LANCASTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-27 published
Self-inflicted wound kills man who shot housemate
A man who police say shot a woman he was living with and then turned the gun on himself died in hospital yesterday.
Pauline MATTIS, 50, was shot in the face on Tuesday at the business she and Frank PERREIRA owned. She remains in hospital.
Mr. PERREIRA was found shot in the head with a handgun beside him.
CFTO news reported last night that Mr. PERREIRA was living with four women at the same time.
"He wasn't coming home. He never spent 24 hours with me. He always had big plans, big lies. He's on the road... this business trip or that business trip," said Carol LABAS.
She said she met Mr. PERREIRA on an Internet dating service and that he owed her $87,000.
John LANCASTER, CFTO News
Page A12

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LANDA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-07 published
LANDA, Eva
Died peacefully, at home, on June 5th, 2003 after a long battle with cancer. Eva is survived by her parents George and Maria HEGEDUS, husband Arthur LANDA, children Jacqueline and David FABIAN, grandchildren Matthew and Jillian FABIAN. Remembered by step-sons Adam, Jeremy and Shaun. Loved by dear Friends Terry and Simon. Special thanks to the Temmy Ladner Palliative Care Unit. Contact Benjamin's Funeral Home for arrangements 416-663-9060. Donations can be made to the Jewish Family and Child Service Scholarship Fund.

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LANDRY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-09 published
Hugh THIRD
In loving memory of Hugh THIRD, who passed away Wednesday, July 3rd, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital - Laurentian Site.
Beloved husband of Lois (CLAIR) THIRD of Sudbury. Loving father of Lisa Gladstone and Krista THIRD both of Toronto and David THIRD (fiancée Jody LANDRY) of Val Caron, stepchildren Christina DEMJEN (husband Attila) of Keswick and Gregory MUCIN (wife Lisa) of Sudbury. Cherished grandfather of Molly, Tyler, Amy, Ric and Holly. Dear son of William and Eunice THIRD predeceased. Dear brother of George of Little Current, Elaine McGAULEY (husband Dwight predeceased) of Tehkummah and Ed predeceased (wife Lilly of Gore Bay). Sadly missed by nieces and nephews.
A celebration of Hugh's life was held at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home on July 7th, 2003. Cremation at the Parklawn Crematorium.

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LANDRY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
Wesley " Wes" Edward HALL
In loving memory of Wesley "Wes" Edward HALL who passed away on Sunday, October 26, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital, St. Joseph's Health Centre at the age of 70 years.
Beloved husband of Lucille (FORTIER) HALL predeceased 1995. Loving father of Wesley (wife Valerie) of Toronto, Michael (wife Colleen) of Ottawa, Allison (husband Alvin LANDRY) of Oshawa, John (wife Marie-Anne) of Ponty Pool, Sharon (husband Danny GIRARD) of Arlington, Texas and Sherri-Lynn (husband Joseph BORLAND) of Milan, Mich. Cherished grandfather of Jennifer, Samantha, Jessica, Kaela, Kaitlyn, Bradley, Rebecca, Nicholas and Ashley. Dear son of Harold and Florence HALL, both predeceased. Dear brother of Harold predeceased (wife Valerie) of Cambridge, Kenneth (wife Eleanor) of Grimsby, Bruce of Toronto, Inez (husband Harold COLLINS predeceased) of Sarnia and Beverley predeceased (husband David ARMSTRONG predeceased). Funeral service was held in the RJ Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch St. Sudbury on Thursday, October 30, 2003. Cremation in the Parklawn Crematorium.

