GREANEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-12 published
Died This Day -- 13 school canoeists, 1978
Thursday, June 12, 2003 - Page R9
Adventure outing by Saint John's School, Claremont, Ontario, struck by high winds on Lake Temiskaming, single capsize caused panic and the upset of other canoes, led to deaths of teacher Mark DEANNY and boys
Todd MICHELL,
Barry NELSON,
Jody O'GORMAN,
Timothy PRYCE,
David GREANEY,
Andy HERMAN,
Simon CROFT,
Tim HOPKINS,
Tom KENNY,
Scott BINDON,
Kevin BLACK,
Fraser BOURCHIER
Autopsies showed all drowned but that some had been in water 12 hours before death occurred.

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GRECO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-22 published
ARDIEL, Ruth Winnifred (née FRANCIS) 89 years.
Died peacefully at Windsor Regional Hospital-Western Campus on Tuesday, October 21, 2003. Dearest wife of the late J.R. ARDIEL (1973.) Beloved mother of Joan DUFF, Karen MEYERS and Susan and David RUCH. Dearest sister of June and Fred ROEMMELE. Loving grandmother of Melissa MEYERS and Jim DONOHUE, Jay MEYERS and Tina ROBBINS, Allison RUCH and Ryan SMITH, Dave RUCH and Anne Marie PETTINATO, Julie SANDO, and John PECARARO, Jackie and Frank HAMILTON, Michelle and Joe GRECO and Natalie DUFF. Great grandmother of Max and Miranda PECARARO, Scott and Mathew HAMILTON and Kaity and Nicholas GRECO. Dear Aunt to her special nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews. Remembered by several cousins in London and Toronto. Born on a homestead in Marengo, Saskatchewan to the late Anne and Alfred FRANCIS; pre-deceased by brothers Lloyd (1912), Bruce (Royal Canadian Air Force, 1943) and her sister Dorothy HENDERSON (1964.) Ruth was a long-standing member of Beach Grove Golf and Country Club, Windsor and Tamarac Golf and Country Club, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Visiting in the Walter D. Kelly Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1969 Wyandotte St. East, Windsor, Ontario on Thursday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. The complete funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday, October 24, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend William GALLAGHER officiating. Cremation with interment later in Greenlawn Memorial Cemetery. In kindness memorial tributes to the charity of you choice, Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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GREEN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
Roy Allen GREEN " Squirt"
In loving memory of Roy Allen GREEN on Monday, April 7, 2003,at the age of 54 years.
Cherished husband of Darlene (née OLIVER.) Loved by children Lori and husband Terry CASE of Little Current, Jeff and Tanya of Sault Ste. Marie, Derek and fiancée Lesley of Espanola. Special grandpa of Braedan and Brady CASE. Will be greatly missed by sister Linda and husband Ron BOWERMAN of Sheguiandah, brother Gary and wife Nicole of Little Current, predeceased by sister Norma LLOYD (husband Gerald,) and brother Ronnie (wife Carol WESSEL.) Predeceased by parents Charles and Edna. Fondly remembered by parents-in-law Ting and Pee Wee OLIVER and brothers and sisters-in-law Mike and wife Betty OLIVER, Wanda & husband Lou TROVARELLO, predeceased by Roger OLIVER (wife June.) Uncle to numerous nephews and nieces.
Visitation was from 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm Wednesday, April 9, 2003. Funeral Service was held at 2: 00 pm Thursday, April 10, 2003, both at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Little Current.
Cremation with burial in Holy Trinity Cemetery at a later date.

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GREEN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Theresa " Tessie" Elizabeth MARTEL
In loving memory of Tessie MARTEL, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge, Gore Bay and formerly of Little Current passed away at the Lodge on Wednesday June 4, 2003 at the age of 94 years.
She was born in The Slash, daughter of the late Thomas and Fannie McMULLEN) BONUS. She was a homemaker, and enjoyed knitting, cooking and crocheting. Tessie was a hard working wife and mother, and will be fondly remembered for her pride, love and enjoyment of her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.
Predeceased by her beloved husband Fred MARTEL in 1952. Loving and loved mother of Frances DOMICH (husband Stan,) Winnipeg, Darlene WILSON (husband Bill,) Gore Bay, Allan MARTEL (wife Flora predeceased) Collingwood, Donald MARTEL (wife Ruth), Toronto, Donna SCHEELER, Wallaceburg, Norma GREEN (husband Allan,) Bruce Mines, Wayne MARTEL (wife Mercedes,) Winnipeg and Terry MARTEL (wife Jodie), Belleville. Predeceased by two children Gerald (Sonny) and Norman (Normie).+ Dear sister of Harry BONUS and Leah PHILLIPS both of Collingwood and predeceased by
brothers Allan, John, Herman, William and sisters Cecelia and Loretta. Dear grandmother of 16 grandchildren, 9 great grandchildren. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home on Thursday, June 5, 2003. The funeral service was held on Friday, June 6 from the Wm. G. Turner Chapel of the Culgin Funeral Home with Pastor Les CRAMP officiating. Interment Mountainview Cemetery, Little Current.

