FRACCHIONI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
MOYER, David S.
Born March 5, 1922 in Clinton Township, and died Tuesday, October 14, 2003, at his home in Beamsville. son of the late Ira C. MOYER and the late Georgina Isabella MacLEOD of Beamsville and brother of the late Margaret Irene BROWN, Etta Jean BLUMGOLD of New Jersey, Ronald Claus MOYER of Grimsby and Ralph Levi MOYER of Carruna. In 1930 Ira Claus married Agnes Rohde HANSEN of Denmark and had additional children, Elizabeth FRACCHIONI of Troy, New York, Inge VIAU of Kingston, Peter MOYER and the late Samuel MOYER of Beamsville. Mr. MOYER was uncle of Paul MOYER of Vineland, Thomas MOYER of Beamsville. He is also survived by his daughter Julia Grace DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS and her husband Steven and four grandchildren, Richard, Sarah, Cordelia and William, all of Whitby.
Mr. MOYER attended Queen's University in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and graduated in 1951 with a B.Sc. in Physics. He worked in Toronto as a project engineer and later as a production engineer for most of his professional life. He attended the Vineland Mennonite Church as a child and later the Beamsville Baptist Church. After his marriage he converted to the Anglican Communion and lived mainly in Toronto. In later life he returned to Beamsville and attended services in both the Baptist Church and the Anglican Church.
Mr. MOYER is at the Tallman Funeral Home, 4998 King Street, Beamsville, where the family will received Friends on Thursday 2-3: 30 and 7-8: 30 p.m. The funeral service will be held at St. Alban's Church, 4341 Ontario Street, Beamsville, on Friday, October 17 at 7 p.m. Cremation to follow. If desired, donations to the West Lincoln Memorial Hospital Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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FRACKOWIAK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-10 published
Stove maker got company cooking
Innovator steered Western Foundry Co. into supplying auto exhaust manifolds
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, June 10, 2003 - Page R5
An innovative Canadian businessman who transformed a small family company that produced iron stoves into the world's supplier of exhaust manifolds for cars and light trucks, has died. Dick LEVAN passed away in Brantford, Ontario, in late April. He was 68.
In 1961, Mr. LEVAN joined the Western Foundry Co. Ltd., now called Wescast Industries Inc., as a young engineer with little knowledge about the foundry business. At the time, the company, which now has more than 2,000 employees, had 32 employees who worked with primitive equipment in run-down buildings in the small, southwestern Ontario town of Wingham.
Fifty-eight years earlier, Mr. LEVAN's maternal grandfather Richard VANSTONE had been one of the first businessmen in Wingham to buy five shares, valued at $100 each, in the new foundry. Today, the LEVAN family is the company's major shareholder.
"It was his passion that has driven the growth of the company for the past 42 years," said Mr. LEVAN's son-in-law Edward FRACKOWIAK.
"He made things happen. He didn't wait around for things to happen to him."
Mr. FRACKOWIAK succeeded Mr. LEVAN, who stepped down as the company's chairman of the board in March. He was diagnosed with liver cancer.
In his early years with the company, Mr. LEVAN faced several challenges. In 1964, the same year he was elected president by the board of directors, replacing his father William LEVAN, the company got a contract to manufacture radiators for the Toronto Separate School Board. After a summer spent making the cast-iron hot-water radiators, they were installed, but when they were turned on, they leaked.
The company not only lost $64,000 replacing the radiators but their credibility in the cast-iron heating business. But Mr. LEVAN was determined to turn the company around. He steered the company toward the auto industry and in the late 1960s it started manufacturing auto parts. "He was a leader," said Clyde McBAIN, chairman of Winnipeg-based Ancast Industries Ltd. "He was a hard driver. He was tough."
Mr. LEVAN found himself faced with another tough challenge in 1978 that could have forced the foundry into bankruptcy. Ford Motor Co. recalled 65,000 Bronco transmission extensions that year, according to Wescast. The foundry took partial responsibility and worked with Ford to address the problem. As a result of the recall, Mr. LEVAN became determined to build quality control into the foundry's production system.
"He capitalized on this low point," Mr. FRACKOWIAK said, adding that today the company has an enviable safety record. "I think that was one of the remarkable things about Dick. When faced with a critical issue he could do something about it."
By the early 1990s, the company was a major supplier of manifolds for the Big Three auto makers. Under Mr. LEVAN's guiding hand, the company continued to grow over the next decade. Based in Brantford, Wescast now operates seven production facilities in North America. It also has a joint-venture interest in Weslin Autoipari Rt., a Hungarian-based supplier of exhaust manifolds and turbocharger housings for the European auto market.
Last year, Wescast announced that it had acquired Georgia Ductile Foundries L.L.C., a privately held auto-parts maker also in the cast-iron business, which manufactures suspension and brake components.
Richard LEVAN was born in New Rochelle, New York on May 30, 1934, but grew up in the town of Arnprior, west of Ottawa. He attended Trinity College School, a private school in Port Hope, Ontario, and went onto study engineering physics at the University of Toronto. He graduated in 1956 and two years later married Jane RYERSON. They had four children.
As a young engineer fresh out of school, Mr. LEVAN went to work for a refrigeration company in Brantford, Ontario, before moving to Wingham to join Western Foundry at his father's urging. Known as a demanding employer, Mr. LEVAN was respected for his hard work, directness and leadership abilities. He was someone who had an ability to "cut to the chase," Mr. FRACKOWIAK said.
An astute businessman, one of Mr. LEVAN's favourite expressions was, "Don't let your short-term greed get in the way of your long-term greed."
Over the years, his good sense of humour and ability to laugh at himself served him well. Just before an important meeting in Flint, Michigan., with executives from General Motors Corp., Mr. LEVAN discovered he had forgotten his suit. A colleague came to the rescue, offering to lend him an extra suit.
Mr. LEVAN arrived at the meeting the next day wearing the borrowed suit, the pant legs just short of his ankles. When the General Motors executives arrived, Mr. LEVAN decided to make light of the situation. "We had a lot of rain in Wingham last night," he told them.
Described as "fanatical about improvement," Mr. LEVAN was always looking for new ways to improve the company's products, which meant talking to employees and visiting them on the foundry floor, especially in the early years. On one such visit, an employee approached Mr. LEVAN complaining that he didn't have the right tools for the job. Mr. LEVAN went directly to the employee's supervisor and suggested that the problem be corrected. The supervisor, trying to play down the employee's complaints, told him the tools were fine. After listening to the supervisor, Mr. LEVAN looked at him and said: "You have to give people good tools if you want the job done properly."
Later, despite the company's success and his own personal wealth, Mr. LEVAN remained unpretentious and at his core a small-town family man.
"He liked to have the family around," said Mr. FRACKOWIAK. The family not only worked together but often spent vacations together.
Several family members continue to work at Wescast, including Mr. LEVAN's son William LEVAN, who is the company's vice-president of technology.
Outside work, Mr. LEVAN golfed, fished and was an accomplished pilot. He flew a Cessna 206 for years.
"Dick was never quiet," Mr. McBAIN said. "He liked to have fun."
Mr. LEVAN served on several boards, including Trinity College School, to which he donated generously. He also served as past-president of the Canadian Foundry Association and as past director of the American Foundrymen's Society. In Brantford and Wingham, his philanthropy was well known at local hospitals, churches and golf courses.
Mr. LEVAN, who died at his home in Brantford on April 29, leaves his wife Jane, their four children Sally, Bill, Bruce and Ginny, and nine grandchildren.
"He was more than a guy who knew business," Mr. FRACKOWIAK said.

