FRARESSO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-05 published
FRARESSO, Marino (1915-2003)
Died peacefully in Kingston, Ontario of Alzheimer's. Predeceased by his wife, Mary (LOBLAW.) Loving father of Paul (Dianne) FRARESSO of Kingston and Natalie CRITTENDEN of Oakville. Dear grandfather of Samuel, Joseph, James, Rebecca, and Daniel. Brother of Van (Faye) and the late Charles (Marianne). Marino emigrated from Italy to Powell River, B.C in 1926. A 1940 graduate in Electrical Engineering from University of British Colombia, he relocated to Ontario with Canadian General Electric. He had a successful career with Ontario Hydro from 1944 to 1980. He is remembered for his fairness, principles, integrity and leadership. Sincere thanks to the staff at Providence Manor for their loving care over the last five years. A memorial service will be held at St. Andrew's Church, 47 Reynolds Street, Oakville on September 12th at 11 a.m. Donations to the Alzheimer's Society or Providence Manor, 275 Sydenham Street, Kingston, Ontario K7K 1G7 would be appreciated.

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FRASER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-12 published
Richard Nellis BOWERMAN
In loving memory of Richard Nellis BOWERMAN who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Health Centre on Thursday, March 6, 2003 at the age of 86 years.
Predeceased by dear wife Ethel BOWERMAN (JOHNSON) (December 12, 1975). Predeceased by parents Herman and Bertha (SISSON) BOWERMAN. Loved brother of Susie (1989) and husband Harry LEESON, both predeceased. Stanley (predeceased in 1997,) Hazel (1984) and husband Norman BRANDOW, both predeceased. Harold (1984) and wife Beatrice MEAD, both predeceased. Lila (1988) and husband Thomas SIMPSON, both predeceased. Burton (predeceased in 1951.) Melvin and (wife Dorothy FRASER predeceased,) Clinton and wife Betty DOAN, Stella and husband Ron MacDOUGALL, Pearl and husband Jack ABRAHALL, and Evelyn (husband Ted WHALEN predeceased.)
Visitation was held on Friday, March 7, 2003. Funeral Service was held on Saturday, March 8, 2003 at Manitowaning United Church. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery in the spring.

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FRASER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
Robert Thomas COULTER
In loving memory of Robert Thomas COULTER who passed away Sunday Morning, June 29th ,2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital - Memorial Site at the age of 59 years.
Beloved husband of Lenna (CASEY) COULTER predeceased 1999. Cherished son of Lloyd and Elsie COULTER predeceased. Loving brother of Ernest (wife Marilyn) COULTER of Parry Sound, Mary FRASER (husband Don predeceased) of Falconbridge. Dear brother-in-law of Joan LAFAIVRE (husband Len) of Haileybury. Sadly missed by loving nieces and nephews and their families. Funeral Service in the R. J. Barnard Chapel, Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury, Wednesday, July 2nd, 2003 at 1 pm. Friends may call after 12 noon on Wednesday. Cremation at the Parklawn Crematorium.
also linked as linked as LEFEBVRE

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FRASER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-31 published
Daughter of former ambassador to U.S.
Friday, January 31, 2003, Page R15
Toronto -- Rebecca GOTLIEB has died at age 44. Ms. Gotlieb, who was the daughter of Allan GOTLIEB, a retired diplomat and former ambassador to the United States, died of vascular cancer at Toronto General Hospital on Tuesday.
Ms. GOTLIEB attended high school in Ottawa, after which she studied political science at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, gaining her undergraduate degree in 1980. She decided to remain at Queen's to study law and, after graduating in 1983, went on to work as a staff lawyer with the Ontario Ministry of Health.
She leaves her husband Matthew FRASER, son David from a previous marriage, parents Allan and Sondra GOTLIEB, sister Rachel and brother Marc.
Staff

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FRASER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-04 published
CADE, Gladys Ann (née MIDGLEY)
On March 1, 2003 in her 85th year. Cherished and devoted wife of Don, loving mother of Marilyn and her husband Larry SCHREINER, Darlene and her husband David FRASER and Jim and his wife Cathy. Sister of Margaret MOLLARD and the late Walter MIDGLEY and fondly remembered by their families. Her grandchildren Ross and Duncan FRASER, Laura, Sarah and the late Robert SCHREINER and Matthew, Emily and Paul CADE will each hold in their hearts warm memories of ''Gan'', and of her love of life and laughter. She was proud of each of them. Glad and Don celebrated with their#60 great years of marriage last September. She will be forever remembered for her generosity, her compassion and her guidance. Her family is thankful, as was she, for her long and happy life. Surgeons Dr. Dana WILSON, and Dr. Peter SCHAAL, the medical and nursing staff of the Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga site, provided extraordinary care. During her short stay at the McCall Wing Continuing Care Centre she received comforting care and attention. A very special personal thanks to Dijana, Marietta, Oxana and Anna from Thornbrook Home Care Service for their love and wonderful care in the past months. A reception will be hosted by the family on Tuesday March 4, 2003 from 2-5 p.m. at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West, Etobicoke (between Islington and Kipling Avenues). Service arrangements are private. Donations in memory of Gladys Ann may be made to the charity of her choice, the Children's Wish Foundation Ontario Chapter, 1730 McPherson Court Unit 30 Pickering L1W 3E6.