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LANDRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-14 published
Philanthropist extraordinaire
Francophone students were among the many beneficiaries of her generosity
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, July 14, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- Before he died in February, 1993, millionaire Baxter RICARD urged his wife Alma to spend the couple's fortune wisely. ''Put it back into the community, " he told her. ''Spend it well.'' Mrs. RICARD did not let her husband down.
In the 10 years following the death of Mr. RICARD, who owned a chain of radio, television and cable stations in Northern Ontario, she earned a reputation as one of Canada's most generous philanthropists, highlighted by a $23-million donation in 1998 to a fellowship fund that promotes higher education to francophone students across the country.
Mrs. RICARD, who was born in Montreal on October 4, 1906, died at her home in Sudbury on June 2. She was 96.
To date, the Ottawa-based Fondation Baxter and Alma Ricard has given 81 students a total of $4.2-million to further their postsecondary education. Other beneficiaries of the couple's generosity have included colleges, hospitals, church groups and universities in Sudbury and Toronto.
''Mrs. RICARD is one of the biggest philanthropists in Canada," said Alain LANDRY, executive director of the foundation, which was formed in 1988 to distribute the RICARDs' money to various charitable causes. The fellowship fund was set up a decade later.
Mrs. RICARD, formerly Alma VÉZINA, moved to Sudbury in 1931 after responding to a job advertisement from a hardware store run by Félix RICARD, father of Baxter RICARD. She was trained as a secretary at the time.
''She took the train and arrived at 4 a.m.," says Mr. LANDRY. ''In those days, a young lady was not to be seen with a man going to a hotel, so she and Baxter went to a church where they sat until daylight, and she fell in love with him.'' She worked as an administrative assistant to the elder Mr. RICARD and eventually married Baxter, who in later years inherited his father's hardware store and ran it with the help of his wife.
In 1947, the RICARDs left the hardware business and began building a broadcasting empire in Northern Ontario, starting with two radio stations in Sudbury and growing to include numerous radio and television stations. Radio stations established by the couple included CHNO, the first bilingual radio station in Ontario, CFBR and CJMX-FM.
In 1974, when cable television started to expand, Baxter RICARD and some colleagues obtained a licence for cable distribution in northern and eastern Ontario and created Northern Cable Holdings Ltd., which served the greater Sudbury area and areas as far north as Hearst, Ontario In 1980, the company acquired two television stations to serve the same areas and gave it the name Mid-Canada Television. Mr. RICARD also had an interest in a Toronto cable-television company.
Alma RICARD was her husband's ''right-hand person" and took an active part in the broadcasting business and all other ventures he was involved in, including the city-planning committee in Sudbury, the board of directors at Sudbury General Hospital and the Central Canada Broadcasting Association. ''They were inseparable in all those activities," says Mr. LANDRY.
Like Felix RICARD, Baxter and Alma RICARD were strong believers in a Canadian mosaic that included French-speaking citizens. In an era when Ontario's francophones were not permitted to study in French, Felix RICARD didn't have the financial means to promote the francophone culture and lobby for French schooling, so he became an outspoken trustee on the local school board.
As a trustee, he was ''a defender of the rights of francophones in matters of French education... [who] made significant gains for the francophone population of that region. A school in Sudbury bears his name," says a document obtained from Fondation Baxter & Alma Ricard. Baxter and Alma RICARD, on the other hand, made millions in the broadcasting industry and had the financial wherewithal to further the francophone cause, including the struggle for a quality education for French-speaking Ontarians.
''Baxter had no family and the couple had no children so they had to think of who would inherit their money," says André LACROIX of Sudbury, a lawyer, business associate and long-time friend of the RICARDs. ''Fairly early in the game they realized most of their assets should be used for charitable purposes. That's when they developed the idea of a charitable foundation.'' In its initial years after Mr. RICARD's death, the foundation donated $600,000 to Cambrian College and $1-million each to Sudbury General Hospital, the University of Sudbury, and Laurentian University, all in Sudbury, and a total of more than $4-million to the University of Toronto and St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto.
In the early 1990s, the RICARDs and their associates sold their radio and television stations to Baton Broadcasting and their cable distribution company to CFCF Ltd. In 1998, on the strength of money reaped from the sale, the fellowship fund was started and aimed specifically at francophone Canadians living permanently in a minority situation outside of Quebec who need money to advance their studies beyond a bachelor's degree.
Based on Baxter RICARD's idea, the fund was created jointly by businessman Paul DESMARAIS Sr., now chairman of the executive committee of management and holding company Power Corporation of Canada. Mr. DESMARAIS and Mr. LACROIX, plus Paul DESMARAIS Jr., are members of the board of directors of Fondation Baxter & Alma Ricard.
It was launched with the original $23-million donation from Ms. RICARD and despite many disbursements, today sits at $25-million thanks to interest earned on the principal, says Mr. LANDRY.
Until her death, Mrs. RICARD was president of the board and until three months ago, continued to sign cheques, says Mr. LACROIX, who remembers Mrs. RICARD as a ''generous and kind person who helped people with problems.''
''Baxter's father would be proud of what Alma has accomplished since Baxter died. It is well along the way to what he had promoted for many years," says Mr. LACROIX.
In addition to donations in the millions of dollars over the years, Mrs. RICARD once helped out a person who couldn't handle her mortgage payments and was about to lose her home; she also donated to a religious group that raised money for the poor.
Mr. LACROIX remembers Mrs. RICARD as a woman who loved to have fun.
''From age 70 onward she didn't mind going on until 1 a.m. or 2 a.m. She enjoyed going out at night, she loved to dance," he says. ''She was also quite religious, church attendance was sacred.'' Mrs. RICARD also loved to collect hats: ''She had hundreds of hats and they were attention-getters," says Mr. LACROIX, who knew the RICARDs for more than 30 years.
Of all the recognition she received over the years, Mrs. RICARD cherished most the Officer of the Order of Canada bestowed on her in 2000, says Mr. LACROIX. Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON travelled to Sudbury to present the honour to Mrs. RICARD in her sick bed, at her home, in September, 2002.

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LANE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-19 published
LANE
-In loving memory of our dear Mother and Grandmother Mary Ellen, who passed away March 19, 1998.
In our homes she is fondly remembered.
Sweet memories cling to her name,
Those who loved her in life sincerely,
Still lover her in death just the same.
-Lovingly remembered by, Sheila and family

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LANE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-26 published
LANE
-In loving memory of a dear husband, father and grandfather, Lloyd, who passed away one year ago on March 19, 2002.
God saw you getting tired,
A cure was not to be,
So He put his arms around you,
And whispered "Come to Me."
With tearful eyes we watched you
And saw you fade away.
Although we loved you dearly,
We could not make you stay.
Many times we've thought of you
Many times we've cried.
If love alone could have saved you,
You never would have died.
A golden heart stopped beating
Your tender hands at rest.
God took you home to prove to us
He only takes the best.
--Lovingly remembered by Evelyn and family. Also lovingly remembered by son and brother-in-law Ray GUNDMUNDSON who passed away January 20, 2002 and nephew and cousin Ross LANE who left us on March 26, 2002.

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LANE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
LANE--In memory of our husband, father and grandfather, Douglas, who
passed away May 16, 1998.
Only a memory of bygone days
And a sigh for a face unseen
But a constant feeling that God alone
Knows just what should have been
--Lovingly remembered by wife Sheila and family.