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FRALEIGH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-19 published
SCOTT, Lewis Clayton - August 16, 1909 - September 17, 2003
Died peacefully at Southlake Village Nursing Home, age 94, after a full and distinguished life as a sportsman. In an era when shooting, fishing, hunting and riding were the epitome of sportsmanship, Scott excelled at all.
Born on August 16, 1909 in Vermillion, South Dakota, Lew came to Toronto at an early age with his family. One of his first employers was the Toronto Carpet Company (where he met his future wife Alice PARKER.) He then moved on to the brokerage business with Barrett Sye and Co. as well as in the Toronto Grain Exchange. He established L.C. Scott Construction Company in the 1940's which operated in Canada, the United States and England. After World War 2, the company built a large number of schools and hospitals in Southern Ontario as well as some of the post war homes that were built in New Toronto and North York.
Lew had a lifelong passion for horses. During a family stint in California when he was a youngster, he first galloped racehorses at Hollywood Park and when he grew too big, switched to exercising polo ponies. After his business career was established, he acquired property in Markham - Wyndstone Farm - from which he bred and raised thoroughbred racehorses, steeplechasers and sport horses as well as bird dogs and prize- winning Shorthorn cattle.
Lew was an equestrian sportsman of international stature. He competed in steeplechasing and timber racing in Canada and the United States winning a number of prestigious trophies including the Prince of Wales trophy three times. He played polo in Canada, the United States, England and Barbados and competed at horse shows across Ontario. He was a keen foxhunter and served as the whipper-in for the Toronto and North York Hunt for 20 years prior to becoming a Master of Foxhounds in 1972, a position he held until 1990.
He raised bird dogs and competed with them all over North America in the 40's and the 50's. He was a top fly fisherman and enjoyed duck and pheasant hunting. Both he and his wife Alice were crack shots and long time members of the Toronto Gun Club. As a young man, he was a member of the Argonaut Rowing Club.
At one time, a member or director of the Toronto and North York Hunt, the Canadian Hunter Society, the Canadian Equestrian Team, the Canadian Thoroughbred Horse Society, the Toronto Polo Club and several U.S. polo clubs, the Cowdray Polo Club, United Kingdom Canadian director of the Master of Foxhounds Association of America, the Goodwood Club and the Argonaut Rowing Club. He was also an accomplished pilot who loved flying and had owned several planes.
In 1989, after 54 years of marriage, he lost his beloved wife Alice whose charm, hospitality and hard work was the foundation of the family and the basis which allowed Lew's energetic pursuit of his interests.
Predeceased also by his only son Lewis Christian (Skipper). Leaves daughters Alice FERRIER (Glen) and Susan Jane ANSTEY (Michael VAN EVERY,) granddaughters Jennifer ANSTEY, Elizabeth TRACEY, Janet Louise GAYFORD, Mary FRALEIGH and Margaret Ann SPROULE. Great grandchildren Owen TRACEY, Will FRALEIGH, Jamie FRALEIGH and Tom FRALEIGH.
He will be remembered for his enthusiasm, toughness, loyalty and keen interest in the people and things around him.
If desired, donations in his memory may be made to Think First Canada (for injury prevention in sports and recreation), Med-West Medical Centre, Suite 2-227, 750 Dundas St. West, Toronto, Ontario M6J 3S3 or to the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Endowment Fund.
A Private family service was held. Arrangements entrusted to the Thompson Funeral Home, 29 Victoria Street, Aurora (905-727-5421).

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FRAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
BLOCK, Matthew Alexander
Tragically died of injuries sustained when struck by a car on Hallowe'en evening. Matthew passed away peacefully with his family by his side at the McMaster Medical Centre on Saturday, November 1, 2003. He was 12 years old.
Matthew BLOCK (Cambridge, Ontario) is the cherished son of Kelly (née FLOOD) and Robert BROOK, dear brother of Stephen, Kevin, Andrew, Caitlin and Jenny, friend of Brent, and precious grand_son of Ellen and Denis CASE, Dennis and Patricia FLOOD, Stanley and Evelyn BROOK. He will also be sadly missed by his great aunts and uncles.
Loved nephew of Sheryl FLOOD and Douglas RITCHIE, Christopher CASE, Leslie (née CASE) and Rodney GIEBLER, Debbie and Jerry and Dave and Denise; and cousins Nicole and Alexander. Special friend of Keith, Lena, Zeo and Matthew BENNETT; Ted and Joe GIBBONS Doreen BROWN and Lloyd STEWARD/STEWART/STUART; and all of his many Friends and their families.
Matthew was a student at St. Joseph's School in Cambridge, and he enjoyed playing left wing with Hespler Minor Hockey. Matthew was also an aspiring chef who shared his passion for cooking with all who knew him.
We wish to thank all those who have given us their love and support, and we offer our heartfelt gratitude to the staff at Cambridge Memorial Hospital, McMaster Medical Centre, and specifically Dr. Holly SMITH, Nancy FRAM, and Chaplin Steve. We were comforted to know that Matthew gave the gift of life to seven families through organ donation.
Our dear Matthew will be greatly missed by all who knew him. It was a great joy and honour to have shared 12 years with him.
Friends will be received on Tuesday and Wednesday from 6: 00-9:00 p.m. at Littles Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 223 Main Street East, Cambridge www.funeralscanada.com Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Clements R.C. Church, 745 Duke Street, Cambridge on Thursday, November 6th at 10: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. In memory of Matthew, donations would be appreciated to ''Kids Can Play'' and to the school that he loved, St. Joseph's in Preston, for any educational needs.