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FRASER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
HARLEY, Ruth Margaret (née TAILOR/TAYLOR)
Peacefully on Monday, March 3, 2003 at the age of 94, in Ottawa. She was the deeply loved mother of Rory (Andrew) HARLEY, of her daughter-in-law Jane HARLEY and of her grand_sons Christopher and Michael. She was loved deeply also by her son-in-law Richard GWYN and by her daughter-in-law Danielle FRASER. She was cherished no less by her many life-long Friends, including Jerry and Helen O'BRIEN and by their daughters Sarah and Jayne and by Christian PAVEY, who all regarded her as their grandmother.
Born in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Ruth HARLEY studied at Saint Mary's Academy in Winnipeg and then moved with her parents George and Mary TAILOR/TAYLOR to Saint John's, Newfoundland There she met and married Claude FRASER; both of their children, Sandra Fraser GWYN and Nicholas FRASER, predeceased her. After Claude's death in 1944, she married naval officer Frank HARLEY of Glasgow, Scotland, who also predeceased her. They settled in Ottawa.
By her wit, her acute intelligence, and the warmth of her hospitality, Ruth HARLEY maintained an exceptionally wide circle of Friends, from Newfoundland, from her navy days, and from Ottawa. They, and others, may call at the Westboro Chapel of Tubman Funeral Homes, 403 Richmond Road on Thursday, March 6 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral mass will be held at 10 a.m. at St. Basil's Church, 940 Rex Avenue on Friday, March 7, 2003. In lieu of flowers, donations in Ruth's memory can be made to the Elizabeth Bruyere Health Centre Foundation or the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre. Condolences, tributes or donations may be made at www.tubmanfuneralhomes.com.