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GREEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-03 published
Stanley GOLVIN
By Philip MASS, Thursday, July 3, 2003 - Page A26
Businessman, husband, father, and grandfather. Born August 22, 1918, in Kielce, Poland. Died May 5, in Toronto, of an apparent heart attack, aged 84.
Stanley GOLVIN was a man who had a strong impact on others: individuals who literally owe their lives and their livelihoods to him; countless Friends, colleagues, and employees to whom Stanley was a mentor and a benefactor.
Not that Stanley was always an easy guy to be with. He was complicated and a man of many contradictions. He was exacting in his expectations of himself and others. Even so, he commanded unqualified loyalty, affection, and respect from even those of whom he was most relentlessly demanding. On the whole, we will remember Stanley fondly for his penchant for ideas and for his unwavering qualities of generosity, loyalty, courage, and just plain smarts.
Stanley's life was marked forever by the devastation that the Holocaust brought to what had been a rather commonplace life in Poland. Stanley spent most of the war in the Auschwitz concentration camp. Stanley managed to survive years in the camp even as he put his life in jeopardy time and again to bring food to other starving inmates and to help fellow prisoners escape. Astonishingly, he then managed to escape himself. This period in Stanley's life was not one that he could put behind him easily, nor did he wish to; he did his part in memorializing the Holocaust in several ways, including a video testimony as part of Steven Spielberg's Shoah initiative.
Stanley emerged from the war, like so many others, without a country, without a home, without an intact family, and without material resources. He did, however, come away with one thing of incalculable value: a worldwide network of devoted Friends with whom he shared a common experience that only he and they could truly comprehend.
Not long after the war, Stanley came to New York, determined to achieve personal security. In New York he met Sharon GREEN who soon became Sharon GOLVIN. They set roots in Sharon's home city of Toronto and Stanley, with a partner, opened a furniture store. The business flourished and developed into an impressive chain of outlets. Still restless, Stanley then set out to build the real estate business: that was his passion and is his legacy to his children.
Meanwhile Stanley's family flourished as well, with the birth of Stuart and Ilene and the eventual establishment of their own families. Then, in 1992, came the second tragedy of Stanley's life: the passing of Sharon. And yet, for a second time in his life, out of devastation came rebirth. Ella LOTEM, who Stanley had first romanced in Poland some 45 years earlier, moved to Toronto from Israel to marry him. A softer and mellower Stanley started to allow himself to sit back and enjoy some of life's pleasures, particularly his five grandchildren who adored him.
Stanley shared with me recently that he never could have believed that he would live so long. He was truly amazed by his long and fruitful life, grateful for the "mazal" that had been his companion, and I believe he was now resigned that his time had come. As Stanley would say, "I'm on overtime now."
When Stanley's four-year-old grand_son Benn was told that his Zaidy had died, Benn responded uncertainly, "But he'll be alive again, right?" Intent on having Benn understand the situation, we lost sight of the wisdom in his magical thinking. Indeed Zaidy will be alive again in a very real sense as Stanley's memory and his spirit remain alive and continue to guide us for ward. But before we could affirm this notion with Benn, he uttered simply, and in a soft voice, "But I love Zaidy." As we all do.
Philip MASS is Stanley GOLVIN's son-in-law.

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GREEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-30 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Aston Ignatius GREEN, late of the City of Toronto and Town of Flesherton, who died on or about the 19th day of February, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before September 15, 2003, after which the estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 25th day of July 2003.
Barbara E. GREEN
James MATHER
Wayne L. HOOEY
Estate Trustees with a Will
by: Hooey - Remus
Suite 400, Box 40
One University Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
M5J 2P1
Attention: W. Bruce DRAKE
Solicitors for the Estate Trustees
Page B8

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GREEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Aston Ignatius GREEN, late of the City of Toronto and Town of Flesherton, who died on or about the 19th day of February, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before September 15, 2003, after which the estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 25th day of July 2003.
Barbara E. GREEN
James MATHER
Wayne L. HOOEY
Estate Trustees with a Will
by: Hooey - Remus
Suite 400, Box 40
One University Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
M5J 2P1
Attention: W. Bruce DRAKE
Solicitors for the Estate Trustees
Page B12

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GREEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-13 published
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Aston Ignatius GREEN, late of the City of Toronto and Town of Flesherton, who died on or about the 19th day of February, 2002, must be filed with the undersigned personal representatives on or before September 15, 2003, after which the estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the Estate Trustees then shall have notice.
Dated at Toronto, this 25th day of July 2003.
Barbara E. GREEN
James MATHER
Wayne L. HOOEY
Estate Trustees with a Will
by: Hooey - Remus
Suite 400, Box 40
One University Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
M5J 2P1
Attention: W. Bruce DRAKE
Solicitors for the Estate Trustees
Page B7

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GREEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-23 published
CORNETT, Robert William, M.D., Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada
Died at Hamilton, August 14, 2003. Husband of 50 years to Sondra (MacLENNAN) CORNETT. Father to Shawn, Andrea, Ian, Sarah and Jeffrey as well as their spouses, IanR, Catherine, Bruce and Nancy. Grandfather to 13 energetic grandchildren. Brother to Margaret GREEN. A respected physician, educator and friend, he touched the lives of many in his 75 years.
Bob's family invite Friends and colleagues to join them in celebrating his full and happy life, at the Tamahaac Club, 180 Filman Rd., Ancaster (off Mohawk Rd. W.) on Thursday, August 28th between 3 and 6 p.m. If desired, donations may be made to the Hamilton Health Sciences Foundation, 237 Barton St. E., Hamilton, Ontario L8L 2X2.
''Immortality lies not in our soul, ghosts or spirit, but rather in our progeny, works, and in the memories of those whose lives
we have touched.''