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LANE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-07 published
BERCOVITCH, Patricia (Pat) nee: COWAN
After a 2½ year unwavering, brave and courageous battle with colon cancer, Pat died peacefully with dignity at her home on July 05, 2003. Beloved wife of Morley, survived by mother-in-law Sadie CANHAM, dear sister of Mary CHARIOT (Larry,) brother Ted COWAN (Lucy,) brother Jim COWAN (Sheila,) predeceased by sister Barbara McGURK (Bob.) She will be missed by numerous loving nieces and nephews, along with their children, many aunts, uncles, cousins and caring Friends. Trained as a nurse and a teacher, she worked in many capacities in her field, then came to Wasaga Beach as the owner of the 'old' IGA, touching the hearts of many people along the way. Pat was most at home when boating on Georgian Bay. She will be remembered as a loyal friend, loving sister and a devoted wife. Thanks to Dr. James LANE for the compassionate care he gave Pat. Service at the Steeles Memorial Chapel, 390 Steeles Avenue West (between Bathurst and Yonge), Toronto, on Monday, July 07, 2003 at 11 a.m. Shiva at 65 Knox Road East, Wasaga Beach. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Pat Bercovitch Foundation at the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital would be greatly appreciated.

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LANE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-24 published
McKENZIE, Dorothy Elizabeth Lillian (née LANE)
Devoted wife of the late Wm. Wallace McKENZIE. Born in 1914 in Holland Landing. Daughter of Cuthbert and Emma LANE. Sister of the late Rube OUGH. Died peacefully at home September 22, age 89. She is deeply loved and will be ever remembered by her three daughters Gail, Patsy and Lynne, son-in-law George STEEVES, granddaughter Kerri-Lynn, grand_sons Michael, Andrew and Kyle and her lifes lessons will be lovingly taught to great-grand_son William. We will all miss her. The best mother ever. A mother holds onto her children's hands for a short while and their hearts forever. Friends may call at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles), on Wednesday 5-8 p.m. Funeral Service in the Chapel Thursday, 1 p.m. Interment York Cemetery. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or charity of your choice.

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LANE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-31 published
Canada's last air vice-marshal
Pilot who had the most dangerous job in Bomber Command of Second World War won top military decorations and rose to become lieutenant-general
By James McCREADY, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - Page R7
The double duty of pathfinder and master bomber was the most dangerous assignment in Bomber Command of the Second World War. Like all young fliers who set off to attack German targets, Reg LANE knew he was more likely to be killed in action than any sailor or soldier.
The job of the pathfinder was to go ahead of the main bomber force and drop flares to mark the target. The master bomber would stay over the site for up to 40 minutes, directing the air raid.
Mr. LANE, who has died at the age of 83, did both jobs. He was the commander of the Royal Canadian Air Force's only pathfinder squadron and one of the most decorated Canadian bomber pilots in the Second World War. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross twice, and the rare Distinguished Service Order, which when given to a man of junior rank -- he was only a squadron leader at the time -- is second only to the Victoria Cross for valour.
On two trips as a pathfinder squadron leader, Mr. LANE experienced the twin horrors of the bomber pilot: falling prey to a night fighter and being "coned."
The night fighter struck first. On a raid over Cologne on February 14, 1943, Mr. LANE's Halifax dropped its coloured markers to mark the bomb site only to be attacked by a German Me110, a twin-engine plane with massive firepower. It attacked twice, hitting Mr. LANE's aircraft in the wing. As the Me110 prepared a third attack to finish them off, Mr. LANE stood the Halifax on its nose and put it into a power dive. The bomber screamed toward the surface and he pulled out of the dive close to the sea. The manoeuvre succeeded in losing the fighter, although the severely shot up and metal-stressed Halifax was later declared a write-off.
Being "coned" was to be trapped in the intersecting beams of two or more searchlights. Lit up like a bug on the ceiling of a room, it made a bomber an easy target for anti-aircraft gunners on the ground. On the night of April 16, 1943, the last flight of his second tour of duty, searchlights caught Mr. LANE over Frankfurt as he returned from a raid on the Skoda plant at Pilsen in Czechoslovakia. On that occasion, he dived the plane 1,000 feet to escape the lights.
The citation for his first Distinguished Flying Cross spoke of his After flying 51 missions over Europe, Squadron Leader LANE was awarded the Distinguished Service Order and picked to fly the first Canadian-made Lancaster across the Atlantic. It was called the Ruhr Express. The government wanted to show the public and the Royal Canadian Air Force that it was providing top-of-the-line bombers to replace older planes such as the Halifax and the Wellington, which Canadians were flying.
"The Ruhr Express was a propaganda stunt," says Steve HARRIS, the chief historian of the Department of National Defence in Ottawa. "It was only the prototype, and was flown to Britain long before the regular production Canadian Lancasters were ready to be sent. Choosing Reg LANE to fly the mission shows how highly he was regarded."
The fact that he was a good-looking decorated pilot helped the publicity campaign. The reality was that the first plane was not quite ready to fly. The Lancaster X was made at Victory Aircraft outside Toronto. The plant would later become Avro and make the short-lived supersonic Arrow. The Ruhr Express was rushed into service for its maiden flight on August 1, 1943. Reg LANE later recalled that it was almost unsafe to fly.
"We soon found out about the electrics; none of the engine instruments was working and we had to make a decision whether to press on to Montreal, as planned, or return to Malton," said Mr. LANE, who was fully aware of the propaganda value of the Ruhr Express. "In view of the publicity, we decided it would be politic to head for Dorval. There the aircraft was quickly wheeled into a hangar."
The life of the Ruhr Express is thoroughly documented in Target Berlin, a National Film Board film That is still available.
One of the Canada Carries On series of propaganda "shorts" that preceded the main features, the film was seen at movie theatres during the war. A National Film Board cameraman filmed not only the construction of the Ruhr Express at Malton (now Pearson International airport), but joined the crew that ferried it across the Atlantic and later occupied a passenger seat when Reg LANE took the plane on its first mission over Berlin.
Only six of the new Lancaster X planes arrived in Britain by the end of 1943. Though many others were flown over soon after, by the end of the war many Royal Canadian Air Force crews were still flying the older Halifaxes.
Reginald John LANE was born on January 4, 1920, in Victoria. He went to public school there and after graduating from Victoria High School worked for the Hudson's Bay Co. He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in September of 1940.
After pilot training in Canada, under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan, Pilot Officer LANE arrived in England in July of 1941. He flew his first mission in November of that year, as a second pilot on a Halifax. The target was Berlin and while cloud cover made the flight a bit safer, it was cold and stormy.
In December he and his crew flew two dangerous missions, daylight raids at low altitude against the German battle cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, which were in harbour at Brest on the Atlantic coast of France. The bombers came in at 150 feet and met heavy anti-aircraft fire. In the first raid Mr. LANE's squadron commander was shot down; in the second the six Halifax aircraft were heavily damaged by German fire but managed to make it back to England.
Later he also was part of a group that attacked the German battleship Tirpitz, anchored in a fiord in German-occupied Norway. Pilot Officer LANE's Halifax flew from a base at Kinross, Scotland, then, after arriving over Trondheim in Norway, spiralled through the clouds. The Tirpitz was heavily defended and German guns opened up as Mr. LANE's plane flew just above the water. His bomber was hit, cracking the spar in the main wing. Three other Halifaxes were lost but he managed to make it back to Scotland after a nine-hour flight. The Tirpitz was untouched.
Squadron Leader LANE flew in the first of the 1,000 bomber raids designed by Air Marshal Arthur (Bomber) HARRIS to overwhelm German defences. That raid was against Cologne on May 30, 1942, and 41 bombers were lost. His last operational flight was just before D-Day in June of 1944, when he acted as the master bomber over Caen in Normandy. After that he was awarded a second Distinguished Flying Cross, known as a bar to the first medal, after completing three tours of duty.
"He completed many attacks on heavily defended targets in Germany and has consistently displayed a fine fighting spirit throughout his operational career, read the citation. "An officer of outstanding ability whose courage, cheerfulness and keen sense of duty were an inspiration to his crews."
Reg LANE started the war as a pilot officer, the lowest commissioned rank. By 1944 he was a group captain, the air force equivalent of a full colonel, and after his final flight was put in command of a squadron. He was 25.
After the war he stayed on in the air force, attending the Imperial Defence College in England in 1946. He rose in the air-force hierarchy, and took command of the Royal Canadian Air Force base in Edmonton. Later he returned to Europe twice, the second time as chief of staff of the Royal Canadian Air Force's No. 1 Air Division at Metz, Germany.
When the Army, Navy and Air Force became the Canadian Armed Forces on February 1, 1968, his rank changed from air vice-marshal to major-general. In August of 1969 he became deputy commander of Mobile Command in Montreal, then commander of the Transport base at Trenton, Ontario In 1972, with the rank of lieutenant-general, he moved to Colorado Springs, Colorado., as deputy commander of the North American Air Defence Command.
After retiring he worked for a while as a defence consultant before moving full time to Victoria. He was active in air-force associations in Canada and in England. He was a patron of the Yorkshire Air Museum, which has the only surviving Halifax. On the anniversary of the Battle of Britain in early October, he laid a wreath at the war memorial in Victoria.
Reg LANE leaves his wife Barbara, whom he married in 1944, and their two sons and two daughters.

