GREGOIRE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-16 published
SNELGROVE, Martha Jean, R.N.
On Saturday evening June 14, 2003. Jean died in peace with her loving nephew and niece-in-law Brian and Anneliese O'MALLEY at her side. A Registered Nurse, Jean was born in Colborne, Ontario. She served her country with distinction as a Nursing Sister in the Canadian Army during World War 2 in South Africa, England, and on board hospital ships. After the War she completed her studies as a Hospital Records Librarian and enjoyed a long and productive career establishing medical record libraries in hospitals throughout Ontario. Daughter of the late Donald and Teresa SNELGROVE and predeceased by her sisters Marion and Kathleen, she is survived by her sister Flora GREGOIRE of Innisfil, Ontario and brother and sister-in-law Emmett MALCOLM and Keitha SNELGROVE of Rochester, New York. She will be remembered by her many nieces and nephews, grand nieces and grand nephews. The celebration of Jean's life will be held in the Church of St. Leonard, 25 Wanless Avenue (east of Yonge), on Tuesday, June 17, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m. A reception for Friends and family will follow in Church Hall. In lieu of flowers, Friends may wish to consider a memorial gift to the Church of St. Leonard or Sunnybrook Hospital.

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GRÉGOIRE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-04 published
Died This Day -- 269 airline passengers, 1983
Thursday, September 4, 2003 - Page R9
All aboard Korean Air Lines flight 007 killed when plane shot down by Soviet fighter after straying into Soviet airspace; dead included nine Canadians: Mary Jane HENDRIE of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario; George PANAGOPOULOS, Marilou COVEY, Chun Lan YEH and San-Gi LIM, all of Toronto; François DE MASSY and François ROBERT of Montreal; Larry SAYERS of Stoney Creek, Ontario; and Rev. Jean-Paul GRÉGOIRE, a Tokyo resident.

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GREGOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
McGREGOR
-In loving memory of Donald GREGOR, December 17, 1931 to December 20, 2002.
Safely Home
I am home in Heaven, my beloved ones,
I am so happy here and everything is so bright
There is perfect joy and beauty
In this everlasting light.
Every pain and grief I ever felt is over,
Every restless tossing passed
I am now at peace forever
Safely home in heaven.
Did you wonder why I so suddenly left
I was on my way to cut a Christmas tree for my wife,
Then I heard the Creator call my name.
His love illuminated every step of the way
As I bravely answered his call.
He came Himself to meet me
I did not find it hard to leave
With His own loving arm to lean on
I had not one doubt or dread to follow Him.
You must not grieve for me anymore
Just remember me with loving thoughts, the good times we had.
I love each one of you dearly still, my son and my daughters and
your spouses and all my grandchildren. I will always watch over you.
My spirit lives on in each of you, just remember that.
Try to look beyond the milky way, the stairway to
the spirit world. Pray to trust our Creator's will.
My work was all completed when He called me home.
One day you will hear your Anishnabe name called too
And oh, the rapture of that meeting, the joy to see you come.
-Lovingly remembered by Mary Grace.

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GREGOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-05 published
COSTA, (GREGOR) Val
The beloved wife of Tibor GREGOR died peacefully on December 3rd, 2003 after a courageous battle with cancer. She will be fondly remembered by her husband, daughters Tania, Stacy and her fiancé Nelson WHITFORD and her family in Australia. She will be missed by Jan GREGOR, Anne Gregor ROSE, Fred and Martha ROSE and by her life-long friend Val THOMAS and her numerous other Friends. Val was a member of the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Royal Ontario Museum and a ballet enthusiast. A celebration of Val's rich life will be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W. (2 stop lights west of Yonge St.) on Tuesday December 9th at 1: 00 p.m. with a reception to follow at the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital would be appreciated by the family.

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GREGOROVICH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-20 published
Elizabeth GREGOROVICH
By Alexandra CHYCZIJ Thursday, February 20, 2003 - Page A26
Wife, actress, gardener. Born December 25, 1933, in London, England. Died December 26, 2002, in Toronto, of natural causes, aged 71.