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FRASER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
The Globe was his church'
The editor-in-chief was mentor to journalists, defender of social policies, respected by those criticized in print, and described as a man with a 'warm human touch'
By Michael VALPY Thursday, April 10, 2003 - Page R11
In his two decades as editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, former senator Richard (Dic) James DOYLE wielded a journalistic influence in Canadian public life matched only by that of George BROWN, the newspaper's founder.
He died yesterday in Toronto, one month past his 80th birthday. His wife of 50 years, Florence, passed away on March 20.
Senator DOYLE -- editor from 1963 to 1983 -- gave the newspaper a boldly independent voice, loosening up its then lock-step support for the Progressive Conservative Party.
Under his direction, the newspaper would praise a government one day and lambaste it the next. He was a passionate defender of civil liberties, intensely engaged in the development of Canada's social policies throughout the 1960s and 1970s and as much concerned with the powerless in Canadian society as the powerful.
"In the time I've been editor," he once said, "we've not supported any party in office. I think we make whomever we support uncomfortable. We're the kind of friend you could do without."
He once said he felt more intellectually comfortable with Pierre TRUDEAU than all the prime ministers he knew, and one of his favourite editorial cartoons was one he suggested after overhearing his daughter Judith talking to a friend in her bedroom. It showed two teenage girls sitting on a bed under a poster of Mr. TRUDEAU. One girl says to the other: "He's not 50 like your father's 50."
His views, although stamped on the editorial page, were never imposed on his reporters. He was concerned with a story's news value -- not the fallout -- and he expected his staff to act with the same concern.
He wanted The Globe to be a writer's newspaper and gave his writers autonomy, even when their views went against his own philosophies. He had a special place in his heart for columnists who expressed contradictory opinions.
The young writers invited to attend the buffet lunches he gave regularly for prime ministers, premiers and cabinet ministers, bank presidents and giants of the arts were treated to superb tutorials in the life of their nation that left an indelible mark on their minds.
Warm, funny, theatrical and gregarious, he was a mentor and model for many of Canada's best-known journalists -- among them, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Michael ENRIGHT and Don NEWMAN, former Globe and Maclean's managing editor Geoffrey STEVENS, his successor as Globe editor Norman WEBSTER, and former foreign correspondent, dance critic and now master of the University of Toronto's Massey College, John FRASER.
"He was absolutely fearless," Mr. STEVENS said yesterday. "He did tough stuff. He did important stuff. And he refused to bow to pressure from business, from politicians and for that matter from journalists. I didn't always agree with him, but I always, always respected what he said."
Mr. FRASER said: "He was an editor who made young journalists' dreams come true. Like many who came under his spell at The Globe and Mail, I will go to my grave grateful for the horizons he opened up to me."
George BAIN, for years The Globe's Ottawa columnist, recalled the only time Senator DOYLE actually complained about something Mr. BAIN had written was when he filed an end-piece to a royal tour and suggested that the institution wasn't appropriate to the Canadian circumstances.
"Dic, as a devoted monarchist, was moved to say, 'Did you have to?' The fact is I felt I did -- and he, despite strong feelings, didn't say, 'You can't.' "
When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY appointed him to the Senate in 1985, he decided to sit as a Conservative out of courtesy.
Mr. MULRONEY described him yesterday as "a marvellous man, rigorous, thoughtful, with a disciplined approach to life and a very warm human touch to everything he did.
"When he cut people up, including me, there was no malice to it, no ad hominem attack, he was never bitter or partisan in any way.'The full impact of Senator DOYLE's presence as editor was probably first felt by The Globe's readers on March 20, 1964, when a front-page editorial appeared under the heading, Bill of Wrongs.
It was prompted by legislation proposed by Ontario's Conservative attorney-general, Frederick CASS, which empowered the Ontario Police Commission to summon any person for questioning in secret deprive him of legal advice; and keep him in prison indefinitely if he refused to answer.
"For the public good," the editorial stated, the Ontario Government "proposes to trample upon the Magna Carta, Habeas Corpus, the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Rule of Law.
"Are we in... the Canada of 1964 -- or in the Germany of 1934?
"This legislation is supposed to be directed against organized crime. In fact, it is directed against every man and woman in the province."
Soon after, Mr. CASS resigned.
Senator DOYLE's skills as a writer were particularly evident on an election night when the paper would present an editorial on the results between editions. Alastair LAWRIE, now retired as an editorial writer, recalled that once the results were known, Senator DOYLE would stand in silent thought for maybe a minute and a half and then start to dictate. In a matter of a few minutes, he would complete a reasoned editorial that scarcely required the addition of a comma.
Senator DOYLE preferred to work in anonymity, only accepting honorary degrees and later the seat in the Senate near the end of his newspaper career.
He sat on no boards, belonged to no important clubs, almost never appeared on television or radio, didn't sign petitions and seldom gave speeches. When he met a politician, there were usually witnesses.
He didn't hold a driver's licence and for years arrived at the old Globe office on King Street by streetcar. When The Globe moved to its present office on Front Street, Senator DOYLE took a taxi.
Retired Ottawa Citizen publisher Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and a close friend of Senator DOYLE, suspected "he didn't trust his Irish temper [to drive] and that was probably to the common good."
Mr. DAVEY said Senator DOYLE's low public profile "was part of his own protection against conflicts on his own part. The Globe was his church. Journalism was his religion.
"I think that Dic, in the context of his time, probably had a greater influence on Canadian journalism than any other single individual," Mr. DAVEY said.
"It was Dic's execution that made the Report on Business what it became and is. He was the moving force from within The Globe often unseen -- in the whole question of conflicts of interest as they affected journalists.
"He was really the wellspring of that kind of thinking and, of course, what The Globe did affected very directly what a lot of other organizations did."
Born in Toronto on March 10, 1923, Dic DOYLE seemed destined to get ink on his hands. He said in 1985 that he had decided on a newspaper career at age 7 and joined the Chatham Daily News as a sports reporter after he graduated from Chatham Collegiate Institute. He was promoted to sports editor, city editor and then news editor.
During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and served with the 115 (Bomber) Squadron (Royal Air Force) at Ely, near Cambridge in England. He was discharged at the end of the war with the rank of flying officer.
He was 23 and felt that life was passing him by, so rather than attending university, as other returning air-force officers were doing, he returned to the Chatham paper. It was a decision he said he later regretted.
He came to The Globe in 1951, initially as a copy editor, the only job available. His first byline appeared in The Globe in December of 1952 over a story about milk bottles.
In the same year, he also wrote a book called The Royal Story, a labour of love that proved to be a standard treatment of the monarchy, and which he was the first to acknowledge, replowed already well-tilled soil.
(The Royal family had a special status at The Globe under Senator DOYLE. One former senior editor, the legendary Martin LYNCH, told of being taken off the front-page layout after he replaced a picture of Princess Margaret, which appeared in early editions, with a photograph of a prize-winning pig.
When The Globe decided to publish a weekly supplement in 1957, Senator DOYLE became its first editor, with a staff that had no experience in the weekly field. The paper was laid out on the carpet of the managing editor's office after he had gone home.
It shrunk over the years because, Mr. DOYLE said, it was ahead of its time. It died in 1971.
From there, in 1959, he became managing editor of the newspaper and then editor in 1963. He stepped aside in 1983 to take on the role of editor emeritus and to write a column -- an experience, he said two years later, that left him chastened. "The guy [columnist] out there has his problems."
Former Globe publisher A. Roy MEGARRY, said, "In my opinion, no one -- including the seven publishers that Dic has served with during his time at the paper -- had made a more positive and lasting impression on The Globe than he has."
Likely among the greatest tributes paid to him as an editor came from the Kent Commission established by the federal government in 1980 to investigate the ownership of Canada's daily newspapers after the Ottawa Journal and the Winnipeg Tribune folded in virtually simultaneous moves by the Thomson and Southam chains.
In its report, the commission credited Senator DOYLE with "adhering to an ideal of press freedom that often tends to get lost in the management of newspapers....
"To a great extent, the editor-in-chief of The Globe belongs to a breed which unfortunately is on its way to extinction.
"The Globe and Mail testifies to the influence that continues to be exerted by a newspaper with a clearly defined idea of its role and substantial editorial resources. It is read by almost three-quarters of the country's most important decision-makers in all parts of Canada and at all levels of government. More than 90 per cent of media executives read it regularly and it tends to set the pace for other news organizations."
The Globe and Mail was bought by Thomson Newspapers in 1980. Senator DOYLE made no secret of the fact that he would have preferred having the newspaper bought by R. Howard Webster, who owned it before it became part of the Financial Post chain. However, in 1985 he said that Thomson was the best alternative among the others in the field.
When Prime Minister MULRONEY named him to the Senate, he became the first active Globe journalist to receive such an appointment since George BROWN in 1873. As an editor and a columnist, Senator DOYLE had often preached Senate reform and had opposed patronage appointments.
His acceptance prompted a flow of letters to the editor that favoured and disapproved of the appointment in about equal measure.Senator DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. Funeral arrangements have not been announced.