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FRANCIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Rick FRANCIS
Funeral services for Mr. Rick FRANCIS, age 47 years, who died Saturday, May 17, 2003, were held on Tuesday evening in the Blake Funeral Chapel in Thunder Bay, ON, led by Reverend Larry KROKER of Saint Anne's Church. Eulogies were offered by Kevin MAIN, Jaymie PENNY, Paul FRANCIS, Jennifer O'NEIL and Tamara BROWN. Numerous co-workers from the city of Thunder Bay, fellow coaches from minor hockey, neighbors, Friends and family attended the service. Removal was then made to Little Current, for visitation and Funeral Mass in Saint Bernard's Church celebrated by Reverend Bert FOLIOT S.J. on Thursday, May 22, 2003. The readings were proclaimed by Celina McGREGOR, Jennifer KEYS, Raquel KOENIG and PollyAnna McNALLY. Eulogies were offered by Kerry FRANCIS, Raymond FRANCIS, Jenny McGRAW, Paul FRANCIS and Ruthanne FRANCIS. The offertory gifts were presented by Kerry and Brenda FRANCIS. The Soloist was Rosa PITAWANAKWAT- BURK/BURKE accompanied by the organist Thomas NESHIKWE. Services were largely attended by long time Friends, members of Saint Bernard Church, and family. Honourary Pallbearers were Jeff FRANCIS and David LARSON. The Active Pallbearers were Allan ESHKAWKOGAN, Paul FRANCIS Jr., Robert McGRAW Jr., Craig KOENIG, Mike McNALLY and Chris KEYS.

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FRANCIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
FRANCIS, Elizabeth DAWSON
Betty passed away peacefully at home on February 17, 2003 in her 85th year. Cherished wife of the late Al FRANCIS and much-loved mother of Bob and wife Barb, John and wife Cathy, and Jane and husband Dave. Devoted grandmother to Shaun, Kyle, Nicole, Diane and Bill, and loving sister and aunt to twin Barbara GILMOUR, husband Doug and all their family. Betty's love of family is a rich legacy that she has left to us all. Her zest for life and keen caring for others greatly touched all who knew her. We wish to thank the wonderful staff at 4 Teddington Park, your care was exceptional. A private family memorial will be held to celebrate Betty's life. Donations to Alzheimer Society Toronto, 2323 Yonge Street, Suite 500, Toronto, Ontario M4P 2C9 would be appreciated.

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FRANCIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
FRANCIS, Peter Norton
Suddenly, in Meaford on Wednesday March 5, 2003. Peter FRANCIS, loved husband of Elizabeth EARLY, of Meaford in his 61st year. son of the late Arthur and Jean (KNOWLES) FRANCIS. Loving father of Charles FRANCIS of Toronto. Dear brother of Janet (Ron) PURSER of Brockville. Also remembered by nieces Margaret, Beth and Barbara and great-uncle of Sarah and Amy. Also survived by a brother-in-law Steve EARLY. Funeral services will be conducted at Meaford United Church on Saturday, March 8 at 2: 30 p.m. with interment at Lakeview Cemetery following. Friends will be received at the Ferguson Funeral Home, 48 Boucher Street East, Meaford on Friday from 2 until 5 o'clock. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Meaford Hall Restoration Fund or Meaford General Hospital Foundation would be appreciated and may be made through the Ferguson Funeral Home (519-538-1320).