We were in her home in Toronto, first-time dinner guests, when she asked for some cutlery from a sideboard. I obliged, only to be startled by a kitten nestled in the drawer, purring contentedly. It was not alone. We soon realized that having a meal with Lizzie, as everyone called her, and her husband, J. B. GREGOROVICH, meant sharing their hospitality with dozens of kittens and cats, puppies and dogs. There was even a pigeon! No fool this fowl for, even when offered an opportunity to fly off into Toronto's High Park, he wouldn't leave their home. This entire menagerie lived in a state of glorious chaos, barking, meowing and bellowing -- most of it animal-generated, all good-natured. The homes Lizzie made were always like that, a cacophonous delight: eccentric, caring, inclusive places where her charges and companions -- animals, Friends, and husband alike -- thrived.
Elizabeth GREGOROVICH was born Angela Christine FORBES- GOWER. Lizzie was an actress by vocation and a clerk by profession until rheumatoid arthritis hobbled her. Nevertheless, she remained a resolute gardener, this past year starting a "white garden" in honour of her adored mother-in-law, Mary. She was also a collector of teddy bears. J. B. always scouted around for her during the many trips he made on Ukrainian-Canadian business.
Children loved Lizzie. At Halloween she became a cackling old hag, ambushing those coming close to her lair. I well remember how half-frightened my daughter Kassandra was on our first visit, but also how quickly Lizzie dispelled alarm with good-humoured laughter and treats; how delighted Kassandra was after realizing that the harridan who jumped at us was an adult having as much fun as a kid. We returned every year.
Lizzie was just as she represented herself: kind, generous, happy, a creator of things amazing and curious. In the years I knew her, even when she endured bouts of debilitating illness, she was nothing but certain that there would always be something good around the next bend in her life. Her spirit was infectious. Those who met her came away amused, refreshed.
Lizzie emigrated from England as a teenager, born into a somewhat dysfunctional upper-class British family. She didn't like this country much until, in 1962, she found her perfect companion in John, the son of Ukrainian pioneer settlers, a lawyer and a lieutenant in the army reserves. Lizzie, herself of mixed North Country English Scottish-Irish-Jewish descent, became a stalwart supporter of J. B.'s dedication to the defence of Ukrainian-Canadian civil liberties.
When they retired to Mount Forest, Ontario (there to house an ever-expanding circle of animals on an ark-like farm where all and sundry would have room to run and play and grow, as they did), many deeply missed them and asked why they had moved so far away. Because it was the right place, Lizzie would laugh, near Ontario's highest point, so if another flood came, at least their animals would be spared!
Up there, Lizzie soon became a well-loved local character. But she never forgot the Ukrainian-Canadian community she had joined. Fittingly, her remains were treated according to the ancient custom of partial cremation, leaving bones for eventual interment in her native English soil, preceded by a memorial service in Toronto's St. Vladimir's Ukrainian Orthodox Cathedral.
No one knew that Lizzie had left us until after the New Year began and Ukrainian Christmas had been celebrated. Even as her own life came to end, she thought of others first. That says it all.
Alexandra Chyczij is a family friend.

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GREGORY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
Hockey coach who changed the game
'Captain Video' introduced new teaching tools in more than 25 years with the National Hockey League
By William HOUSTON Monday, June 23, 2003 - Page R5
The morning after Roger NEILSON was fired from his first of seven head coaching jobs in the National Hockey League, he returned to his office at Maple Leaf Gardens.
He viewed and edited the videotape of the Toronto Maple Leafs' loss to the Montreal Canadiens the night before. When a replacement didn't show up, he put the Leafs through a practice. Later, he was asked by a reporter why he was still hanging around.
"Somebody had to run the practice," he said. "Whoever comes in will have to look at the tapes."
The next day, Mr. NEILSON was reinstated when the club could not find a replacement, but Maple Leafs owner Harold BALLARD, always looking for publicity, wanted to make his return behind the bench a surprise. Mr. BALLARD tried to talk him into wearing a ski mask or bag over his head, and then dramatically throwing it off at the start of the game. Numbed by the three-day ordeal of not knowing his status in the organization, Mr. NEILSON almost agreed, but ultimately declined.