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FRASER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-05 published
Lawrence (Larry) C. UTECK
By Graham FRASER Thursday, June 5, 2003 - Page A24
Director of athletics at Saint Mary's University, politician, Canadian Football League all-star. Born October 9, 1952, in Toronto. Died December 25, 2002, in Halifax, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, aged 50.
When Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON pinned the Order of Canada on Larry UTECK's lapel in Halifax last October, there was a spontaneous standing ovation. The man in the wheelchair, silenced and paralyzed by disease, had won the city's heart.
Growing up in Thornhill and Willowdale, Ontario, Larry was part Tom Sawyer, part Huck Finn: mischievous, competitive, and profoundly resistant to being told what to do. He knew the joy and the pain of being adored and betrayed.
He was a talented athlete, but an injured Achilles tendon ended his hopes of playing hockey seriously. He went to the Jesuit school Brébeuf Collegiate, but his prickly resistance to authority resulted in the principal telling his mother every year to find another school for him. Every year, she prevailed and Larry stayed.
He had a continuing affection for waifs and strays, the marginal and the eccentric. He loved football, and played with reckless intensity, but hated being defined as just an athlete.
Larry went to the University of Colorado on scholarship, but insisted on taking East Asian Studies, and was furious when he was told he couldn't study Chinese because it conflicted with football practice.
He attended Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario, for a year before being drafted by the Toronto Argonauts -- but after his first season, travelled through still-war-torn Vietnam and Cambodia, taking extraordinary risks, collecting amazing stories and lifelong Friends.
Larry's career in the Canadian Football League was defined by his physical courage. He was a punishing tackler -- it was unnerving to see him straighten out his helmet afterwards, as if his neck had been unhooked -- and a self-destructively determined punt returner.
He paid the price. After five years in Toronto, he was traded to Montreal (where his interception and touchdown took the Alouettes to the Grey Cup in 1978), and then, as his body deteriorated, to British Columbia and finally to Ottawa.
After his football career ended, it took him a while to acknowledge how much he loved the game. In 1982, he was hired as an assistant coach at Saint Mary's University and moved to Halifax, where he fell in love first with the city, then with Sue MALONEY (whom he married in 1989), and their two children Luke and Cain.
He became head coach in 1983, taking the team to the Vanier Cup three times. He saw a world beyond the football field; he was as proud of David Sykes winning a Rhodes Scholarship as he was of the players who went on to play professionally.
In 1994, he ran for Halifax City Council and was elected, and in 1998 became deputy mayor. He was as hardworking and candid as a politician as he was as a coach. In December 1997, Russell McLELLAN, then Liberal premier of Nova Scotia, tried hard to persuade him to be a candidate. Tempted, Larry said: "I just can't."
He was already feeling the first symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; it was the beginning of a five-year decline and an extraordinary demonstration of grace, wit and courage. As he wrote his young daughter Cain, "I had a long, active, and productive life as a caterpillar. Now I am more quiet and restful, kind of like living in a cocoon. I don't know how or when or even why, but when this stage is over I will be a butterfly. Won't that be something, your Dad the butterfly."
At his instruction, the Bob Dylan song I Shall Be Released was played at his memorial service at the Basilica in Halifax, where 1,500 people came to say goodbye.
Graham is Larry UTECK's brother-in-law.

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FRASER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-02 published
James Edward FRASER April 1, 1929 - July 29, 2003
(Former Executive Director Track 3 Ski Association and in retirement tour escort for Golden Escapes Travel) Jim died peacefully after a short but feisty battle with cancer. Loving husband for 50 years to Virginia FAGE (Ginny.) Jim's zest for life and love of family is treasured by his daughters, Leslie (Ken HOYT,) Meredith (Ed YAWNEY) and Leah (Steven SPENCER.) Proud Grandpa of nine grandchildren, Meghan, Jenna, Taryn, Andrew and Owen HOYT, Tyler and Jennifer YAWNEY and Stephanie and Scott SPENCER. Jim was well known for his optimism and sense of humour which continued throughout his illness. His love of travel, good food (he especially enjoyed cooking for his family and Friends), music, theatre, dancing and skiing will be remembered by his family who will carry on his favourite tradition of all camping together. Jim was predeceased by his parents Judge Allan and Margaret FRASER and his brother John FRASER. He will be missed by his sisters Molly (Jack BOYD) and Diane (Michael McCORMACK) all of Ottawa. In accordance with Jim's wishes there will be no visitation. There will be a private family service and interment at Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa. A celebration of Jim's life will take place in Toronto on September 13, 1-4 p.m. at the Old Mill Garden Room. The family wishes to thank the staff at Sunnybrook Hospital and Cancer Centre who were so kind and caring to both Jim and his family. If desired, donations in his memory may be made to Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre or The Lions Foundation of Canada (a facility for training guide and helper dogs) (905)842-2891. Condolences and inquiries regarding the celebration may be sent to jimandginny13@hotmail.com

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FRASER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-02 published
FRASER, Jessica
Died peacefully in her sleep, at Toronto, on Wednesday, July 30, 2003. Born in Glasgow, Scotland, to James and the late Ethel DICK, Jessica emigrated to Canada as a youngster and grew up in Montreal. She began her professional career as a teacher and later proprietor of her own nursery school in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. A graduate of the drama program at Arcadia University, Jessica entered the theatre world as an award winning actress in both amateur and professional productions. After 20 years in Nova Scotia, she moved to Toronto where she discovered her talents as an administrator, becoming General Manager of Theatre Direct Canada. She continued exercising her teaching skills as a lecturer in theatre management at York University. At the time of her death, Jessica was Executive Director of the Toronto Theatre Alliance, having successfully produced the Dora Mavor Moore Awards, and was recently appointed by the Bank of Montreal to produce the prestigious Elinore and Lou Siminovitch Prize. She was a consultant to the Vancouver Professional Theatre Alliance and conducted research on theatre development for the Canadian Consulate in New York. She was a tireless and passionate advocate for the importance of the performing arts, and her community involvement was extensive. She was the driving force behind T.O. Tix, the Toronto Theatre Alliance's half price ticket booth; a member of the Board of Directors for Tourism Toronto and the Board of Management of Yonge/Dundas Square; and a member of the Advisory Board, University of Toronto Arts Management Co-operative program. The passion she had for the performing arts was usurped only by that for her family and Friends. Jessica is the loving mother of Andrew of Perth, Australia, mother-in-law of Rachel, and cherished grandmother (''Designer Gran'') of Lucy. She is the dear mother of Laurie of Toronto and mother-in-law of Tom EYMUNDSON. She is also survived by her father James M.R. DICK, her only sister Muriel and her husband David KENNEDY, her only brother Martin DICK and his wife Janet. Jessica will be sadly missed by her former husband and good friend Sandy FRASER, niece Tobi, nephew Rick, many other relatives in Canada and Scotland, and an extensive group of devoted Friends. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday, August 5th. A Memorial Service will be held at Can Stage (Main Stage), 26 Berkeley Street, on Wednesday, August 6th at 7: 30 p.m., followed by a reception in the Courtyard. If desired, donations for the establishment of an award in Jessica's honour may be made to Theatre District Canada, 720 Bathurst Street, Toronto M5S 2R4.