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FRANCIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-22 published
ARDIEL, Ruth Winnifred (née FRANCIS) 89 years.
Died peacefully at Windsor Regional Hospital-Western Campus on Tuesday, October 21, 2003. Dearest wife of the late J.R. ARDIEL (1973.) Beloved mother of Joan DUFF, Karen MEYERS and Susan and David RUCH. Dearest sister of June and Fred ROEMMELE. Loving grandmother of Melissa MEYERS and Jim DONOHUE, Jay MEYERS and Tina ROBBINS, Allison RUCH and Ryan SMITH, Dave RUCH and Anne Marie PETTINATO, Julie SANDO, and John PECARARO, Jackie and Frank HAMILTON, Michelle and Joe GRECO and Natalie DUFF. Great grandmother of Max and Miranda PECARARO, Scott and Mathew HAMILTON and Kaity and Nicholas GRECO. Dear Aunt to her special nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews. Remembered by several cousins in London and Toronto. Born on a homestead in Marengo, Saskatchewan to the late Anne and Alfred FRANCIS; pre-deceased by brothers Lloyd (1912), Bruce (Royal Canadian Air Force, 1943) and her sister Dorothy HENDERSON (1964.) Ruth was a long-standing member of Beach Grove Golf and Country Club, Windsor and Tamarac Golf and Country Club, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Visiting in the Walter D. Kelly Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1969 Wyandotte St. East, Windsor, Ontario on Thursday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. The complete funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday, October 24, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend William GALLAGHER officiating. Cremation with interment later in Greenlawn Memorial Cemetery. In kindness memorial tributes to the charity of you choice, Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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FRANCIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-24 published
'The lovable rogue' who made and lost fortunes
One of Canada's most successful real-estate salesmen threw famous parties, especially during the 1980s boom, when he brokered property deals worth more than $10-billion
By James McCREADY, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, December 24, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- His Friends called him a lovable rogue. His enemies left out the lovable. Eddy COGAN was a love-him or hate-him kind of guy, a brash real-estate salesman, maybe the most successful real-estate salesmen of his era in Canada. He sold more than $10-billion of real estate in the 1980s, by far his most successful decade.
When Eddy COGAN died in late October, people remembered two things about him straightaway: He was the one who brokered the huge Greymac apartment deal. And he was also the greatest party-giver of the 1980s in Toronto, spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on a three-day bash, when he would take over the entire Windsor Arms Hotel -- rooms, restaurants and bars -- and open them to his Friends.
Mr. COGAN brokered a deal in 1982 to sell 10,931 apartment units belonging to Cadillac Fairview to a group led by Leonard ROSENBERG of Greymac Trust. The sale was worth $320-million but Mr. COGAN found out a couple of hours later that Mr. ROSENBERG and his partners had flipped the buildings, selling them for $500-million to what turned out to be a fictitious Saudi Arabian consortium. Mr. ROSENBERG eventually went to jail, but Mr. COGAN was clean since he didn't have any part in the illegal flip.
Edwin Aubrey COGAN was born on October 5, 1934. His father had fled Ukraine after the Russian Revolution. It was a sound decision, since Stalin starved the Ukrainian peasants in the 1930s and Hitler's death squads killed almost all the Jews in Kiev during the Nazi occupation.
Eddy's father was a professional boxer and waiter who changed his name from COHEN to COGAN to get work at Toronto's Park Plaza Hotel, which didn't hire Jews in the 1930s. Eddy went to Palmerston Public School but wasn't much of a student and dropped out of school in Grade 9. At 15, he went west and worked in the woods in British Columbia.
A few years of manual labour had him thinking about a change, and he returned to school and qualified as a land surveyor. After many years working surveying properties, he decided to move into real estate. In the 1950s, when Mr. COGAN started doing property deals, most of the action was in what is called "assembling" land, which means buying up huge tracts of land, not just in the country but also in the city.
Mr. COGAN would do things such as go door-to-door asking people if they wanted to sell their houses or buildings. He was working for developers such as Cadillac Fairview, which in turn would put up a strip of high-rise apartment buildings once the land had been assembled. Probably more than any town planner, Mr. COGAN changed the face of Toronto from the 1950s to the 1980s.
"After rent control came in, in 1975, there was less demand for buildings," says Larry COGAN, who worked with his father for more than 20 years. "It was the main reason Cadillac Fairview decided to sell off those properties."
It was that deal that made Eddy COGAN rich and allowed him to launch the famous parties of the 1980s. The parties ended with the real-estate crash of 1989-90. Mr. COGAN had invested in a 6,000-acre property called the "jail lands" just north of the city. It was an old prison farm that was to be turned into a residential development. When the property boom went bust, so did Mr. COGAN. It was the end of one big fortune and the start of a decade spent rebuilding his wealth. In the 1990s, perhaps his most successful transaction involved Terminal 3 at Toronto's Pearson Airport.
Mr. COGAN was a slender man with a wiry build and movie-star good looks. Women found him attractive, and his Friends said that women were his weakness. He enjoyed spending time in Los Angeles and New York in the company of models and actresses -- some famous, some not.
"When he saw an opportunity to be with a high-profile, beautiful woman, he would approach it like a real-estate project," his son Larry said. "He would network and use all his skills to close the deal."
Like many people who work on deals for a living, Eddy COGAN had an unconventional business day, in particular in the latter part of his career. He loathed gadgets. He didn't like cellphones or computers and never had an e-mail address of his own. Rather than offices, he preferred to meet in restaurants, though he was a light eater and didn't drink much. After the Windsor Arms and its restaurants closed, he switched to Prego, a restaurant in Yorkville.
Mr. COGAN lived his work. He was always working on a deal, micromanaging it to make sure the project came off.
"He was a big thinker. He was very fit and he liked to walk and think," said Diane FRANCIS, the journalist who became a close friend after doing a few stories on him in the mid-1980s. "The last big deal he was working on was in Niagara Falls, New York."
When he first looked at Niagara Falls, the town on the Ontario side was a success, with a casino and a diversified tourist trade. Niagara Falls, New York was a dump, with an empty centre, shuttered factories and a neighbourhood that was a household name for environmental catastrophe, Love Canal. Mr. COGAN spent the better part of a decade trying to develop the New York side into a place as successful as the Ontario side. At the time of his death, a casino had opened on the New York side and he was closer to putting his dream together.
He lived in downtown Toronto in a huge penthouse in the Colonnade on Bloor Street, a rental apartment with a small swimming pool inside the unit. Mr. COGAN was a generous man, always willing to help his Friends. Once, when promoters were trying to put together a race between American and Canadian superstar sprinters, Mr. COGAN helped bankroll it. It lost money.
Mr. COGAN married once and divorced. He leaves his six children.

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FRANCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-23 published
FRANCK, Florence (née VALE)
Died peacefully at Eden Manor on July 18, 2003, following a long illness at the age of 94. She was the widow of the well known Toronto artist Albert J. FRANCK, and a noted painted and writer in her own right. Friends of Florie who may wish to honour her memory are asked to send a donation to Nellie's Hostels for Women.