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GREEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-17 published
Hit by bus, bicycling student killed
Police attempting to reconstruct events that led to tragedy in front of high school
By Ken KILPATRICK Wednesday, September 17, 2003 - Page A18
Burlington -- An 18-year-old student was struck by a school bus and killed while riding her bike outside her high school yesterday morning.
Jesica Marie GREEN, a Grade 12 student, was riding her bicycle across a driveway just 30 metres from the front door of Lord Elgin High School when she was struck by a school bus that had just delivered its students and was exiting on to the street.
She was pronounced dead at the scene.
The area in front of the school was busy with students and motorists when the accident occurred just after 8 a.m.
"We all freaked out," said a student who was part of a group standing in front of the school at the time.
"Someone said a person had been hit. She was kind of sprawled out under the bus. A passing car driver ran over and told us to call the police. We all stayed back... no one wanted to go any closer to see what was really going on."
He said it didn't look as if the victim had been wearing a bicycle helmet.
Three hours later, a truck safety officer and staff from the Ontario Ministry of Transportation repeatedly drove the bus from a parking spot in front of Lord Elgin to the New Street entrance. At one point, a woman stood behind the driver and videotaped the view through the windshield.
Dan MARADIN, general manager for Laidlaw Transit Ltd., said he and the company "are deeply saddened by the incident and our thoughts go out to the victim's family and Friends."
The woman driving the bus -- who has not been identified -- was traumatized by the accident, he said, and the company is offering her counselling. "She was a good driver and had been with us for 1½ years."
Mr. MARADIN said the driver had been trained by Laidlaw. Training to operate a school bus comprises 40 hours of classroom and behind-the-wheel lessons.
The Halton District School Board immediately sent its Tragic Event Response Team into the school to offer counselling to those who witnessed the accident.
Students who needed help immediately were called to the school's conference room where the response team waited with cookies and drinks.
One student, in Lord Elgin as the event unfolded outside, said they were told to stay in their classrooms and away from the front of the school.
"The mood inside the school was very sad and there were some tears," she said.
Marnie DENTON, communication officer with the school board, said the response team "is there to help students who witnessed the accident and those who were Friends of Ms. GREEN. They will be at the school for as long as they are needed. They have specialized training and help our students deal with the shock associated with tragedy."

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GREEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
GENSER, Bonnie
It is with great sadness that we announce the death of our mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, Bonnie GENSER, who died on Sunday, November 29th, 2003. She died peacefully, without pain, with her family by her side. She was predeceased by her husband Harold GENSER who died in 1980, and her siblings Rebecca JAUVOISH, Lottie BECKMAN, Bessie MELEMADE, David LEVIN, Rosie LEVIN, Esther POLLOCK and Harry LEVIN. She leaves to grieve her death and celebrate her life, three daughters, Naomi COHEN (Jared SABLE,) Toronto, Barbara BUTLER, Winnipeg, Susan STARR (Don STARR), Toronto, London, six grandchildren, 6 great-grandchildren. In addition to her immediate family, she is remembered by her sisters-in-law Esther Genser KAPLAN, Myrna LEVIN, Beverley LEVIN and Marion Vaisley GENSER, and many nieces and nephews.
Bonnie served in a leadership capacity in various areas of the community; president of the Bride's group, National Council of Jewish Women, president of Lillian Frieman Chapter of Hadassah, founder of the Shaarey Zedek Girl Guides, and later as a commissioner of the Manitoba Girl Guides. During her many visits to Israel she served as a volunteer in areas of agriculture, education, archaelogy, and social services.
She lived life to the fullest, and will be remembered for her dynamic personality, wit, charm, generosity, and infectious smile which made everyone feel special.
We wish to thank Vangie, Claire, Amy, and Ruth for their loving care.
Pallbearers were her grand_sons Scott COHEN, Paul RAYBURN, Josh BUTLER, Sheldon POTTER, granddaughters Hally and Misha STARR, and nephews Michael and Daniel LEVIN. Honorary pallbearers were Don STARR, Jared SABLE, Perry RAYBURN, and Mayer LAWEE.
Rabbi Allan GREEN officiated and her granddaughter Leanne POTTER spoke on behalf of the family. Donations in Bonnie's memory may be made to The Bonnie Genser Fund in the Women's Endowment Fund of the Jewish Foundation of Manitoba, C-400-123 Doncaster Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3N 2B2, (204) 477-7525 or www.jewishfoundation.org or the charity of your choice.