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LANG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-22 published
LANG, Patricia Eileen (née LEDDY)
Died of natural causes in her 87th year, at Haliburton, Ontario, on December 15th, 2003. Born in Saskatoon in 1917, Pat was the fouth of seven children who grew up in a big rambling house on Saskatchewan Crescent. Their home served as the unofficial hub of the city's social scene from the children's formative years to adulthood, when Pat left to marry Rudy LANG in 1950. She met Rudy sight unseen by teletype, communicating between her job at Trans-Canada Airlines in Saskatoon and his at Canadian Pacific Airlines in Regina. They enjoyed a long, happy life together until Rudy's passing in 2002.
Pat and Rudy moved to Toronto in 1950 and started a new family. In the East for the first time, Pat dedicated herself to raising her son, Gerry and daughter Kathleen. She was an avid bridge player and generously volunteered her time throughout her life serving the Red Cross, the Catholic Women's League and the Mississauga Hospital Auxiliary.
With the exception of four years in Ottawa, Pat spent the rest of her life in the Toronto/Mississauga area, until her 12 year affliction with Alzheimer's Disease required her to move to extendicare facility in Haliburton in 2001 where she received the most perfect, loving care of the professionals and fellow residents. The family is profoundly grateful to Jane ROSENBERG and her enlightened staff and to Dr. HARTWICK for the good physical health and quirky vigour she enjoyed in her last years.
Patricia LANG is survived by Kathleen LANG and Andrew HACKETT, Gerry and Colleen LANG and grandchildren Geoffrey and Meghan LANG, and brothers Murray LEDDY and Brian LEDDY. Her feisty energy and wit touched everyone.
A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at the Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, Minden on Friday, January 9, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment to take place in the spring at Ingoldsby Pioneer Cemetery. Reception to follow in the family centre at the Gordon A. Monk Funeral Home Ltd.
Memorial donations to the Extendicare Proud Pioneers would be appreciated and can be arranged through the Gordon A. Monk Funeral Home Ltd., 127 Main Street, Minden (1-888-588-5777).