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FRASER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
FRASER, John Carling
Born in Vancouver British Columbia May 27, 1977. Died unexpectedly of natural causes in Victoria British Columbia on September 3, 2003. He is survived by his parents, Kitsy and Dick FRASER; brother, Brian FRASER; and partner, Jenn BAXTER; all of Surrey, British Columbia. John was a graduate student at the University of Victoria and was very active in the Boy Scout movement. A memorial service will be held Sunday, September 21, 2003 at 3: 30 p.m. at the First Unitarian Church of Victoria, 5575 West Saanich Road, Victoria British Columbia. In lieu of flowers, donations to Amnesty International would be appreciated.

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FRASER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-21 published
Margaret Evelyn SWINDEN
By Mark FRASER Tuesday, October 21, 2003 - Page A28
Wife, mother, grandmother, friend, volunteer. Born January 17, 1909, in Brantford, Ontario Died July 27, in Newmarket, Ontario, of Alzheimer's disease, aged 94.
The last time I visited my grandmother in the nursing home she was asleep and I knew she did not have much time left. I knelt at the side of her bed grasping her hand, hoping that she would wake up so that I could see her big, bright smile one last time.
She never woke up.
Margaret Evelyn NORTHMORE was born in Brantford, Ontario, and lived most of her life in Toronto. In her teens, she had gone to work at Holt Renfrew; it was then that she met her future husband, William SWINDEN.
Margaret's father passed away at the beginning of the Depression, when she was 21, so she went to work at Eaton's for $12 a week to support her mother.
Margaret married William in 1937 and they raised one daughter, Lynn; they lived in Leaside and later York Mills. In November, 1972, Margaret lost her husband suddenly, but, true to her character, Margaret went on living life and moved to a new house directly behind her daughter's home in Scarborough. The two homes had connecting backyards so Margaret would always be close to her four grandchildren: Mark, Bonnie, Ann-Marie and Katherine.
Margaret always put the well-being of others ahead of her own that's why volunteer work was a part of her life for nearly 25 years. She never received any recognition or awards for this work, nor did she seek any. She didn't do it for recognition she did it because she cared.
Margaret volunteered with the Oriole York Mills church for several years doing home visitation. Later, she volunteered for six years at the Blythwood School swimming pool helping handicapped children. When she was 71, she began volunteering at North Bridlewood public school one day a week to help Grade 1 children with their reading.
She loved children and enjoyed her work at the school so much that she stayed for 15 years. She was known as "Grandma SWINDEN" to countless children at the school over the years and she truly loved the work.
At Halloween, Christmas and the end of the school year she would take gifts or candies for all of the children in her class.
On her last day at school one year, the teacher had told the children that this would be Grandma SWINDEN's last day and that she would be back after the summer. One boy approached her and said, "You might be dead." The next fall she approached the same boy again and said: "Michael, I made it!"
In addition to her volunteer work, Margaret was very active into her 80s, working out three times a week at her health club, living by herself very independently and still driving her car.
She had a busy social schedule with her many Friends and even had a chance to meet Elton John, going to his concert in Toronto with a backstage pass when she was 85.
Margaret lived her life with no regrets and often said that if she could do it over again, she wouldn't change a thing. She will always be remembered for her love of life, her generosity, her laughter and the big, bright smile that never seemed to leave her face.
Margaret had a sharp mind, a positive outlook on life and a wonderful sense of humour.
Sadly, the ravages of Alzheimer's changed all that. It robbed her of her dignity and her independence. It took her mind and it took her memory. But it couldn't take her big, bright smile.
Mark FRASER is Margaret SWINDEN's grand_son