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GREEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-18 published
Black pride of Canadian track and field
First Canadian-born black athlete to win an Olympic medal was member of relay team at 1932 Los Angeles Games but could find work only as a railway porter
By James CHRISTIE, Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - Page R9
Ray LEWIS's event in Olympic track and field was officially the 400-metre sprint, a flat race. His enduring place in Canadian sport history, however, was earned for hurdling a barrier.
Mr. LEWIS, who died in his native Hamilton at age 94 on the weekend, was the first Canadian born black athlete to stand upon the Olympic medals podium. He won a bronze medal as a member of the Canadian 4 x 400-metre relay at the Los Angeles Games in 1932.
At a time where racial discrimination was the way of the world, Mr. LEWIS didn't get to live a hero's life. Viewed today as a pathfinder for talented black athletes, in the 1930s Mr. LEWIS had to all but quit his athletics training because of the demands of his job as a railway porter with the Canadian Pacific Railways. He spent 22 years on the trains making 250 trips from Toronto to Vancouver. To try and stay fit, Mr. LEWIS would train by running alongside the rails when the train stopped on the prairies.
"He deserved so much more than he ever received," said Donovan BAILEY, who won two gold medals at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics in the 100 metres and 4 x 100-metre relay. "I benefited from his going before.
"I had the honour and good fortune of having lunch with Ray LEWIS and talking with him. I couldn't imagine what it was like in his day. It was so different. Ultimately, he's one who inspired me."
Raymond Gray LEWIS was a Hamiltonian, cradle to grave. James WORRALL, honorary member of the International Olympic Committee and Canada's Olympic flag bearer in 1936, recalled the family roots in the area went back to the 1840s when his great grandparents escaped slavery in the United States and settled near Otterville, Ontario
The youngest child of Cornelius LEWIS and Emma GREEN, Ray LEWIS was born October 8, 1910, at 30 Clyde St. He began running races for fun at age 9 when he entered as contest at a local picnic. He began formal training in track and field at Central Collegiate where the autocratic John Richard (Cap) CORNELIUS was his coach. In 1929, he established a Canadian high-school track-and-field record of four championships in one day, taking the dashes at 100, 200, and 440 yards as they were measured then, and anchoring the one-mile relay. In 1928 and 1929, Mr. LEWIS was part of the Central relay team that won the United States national schoolboy title.
He briefly attended Marquette University in Milwaukee but returned to Canada during the Depression and joined the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Besides his Olympic medal performance with teammates Phil EDWARDS, Alex WILSON and Jimmy BALL, Mr. LEWIS was also a Canadian champion several times and competed in the inaugural British Empire Games in 1930 in Hamilton and the 1934 Empire Games in London. where he won a silver medal in the mile relay. Mr. EDWARDS was actually the first black athlete to win an Olympic medal for Canada in 1932, getting the 800-metre honour about a half-hour before the relay with Mr. LEWIS. Mr. EDWARDS, however, was native of British Guyana, while Ray LEWIS was a local.
Mr. LEWIS, who in 2001 was awarded the Order of Canada, had a life-long attachment to the Empire Games, later renamed the Commonwealth Games. He was an adviser to the bidders who recently sought the 2010 Games for Hamilton and vowed that if the Games were coming back, he'd be there to greet them at the official opening at age 100. The Hamilton bid lost out last week to one from New Delhi, India. He lit the torch during the opening ceremonies at the International Children's Games in Hamilton July 1, 2000.
Mr. LEWIS wrote an autobiography entitled Shadow Running in which he detailed his life "as porter and Olympian." He was featured in a 2002 TVOntario documentary series on racism, Journey to Justice. "It [racism] felt worse here, because it wasn't supposed to happen here," he recalled in the video.
Whereas white athletes had an opportunity for coaching jobs after their careers, Mr. LEWIS did not. His position as a porter was one of the few jobs open to men of his race.
"The first time I met him, the Canadian team was on its way to Fort William, Ontario, for the Canadian championships in 1933. They travelled by Pullman and Ray was the porter. He couldn't get the time off to compete. But he did make the 1934 Empire Games team and was presented to the Prince of Wales, something that was a point of honour for him. He felt it was something to rub into all those people who had kept him off teams and out of places because he was black," Mr. WORRALL said.
Mr. LEWIS married Vivienne JONES in 1941, and they adopted two children, sons Larry and Tony.

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GREEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-03 published
Stanley Charles WIGGINS
By L. Bruce CRONK, Wednesday, December 3, 2003 - Page A26
Family man, band leader, insurer, civic supporter, athlete. Born August 9, 1925, in Belleville, Ontario Died August 3, in Kingston, Ontario, of cardiac arrest, aged 77.
Stanley WIGGINS was born in Belleville on the Bay of Quinte in southern Ontario and lived here all his life -- to the immeasurable benefit of the Quinte community. His mother, Beulah, was of United Empire Loyalist background. His father Fred's family was from County Tyrone, Ireland. Stan loved his parents, and cared for his mother to the end of her 93 years.
At age 12, Stan was introduced to the trumpet by bandmaster Jack GREEN of the Salvation Army Citadel Band, a remarkable teacher who initiated many young people into brass music. Three years later, at 15, Stan joined the Commodores Orchestra, famed in Eastern Ontario for its mellow "Big Band" style. He played with them for 60 years. I recall the dancing slowing almost to a halt when Stan's silver-toned trumpet would soar into one of the well-known solos of Bunny Berigan or Harry James, followed by loud applause.
After high school, Stan entered medicine at Queen's University, until illness forced him to abandon the dream of becoming a doctor. He studied at the Ontario Business College and then joined the London Life Insurance Company, first as an underwriter, then manager. In 1948 he married Margaret MILLER, a girl from his own Belleville Collegiate Institute. They and their children, Joanne, Jim and Carol, formed a close-knit family, camping, cottaging and skiing together.
Stan was always physically active: a skier, sailor, camper, golfer and avid swimmer. After he developed cardiac problems, I used to see him at the Harbour Club in the early morning, swimming laps. I still look -- but he's no longer there.
Stan had the capacity to listen with complete interest whenever anyone addressed him. He was, indeed, "Mr. Belleville." His community-caring spirit was manifested in his service on the board of education and of the Children's Aid Society, his presidency of the Belleville Club and the Sales Ad Association.
Stan also gave his musical talents to the Concert Brass and 8 Wing Concert Band, and his own group, the River City Jazz Band. His daughter told me that as a young man he'd stayed with a relative in New Jersey, commuting to New York for special trumpet lessons, and had been offered jobs with several popular bands -- but decided that the constant on-the-road life of a jazz musician was not for him. He was more interested in family life, work, and civic activities. In 1997, Stan received the Quinte Arts Council Recognition Award "in recognition of outstanding contribution to the arts in Quinte."
On Saturday, August 2, he led the Commodores for three hours at the Wellington Waterfront Festival. A close friend and fellow member of the Commodores, trumpeter Bruce PARSONS, later said: "Stan was bound and determined to play that horn up to the day he died, and by God, he did."
On Sunday morning, he and Margaret received Holy Communion, and then, in the afternoon, went with Friends on a Thousand Islands cruise followed by a massed bands tattoo at Fort Henry in Kingston. While the bands played Stan's own arrangement of the New Maple Leaf Forever, a vicious electrical storm broke. Stan hurried off to the bus to get umbrellas for the ladies. Then he collapsed.
At Stan's packed funeral service, Reverend Peter JOYCE gave thanks for Stan's life, and then quoted the song The Commodores always play at the evening's close -- "We'll meet again, /Don't know where, /Don't know when, /But I know we'll meet again/Some sunny day." Amen to that.
L. Bruce CRONK has been a friend of Stan's since their boyhood.