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LANG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-26 published
He was the voice of the land
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation broadcaster oversaw radio programming that connected the country's isolated agricultural and fishing communities
By Carol COOPER, Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, December 26, 2003 - Page R15
It wasn't a great beginning. Racked with nerves during his first on-air stint for a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Winnipeg radio agricultural show in 1944, Bob KNOWLES gabbled the market reports in a record three minutes, instead of the scheduled 10, with the result that his boss had to spend the next seven minutes rereading them.
"I don't suppose anyone made any sense out of anything I'd read," Mr. KNOWLES told the Regina Leader Post in 1981.
Many voice and elocution lessons later, Mr. KNOWLES became an accomplished and well-loved farm broadcaster, who won the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation farm department's Cowhide Trophy for proficiency in broadcasting in 1951 and then rose through the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ranks to become the national supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts.
Mr. KNOWLES, who in that capacity, oversaw programs such as Country Calendar, Country Magazine, Summer Fallow and the daily agricultural noon-hour shows, died in his sleep recently. He was 83.
Farm shows on radio and television offer up-to-date market information, advice on growing crops and raising animals, and news on the latest agricultural research from the universities to their busy and isolated rural audience. In days gone by, when many more Canadians made their living from the land without modern communication methods, radio farm shows were particularly important.
As national supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts, and chair of National Farm Radio Forum's executive committee for a number of years, Mr. KNOWLES contributed to one ground-breaking Canadian show. Launched in the early forties as an adult-education program for farmers, Farm Radio Forum brought farmers, their wives and often their children together in an early version of interactive radio. Gathering weekly throughout the winter in living rooms, kitchens and community halls across the country, they listened to the show's broadcasts.
After hearing a panel discussion, the group discussed questions presented in study guides. A secretary recorded answers, which were sent back to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, some to be aired the following week. Their responses helped shape agricultural policy across the country and initiated several projects, said Rodger Schwass, a former national secretary of Farm Radio Forum and professor emeritus from York University.
As its chair during the late fifties and early sixties, Mr. KNOWLES helped choose show topics and panelists and became involved in one of its projects, Radios for India.
Forums across Canada raised money to help start a radio forum in India, one of several countries, including Jamaica, Belize, Ghana and Nigeria that adopted the Canadian idea. When the head of Indian radio came to Canada for three months to study radio forums, Mr. KNOWLES shepherded him around the country. In turn, Mr. KNOWLES participated in a training program in India. Radio forums became the chief means of disseminating information during India's Green Revolution, which ended up doubling the country's food production.
Robert Gordon KNOWLES was born on February 5, 1920 to Gordon and Catherine Finn KNOWLES on the family's homestead in Rutland, Saskatchewan. The family had settled there from Ontario in 1907, in the town that no longer exists, roughly 160 kilometres west of Saskatoon. Affected by mild cerebral palsy resulting from a difficult birth, Mr. KNOWLES walked with a mild limp and was unable to use his right hand.
Although Mr. KNOWLES wanted nothing more than to become a farmer, his father feared his son's disability would make that difficult. Instead, he encouraged Mr. KNOWLES to continue his education. Upon completing his B.Sc. in agriculture at the University of Saskatchewan in 1942, and with a low service rating because of his disability, Mr. KNOWLES did not enlist during the Second World War. Instead, he completed his master's degree in agriculture at the university in 1944, where he had met Pat APTED, an honours graduate in arts and biology, whom he married in 1943.
With so many men overseas, Mr. KNOWLES had three job offers upon graduation: as a district agriculturalist in Alberta, as a land inspector for the Canadian Pacific Railway, or as a western farm commentator with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. He chose the people's network. "At that time, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation was only eight-years-old and it seemed like a very glamorous position," Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon Daily News in After his first position in Winnipeg, he transferred to Edmonton for a similar job, staying nine months, before returning to Winnipeg as regional farm-broadcast commentator in 1950.
Of his early days in broadcasting, Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon paper, "I made my work pass the following test: Is it of interest and value to the farmer to know about this and why? I think I did all right because I've been criticized equally by all farm organizations at one time or another."
In 1954, Mr. KNOWLES and his family packed up and moved to Toronto, where he became the assistant supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts and 19 months later, the supervisor.
Not only did he manage the section's budget, set its policy and advise regional announcers across the country, but at least once provided the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation with a breaking story.
In 1963, Mr. KNOWLES and most of the network's farm department were on a flight that crashed during landing at Toronto International Airport.
Uninjured, Mr. KNOWLES left the plane to be put into a holding room with fellow passengers. Once there, he demanded to call home to reassure his wife and young family. Granted the privilege, he immediately called the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's newsroom.
In 1967, with a major network restructuring under way, Mr. KNOWLES took a three-year leave of absence to work for the Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome on the development of farm broadcasts.
Upon returning to Canada, he found his job had disappeared. Mr. KNOWLES took the only Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Radio farm commentator's job available, where he reported, wrote and delivered approximately 6,000 broadcasts for Radio Noon in Regina, until his retirement in 1980.
Said Bonnie DONISON, producer of Radio Noon. "Because he was so friendly and warm, people really liked to talk to him and And he held some interesting interviews, once with a trouserless federal minister of agriculture, Otto LANG. Mr. LANG had ripped his pants getting out of a taxi, so he removed them, sent them aside for mending and carried on, recalled Gerry WADE, a fellow farm-broadcaster who worked with Mr. KNOWLES in Regina.
Of his broadcasting career, Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon Daily News, "I can honestly say that during all of my time as a journalist, there never was a day I didn't want to go into work."
Mr. KNOWLES also helped create the Canadian Farm Writers Federation and was inducted into the Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame in 1990.
He died on November 5 in Ottawa. His first wife Pat, predeceased him in 1997. He leaves his second wife Marney, children Tony, Laura, Alan and Janet, seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