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FRASER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-28 published
ANSPACH, Herbert Kephart
Born in Ada, Ohio on September 3, 1926, died in Toronto, Ontario on November 22, 2003. Herb was a man of character who exemplified integrity, fairness, hard work, lifelong learning, and who made a remarkable impact on the world and people around him. He was a business leader in the U.S. and Canada, a patriotic citizen and supporter of the communities in which he lived, a dedicated husband, a good-humoured friend to many, and an inspirational father, grandfather, and father-in-law. His intelligence and hard work earned him an Engineering Degree from University of Wisconsin, a Law Degree from University of Michigan, many scholarships and academic awards, and a productive career from GoodYear to the U.S. Patent Office to Whirlpool, where he was a Patent Lawyer, Vice-President of Personnel, subsidiary President (Inglis, Toronto), and ultimately President of Whirlpool Corporation of St. Joseph, Michigan. He was successful in his work, inspirational in his coaching of all those he took under his wing, and generous with his wisdom and counsel to many through his profession, educational endeavours, and personal life. In his retirement years, Herb and his wife, Elizabeth, resided in Boca Raton, Florida while he continued to remain active in international business consulting, investing, Pro-Am Golf Tournaments, betting on every sports play-off, and keeping in touch with his family and Friends. Upon his illness in 1999, he moved to Toronto, Ontario with his wife, both under the care of their daughter, Heather Anspach FRASER. Here, he spent his valuable final years with his wife Elizabeth, granddaughter Ceilidh, and son-in-law Neil FRASER. A special thanks to those who have made his last years a rich and wonderful experience, from the folks at Baycrest Hospital (particularly Dr. Morris FREEDMAN,) the caring staff of the Bradgate Arms (guided by Stephanie REGENT,) the incredible team at Sunnybrook who made his last days comfortable (led by Dr. Robert FOWLER,) and the loving caretakers who stayed by his side until the end (Cecilia, Angie, Cora, Janet, Anna and Asher). Herb touched many lives in many places around the world. He leaves many who will miss him dearly but will remain inspired by his character for the rest of their lives. Private memorial services will be held in Toronto and in the U.S. Contributions will be accepted for the Herbert and Elizabeth Anspach Family Foundation, a charitable learning foundation established by their daughter to advance education and medical research. Those wishing to contact the family may do so through the Humphrey Funeral Home A. W. Miles Chapel, Toronto (1-800-616-3311).

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FRAYNE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-21 published
The soul of Canadian basketball
The coach who led national teams to Olympics, world championships, was a well-loved motivator on and off the court
By James CHRISTIE Monday, April 21, 2003 - Page R5
Jack DONOHUE knew how to win. His underdog Canadian basketball teams won games against National Basketball Association-bound superstars -- and Mr. DONOHUE won every heart he touched.
The former national basketball coach and famed motivator was arguably the most beloved figure in Canadian amateur and Olympic sport. Mr. DONOHUE died Wednesday in Ottawa after a battle with cancer. He was 71.
With his trademark New York Irish accent and gift for telling inspirational and humorous stories, Mr. DONOHUE was the soul of basketball in Canada for almost two decades and led the national team to three Olympic Games and three world championship tournaments.
His great players included a high schooler in New York named Lew ALCINDOR (later Kareem ABDUL- JABBAR;) Canadian centres Bill WENNINGTON and Mike SMREK, who went on to get National Basketball Association championship rings with Chicago and Los Angeles respectively Leo RAUTINS, a first-round draft pick of Philadelphia 76ers in 1983; guards Eli PASQUALE and Jay TRIANO, who is now assistant coach with the Toronto Raptors.
"For all he's done for basketball in this country -- not just with the national team, but with clinics and all his public speaking he should get the Order of Canada," Mr. TRIANO said.
Under Mr. DONOHUE, Canadian teams stayed among the top six in the world for 18 years. Canada finished fourth at the 1976 Montreal and 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and claimed gold at the 1983 World University Games in Edmonton. In the process they beat a team of U.S. college talents that included future National Basketball Association stars Charles BARKLEY, Karl MALONE, Kevin WILLIS, Ed PINCKNEY and Johnny DAWKINS. The monumental win over the United States came in the semi-final. The gold medal match was just as much a stunner, as Canada beat a Yugoslavian team built with members of the world championship squad.
Globe and Mail columnist Trent FRAYNE recorded how the loquacious Mr. DONOHUE had steered the Canucks to the improbable triumph, making them believe in themselves:
"You've got to appreciate how much talent you have," Jack would say, hunkering down beside a centre or a guard or, every now and then, an unwary newshound (Jack is ready for anybody). "You are unique. Think about that: there's nobody else in the world like you. If you want to be happy, try to make other people happy. Hey, if you want to be loved, you must love others. The way to improve is to do something you have never done. Don't be afraid of your emotions. Let 'em all hang out. Emotions are your generator. The intellect is the governor...."
And now, in the seventh month of July, it has all come about just as Jack promised. On Saturday night in Edmonton, his players, Jack's Guys, hoisted him upon their shoulders, and, for once, Jack's jaw was still. Blue eyes blinking rapidly behind silver-rimmed spectacles, white hair tousled, Jack put the scissors to that final strand and held the net aloft.
Coaching was a passion, not so much for the trophies, but for the human victories, personal challenges and little triumphs.
"I remember my father coming home tired and dirty every night. That's not for me. I love what I'm doing, so it doesn't seem like work and never will," he said.
Since retiring as national coach in 1988, Mr. DONOHUE has been the darling of the motivational speakers' circuit. In that regard, Mr. DONOHUE never quit being The Coach. He urged captains of industry to get the most out of themselves and build teamwork among employees as he did his players.
Often, Mr. DONOHUE told them to find opportunity even in the midst of problems: "It's all a matter of attitude. A guy leaves the house wearing his new, expensive suit for the first time, trips and falls in a puddle. He can get up and curse; or he can get up and check his pockets to see if he caught any fish, " he said in an interview with The Globe and Mail before the Los Angeles Olympics.
Mr. DONOHUE, who was born June 4, 1931, received a bachelor's degree in economics at New York's Fordham University and a master of arts in health education before serving with the U.S. Army in the Korean War. He began teaching in American high schools in 1954 and eventually wound up at New York's Power Memorial Academy, where he coached Mr. ABDUL- JABBAR and amassed a 163-30 record.
He later moved up to Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts., before taking the reins of the Canadian program -- at first coaching both the men's and women's teams. Mr. DONOHUE was inducted into the Canadian Basketball Hall of Fame in 1992. He is also in the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame, and was awarded a Canada 125 medal by the Governor-General.
When the National Basketball Association expanded north into Canada in 1995, Mr. DONOHUE became director of international public relations and director of Canadian player development for the Vancouver Grizzlies.
One of Mr. DONOHUE's proudest times in basketball came when Mr. TRIANO followed in his path as a national coach. At the 2000 Olympics, Canada -- with Steve NASH and Todd MacCULLOCH -- finished with a 5-2 record, defeating mighty Yugoslavia once again, as it had in 1983.
"We talked about everything from how to guard guys on the perimeter to dying. I think he's at peace with it," Mr. TRIANO said of his mentor at a recent Raptor practice.
"He taught with humour," Mr. TRIANO said of Mr. DONOHUE's coaching style. "We learned a lot because we were laughing all the time."
A colourful broadcaster, naming names -- at least pronouncing them correctly -- wasn't one of Mr. DONOHUE's many strengths. He didn't earn the nickname "Jack Dontknowho" for no reason, Mr. TRIANO said. "It was always, 'that guy,' or 'you over there,'" he said. "I've seen him struggle to introduce his kids because he couldn't remember their names. He always told me he liked doing colour for the European teams, because no one knew if he wasn't saying their names right."
He travelled the world, but the dearest sight for Mr. DONOHUE was always his own front door, in Kanata, Ontario, where he spent his last days. Behind that door were wife Mary Jane, his six kids and his grandchildren.
"We're asking you to hug your families, extra special, and we're asking you to enjoy life, because we sure did and we still are," Mary Jane DONOHUE said this week.
Somewhere, the busy coach found time for all he needed to do. He used to keep a block on his desk reminding him that there are 86,400 seconds in a day, time enough if he organized himself. Family was a priority. At least five minutes of Mr. DONOHUE's day had to be reserved for hugging his kids. He was a believer in family and in human contact. In his coaching years, when he returned from a road journey, there would be a lineup awaiting him at home, the kids taking their turns to make up for the lost minutes of hugging during his absence.
"I met him at a dance he didn't go to," Mary Jane DONOHUE said in the pre-Los Angeles Games article. "My girlfriend and I went and he had several Friends who were very up on it. But Jack said he'd rather go to a movie and would meet them later. He came through the door as my girlfriend and I were walking out.
"He asked why we were leaving so soon, and said there were two gentlemen he wanted us to meet. He introduced my friend to one of his, then I asked who the other gentleman was supposed to be. Guess who?"
Mary Jane DONOHUE felt trust instantly. "I could have gone across the country with him that night and felt safe. If he's for you, he's for you all the way."