"He hated that story," said Jim GREGORY, who hired Mr. NEILSON to coach the Leafs in 1977 and was fired along with the coach at the end of the 1978-79 season. "I hated that story."
The incident reflected poorly on Mr. BALLARD, but in a smaller way it helped create the image of Mr. NEILSON we have today, that of a coach who put the team ahead of his ego, who was loyal to his players and dedicated to his job.
Mr. NEILSON, who died Saturday after a long battle with cancer, will be remembered not just as a man who loved hockey, but also as a skilled strategist and innovator. He stressed defensive play and systems, and also physical fitness. In Toronto, he was given the nickname "Captain Video," because he was among the first to use videotape to instruct his players and prepare for games.
When Mr. NEILSON, a soft-spoken man famous for his dry sense of humour, was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame last year, he was asked about the late, controversial Leafs owner.
"I'm sure he's looking up rather than down," he said, with a smile, before saying Mr. BALLARD did some "good things for hockey."
Mr. NEILSON was also named to the Order of Canada in January.
Roger Paul NEILSON was born in Toronto on June 16, 1934, and went as far as Junior B hockey as a player. While earning a degree at McMaster University in Hamilton, he started coaching kids baseball and hockey.
After graduating, he taught high school in Toronto and his passion by then was coaching. In hockey, he won Toronto and provincial titles at different levels. In 10 years, his Metro Toronto midget baseball teams won nine championships, once defeating a team that included pitcher Ken DRYDEN, who would later become a Hall of Fame goaltender with the Montreal Canadiens.
Mr. NEILSON scouted for the Peterborough Petes of the Ontario Major Junior Hockey League before moving to Peterborough in 1966 to coach the team. During his 10 years behind the bench, the Petes never finished below third place and won the league championship once.
By the time Mr. NEILSON moved to the National Hockey League to coach the Leafs in 1977, his reputation for creativity and also mischief was firmly established. In baseball, he used, at least once, a routine involving a peeled apple, in which the catcher threw what appeared to be the ball wildly over the third baseman, prompting the runner to race home. As the apple lay in the outfield, the catcher met the runner at home plate with the real baseball in his glove.
Always looking for a loophole in the rules, Mr. NEILSON's ploys instigated rule changes in hockey. On penalty shots against his team, he used Ron STACKHOUSE, a big defenceman, instead of a goalie. Mr. STACKHOUSE would charge out of the net and cause the shooter to flub his shot. The rule was subsequently changed to require the goalie to stay in his crease.
Over an National Hockey League career that lasted more than 25 years, Mr. NEILSON holds the record for most teams coached (seven.) He also held four assistant coaching positions. But he never won the Stanley Cup. He didn't coach great teams. He seemed to enjoy the challenge of taking an average group of players, making them into a solid, defensive unit, and seeing them succeed.
In his first year with the Leafs, he moulded a previously undisciplined group of players into a strong unit that upset the New York Islanders in the 1978 playoffs.
In 1982, Mr. NEILSON's playoff success with the Vancouver Canucks underscored his skill as a tactician and manipulator.
When Canuck head coach Harry NEALE was suspended late in the season, Mr. NEILSON, his assistant, took over. The Canucks weren't expected to advance past the first round of the playoffs. But backed by strong goaltending from Richard BRODEUR, they defeated the Calgary Flames and then the Los Angeles Kings to advance to the semi-finals against Chicago.
The Canucks won the first game, but with Chicago leading 4-1 late in the second game, Mr. NEILSON, unhappy with the officiating, waved a white towel from the bench, as if to surrender to the referee. He was fined for the demonstration, but the white towel became a symbol of home-fan solidarity. In the Stanley Cup final, the Canucks were swept by the powerhouse Islanders.
In addition to Toronto and Vancouver, Mr. NEILSON's journey through the National Hockey League consisted of head coaching jobs with the Buffalo Sabres, the Kings, New York Rangers, Florida Panthers and Philadelphia Flyers. He worked as a co-coach in Chicago, and as an assistant coach with the Sabres, St. Louis Blues and Ottawa Senators.