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LANG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
LANG, Patricia Eileen (née LEDDY)
Died of natural causes in her 87th year, at Haliburton, Ontario, on December 15th, 2003. Born in Saskatoon in 1917, Pat was the fouth of seven children who grew up in a big rambling house on Saskatchewan Crescent. Their home served as the unofficial hub of the city's social scene from the children's formative years to adulthood, when Pat left to marry Rudy LANG in 1950. She met Rudy sight unseen by teletype, communicating between her job at Trans-Canada Airlines in Saskatoon and his at Canadian Pacific Airlines in Regina. They enjoyed a long, happy life together until Rudy's passing in 2002.
Pat and Rudy moved to Toronto in 1950 and started a new family. In the East for the first time, Pat dedicated herself to raising her son, Gerry and daughter Kathleen. She was an avid bridge player and generously volunteered her time throughout her life serving the Red Cross, the Catholic Women's League and the Mississauga Hospital Auxiliary.
With the exception of four years in Ottawa, Pat spent the rest of her life in the Toronto/Mississauga area, until her 12 year affliction with Alzheimer's Disease required her to move to extendicare facility in Haliburton in 2001 where she received the most perfect, loving care of the professionals and fellow residents. The family is profoundly grateful to Jane ROSENBERG and her enlightened staff and to Dr. HARTWICK for the good physical health and quirky vigour she enjoyed in her last years.
Patricia LANG is survived by Kathleen LANG and Andrew HACKETT, Gerry and Colleen LANG and grandchildren Geoffrey and Meghan LANG, and brothers Murray LEDDY and Brian LEDDY. Her feisty energy and wit touched everyone.
A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at the Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, Minden on Friday, January 9, 2003 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment to take place in the spring at Ingoldsby Pioneer Cemetery. Reception to follow in the family centre at the Gordon A. Monk Funeral Home Ltd.

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LANG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
WINTERMEYER, Elizabeth ''Betty'' (formerly GREENE, née LANG)
Peacefully, at K-W Health Centre of Grand River Hospital, Betty died on Monday, December 29, 2003. She was 87.
Dear sister of Kelly NASH of London, Sandra ORR of Waterloo and Peggy O'BRIEN of Peterborough. She will also be remembered by members of the WINTERMEYER family, brother-in-law Bryson ''Spike'' KEARNS of Kitchener and her very special nieces, nephews and their families.
She was predeceased by her husbands, Robert L. GREENE and John J. WINTERMEYER, parents Angela (KELLY) and Reinhold LANG and sisters Ann KEARNS and Patsy BEAN.
Friends are invited to share their memories of Betty with her family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m., Friday, January 2, 2004. Prayers will be said at the funeral home on Saturday, January 3, 2004 at 10 a.m., followed by the funeral mass at St. Louis Roman Catholic Church, Waterloo, at 10: 30 a.m., Saturday, with Rev. Robert LIDDY, C.R. as celebrant. The parish prayer will be held at the funeral home on Friday evening at 8: 45 p.m. Following cremation, interment will take place in the WINTERMEYER family plot in Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener.

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LANGANKI o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Vina Mary LANGANKI
November 17, 1931 to January 12, 2003
It is with great sadness that the family announces the passing of Vina Mary LANGANKI, who passed away suddenly on January 12th, 2003.
Vina was born in Sucker Creek, Manitoulin Island on November 17th, 1931. It was there that she enjoyed visiting her grandmother who taught her many life lessons. At the age of 16 she moved to Cleveland, Ohio where she cared for a family who taught her about the many facets of the Jewish religion and traditions. In 1963 she moved to live with her sister Viola, and her brother-in-law Willi HACKL. She met her husband Paul LANGANKI in 1965 and they were married at St. Luke's Anglican Church in Dryden. In 1966 they had their first child Roger David, followed by Gregory Wayne in 1967. Vina enjoyed spending time with family and Friends, gardening, baking, cooking and her dedication to her faith, which lead her to pursue a commitment as a layreader for St. Luke's Anglican Church. Her work with the church involved her in all aspects of church life, as well as, several charitable foundations. She was very appreciative for the fellowship of the church. Her trip to the Holy Land in 2001 was a perfect culmination to her faith. However, her greatest joy was spending time with her grandchildren. Vina was predeceased by her husband Paul, and her mother May and her father John, her brother Clarence and her niece Katherine. Vina is survived by her devoted sons Roger (Debbie) and Wayne LANGANKI both of Dryden. Brothers: Ted NAHWEGHOW of Six Nations, Robert (Delores) NAHWEGAHBOW of Mississauga and Garry NAHWEGAHBOW of Sudbury. Sisters: Viola (Willi) HACKL of Dryden, Beaulah NAHWEGAHBOW of Montana, Colleen (Jack) ANDERSON of Moose Jaw. Grandchildren Zachary and Amy LANGANKI and Dylan HALE, numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held on Thursday, January 16th, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. at St. Luke's Anglican Church. Interment at the Dryden Cemetery.

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LANGFORD o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-26 published
Dorothy Evelyn PURVIS (née LANGFORD)
In loving memory of Dorothy Evelyn PURVIS (née LANGFORD) passed away October 28, 2003 after a short battle with cancer, at the age of 91.
Dorothy was predeceased by her husband William and her son William Edward (Bill). Dorothy will be deeply missed by her daughter-in-law Barbara, grand_son William Evan (Bill), great grandchildren Michelle, Shannon and their mother Maureen, grand_son Christopher Peter and his wife Sharon, great grandchildren Jessica, Brandon and Austin.
Dorothy will be fondly remembered by numerous family and Friends in Calgary, Sudbury (Ontario), Gore Bay (Ontario) and Tobacco Lake (Ontario). The family would love to thank the staff at the Renoir and the Sarcee Hospice for their love and professional care. Memorial service and funeral will be held at the All Saints Anglican Church early in July, 2004, at a date and time to be determined and shared in these publications.

