Brown Funeral Home, Robinson Chapel (King Street East at Wellington, Hamilton) on Monday, August 4 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts to the Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre Foundation, Hamilton Community Foundation or charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-06 published
MARSHALL, Margaret Elizabeth, R.N.
Died peacefully on September 2, 2003 in her 93rd year. Beloved aunt of Thomas and Patricia MARSHALL, Toronto and Robin YOUNG, Scituate, Massachusetts. Loving great aunt of Heather and Andrew YOUNG and Jennifer, Sarah and Christopher MARSHALL. Great grand aunt of Madison and Mackenzie YOUNG. Predeceased by her brothers Thomas and Robert and her sister Helen. A memorial service of thanksgiving for Margaret's life will be held at 2 p.m. on Monday, September 22, 2003 at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West (two lights west of Yonge St.) Donations to K- Wing, Sunnybrook Hospital, where Margaret received such wonderful care during the last years of her life would be appreciated by the family.

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