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FRANK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-28 published
He had a passion for big cats
Canadian wildlife biologist pioneered long-running cougar project, radio-tracked lions in East Africa
By Allison LAWLOR Monday, July 28, 2003 - Page R7
Ian ROSS, a Canadian wildlife biologist whose love of big cats took him deep into the bush in East Africa, has died after his small plane crashed in central Kenya. He was 44.
Mr. ROSS was radio-tracking lions in Kenya's Laikipia district as part of a research study aimed at improving the conservation of large carnivores in Africa, when the two-seater Husky aircraft he was a passenger in crashed and burned.
The plane, which was flying at a low altitude in order to allow him to track the animals, crashed in the early evening of June 29. Mr. ROSS and the American pilot who was flying the plane were killed instantly, said Laurence FRANK, director of the Laikipia Predator Project and a research associate at the University of California at Berkeley.
Mr. ROSS, who arrived in Kenya from Calgary in January, had intended to stay there working on the project for at least a year.
"He had this real passion for big cats. He wanted to study them around the world," said Vivian PHARIS, who sits on the board of directors at the Alberta Wilderness Association, of which Mr. ROSS was a member for close to 20 years.
"Large carnivores are interesting because their populations tend to be the first to suffer from human activities," Mr. ROSS said a few years ago in a short article written on the occasion of a high-school reunion. "They require huge land areas and some of their characteristics are very similar to and conflict with our own."
Although Mr. ROSS had spent considerable time in the field researching several wild animals, including lions, grizzly bears and moose, Mr. ROSS was best known for his expertise on cougars.
In the mid-1990s, he and colleague Martin JALKOTZY, with whom he ran a small Calgary-based consulting firm called Arc Wildlife Services, completed a 14-year study on cougars.
The study, considered the longest-running cougar project and the most intensive of its kind, looked at everything from cougar population dynamics, to the effects of hunting, to food and habitat use.
The intensive fieldwork took place in the winter in the foothills of Alberta. Winter allowed the researchers to follow a cougar's tracks in the snow. Once a cat was tracked, with the help of dogs, the animal would be tranquillized before it was radio-collared and its measurements were taken.
"We worked really well as a team," Mr. JALKOTZY said. "It was something Ian did quite well."
The cougar project received wide public attention when Mr. ROSS appeared on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's Morningside with Peter GZOWSKI and Arthur BLACK, the former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio host, followed along with Mr. ROSS and Mr. JALKOTZY while they radio-collared a cougar. Mr. BLACK recorded the event for his program Basic Black.
In the mid-1980s, not long after Mr. ROSS became involved in the study, he lost his friend and mentor Orvall PALL. Mr. PALL was killed in a plane crash while tracking bighorn sheep in Alberta. At the time of his death he was working with Mr. ROSS and Mr. JALKOTZY on the cougar project.
Over the years, Mr. ROSS, who was described as quiet and unassuming, made a number of public presentations on the cougar study. He was especially in demand in 2001 after a woman was killed by a cougar while cross-country skiing near Banff, Alberta.
"Ian really believed in public education," believing it was the first step toward conservation, Mr. JALKOTZY said. Speaking publicly also helped to raise money, from individual donors, corporations and other sources, for the independent study.
Mr. ROSS also did a lot of work with Alberta Fish and Wildlife and was instrumental, along with Mr. JALKOTZY, in getting the province to adopt a new cougar wildlife management plan to control hunting.
Ian ROSS was born on December 16, 1958, in Goderich, Ontario He was the third of four children born to Burns and Ruth ROSS. Childhood was spent in the fields of Huron County near his home, climbing through muskrat swamps and collecting pelts and animal skulls.
After high school, Mr. ROSS left Goderich for Guelph, Ontario, where he studied wildlife biology. In 1982, he graduated from the University of Guelph with an honours degree. Soon after, he packed up his pickup truck with all his possessions and drove west to Alberta. After a short stint working as a beekeeper in the Peace River area, he was hired by a small private consulting firm in Calgary as a wildlife biologist and started studying grizzly bears and moose.
In 1984, he married Sheri MacLAREN, also from Goderich. The couple separated in January, 2002.
Over the course of his career, Mr. ROSS figured he had captured and released more than 1,000 large mammals including bighorn sheep, cougars and grizzlies, for research. Not afraid of large animals, he captured and collared his first leopard two days before he died.
Andrew ROSS recalls one time his older brother was injured by a moose when it kicked him in the face after being sedated. He was left bruised and with a cracked cheekbone.
"He was extremely meticulous and careful," Dr. FRANK said, referring to Mr. ROSS's work.
Through his consulting firm, Mr. ROSS conducted numerous environmental impact studies in western and northern Canada for the oil industry and government. The work required Mr. ROSS to spend a lot more time at his office desk instead of in the field where he felt his true talent was.
"Working with these large animals is very exciting and also very dangerous," Dr. FRANK said.
Mr. ROSS loved being in the field but hated what he had to do to the animals. He knew that by capturing the large predators he was causing them trauma, but he strongly believed that what he was doing was for the benefit of research and in the end the benefit of the animals, Dr. FRANK said.
"He was just so aware of the animal's experience, the animal's dignity, if you can put it that way," Dr. FRANK said.
Mr. ROSS spent the spring of 2002 working in northern British Columbia capturing grizzly bears for research. The job meant Mr. ROSS, a man small in stature but strong and wiry, and a pilot would fly low over an area in a helicopter trying to spot bears. Once they had, Mr. ROSS's job was to lean out of the plane, secure in his harness and dart the animal with a tranquillizer. After the animal was sedated, they would circle back, land the plane and eventually radio collar the animal.
"He had great capture skills," Mr. JALKOTZY said.
Aside from being a committed conservationist, Mr. ROSS was also an avid hunter and enjoyed hunting elk, moose and deer. But he vigorously opposed the trophy killing of wolves, bears and cougars.
Andrew ROSS recalls that when his brother went moose hunting, deep in the woods, he would only bring three bullets with him. He figured that if he couldn't kill an animal with those, he didn't deserve to get one.
"He would often get the moose with one bullet," Andrew ROSS said.
While he loved to hunt, he never went out in an area he was studying, considering that to be a conflict of interest, his brother said.
"Ian cared passionately about wildlife and wild country," and tried to do what he could to conserve it, Mr. JALKOTZY said.
Next month, Mr. ROSS's ashes will be dispersed in Alberta's Kananaskis country, where he had spent so much time with the cougars.

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FRANKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-30 published
BAUCH, Mrs. Helga (née FRANKE) - Search for heir
Deceased 11th January 2003 in Winsen/Luhe, Germany:
Mrs. Helga BAUCH, née FRANKE, born on 17.07.1923.
I am trying to tind her legal heir
Mr. Dietrich-Eckard BAUCH, born 19.10.1944,
Master motor vehicle mechanic
He, or anyone who knows of him, is requested to contact the administrator of the deceased's estate stated below. Otherwise Mr. BAUCH will be declared dead.
In the event that Mr BAUCH is no longer alive, then his children could be the heirs.
Gitta GOEBELS, Administrator of the deceased's estate
Rohlantstr. 16, D-21423 Winsen/Luhe, Germany
Tel. 0049 (0) 170 47 37 143
Page B7

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FRANKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-06 published
BAUCH, Mrs. Helga (née FRANKE) - Search for heir
Deceased 11th January 2003 in Winsen/Luhe, Germany:
Mrs. Helga BAUCH, née FRANKE, born on 17.07.1923.
I am trying to find her legal heir
Mr. Dietrich-Eckard BAUCH, born 19.10.1944,
Master motor vehicle mechanic
He, or anyone who knows of him, is requested to contact the administrator of the deceased's estate stated below. Otherwise Mr. BAUCH will be declared dead.
In the event that Mr BAUCH is no longer alive, then his children could be the heirs.
Gitta GOEBELS, Administrator of the deceased's estate
Rohlantstr. 16, D-21423 Winsen/Luhe, Germany
Tel. 0049 (0) 170 47 37 143
Page B7