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LANGIANO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-25 published
DONOGHUE, Lynn, R.C.A.
Born April 20, 1953, Red Lake, Ontario. Died November 22, 2003, St. Joseph's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. Lynn leaves to cherish her memory her parents Marjorie (Marni) DONOGHUE, Meaford, Ontario and H. Graham DONOGHUE and his wife Jacqueline, Calgary, Alberta, her beloved son, Luca LANGIANO and his father, Domenico LANGIANO, Toronto, her sister Barbara VAVALIDIS, husband, Stefanos and sons, Alexander and Philip, London, England, her extended family and many Friends.
Lynn was a respected and critically acclaimed artist and portraitist whose strong vibrantly luminous works can be found in galleries and museums across Canada and in private collections internationally. She was elected a member of the Royal Academy of Art in 1991. Lynn was also recognized as an active advocate for many civic and humanitarian causes. She received the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal for outstanding service to the community in 2002.
Cremation has taken place. A celebratory service will be held at Saint Mary Magdeline Anglican Church in January. Date to be announced. Those wishing to remember Lynn may do so by supporting those causes of special interest to her.

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LANGIANO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-04 published
A painter of real people
Toronto artist sought to get beneath a subject's veneer to achieve a 'luminous presence'
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, December 4, 2003 - Page R11
'She'll paint you the way she wants," David MIRVISH, patron and art collector, once said of the Canadian portrait painter Lynn DONOGHUE.
"She's sensitive to mood," Mr. MIRVISH, who sat for Ms. DONOGHUE on several occasions, told The Financial Post Magazine in 1984. "She may catch you at a different angle, and not every subject feels that's the way they want to be seen. The important thing is whether it's a successful picture or not. You shouldn't expect to like a portrait."
But what you could expect if you were having your portrait painted by Ms. DONOGHUE is that you would at the very least enjoy the process. Sitting for the Toronto-based painter was like having tea with a lively, old friend.
"You were always chatting about this and that with Lynn," said Father Daniel DONOVAN, an art collector and professor of theology at St. Michael's College in the University of Toronto, who also sat for Ms. DONOGHUE. " She was always vibrant and alive."
Always seeking to get beyond a person's veneer, Ms. DONOGHUE enjoyed the process of trying to draw out her subjects. "She wanted people to [be] open and communicate with her," Father DONOVAN said.
Mr. DONOGHUE, considered one of the pre-eminent portrait painters in Canada, died last month in Toronto. She was 50.
"She made a huge impact [in the Canadian art world] and did so at a very young age," said Christian Cardell CORBET, founder of the Canadian Portrait Academy.
"She was at a stage... where she was just about to take off," Mr. CORBET said. "What she could have contributed was just cut short."
Ms. DONOGHUE started showing her work in 1973. Her early work caused a stir when some galleries refused to show her giant portraits of naked males. Since then she has had countless group shows and solo exhibitions. Her work can be found in the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Ontario Legislature, the National Museum of Botswana, the Vancouver Art Gallery, and several other private and public collections.
Ms. DONOGHUE, who was elected a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in 1991, did both commissioned and non-commissioned portraits. One of her notable commissions was of John STOKES, the former speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario.
Last year, Ms. DONOGHUE completed a portrait of Margaret ATWOOD that came was at once celebrated. After approaching the Canadian literary icon to paint her portrait, Ms. DONOGHUE set about to capture Ms. ATWOOD using bright oil colours. In the portrait, Ms. ATWOOD, sits with her legs crossed and looks out at the viewer wearing a vibrant, green shirt.
"She was not afraid of colour," Mr. CORBET said. "She would take it [paint] right from the tube."
Three years ago, Terrence HEATH, the former director of the Winnipeg Art Gallery, wrote in BorderCrossings following an exhibition of Ms. DONOGHUE's work at a Toronto gallery: "Each painting... is a statement in colour. The figures are set in colour fields that tell you as much about the figure as the likeness and body position do. Most remarkable about these paintings is their sheer luminous presence."
"She created honest portraits" and "didn't follow much of a systematic approach to portraiture," Mr. CORBET said. "She allowed her spontaneity and intuition to come through."
Ms. DONOGHUE once said that her historic mentors, such as Frans Hals, conveyed in their portraits the feeling of people who are very alive. "Why do people know, when they look at a painting of mine, that it is a real person?" she told The Financial Post Magazine in 1984. It was one of her perpetual queries into the nature of portrait painting.
Lynn DONOGHUE was born on April 20, 1953, in the small community of Red Lake in northern Ontario, more than 500 kilometres from Thunder Bay. Her father Graham DONOGHUE was a mining engineer who moved his family about, including a spell in Newfoundland. Ms. DONOGHUE finished high school at H.B. Beal Secondary School in London, Ontario She graduated in 1972 with a special art diploma.
Having lived in England and New York as an artist, Toronto was home to Ms. DONOGHUE. She lived with her 14-year-old son Luca in a loft in a converted industrial building in the city's west end. Her loft doubled as her studio. In the cluttered space, some of her paintings hung on the walls and canvases were stacked next to the essentials required for daily living. Living off the sale of her paintings, Ms. DONOGHUE financially scrapped by month to month, her Friends said.
Described as vivacious and gregarious, she was "the life of the party." An active member of the arts community, she could regularly be seen at gallery openings and art shows around Toronto. Outside the art world, she was an active community member. Most recently she helped to organize events for Toronto's new mayor David MILLER during the municipal election. She also attended the Anglican Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, where a painting she had done of her son's baptism hung on the wall.
An exhibit of Ms. DONOGHUE's most recent major work is scheduled to open at the MacLaren Art Centre in Barrie, Ontario, in March. Called the The Last Supper, the large group piece, which Ms. DONOGHUE started in 2001, consists of 13 portraits encircling a central table piece, which is itself a triptych. The installation requires a total wall space of about 5 metres by 10 metres (16 feet by 34 feet).
Father DONOVAN well remembers how he first learned of the project. One day, he received a call from Ms. DONOGHUE asking if he would have lunch with her. She had an idea she wanted to talk to him about. The idea turned out to be the The Last Supper and Ms. DONOGHUE said she needed his help. After their lunch, she invited Father DONOVAN, along with several others, to dinner. While they were eating and drinking, she photographed them, capturing their mannerisms and expressions. From the photographs, she made a series of sketches which she then used to develop the large group piece.
"She loved what she was doing," Mr. CORBET said. "There was this inner drive that said 'go on.' "
Ms. DONOGHUE, an insulin-dependent diabetic, died on November 22 in a Toronto hospital, after suffering from an insulin reaction that led to a coma.
She leaves her parents Marjorie and Graham DONOGHUE, her son Luca LANGIANO and his father, Domenico LANGIANO and sister Barbara VAVALIDIS.