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GREEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-09 published
GREEN, Sarah Besau (née BESAU)
Born in Schenectady, New York, 1936, died in Ottawa December 6, 2003, was the beloved wife of Paul, mother of Rebecca, Gretchen, and Amy, and grandmother of Madeline, Simone, Sarah, Adam, and Lili. She was the daughter of Marjorie BESAU and the late Frank BESAU, and sister of Margaret ZUCCARINI and the late Ellen ANGUS.
Receiving a Bachelor of Music degree from the Eastman School of Music in 1958, Sarah performed and taught flute for many years. She earned a Master's degree in English Literature from the University of Western Ontario in 1995, through which she rekindled her lifelong interest in Native history and culture. After moving to Ottawa, Sarah was active with the Ottawa Newcomers and shared her love of literature as a convenor of one of the book clubs and as a Newcomers publicity director. She spent many happy summers at her camp in the Adirondacks with family and Friends.
Sarah will be remembered for her devotion to beauty, goodness, and truth. Throughout her courageous three-year struggle with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, her spirit remained vibrant, and despite debilitating physical handicaps, she became an activist in raising awareness about this destructive disease. Friends may visit at the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 315 McLeod Street, Ottawa on Friday, December 12 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held in the Chapel on Saturday, December 13 at 2 p.m.
Donations can be made to the Champlain Regional Office of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Society, 225-250B Greenbank Rd., Nepean Ontario, K2H 8X4, or at www.alsontario.org. Condolences/donations at www.mcgarryfamily.ca.

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GREENBERG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-29 published
Ben HOCHMAN
By Marilyn HERBERT, Monday, December 29, 2003 - Page A20
Born in Wierzbice, Poland, in 1908, 1910, or 1912 -- depending on the document consulted. Died November 4, in Toronto, of general decline, aged (about) 95.
Ben HOCHMAN lived a very long, healthy (and unmedicated) life to the end. In his prime, his first 90 years, he could out-walk, out-carry and out-smile any of us. He loved being in his garden, or at his sewing machine, caring for his grandchildren or simply reciting aloud all the street signs while riding in the car. He cherished life and always faced it with a positive outlook.
He was born in Wierzbice, Poland in 1908, 1910, or 1912 - -- depending on which government document you were looking at. Birth certificates were expensive and especially difficult to come by. On my father's 75th birthday, he laughed and said he was sorry but he could not accept our gift because he was not yet 75. He had been drafted into the Polish Army at 19 instead of the obligatory 21. The only way he had of pinpointing the accurate date, was to recall the celebration of his bar-mitzvah.
Born to Naftali and Rivka HOCHMAN, Ben was one of a family of four boys and one girl. After their father had an accident that claimed the use of his hands, Ben and his brothers took up tailoring. In time, Ben married Hennele GREENBERG and they had two small boys, each born while he was away in the army.
War brought bitter times to the Jews of Europe, but Ben had always enjoyed good relations with his Polish neighbours. In the end, it was a good Polish family who saved Ben and his surviving brother, Yosef, by keeping them hidden in their barn for two years. During this time, two of the family's children were arrested and detained, but never gave up Ben and Yosef; the brothers, protected by the family dog, slept each night in the fields far from detection, returning to hiding at sunrise.
The war cost Ben the lives of his parents, his remaining brothers, sister and sister-in-law, his wife and young sons, but not his dauntless spirit. Ben and Yosef left Poland in search of a way to rebuild their shattered lives. When they arrived at the displaced persons camp in Feldafing, Germany, Ben met and married Fanny AJDELBAUM, a young woman he had previously known from his old neighbourhood.
Desperate to leave Europe's destruction and mayhem, Ben put his name on every emigration list he could find. Salvation came from Canada: Jews with experience and skills in the garment industry were able to enter Canada. An uncle, Mendel HOFFMAN, sponsored him, and so while his only surviving brother finally arrived in Israel, Benny, Fanny and Marilyn disembarked at Pier 21 in Halifax and moved on to Toronto, where six years later, Harry was born.
Life was never easy but, by working extremely hard, Ben made a good living, first as a tailor and, finally, as a smoke-shop proprietor. Ben never minded working 14 hours a day, seven days a week and 51 weeks a year, because he was in Canada. Although he missed his brother, he was forever grateful for the opportunities and Friendships he made here.
He raised two children, Marilyn and Harry, who gave him the loves of his life -- his six grandchildren: Jenny, David, Adina, Laura, Mark and Steven. He was a proud and doting grandfather who babysat, drove them to their Friends and enjoyed watching them in their various activities.
Everyone's life is unique, but survivors of any of history's atrocities will always have a special place. Regretfully, Ben and his brother, Yosef, both passed away this same year. Despite living half a world apart for more than half a century, their bond continues to be unbreakable.
Marilyn HERBERT is Ben's daughter.