Ottawa, where he was hired in 2000, was his final destination. In the 2001-02 season, head coach Jacques MARTIN stepped down for the final two games of the regular season to allow Mr. NEILSON to coach his 1,000th regular-season game.
Frank ORR, who covered hockey for The Toronto Star for more than 30 years, said, in 2002, "Roger is one of the few people I've met in any line of work who never had a bad word to say about anybody."

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GREGORY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
A remarkable life, and a friend to all
By Eric DUHATSCHEK Monday, June 23, 2003 - Page S1
Nashville -- Roger NEILSON's legacy in hockey will endure because he coached 1,000 games among eight National Hockey League teams, because he was an innovator and because he served as a mentor and a tutor to others during a Hall of Fame career.
But the contributions of NEILSON, who died Saturday in Peterborough, Ontario, at 69 after a lengthy battle with cancer, contain a vibrancy matched by few others because of the countless Friendships he developed during his lifetime.
The proof of that came in June of last year when a dozen of his closest Friends organized a tribute to NEILSON. It was held in Toronto, a day before the National Hockey League awards dinner, to make it easier for people to attend, which they did. More than 1,300 people were there.
NEILSON was responsible for helping several players and coaches get to the National Hockey League, including Bob GAINEY, Craig RAMSAY and Colin CAMPBELL, players on the Peterborough Petes junior team that NEILSON coached in the 1970s.
Among those who benefited from NEILSON's guidance was Florida Panthers coach Mike KEENAN. Scotty BAUMAN/BOWMAN, the Hall of Fame coach, recalled Saturday how NEILSON talked him into hiring KEENAN, who had also coached the Petes, into running the Buffalo Sabres' minor-league affiliate in Rochester, New York in the early 1980s.
"Roger didn't have any enemies," KEENAN said. "He lived his life in a principled way. He had a great deal of respect for people and found goodness in all of them. He was very unique and all of us were blessed to know him.
"I'm saddened by his passing, but to me, this is a life to be celebrated, a life that was so influential to many of us."
NEILSON had an endless fascination with the rulebook that forced the powers in whatever league he happened to be coaching in to revise and clarify each loophole he probed. For a penalty shot, he would put a defenceman in the crease instead of a goaltender, instructing the defenceman to rush the shooter as soon as the latter crossed the blueline, to hurry him into a mistake.
Once, when his team was already two players short with less than two minutes remaining in the game, NEILSON kept sending players over the boards, getting penalties for delaying the game. The strategy worked, taking time off the clock and upsetting the other team's flow. At that stage of the game, it didn't matter how many penalties NEILSON's team was taking. If a coach tried that tactic today, the opposition would be awarded a penalty shot.
NEILSON, whose last job was as an assistant coach with the Ottawa Senators, coached his 1,000th National Hockey League game on the final night of the 2001-02 regular season, temporarily filling in for Senators head coach Jacques MARTIN. NEILSON was involved with a dozen National Hockey League teams in a series of different capacities, including his eight different turns as a head coach. In 1982, he took the Vancouver Canucks to the Stanley Cup final, his one and only appearance in the championship series as a coach. The Canucks were swept by the New York Islanders.
It was during that playoff run that NEILSON placed a white towel on the end of a stick, a mock surrender to the on-ice officials.
In 1999, NEILSON was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a form of bone cancer, and needed a bone marrow transplant. He also developed skin cancer, the result of a lifetime of being outdoors, in the sun, usually in raggedy old shorts and T-shirts, with a well-worn baseball cap perched on his head.
"He put in an incredible, inspiring fight with an insidious disease," said KEENAN, who added that NEILSON kept in constant contact with his mother Thelma, after she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.
"They found strength in each other. That's the type of individual Roger was. He'd reach out and touch somebody who needed help. He was deathly in pain the last few times we spoke, but he would not let it influence his life."
The high regard for NEILSON was clear during the tribute for him last year. Former coach and Hockey Night in Canada analyst Harry NEALE, who worked with NEILSON in Vancouver, was the master of ceremonies. But he was so overcome by emotion so many times that he let his good friend Roger steal the show.