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FRANKLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-16 published
Bluesman made his mark
Canadian harpist's brush with greatness was frustrated by his battle with the bottle
By Bruce Farley MOWAT Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, January 16, 2003, Page R9
He will be remembered for creating some of the high water marks in the history of popular music in Canada. Blues harpist Richard NEWELL, also known as King Biscuit Boy, has died. He was found dead at his house in Hamilton on January 5.
Richard NEWELL's story is the stuff of legend, but not legendary. The Oxford Canadian Dictionary defines legend as "a traditional story sometimes popularly regarded as historical, but unauthenticated."
Nearly all the career anecdotes surrounding King Biscuit Boy have been verified. Yes, he really was recruited for the Allman Brothers in 1969, for Janis JOPLIN's Full Tilt Boogie Band in 1970 and for a mid-seventies session with Aretha FRANKLIN. The stellar Houston blues guitarist, Albert COLLINS was recording a version of Mr. NEWELL's Mean Old Lady, before he died in 1994.
Mr. NEWELL, though, would rarely volunteer to offer up such information, unless you prodded him for it. He didn't think it was important.
He was born the son of Lily and Walter (Dick) NEWELL, an Royal Air Force airman stationed in Canada during the Second World War. Richard NEWELL developed an early interest in music, from the country of Hank WILLIAMS Sr. to the jump blues of Louis JORDAN, to the frenetic sounds of such original rock 'n' rollers as Little Richard. At age 12, he purchased his first harmonica after discovering the blues via late-night AM radio.
Mr. NEWELL spent seven years rehearsing his ever-expanding collection of blues 45s, which he purchased on regular hitchhiking forays to Buffalo. Few of his Friends at the time were even aware that he played harmonica and guitar.
In 1963, Ronnie COPPLE's sock-hop rock 'n' roll group, the Barons, recruited Mr. NEWELL as its lead singer. Mr. NEWELL had heard a recording of their instrumental original, Bottleneck, and came by with an record by the prototypical American electric blues slide guitarist, Elmore JAMES.
Within weeks of his joining, the group was transfigured into the flat-out, deep blues band, The Chessmen Featuring son Richard. The sound was guitar driven and harmonica-heavy, certainly not the type of thing you'd find at the average mid-sixties Southern Ontario teen dance. The band made it to Europe the following summer, playing successful shows at U.S. Army bases to predominantly black audiences.
Back in Canada, Mr. NEWELL would go on to become the lead singer of Richie Knight and The Mid Knights in 1966. He also made his debut professional recording at this time, as a session harmonica player on a recording by country singer, Dallas HARMS, best known for writing such hits as Paper Rosie for American country singer Gene WATSON.
When ex-Mid Knight and future Full Tilt Boogie band member Rick BELL was recruited for the Ronnie HAWKINS band in 1968, Mr. NEWELL's name came up. After one audition, he was hired on the spot and rechristened with the royal King Biscuit Boy moniker, a title he was never totally comfortable with.
Back in his native Arkansas, HAWKINS had rehearsed in the basement of the old KFFA radio station where blues harpist, Sonny Boy Williamson 2nd (Rice MILLER,) did his King Biscuit Flour Hour broadcasts. To HAWKINS, Mr. NEWELL must have sounded like a letter from home.
When JOPLIN scooped BELL and guitarist John TILL from HAWKINS's band early in 1970, Mr. NEWELL and drummer Larry ATAMANUIK were left with the task of re-assembling the band. That group would become the first King Biscuit Boy-led outfit, Crowbar. In a fit of pique, HAWKINS had inadvertently given the band its name in an exchange of parting shots at the Grange Tavern in Hamilton. "You guys are so dumb," he yelled, "you could fuck up the moving parts of a crowbar."
As the bandleader, singer, harmonica player and guitarist on Official Music, Mr. NEWELL was responsible for building a razor-sharp and singularly intense sound. The rehearsals for these sessions were apparently tension-laden affairs, but the payoff came when the album muscled its way on to the Canadian charts, (without the benefit of Canadian-content regulations), the fastest-selling domestic release to date.
Mr. NEWELL and the band would part ways after King Biscuit Boy and Crowbar had scored on the singles chart with the traditional piece, Corrina, Corrina. In 1971, Crowbar (without King Biscuit Boy) earned a place on the bestseller charts with a song that was to become a perennial Canuck rock anthem. Oh, What a Feeling was the first domestic single to take advantage of the newly legislated Canadian-content rules for broadcasting.
Fate intervened throughout the following years to rob Mr. NEWELL of his career momentum. The backing band he assembled to promote Good 'Uns, the 1971 followup to Official Music, was beginning to work on a third album, when the funding for it ran out.
With the momentum lost, that unit disintegrated, with guitarist Earl JOHNSON leaving to form the hard-rock outfit, Moxy.
In 1974, sessions produced by Allen TOUSSAINT, the architect of many a New Orleans Rhythm and Blues classic, would culminate in the Epic label release of a self-titled recording. Mr. NEWELL would tour the United States the following year with The Meters (featuring future members of the Neville Brothers) as his backup band. When the Epic label cleaned house later that year, though, he was one of the acts dropped.
In 1972, Mr. NEWELL wed Jacqueline WILLETTS but found that married life did not curb his increasingly frequent drinking binges. The couple divorced in 1979. Alcoholism was also the source of most of his professional woes for the better part of his life, as key shows were either cancelled, or worse, rendered into shambles. Musicians who worked with him tended to admire him, but found it incredibly frustrating that such an enormous talent was being squandered.
At several junctures in his career, Mr. NEWELL managed to quit drinking. Of the three albums he recorded and released in the eighties and nineties, two were the direct dividends of his abstinence. Those recordings earned him Juno nominations, in 1988 for Richard NEWELL aka King Biscuit Boy,and in 1996 for Urban Blues Re: NEWELL. The latter is still in print on Holger Peterson's Stony Plain label. Official Music, along with Good'Uns and Badly Bent, a best-of compilation, are available on the Unidisc label (http://www.unidisc.com). The rest of the King Biscuit Boy catalogue, including the 1980 Mouth of Steel album, is out of print.
In 2000, Mr. NEWELL's mother died and he left regular stage work, preferring the seclusion of his home in the central Mountain neighbourhood of Hamilton. His last recordings include a version of Blue Christmas, available on the Hamilton Hometown Christmas Compact Disk compilation assembled by saxophonist and long-time friend, Sonny DEL RIO. An original composition, Two Hound Blues, along with material recorded by DEL RIO and Mr. NEWELL in the late seventies (the Biscuit With Gravy sessions) is planned for release this year.
Mr. NEWELL, who leaves his father Dick, brother Walter (Randy,) and son Richard James Oddie, made his last public performance in a cameo appearance with The Little Red Blues Gang on September 12, 2002, at Mermaids Lounge in Hamilton. The 60 or so audience members present were treated to a version of his hit, Corrina, Corrina, which is strange, because he never particularly cared for that song.
Richard Alfred NEWELL, musician; born March 9, 1944, in Hamilton died in Hamilton, January 5, 2003.