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GREENBLATT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
GREENBLATT, David
On Tuesday, December 23, 2003, died comfortably at home surrounded by his loving family, at the age of 84. David GREENBLATT, beloved husband of Hilda. Loving father and father-in-law of Michael and Beth, Jesse and Joyce, Steven, and Caroline. Dear brother of the late Mitzi BURK/BURKE, and Ena PAUL. Devoted Zaida of Melodie, Elisha, Adam, and Joshua. David was the proprietor of Advance Lumber and Wrecking Company. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (one light west of Dufferin), for service on Wednesday, December 24, 2003 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Pride of Israel section of Mount Sinai Memorial Park. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the David Greenblatt Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto M6A 2C3, (416) 780-0324.

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GREENE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
GREENE, Margaret Eleanor

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GREENE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-13 published
Edward James HOUSTON
By Jim HOUSTON, Thursday, November 13, 2003 - Page A28
Lawyer, judge, war veteran, "sports nut," father, friend to many. Born September 15, 1918, in Arnprior, Ontario Died May 27 in Ottawa, of colon cancer, aged 84.
Ed HOUSTON accomplished much in his life: He was a bomb aimer in Lancaster bombers in the Second World War, a prominent lawyer and judge in Ottawa for almost 50 years, and the National Hockey League's first arbitrator. But it was his family and Friends, not his accomplishments, which mattered most to him. Speaking at Ed's funeral in Ottawa on a sunny Friday in late May, the Honourable Patrick GALLIGAN (Ed's former law partner and long-time friend) said there are "legions of people" whose lives have been affected for the better by Ed HOUSTON.
Ed was a product of his generation -- the people that came of age in the "dirty thirties," served their country in wartime, and then made their contributions (and let off some steam) as civilians in a more prosperous post-war Canada. Born and raised in modest circumstances in the Ottawa Valley town of Arnprior, Ed left home in the Depression to find work. He ended up working in a drug store in Schumacher, Ontario, near Timmins. There he met a Torontonian, Joe GREENE, who was to become his best friend and my godfather. Like thousands of other young Canadians, Ed volunteered for military service in the Second World War. His air force days changed his life. In January, 1944, he was shot down over Berlin, with five of seven aboard perishing, and became a prisoner of war for 15 months (he escaped in April, 1945). The veteran's benefits he earned through his wartime service gave him the opportunity to attend the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall Law School, which opened the door to a successful career and countless Friendships in the legal fraternity. While at university, Ed met and married Mary McKAY of Galt, Ontario, and the first of their two sons, Bill, was born. In 1950 they moved to Ottawa where Ed began his legal career as an assistant Crown attorney. Later -- as a lawyer in private practice and then as a judge -- Ed became known for helping younger lawyers learn the ropes.
Ed was, by his own admission, a "sports nut." As a participant, golf was his passion -- and on the course he was known as Steady Eddie for his straight drives and sure putting. As a spectator, he was an avid fan of almost every sport. Even in the final days of his life, when you handed him a newspaper -- another benign addiction of his -- he would still dive for the sports section, and be lost in it for hours. On the day before his death, he rejoiced in the Blue Jays having just swept the Yankees in a four-game series.
As a judge, Ed had to make lots of tough decisions. However, the decisions that got him the most publicity took place outside the courtroom, in his capacity as arbitrator for the National Hockey League. In 1991, Brendan SHANAHAN became a free agent and jumped from the New Jersey Devils to the St. Louis Blues. Under the free-agency compensation regime then in effect, Ed had to decide which player the Blues would have to give to the Devils as compensation for signing SHANAHAN. When Ed chose defenseman Scott STEVENS (who captained the Devils to the Stanley Cup earlier this year), his decision was greeted with a storm of media criticism. But Ed never second-guessed himself, and moved on.
In a letter Ed received a couple of years ago, another friend of his, the late Ray HNATYSHYN, former Governor-General of Canada, summed up how he will be remembered by family, Friends and acquaintances alike: "Ed, you have served your community, province and country with great distinction, and I am privileged to call you my friend." My sentiments exactly.
Jim HOUSTON is Ed's son.

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GREENE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
WINTERMEYER, Elizabeth ''Betty'' (formerly GREENE, née LANG)
Peacefully, at K-W Health Centre of Grand River Hospital, Betty died on Monday, December 29, 2003. She was 87.
Dear sister of Kelly NASH of London, Sandra ORR of Waterloo and Peggy O'BRIEN of Peterborough. She will also be remembered by members of the WINTERMEYER family, brother-in-law Bryson ''Spike'' KEARNS of Kitchener and her very special nieces, nephews and their families.
She was predeceased by her husbands, Robert L. GREENE and John J. WINTERMEYER, parents Angela (KELLY) and Reinhold LANG and sisters Ann KEARNS and Patsy BEAN.
Friends are invited to share their memories of Betty with her family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m., Friday, January 2, 2004. Prayers will be said at the funeral home on Saturday, January 3, 2004 at 10 a.m., followed by the funeral mass at St. Louis Roman Catholic Church, Waterloo, at 10: 30 a.m., Saturday, with Rev. Robert LIDDY, C.R. as celebrant. The parish prayer will be held at the funeral home on Friday evening at 8: 45 p.m. Following cremation, interment will take place in the WINTERMEYER family plot in Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener.