NEILSON's self-deprecating sense of humor surfaced when he scanned the crowd and suggested that everyone he'd ever said hello to in his lifetime had turned up for the event. He quipped that at $125 a ticket, it must be an National Hockey League production. What other organization would set the price so outrageously high?
NEILSON's health was deteriorating this spring, but he managed to accompany the Senators on the road for their second-round series against the Philadelphia Flyers. The Senators pushed the eventual Stanley Cup champions, the New Jersey Devils, to seven games in the Eastern Conference final before being eliminated.
NEILSON's speech to the team before Game 6, with the Senators trailing 3-1 in the series, was cited by the players and the coaching staff as the inspiration for their comeback against the Devils.
"The only sad part is we weren't able to win a Stanley Cup for him this year," Martin said.
With his health failing, NEILSON asked BAUMAN/BOWMAN to be the keynote speaker at his annual coaching clinic in Windsor earlier this month.
"I talked to him only a week ago," BAUMAN/BOWMAN said. "I said, 'The coaches in the National Hockey League are getting blamed a lot for the [defensive] style that teams are playing.' I said, 'You should blame Roger NEILSON because he's the one training all these coaches.'
"Roger was a special person. The people that follow hockey know what he went through. I truly think he battled it right to the end and it was hockey that probably kept Roger going." eduhatschek@globeandmail.ca
Remembering Roger NEILSON
"The coaches in the National Hockey League have been getting blamed a lot for the style of game the teams are playing. I said, 'You should blame Roger NEILSON because he's training all these coaches.' "He battled right to the end. Hockey and life for Roger were intertwined. That probably kept him going to the end. He never got married. He was married to hockey."
Scott BAUMAN/BOWMAN
"All the awards he won this year tell you about his hockey career's innovativeness and what kind of person he is. Some people are going to remember Roger for nothing to do with hockey just because of what a humanitarian he is. He put up an unbelievable battle. From when he found out how sick he was, if had happened to most people, they would have had their demise many months ago. He fought hard."
Jim GREGORY
"I know I haven't met a person who could equal Roger's passion for hockey. The honours bestowed on him in the past year, the Hockey Hall of Fame and the Order of Canada, did not come by accident. He has done so much for so many kids and I will always remember that legacy."
Harry NEALE
"He's an individual we can all be inspired by, by his ability to deal with some difficult situations in his own life. He has such a high level of respect for human beings. "He was fortunate in way he lived his life. It was impacted by his faith and his religion. He observed those principles on a daily basis, things most of us have a hard time dealing with. He saw the goodness in everyone else."
Mike KEENAN
"He did a lot of work at the grassroots level with his hockey camps, coaches' clinics, his baseball teams, his summer programs. He wasn't really in it for himself very much. "It's a word you use too often to make it special but in his case he was unique, he really was."
Bob GAINEY
"Hockey has lost a great mind, a great spirit, a great friend. The National Hockey League family mourns his loss but celebrates his legacy -- the generations of players he counselled, the coaches he moulded, the changes his imagination inspired and the millions of fans he entertained."
Gary BETTMAN
Life and times
Born: June 16, 1934, in Toronto.
Education: Roger NEILSON graduated from McMaster University in Hamilton with a degree in physical education.
Nickname: Captain Video because he was the first to analyze game videos to pick apart opponents' weaknesses.
Coaching career: NEILSON coached hockey teams for 50 years. He was a National Hockey League coach for Toronto, Buffalo, Vancouver, Los Angeles, the New York Rangers, Florida, Philadelphia and Ottawa. The Senators let him coach a game on April 13, 2002, so he could reach 1,000 for his career. He was an National Hockey League assistant in Buffalo, Chicago, St. Louis and Ottawa.
Major Honours: Elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in the builders category last year. Invested into the Order of Canada in May.
Tributes: ESPN Classic Canada will air a 24-hour tribute to NEILSON beginning today at 6 p.m. eastern daylight time. The programming will include a profile, footage from the famous white towel game during the 1982 Stanley Cup playoffs and his 1,000th game behind the bench.