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FRAYNE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
Moms always liked him best
The Happy Gang's popular lead singer had a good reason for saying hello to his mom whenever the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio classic was on air
By James McCREADY Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, July 12, 2003 - Page F10
The double knock on the door occurred every afternoon at 1.
"Who's there?"
"It's the Happy Gang."
"Well, come on in!"
Then Eddie ALLEN, Bert PEARL, Bobby GIMBY and the rest of the cast of Canada's most popular radio program would break into "Keep happy with the Happy Gang."
Mr. ALLAN, the show's main singer, accordion player and sometimes emcee, died last week, leaving Robert FARNON as the gang's sole surviving member.
Every day as many as two million Canadians tuned in The Happy Gang, which led the national ratings for most of its run on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation from 1937 to 1959. Until television came along in 1952, Mr. ALLEN and his cast mates were among the most famous people in the country.
The show was the creation of Mr. PEARL, who'd come to Toronto from Winnipeg (his real name was Bert SHAPIRA) to study medicine. To pay for his education, he started playing piano on radio with a band that included violinist Blain MATHE, organist Kay STOKES and Mr. FARNON, a trumpet player who would go on to be the most successful of them all.
The band morphed into the Happy Gang and Mr. PEARL was the driving force behind it. Eddie ALLEN was hired as the fifth member of the troupe and stayed with the program until it went off the air.
He was born Edward George ALLEN on December 24, 1920, in Toronto, and came from a family of musicians. His father, Bill ALLEN, played the trombone and was in a military band in France during the First World War. When Eddie was 10, his father asked him what instrument he wanted to play. The boy thought about it for a while and made up his mind after seeing a huge piano accordion in a music-store window.
"It was bigger than I was," Mr. ALLEN remembered, "but dad bought it anyway."
In a couple of years, he was entertaining at small events with his accordion, making $5 or $10 a week. Better than a paper route. He also won some local singing contests. When he was 17, he started singing and playing three nights a week on a radio program called The Serenader. Bert PEARL heard it and called him in.
"I auditioned him with Bert PEARL, and we liked him right away," Mr. FARNON says from his home on Guernsey in the Channel Islands. "He looked about 12 years old and could barely see over the top of his accordion. He was terribly shy, no self-confidence like the rest of us. He was very popular with the ladies, a very good-looking little chap."
What impressed most was his voice. "There really wasn't a singer in the Happy Gang until he came along. I really liked his voice."
Mr. FARNON remembers an incident from a Happy Gang rehearsal. "Eddie was about to sing a song called, I'll Take You Home Again, Kathleen, and I came up behind him and said, 'If you bring the gasoline.' He laughed so much he couldn't sing it when we went on the air."
The Happy Gang was old Canada, when the country was more rural and white skinned. It is impossible to imagine the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation mounting something so corny and wholesome. How corny was it? The host, Mr. PEARL, was known as "that slap-happy chappy, the Happy Gang's own pappy."
He also knew that sentiment sold. Mr. ALLEN would sing The Lord's Prayer on the program, two or three times a year, such as Good Friday, and during the war he sang it as an inspiration for mothers and their boys overseas.
By that time, the show's "appeal was enormous," wrote Ross MacLEAN, the late Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer and media critic who began listening as a child. "During the war years... its influence on the nation was profound. Its almost daily performance of There'll Always Be An England helped maintain home-front resolve and stirred at least this school kid into a frenzy of tinfoil collection, war certificate sales and the knitting of various items for the navy."
Among the cast, Mr. ALLEN was the kid. He was slight, about 5-foot-6, and looked as though he were too young to shave. A newspaper reported that while he was on his honeymoon in 1942, a hotel clerk in Hamilton didn't believe he was old enough to be married and refused to rent him a room. Even some of his fans were quoted by writer Trent FRAYNE as saying, "Oh my goodness, don't tell me that little boy's married."
On air, he always sang old-fashioned ballads. "Every mother would love the stuff he sang," said Lyman POTTS, a retired broadcaster who crossed paths with some of the gang. He recalled that one of the songs Mr. ALLEN performed on a Happy Gang recording was I'm a Lonely Little Petunia in an Onion Patch. It was popular on the program, maybe because it was the perfect example of the Happy Gang's sort of cornball humour.
Another example is the line Mr. ALLEN used almost every day in the early years of the program. Mr. PEARL had told him not to let fame go to his head -- "Don't ever get the idea that you're too big to say hello to your mother." So, for his first six years, Mr. ALLEN's opening words were "Hello mom."
During the war, they dropped the shtick for fear of hurting the feelings of mothers with sons in uniform. It sparked a letter-writing campaign. "Don't let Eddie stop saying 'Hello mom,' " Liberty Magazine reported in May, 1945. "He reminds me of my own boy overseas. I wonder if he could think of all of us mothers when he says hello."
Over the years, the show appeared 195 times, always live (tape had yet to come into use when it began), in the course of an annual 39-week season, most of the time with the same cast. Its time slot was moved when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation began running a 1 p.m. newscast, but the shift to 1: 15 EST didn't hurt the ratings. At first, it was produced in a studio on Davenport Road in Toronto and later in front of an audience of 700 to 800 on McGill Street near College and Yonge.
The program's mainstay was not talk or jokes but music, and the signature double knock on the door was an old-fashioned radio sound effect provided by Blain MATHE, who would move up to the mike and rap twice on the back of his violin.
Working together so closely did create some personality conflicts. There were practical jokes, usually aimed at the most uptight cast member: Mr. PEARL, a control freak who loved to plan the program in detail and had his own small office at the McGill Street studio.
One day, Mr. ALLEN and the other Happy Gang members set all the clocks forward by a few minutes. "We're late," they announced to Mr. PEARL, who raced into studio. After the opening, a couple of performers started to whine: "I don't want to do this."
Thinking they were actually on air, Mr. PEARL was shocked -- and didn't feel much better when he learned it was all a joke. It might have been one of the reasons he suffered a nervous breakdown (called "nervous exhaustion" for public consumption) and left the show in 1950 after 18 years and moved to the United States.
Eddie ALLEN took his place as emcee, but the incident rated an article in Maclean's by June CALLWOOD, the country's top magazine writer at the time, entitled: The Not So Happy Gang.
By then Mr. FARNON was long gone. During the war, he had joined the Canadian Army Show's band, and later led the Canadian band with the Allied Expeditionary Force, just as Glen MILLER led its U.S. ensemble. After the war he became a top arranger, working on Frank Sinatra albums and scores for such movies as Horatio Hornblower starring Gregory Peck.
Sinatra, however, was a little too flash for Eddie ALLEN, who preferred Bing Crosby. He was a sharp dresser, but his style was understated, almost always a conservative suit and muted shirt in a business where the shirt easily could have been orange.
His love of clothes gave him something to do when he left show business. Eddie ALLEN owned a men's clothing store in the west end of Toronto after he left the program. He later retired and moved to London, Ontario