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FRANKLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
BUCHANAN, Audrey Cameron
At the Cambridge Memorial Hospital, on Sunday, February 23, 2003, in her 90th year. Audrey BUCHANAN (née SMAIL,) formerly of Toronto, was the beloved wife, for over 60 years, of the late Stanley BUCHANAN (2000.) Dear mother of Betty BUCHANAN of Toronto, and Nancy RZESZUTKO and her husband, Walt, of Cambridge; loved grandmother of Sian SILLS and Mark FRANKLIN of Toronto, Erin and Michael HARTMAN of Burlington and Kathryn and Corryn RZESZUTKO of Cambridge dear sister of Alex SMAIL of Oakville; dear sister-in-law of Alfred BUCHANAN of Toronto; and special aunt of Kathleen SMAIL of Tualatin, Oregon, Pat BRANDON of Coldwater, Ontario, Blake and Allison SMAIL, Bruce and Judy SMAIL, all of St. Joseph's Island, Ontario, and Janet SMAIL of Sault Saint Marie. Audrey graduated in nursing from Women's College Hospital in 1937, following which she became Night Supervisor of The Ontario Hospital in Saint Thomas. Since her retirement from nursing, Audrey had been actively involved with the Alumnae Association of Women's College Hospital. She treasured the long, happy summers spent with children and grandchildren at the family cottage at Floral Park on Lake Couchiching. Since 2001, she resided at Queen's Square Terrace in Cambridge, Ontario, where she found a happy and fulfilling life surrounded by new best Friends and kind caregivers. Friends will be received at Coutts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 96 St. Andrews Street, Cambridge (wwwfuneralscanada.com), on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted in the funeral home chapel on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 at 3 p.m. A reception will follow in the Coutts Family Reception Cottage. Spring interment will take place at Carlyle Cemetery in Iron Bridge, Ontario. As expressions of sympathy, donations may be made to Women's College Hospital Alumnae Memorial Fund, 58 Lascelles Boulevard, Toronto, Ontario M5P 2E1.

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FRANKLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
DALGLEISH, Gordon John
Peacefully in his son's arms, at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, on March 4, 2003. Dear husband and best friend of Suzanne (née MORRISON) and devoted father of Cameron and Suzanne Jane. Beloved brother-in-law of Sheila COLLINS and dear uncle of Catherine and Julie CIEPLY. Best buddy to MacTavish. Gord cherished the many Friends he made throughout his life. Gord's family deeply appreciates the care, love and Friendship of cardiologist Dr. Donald PEAT, Dr. Bruce MERRICK, Dr. Tom STANTON and nurses Nancy DAHMER and Patti FRANKLIN gave him so generously. For many years Gord was an enthusiastic member of the Canadian Ski Patrol, Canadian Ski Instructors Alliance and he was a ski instructor at Mansfield Skiways. Friends will be received at Saint John's United Church, 262 Randall Street, Oakville, (905) 845-0551, on Saturday, March 8, 2003 at 11 a.m. until the time of the funeral service at 12 p.m. Reception to follow the funeral service. Burial to take place at Trafalgar Lawn Cemetery, Oakville. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Heart Function Clinic at the Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital.

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FRANKLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-04 published
'Gentle Ben' town mayor transformed his community
When first elected in 1970, Nepean, Ontario, was $22-million in the red but 30 years later his careful leadership had eliminated the entire debt
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, April 4, 2003 - Page R13
Ottawa -- For Ben FRANKLIN, there was no such thing as a two-minute drive to the corner store for a newspaper or a quick trip to a local supermarket for groceries. Inevitably, the former mayor of Nepean, Ontario, now amalgamated with Ottawa, would meet people along the way, and what started as a quick errand would extend to several hours of mingling and chit-chat with those he'd encounter along the way.
"He'd often say he was popping out for two minutes to go to the store and six hours later he'd come home," says Mary PITT, who recalled how his wife, Sherry, remembers her husband.
Ms. PITT, who worked as Mr. FRANKLIN's administrative assistant for 18 years before succeeding him as mayor in 1997, said Mr. FRANKLIN never put on any airs with his constituents, and for that, he was universally well liked. "He wasn't one to go around saying 'I'm Ben FRANKLIN and you've got to pay attention to me.' He was just Ben, Gentle Ben as some called him."
Mr. FRANKLIN, Nepean's longest-reigning mayor, died on March 22 at age 60, while awaiting a heart transplant. "Gentle Ben, " as he was known for his engaging and friendly personality, had been at the Ottawa Heart Institute since February 1, and had an artificial heart implanted March 3. He died from bleeding in the skull, caused by a weakness of blood vessels in his brain.
Mr. FRANKLIN was born on August 15, 1942, in Elgin, Ont, a community near Smiths Falls, south of Ottawa. Like his mother, he became a teacher. While teaching high-school geography in Ottawa in the early 1970s, he began writing a column for a weekly newspaper in Nepean and eventually developed an interest in politics.
He won a seat on Nepean's council in 1972 and took office in January, 1973. At the time, it was a part-time job, and Nepean was a township.
"One day he decided that if change was to happen he would have to get into politics," says Ms. PITT, who campaigned door-to-door for Mr. FRANKLIN the year he was first elected. He became mayor in 1978 and Ms. PITT joined his staff as administrative assistant two years later when he gave up his teaching job.
He left the mayor's office in 1997 because of his heart disease, his dwindling energy, and concern that continuing stress might lead to further problems.
Al LONEY, a former Nepean councillor who entered politics the same year as Mr. FRANKLIN, said Mr. FRANKLIN leaves a legacy of sound fiscal management and plenty of parks and recreational facilities in Nepean, which became part of Ottawa in January, 2001, when 11 municipalities were amalgamated to become the new city of Ottawa.
When Mr. FRANKLIN took over as mayor in 1978, Nepean was $22-million in debt, and its taxes were higher than the regional average. Thanks to Mr. FRANKLIN's pay-as-you go philosophy, the debt was eliminated and by the time Nepean was absorbed into the amalgamated Ottawa-Carleton in 2001, it also had the lowest taxes in the region.
"He emphasized the need to put more money into reserve funds, so when the time came to buy a fire truck or put up an arena, the money was there," says Mr. LONEY, who often played golf with Mr. FRANKLIN. " When we built the new city hall in 1980, it cost $24-million and we had all the money we needed to pay it off."
The former city hall building, which also houses a theatre and a public library, is now known as Ben Franklin Place. A park now under construction in the former Nepean will also bear Mr. FRANKLIN's name.
Mr. FRANKLIN's frugal bent extended to his dress, which was usually casual. His casualness "may have contributed to the fact that nobody felt intimidated by him," says Mr. LONEY.
A well-known story about Mr. FRANKLIN's lack of concern for appearances occurred when Mr. LONEY and the mayor went to California on city business. Because most of his clothes were being cleaned, Mr. FRANKLIN brought along only one pair of dress pants and Mr. LONEY had to stand in front of him at most of the meetings they attended because the mayor had dripped ketchup on his pants on their first day out.
Around the Nepean council table Mr. FRANKLIN was known as a consensus builder, who rarely let issues or political opponents get under his skin, adds Mr. LONEY. " He'd have six of the seven votes he needed and I'd say 'That's all you need.' He'd say, 'Give me a few days and I'll get that last one.'"
For two days after his death, Mr. FRANKLIN's body lay in state at Ben Franklin Place where he had presided over dozens of council meetings and where his funeral service was held on March 26. Appropriately, his casket was green, the official colour of the former city of Nepean.
He leaves his wife, Sherry; son, Brent; daughter Suzanne; brother Bill and sister Anita.