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GREENSPAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
TEPER, Morris
On Wednesday, March 5, 2003 at his home. Morris TEPER, beloved husband of the late Esther TEPER. Loving father and father-in-law of Luba and Johnny GREENSPAN, Helena BEN- DAVID, Irv TEPER and Karen HACKER. Dear brother of Zvi TEPER. Devoted grandfather of Joy and Nathaniel, Kyle, Koryn, Shelly, Jonathan, Maya, Robin, Sean, and Mattie. Devoted great-grandfather of Jordan ELY. At Beth Tzedec Synagogue, 1700 Bathurst Street for service on Thursday, March 6, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m. Interment Driltzer Young Men's Society Section of Dawes Road Cemetery. Shiva 3 Newgate Road. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Morris TEPER Memorial Fund, c/o the Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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GREENWAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
Died This Day -- Thomas GREENWAY, 1908
Wednesday, October 29, 2003 - Page R5
Merchant, farmer, land speculator, politician born at Kilkhampton, Eng., March 25, 1838; 1844, immigrated with family to Huron County, Canada West; supporter of John A. MacDONALD; 1875, elected Member of Parliament for Huron County; 1879, broke with MacDONALD and moved to Manitoba; became first leader of Manitoba Liberal Party 1888, named premier; ended Canadian Pacific Railway monopoly and encouraged Northern Pacific Railway to induce competition in freight rates.

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GREENWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-15 published
Maker of men: 'The Chief' ran Kilkoo Camp for Boys
For 25 years, Ontario educator ran a wilderness camp for boys and then helped launch Toronto's Greenwood College
By Allison LAWLOR Thursday, May 15, 2003 - Page R9
John LATIMER's idea of a perfect evening was visiting with young campers in their cabins at Kilcoo Camp, telling stories and listening to tales of their day's adventures.
"You haven't seen the Pied Piper in action until you saw John in action," said his long-time friend David HADDEN, the head of Lakefield College School, a private school in Lakefield, Ontario "The kids just loved him."
Mr. LATIMER's life-long love of Kilcoo Camp, the Ontario boy's camp he directed for more than 25 years, began in 1938. At the age of 8, Mr. LATIMER arrived at Kilcoo, located on the shores of Haliburton's Gull Lake, about two hours' drive northeast of Toronto, as a young camper.
He loved the outdoors and became an accomplished canoeist. After several years as a camper, Mr. LATIMER moved on to become a leader-in-training, counsellor and program director at the camp. Then in the fall of 1955, he bought the camp and became its director.
Mr. LATIMER, along with his wife Peggy, directed Kilcoo until 1981. It was as director of Kilcoo that he became known as "Chief" a name that stuck with him throughout his life. After retiring from Kilcoo, he had a cottage built beside the camp and remained active in camp life and as a well-known face to the young campers. Not long after stepping down as the camp's director, Mr. LATIMER's eldest son, David LATIMER, took over and continues to direct the camp.
Mr. LATIMER later wrote a book called Maker of Men: The Kilcoo Story, about the place he loved so much. He also co-authored a camp-counsellor's handbook. With his wide smile and keen interest in people, Mr. LATIMER captured people with his enthusiasm.
"He just had this special gift," said Mr. HADDEN, who considers Mr. LATIMER his mentor and the reason he pursued a career working with young people. "No one I know has had a greater capacity to love so many people."
Mr. HADDEN added: "He had the ability to touch people's souls, really I believe that."
John Robert LATIMER was born on October 13, 1930, in Toronto. After graduating from Lawrence Park Collegiate Institute in north Toronto, he went on to radio school. He completed his training and went to work as an announcer at private radio stations in Guelph, Ontario, and Stratford, Ontario, before joining the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto. At the public broadcasting corporation, he worked in the film department but continued to spend his summers at Kilcoo Camp.
"I think he worked to go to Kilcoo," said his long-time friend John KENNEDY.
At a party of camp Friends, he met his future wife Peggy MacDONALD. The couple married on April 29, 1961, and later had three sons, who grew up around the camp.
Not long after retiring as director of Kilcoo in 1981, Mr. LATIMER went to work in the Ontario government's Office of Protocol.
"He never had any intention of retiring," his wife Peggy LATIMER said. "He always said he didn't like golfing."
As acting chief of protocol, Mr. LATIMER was responsible for making sure visits to the province by the Royal Family and heads of state ran smoothly.
In his role, Mr. LATIMER and his wife had occasion to meet the Queen, Prince Philip, the late Queen Mother and several other members of the Royal Family. The Duchess of York, Sarah FERGUSON, spent time at Kilcoo Camp learning how to paddle a canoe.
From the Ontario government, Mr. LATIMER went to Royal St. George's College, a private boys' school in Toronto, where he was headmaster from 1988 to 1996. About three years ago, Mr. LATIMER and his son David sat down with Richard WERNHAM, a lawyer and entrepreneur who made millions selling his mutual-fund company Global Strategy, to talk about their dream of starting up a private school in Toronto.
Together they, along with Mr. WERNHAM's wife Julia WEST, founded Greenwood College School (the school was named in honour of Mr. LATIMER's mother, Zetta GREENWOOD.) The school, which emphasizes not only academic achievement but the student's emotional, social and physical development, opened last September.
"He fully believed in leadership and building leaders," said David LATIMER, who is the school's director of community life. "He always believed that through leadership, all kids could be helped."
An active member of the school, John LATIMER served on the school's board of directors and took part in interviewing hundreds of prospective students for the school's first year.
Having founded the school, which fulfilled a long-time dream, Mr. LATIMER pursued another goal. He got tickets for his first rock concert. Sitting in the 11th row of the Rolling Stones concert in Toronto last year was a spry man in his 70s, said his son David.
Known as a prankster, Mr. LATIMER's jokes ran from sending dead flowers on a birthday, to filling a room full of balloons, to placing a strange object in a bed.
Mr. KENNEDY can remember finding a plastic rose in his lush rose garden at his home in British Columbia and opening up his suitcase after a trip with Mr. LATIMER to find hundreds of packages of matches tucked away in shirt pockets, socks and underwear.
About three years ago, Mr. KENNEDY and his wife joined the LATIMERs on a trip to Disneyland in California. The two couples spent three days going on every ride, and exploring every exhibit.
"He revelled in it -- he loved it," Mr. KENNEDY said of the trip. "If there is such thing as an inner child, he had it."
Mr. LATIMER, who died in Toronto on April 22 after a short battle with cancer, leaves Peggy, his wife of 42 years, their three sons David, Jeffrey and Michael, and grandchildren Tori, Thomas, T. J. and Charlie.
"I do not regret leaving this Earth... because my life has been utterly fantastic," Mr. LATIMER said not long before he died.