Funeral: Services for NEILSON will be held at 2 p.m., Saturday at North View Pentecostal Church in Peterborough, Ontario (705-748-4573). The church is at the corner of Fairbairn Street and Tower Hill Road.

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GREGORY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
Crash kills promising teen
By Jonathan FOWLIE, Thursday, December 18, 2003 - Page A18
An 18-year-old man was killed and another seriously injured when their white Toyota Celica slammed into a hydro pole yesterday afternoon on Kingston Road near Danforth Avenue.
Allen BELLEHUMEUR died immediately, and was identified by his distraught parents who arrived at the scene shortly after the crash.
His close friend, Chris THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, was in the passenger seat and was rushed to intensive care at St. Michael's Hospital. He was in critical condition last night after suffering internal head injuries.
Mr. BELLEHUMEUR graduated from nearby Birchmount Park Collegiate last year, where Mr. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON was still attending classes.
Darryl MOREY, a physical-education teacher at the school, described Mr. BELLEHUMEUR as a driven student who was always pushing to improve himself. "I know academically he did very well. He fought for everything he could get. He hated getting a 70 [per cent]."
Mr. MOREY, who has been teaching for 16 years, said Mr. BELLEHUMEUR also loved hockey and was a "huge Leaf fan" who often wore the team's jersey.
Mr. BELLEHUMEUR was engaged to his long-time girl friend, the daughter of a teacher at Birchmount Park and a student at the school, Mr. MOREY said. The young man's parents run a variety store on Danforth Avenue, Mr. MOREY said, where the teenager used to work.
The school held an emergency staff meeting yesterday at which a crisis counsellor delivered the news of the crash, the teacher said. Students will be given the news today.
Police said yesterday afternoon that Mr. BELLEHUMEUR had been "changing lanes erratically" when his car jumped a small median on the ramp where Danforth Avenue feeds onto Kingston Road.
After the car cleared the median, it swerved across two lanes before knocking over a hydro pole, Sergeant Rob GREGORY of traffic services said last night.
Skid marks showed the path the car took over the median and directly into the hydro post, which broke in many places as a result of the collision. After hitting the post, the car bounced back onto the road and came to rest on its roof.
No one else was hurt and no other cars were involved in the collision. Sgt. GREGORY said that the teens had definitely not been drinking but that "speed certainly will be a factor we will be looking at."

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GRENFELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-26 published
GRENFELL, Douglas Paul
Our beloved Paul died peacefully, Sunday 23 March, 2003 at Toronto Grace Hospital, in the loving setting of the Palliative Care Unit, thus ending a two year adventure with a brain tumour. He leaves a circle of constant Friends and a grieving family: mother Gwendoline, wife Sally, parents-in-law Richard and Kathleen LITCH, his children and Sally's, Jennifer and her husband Thomas and their sons Ian and Daniel, Philip and his partner Albert Liu, Lisa and her husband Nicholas SAMSTAG, Laura and her husband Gabriel BINCIK and their daughters Hanna and Julia, Amelia WALLNER and her partner Todd DYER, Anna WALLNER and her husband Blair QUINN, the LITCH and MERCER families and cousins in England. Predeceased by his father Harold. Also remembered by Molly LOGAN.
Cremation. Service of Thanksgiving for Paul's life will be at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, M4V 1R5, (416) 925-5977, Monday 31 March at 11 a.m. with The Reverend Dr. Andrew STIRLING officiating. Kindnesses to others or gifts to the Gerry and Nancy Pencer Centre for Brain Tumours, 610 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 2M9 (416) 946-6560 or to Paul's Church would honour his memory.
''...Sorrow and Love flow mingled down...''

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GRENIER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Deacon David Roland COLEMAN TRUDEAU
In loving memory of Deacon David Roland COLEMAN TRUDEAU at the age of 78 years Thirty years of sobriety. Died peacefully surrounded by his wife and family at the Manitoulin Health Centre on Wednesday evening December 10, 2003.