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FRANKLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-23 published
FRANKLIN, Harry William
Born September 12, 1909, died peacefully at Humber River Regional Hospital on May 22, 2003. Beloved husband of Frances Dorothy (née KITCHING) for 67 years. Dearly loved father of Evan (Pat) and John (Susan). Devoted Umpa to Andrew and Sarah, Grandpa to Stacey and Kyle. Harry will be greatly missed by family in South Africa and Australia and the extended KITCHING Family. A Service of Remembrance will be held at Kingsway- Lambton United Church, 85 The Kingsway in Etobicoke on Tuesday, May 27th at 11: 00 a.m. Arrangements entrusted to Turner and Porter, Yorke Chapel (416) 767-3153. In lieu of flowers the family would appreciate donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, 1920 Yonge Street, 4th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M4S 3E2.

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FRANKLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-14 published
Doris MARSHALL
By Jamie SWIFT, Paul EPRILE, Monday, July 14, 2003 - Page A18
Jamie and Paul are Friends of Doris
Homemaker, teacher, writer, visionary. Born January 4, 1911, in Killarney, Manitoba Died January 15, in Toronto, of old age, aged 92.
When we first got to know Doris MARSHALL in the mid 1970s, we encountered everyone's grandmother. She served her famous biscuits and lemon tarts accompanied by tea in delicate porcelain cups. Perhaps it would be homemade oat-cakes and cheese with sherry. A minister's widow, she seemed to fit the little-old-lady stereotype right down to the tissue tucked under her well-ironed cuff.
But that wasn't all she kept up her sleeve. Doris had a passion for social justice. Anything showing old people in isolation or robbed of dignity made her shudder. Once the tea was poured, she would extract an item she had carefully clipped: it could be any news item hinting that old people are somehow a problem to be solved.
While preparing her 1987 book on aging, Doris maintained a unique filing system involving paper clips, hundreds of clippings, and handwritten notes inscribed on the clippings themselves, to save paper. Doris knew how to stretch what she had. She was the oldest of eight children from a Manitoba farm family. Because her mother preferred outdoor work, Doris began to cook for a family of 10 plus guests -- as a young teenager. Her work as a live-in housekeeper financed her studies at Winnipeg's United College, where she met George MARSHALL. Before marrying, she spent four years in Norway House, working at a residential school.
She realized that teaching sewing and music to aboriginal children left them ill-equipped for life in either white or native society. After a stint in The Pas as the "minister's wife," she settled in Winnipeg with her husband and three daughters: Brenda, Judith, and Mary. While doing community work, she helped organize Winnipeg's first Indian Friendship Centre.
Doris became a single mother with George's death in 1959. Her new parish job at Westminster United Church led to work with the neighbourhood old ones -- she abhorred the term "seniors." This be came her passion. She soon found herself at the United Church's Toronto head office, working in the field of aging.
Doris never saw herself as a gerontology specialist. One of the lessons she drew from her Norway House experience was the way in which native culture valued and cared for elders in the community. These lessons were reinforced in her travels to China, Ghana and Mozambique.
"We must discover new family and neighbourhood relationships," she would later write. "Helping one another and fighting together for just and fair treatment for all would be the rallying point for a different kind of extended family."
Doris found a new extended family in and around the Development Education Centre, where a community of younger people shared her vision. She proceeded to organize a group of elders. Then she wrote a book, Silver Threads: Critical Reflections on Growing Old.
She used her life as a prism through which the problems of aging are reflected. Her 1988 national promotion tour, under taken at age 78, took the book into a second edition. The tour included a visit to grand_son Jama's Grade 2 class as his "show-and-tell." He was the only one with a grandmother who was also an author.
Doris lived independently in her tidy Annex apartment, with its lace doilies and family keepsakes, until 1999. Her capacities diminished, her family knew that she did not want to enter long-term care. But she was, as usual, gracious in accepting what she could not change.
She once said that she agreed with physicist Ursula FRANKLIN's vision of the ideal society. It's like a potluck supper -- everyone brings something and everyone gets something. Doris brought the best she had. And she shared it all around.

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