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LANGLANDS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-23 published
HILDESHEIM, Pauline Mary Adela
75, of Halifax, Nova Scotia, died suddenly on December 18, 2003 in the Halifax Infirmary, Q.E. II. Born in Toronto, Ontario in 1928, she was the only child of Paul and Nora HOME (CAWTHORNE.) Her father changed his last name from HILDESHEIM to HOME at the beginning of the First World War. Pauline attended Moulton College, then took an Honours B.A. in modern languages and literature from Trinity College in 1949 followed by an M.A. She went on to teach French, Latin and German at Edgehill School for Girls in Windsor Nova Scotia In 1953 she earned the degree of Bachelor of Library Science at the University of Toronto. She was appointed Assistant Librarian at the Halifax Memorial Library and then became an Assistant Librarian at the University of Toronto Library. Pauline returned to Halifax where she ultimately held the post of Deputy Chief Librarian at the Halifax Memorial Library, which she filled with great distinction until her retirement. During her professional career, she earned the degrees of Master of Library Science from the University of Toronto and Master of Public Administration from Dalhousie University. Pauline was a generous supporter of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia and an enthusiastic member of its Travel Committee, as well as being an active member of the Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia. She was Treasurer of the Canadian Federation of University Women, Halifax Branch, a Member of the Congregational Council of the Cathedral Church of All Saints. As well, she was Treasurer of the Cathedral Branch of Anglican Church of Women, a member of the Cathedral League, and a faithful communicant of the Anglican Church of Canada. Pauline is survived by several cousins and her god-daughter, Cynthia LANGLANDS, of Dallas, Texas. Pauline possessed a remarkable memory along with high intelligence and a strong voluntary spirit, and will be sadly missed by her family and many Friends. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held in early 2004. Details to be announced later. Donations in Pauline's memory can be made to the Cathedral Church of All Saints, the Art of Gallery of Nova Scotia or a charity of choice.

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LANGLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
LANGLEY, Leslie Lyn (née LANGLOTZ) B.Sc. (Eng.,) M.Sc. (Eng.) Queens, P. Eng.

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LANGLOTZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
LANGLEY, Leslie Lyn (née LANGLOTZ) B.Sc. (Eng.,) M.Sc. (Eng.) Queens, P. Eng.

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LANGSFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-10 published
LUCAS, Professor Emeritus Alec
Died, after a lengthy illness, at Island Lodge in Ottawa, on May 6th, 2003. He was born in Toronto June 20, 1913, the youngest child of Bert and Emma LUCAS, and grew up on a farm near Cobourg. It was here his love of nature and books was nurtured. Schooling began at Cook's School, a two-roomed school near Cobourg, where he later taught while studying for a B.A. and M.A. from Queen's. He obtained a Ph.D. in English from Harvard in 1951. Wishing to return to Canada, he accepted an offer from University of New Brunswick and taught English there until 1957 before going to McGill where he taught for and wrote for the next 30 years. After retirement he was made an Emeritus Professor in 1984, and worked part-time, which included a visiting lectureship in Iqaluit. He continued to write until he suffered a stroke in December 1995. Alec was an early advocate for the importance of teaching of Canadian literature and was the founding coordinator of the Canadian Studies Program, the forerunner of The McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. He wrote extensively on Canadian literature, including articles for The Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature, and the Literary History of Canada. He published books on writers such as Hugh MacLennan, Farley Mowat and Peter MacArthur and edited several anthologies of short stories including the best selling Great Canadian Short Stories. His passion for literature and teaching was matched by his concern for and interest in nature he was an active conservationist and bequeathed most of his woodland property at Plaisance, Quebec to the Quebec Society of the Protection of Birds as a nature reserve. He is predeceased by his parents, and siblings Eva FISHER, Vera FORSYTH, and Leonard LUCAS. He leaves his wife, Sharon; former wives Margaret and Coula; children George (Charlotte) of White Rock, Suzanne (Allan) LANGSFORD of Kingston, and Edward of Halifax, five grandchildren, several nieces and nephews including Sylvia (Tom) MIDDLEBRO'of Ottawa and Joan (Dick) MEYER of Barrie and grandnieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held at the Mackay United Church, 39 Dufferin Road, Ottawa, May 16 at 3 p.m. Ashes will be interned in Cobourg at a later date. If desired, a donation can be made in his memory to Island Lodge, 1 Porter's Island Ottawa K1N 5M2 or a charity of choice.

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LAN surnames continued to 03lan002.htm