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FRAZEE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
Eric Reginald HOARE On a sunny morning walk with his dog Cody and wife Rosemary (both beloved), Eric died a beautiful, sudden, death on March 3, 2003. Eric was born April 8, 1918 and raised in Orillia, Ontario in a close and loving family. He attended Queen's University before joining the Tropicana Oil Company and with his new bride moved to El Centro, Columbia. Returning to Canada, Eric joined Imperial Oil and raised his growing family of Geoff, Tony and Wendy. They lived in Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver and Edmonton before he and Roey retired in 1981 to British Columbia's Sunshine Coast. His retirement years were spent exploring the love for his wife, children, son-in-law Jerry, step grandchildren, grandchildren, dogs and cat. Any and all felt his love flood into them through a hug, a tick removed or biting into one of his many favourite varieties of cookies. 'Uncle Eck's' wealth of family includes Peter and Bev HOARE, David and Willy BOHME, Katie DRINKWATER, Rob and Pat GILL, Dave and Marlene GILL, and their families in Ontario, Mardee and Bruce BUDD and family in Alberta and the FRAZEE family on the west coast. Since Dad always enjoyed a party, two celebrations of his life will take place, one in Sechelt, British Columbia and the other in Orillia, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Sargeant Bay Society, Box 1486, Sechelt, British Columbia V0N 3A0 or the Sunshine Coast Hospice, c/o R.R.8, 308 Skyline Drive, Gibsons, British Columbia V0N 1V8.

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