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GREER/GRIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-02 published
Robert TROW
By Ann SILVERSIDES Wednesday, April 2, 2003 - Page A20
Gay liberation and A.I.D.S. activist, health-care worker, musician. Born November 23, 1948, in Toronto. Died October 21, 2002, in Toronto, of a brain aneurysm, aged 53.
The last time I saw Robert, he was bicycling north on Church Street near Queen Street in Toronto, heading to a meeting. Though he was running late, he graciously stopped to answer some questions I'd been meaning to ask him about the history of Hassle Free Clinic, the downtown Toronto sexual health clinic where he spent 26 years, first as a volunteer and later as a long-time staff member. A few weeks later, Robert was dead, and Canada lost a knowledgeable, tireless Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome activist who had kept up his activism until the day he died.
About 400 people attended his memorial service at Hart House Theatre at the University of Toronto. As an undergraduate, Robert had performed in that theatre, and he remained a member of Hart House long after completing two University of Toronto graduate degrees.
He grew up in Thornhill, Ontario, the eldest of three boys. His father was an engineer, and his mother a homemaker. Playing piano, which he took up as a child, was a lifelong passion.
Many gay men are rejected by, or alienated from, their original family; their gay Friends become their family. Robert was lucky: he maintained close ties with parents, brothers and extended family, and kept up with both (heterosexual) best Friends from high school and a large family of gay Friends.
In the mid-1970s, Robert began working and living communally. He volunteered on the collective that ran The Body Politic, a left-wing gay liberation newsmagazine published in Canada but with a worldwide readership. He wrote articles, mostly about health-care issues, edited, proofread and did paste-up -- but also took on the thankless task of distribution manager. He lived in a series of communal houses with his former long-time partner, writer Gerald HANNON, and other Body Politic collective members.
To his Friends, Robert was known as Bunny, and his foibles -- dithering, an aversion to drafts, a highly developed sense of personal frugality, a propensity to lose his wallet, a talent for being, as Gerald noted, sprawlingly messy -- were more than offset by his generosity to all and his wicked sense of fun.
When Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome emerged in the early 1980s, Robert helped organize the first public Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome forum in Toronto on April 5, 1983, which was sponsored by Hassle Free and Gays in Health Care. He went on to be a founding member of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Committee of Toronto. After a test for Human Immunodeficiency Virus was developed, Hassle Free became the first clinic in Canada to offer anonymous testing. When anonymous testing was eventually legalized in Ontario, the government adopted Robert's manual on anonymous testing guidelines.
Robert served on the Ontario Advisory Committee on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and other bodies. "But first of all, he was passionate about Hassle Free Clinic. He wouldn't take on anything that wasn't also good for the clinic," said Jane GREER/GRIER, his co-worker at the clinic. All the while, Robert was Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive and coping with the effects of his condition and medications.
The Ontario Ministry of Health awarded him a posthumous citation, and Toronto City Council observed a moment's silence in his honour. Silence was an odd tribute, Gerald noted -- because Robert almost never stopped talking, whether it was his "up-to-date" gossip about the Hapsburgs or the Holy Roman Empire, or his appreciative "Oh, boy!" when one of his Friends served him dinner.
Robert is survived by his partner, Denis FONTAINE, his parents Bill and Lucie, his brothers Philip and Christopher, and his wide family of Friends.
Ann SILVERSIDES is a friend of Robert TROW.

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GREER/GRIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-31 published
Deena (Dinny) Marion GREER/GRIER (née STERN)
Born December 18, 1933 10: 13 p.m.
Died July 27, 2003 4: 22 p.m.
Sagittarius
''Two roads diverge in a wood, And I -- I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.''
Passed away peacefully on Sunday, July 27, with her loving children, Jon, Wendy and Robin, at her side, after fighting cancer bravely for seven years. Loving grandmother of Mathieu, Stephanie and Lucas GREER/GRIER- BEAUREGARD. Mother-in-law to Stacey (Jon) and Bruno (Wendy.) Her former husband David GREER/GRIER remained a devoted friend.
Born and raised in Montreal, with Friendships extending from her childhood and McGill University days through to the Canadian astrological community and beyond, she was mentor to many who sought out her tolerance and wisdom. Deena was widely known and loved for her sense of humour and feisty independence. Her youthful and vibrant spirit will be sadly missed by all who knew her. Fly away, fly away...
Her family wishes to extend their deep gratitude to the caring staff of the Jewish General Hospital.
Memorial at 3 p.m. Friday, August 8th at Mount Royal Funeral Complex, 1297 Chemin de la Foret, Outremont, Quebec, (514) 279-6540, www.mountroyalcem.com
Condolences to www.everlastinglifestories.com
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made ''In Memoriam Deena Grier'' to the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, 790 Bay Street, Suite 100, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1N8 1-800-387-6816 www.cbcf.org

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GRE surnames continued to 03gre002.htm