Beloved husband of Clara (FOX) TRUDEAU of Wikwemikong and first wife the late Tillie KUBUNT of Newberry, Michigan. Dear son of the late Dominic and Angeline (WASSEGIJIG) TRUDEAU of Wikwemikong. Dear step-father to Bill TUCKER, Sharon (husband Ray) Wynn and Bob TUCKER of Newberry, Michigan, Lindell MATHEWS of Wikwemikong, Annie KAY (friend Eric EADIE,) Mathew and Linda MATHEWS (predeceased.) Loving grandfather to Billy, Karen, Jimmy, Linda (friend Wayne), Ronald (friend Tracy), Maxwell, Lindsay, Michael, Darla and a few more from Newberry, Michigan (names unknown at time of printing). Predeceased by two grandchildren Linda Marie and Lucy Marie. One great granddaughter Deanna MATHEWS. Loving brother of Stella (Jim predeceased) PAVLOT of Sault, Michigan, Ursula (Bob) SCHUPP of Meza, Arizona, Elsie (John predeceased) BOWES of Shorter, Alabama. Predeceased by brothers and sisters and in-laws Tony (Margaret) TRUDEAU, Isadore (Marge) WEMIGWANS, Lena (Bova) GRENIER, and Francis (Nestor) KARMINSKI. Will be sadly missed by Godchildren Jonathon DEBASSIGE, Alison RECOLLET, Darcy SPANISH, and many nieces, nephews and cousins.
Rested at St. Ignatius Church, Buzwah. Funeral Mass was held at Holy Cross Mission, Wikwemikong on Monday, December 15, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Doug McCarthy s.j. officiating. Cremation at the Sagamok Anishnawbek First Nations Crematorium. Lougheed Funeral Home.

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GRENON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-10 published
Marguerite Esther LOCHEAD
In loving memory of Marguerite Esther LOCHEAD, July 11, 1919 - September 2, 2003.
Marguerite Esther LOCHEAD, a resident of Mindemoya, passed away at the Mindemoya Hospital, Mindemoya on Tuesday, September 2, 2003 at the age of 84 years. She was born in Dalhousie Township daughter of the late Hugh and Marion (PARK) LOCHEAD. Marguerite was a teacher for 35 years, teaching in such places as Copper Cliff, Gatchell and Little Current before retiring to Mindemoya. She became very active in the Mindemoya United Church. She had many hobbies, including gardening, knitting and art especially painting with oils. Well-known and respected in her community, she will be sadly missed by all who knew her. A loving sister, aunt, great aunt and friend, many fond memories will be cherished. Marguerite is survived by her sister Marion "Betty" SLOSS of Spring Bay and brother Alex LOCHEAD and wife Mary of London. Predeceased by a brother Alex LOCHEAD and wife Mary of London. Predeceased by a brother Charles and brother-in-law Elwood SLOSS. Dear and loving aunt of Jim SLOSS, Susan GRENON, Mary Lynn McQUARRIE, Bill LOCHEAD, Charles LOCHEAD, Marian LOCHEAD, James LOCHEAD and Phyllis SPARKS. Also survived by 11 great nieces and nephews. Friends called at the Mindemoya United Church, Mindemoya on Friday, September 5, 2003 from 2 - 4 pm and 7 - 9 pm. The funeral service was conducted at the Church on Saturday September 6, 2003 at 11 am with Reverend Mary Jo ECKERT TRACY officiating. Interment in Mindemoya Cemetery.
also linked as linked as LOCKHEAD

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GRESCO o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-20 published
Urbain Paul HEBERT
In loving memory of Urbain Paul HEBERT who passed away Tuesday afternoon, August 12th, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital-Laurentian Site at the age of 70 years.
Beloved husband of Shirley (née (TYSON DUGIT)) HEBERT of Killarney. Loving father of Sheila (husband Bob SIMONEAU) of Gogama, Laura (husband Harold WARD) of Sudbury, Leslie (wife Nicole) of Nova Scotia and Yvette (husband Murray TESSIER) of Chelmsford. Cherished grandfather of Michele (partner Mike), Paul, Anthony, Kevin, Peter, Natalie, Kelly, Taylor, Chris and Steven. Dear son of Joseph and Mary HEBERT both predeceased. Dear brother of Blanche McDONALD of Hamilton, predeceased by Raymond, Robert, Ella PITFIELD, Flora PROULX (husband Allan of Killarney,) Robina GRESCO and Elwood (wife Mandy of Providence Bay). Sadly missed by many nieces, and nephews. Born in Killarney where he married Shirley in 1960. He was the Junior Ranger Subforeman for 24 years as well as a commercial fisherman. He was an avid outdoorsman who enjoyed trapping, fishing and hunting. Urbain was an accomplished goalie having played competitive hockey for many years. Rested at Veteran's Memorial Hall, Killarney. Funeral Mass was held in St. Bonaventure Church Killarney on Saturday, August 16th, 2003 at 11 am. Cremation in the Parklawn Crematorium. Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home.

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GRESSER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-10 published
GRESSER, David Lloyd
Died peacefully in the arms of his loving wife after 11 years of marriage at Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, on Monday September 8th, 2003. David was 48 years of age, of Waterloo. He had been employed with Apotex Pharmaceutical Co. of Toronto for 18 years.
Loving husband of Diana LOBB. Will be missed by his father and mother-in-law, Roland and Iona LOBB. Brother-in-law of David and his wife Rebecca LOBB all of Georgetown, and Rita, Rena, Dainty and Pat.
David is survived by his father Bruno GRESSER of Brantford. Brother of Richard and his wife Carol of Ottawa and Robert of Brantford. He is survived also by a niece Hope and a nephew Noah.
Predeceased by his mother Helen GRESSER.
Friends are invited to share their memories of Dave on Wednesday 7-9 p.m. The funeral and committal service will be held in the Edward R. Good Funeral Home Chapel, 171 King Street South, Waterloo, on Thursday, September 11th, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Reverend Julia GILL officiating.
Cremation.
In Dave's memory donations to the Hamilton Health Sciences Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be greatly appreciated by the family by calling the funeral home at (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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GRETHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-28 published
MURRAY, Mari-Ellen
It is with great sorrow that we announce the death of Mari-Ellen MURRAY on Saturday, November 22nd, 2003 while vacationing in South Africa. A vibrant and determined woman, Mari-Ellen lived life as a perpetual adventure, unaltered by her battle with breast cancer. She died quickly and mercifully while pursuing her love of travel with her cherished husband Andrew BISHOP. Beloved daughter of Norman and Nerina MURRAY; granddaughter of Luigia SINELLI, sister of Jacqueline, Stephanie and Rob WATSON, Marisa and Paul GRETHER, and Christine; treasured Aunt Mimi of Madeleine and Cole WATSON; much-loved daughter-in-law of Trevor and Barbara BISHOP; sister-in-law of Timothy and Michael. Our inspiration and pillar of strength, she will be sorely missed by all who knew her. Visitation at Kopriva Taylor at 64 Lakeshore Road West in Oakville from 2: 00 to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Sunday, November 30th, 2003. The Funeral Mass will take place on Monday, December 1st at 1: 30 p.m. at St. Basil's Church, 50 St. Joseph Street at Bay Street in Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Ave. Toronto, M5G 2M9 or Willow Breast Cancer Support and Resource Services, 785 Queen Street East, Toronto, M4M 1H5 would be greatly appreciated.

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GREYSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
GERSHENOVITZ, Percy
Died peacefully on Sunday, April 20, 2003, age 95. Beloved husband of the late Lily GERSHENOVITZ, father of Dr. Ruth PIKE, Anita and Dr. Bernard FRIEDMAN, Dr. David and Janet GREYSON. Devoted grandfather of Robert and Ellen PIKE, Stephen and Lori PIKE, Jeffery and Alyson PIKE, Maggie and Matthew GREYSON. Proud great-grandfather of Brandon, Harrison, Matthew, Jordan, Daniel, Benjamin and Jonathan PIKE. He will be greatly missed by many relatives and Friends. Funeral at Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West, Tuesday, April 22 at 10 a.m. Due to the Festival of Passover, shiva will commence Thursday evening, April 24 until Sunday, April 27, at 25 Whitney Avenue, Toronto. Donations may be made to the Harold and Grace Baker Centre Foundation (416) 654-2889.

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