DAVALOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-12 published
HILLEN, James
The family regrets to announce the death of James HILLEN, formerly of Montreal and Ottawa, in Bermuda on June 12, 2003. Born April 20, 1920, Belfast, he died peacefully after a short illness and was buried on the 17th June, 2003. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Margaret (FINLAYSON) Bermuda. A sister, Susan (J. D. McSHANE) Ottawa. His daughter Susan, (Dr. Simon COTE) United Arab Emirates. His son, Douglas (Allison MAITLAND) Bermuda. His grandchildren, Georges COTE, Montreal. Amy CÔTÉ (Emmanuel DAVALOS) Montreal. James, Christian, and Samantha HILLEN, Bermuda. His great-grand_son, Loic DAVALOS, Montreal. Mr. HILLEN joined the Black Watch Royal Highland Regiment of Canada in 1936 and served overseas from 1940-1945. He was captured at Dieppe and was detained for over two years as a prisoner-of-war in Germany. After his repatriation to Canada he studied at McGill University, graduating with a C.A. degree in 1955. He was a life member of both the Quebec and Ontario Order of Chartered Accountants as well as the Canadian Institute. He began his career with Cunnard Steamship Co. and then worked for a group of shipping interests and was instrumental in their relocation to Bermuda in 1961. In Bermuda he also worked for the Bermuda Hospitals Board and Ancon. A keen golfer, he was also a 20 year member of the Lions Club and an active member of Christ Church, Warwick. He will be sadly missed by his family and Friends.
Died This Day -- Louis Hémon, 1913
Monday, July 7, 2003 - Page R5
Novelist born in Brest, France, on October 12, 1880; 1911, immigrated to Montreal; moved to the Lac-St-Jean region of Quebec to work on backwoods farm; used experience to write Maria Chapdelaine, a classic account of Quebec habitant life; killed in a railway accident in Northern Ontario; book published posthumously.

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DAVEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
The Globe was his church'
The editor-in-chief was mentor to journalists, defender of social policies, respected by those criticized in print, and described as a man with a 'warm human touch'
By Michael VALPY Thursday, April 10, 2003 - Page R11
In his two decades as editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, former senator Richard (Dic) James DOYLE wielded a journalistic influence in Canadian public life matched only by that of George BROWN, the newspaper's founder.
He died yesterday in Toronto, one month past his 80th birthday. His wife of 50 years, Florence, passed away on March 20.
Senator DOYLE -- editor from 1963 to 1983 -- gave the newspaper a boldly independent voice, loosening up its then lock-step support for the Progressive Conservative Party.
Under his direction, the newspaper would praise a government one day and lambaste it the next. He was a passionate defender of civil liberties, intensely engaged in the development of Canada's social policies throughout the 1960s and 1970s and as much concerned with the powerless in Canadian society as the powerful.
"In the time I've been editor," he once said, "we've not supported any party in office. I think we make whomever we support uncomfortable. We're the kind of friend you could do without."
He once said he felt more intellectually comfortable with Pierre TRUDEAU than all the prime ministers he knew, and one of his favourite editorial cartoons was one he suggested after overhearing his daughter Judith talking to a friend in her bedroom. It showed two teenage girls sitting on a bed under a poster of Mr. TRUDEAU. One girl says to the other: "He's not 50 like your father's 50."
His views, although stamped on the editorial page, were never imposed on his reporters. He was concerned with a story's news value -- not the fallout -- and he expected his staff to act with the same concern.
He wanted The Globe to be a writer's newspaper and gave his writers autonomy, even when their views went against his own philosophies. He had a special place in his heart for columnists who expressed contradictory opinions.
The young writers invited to attend the buffet lunches he gave regularly for prime ministers, premiers and cabinet ministers, bank presidents and giants of the arts were treated to superb tutorials in the life of their nation that left an indelible mark on their minds.
Warm, funny, theatrical and gregarious, he was a mentor and model for many of Canada's best-known journalists -- among them, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Michael ENRIGHT and Don NEWMAN, former Globe and Maclean's managing editor Geoffrey STEVENS, his successor as Globe editor Norman WEBSTER, and former foreign correspondent, dance critic and now master of the University of Toronto's Massey College, John FRASER.
"He was absolutely fearless," Mr. STEVENS said yesterday. "He did tough stuff. He did important stuff. And he refused to bow to pressure from business, from politicians and for that matter from journalists. I didn't always agree with him, but I always, always respected what he said."
Mr. FRASER said: "He was an editor who made young journalists' dreams come true. Like many who came under his spell at The Globe and Mail, I will go to my grave grateful for the horizons he opened up to me."
George BAIN, for years The Globe's Ottawa columnist, recalled the only time Senator DOYLE actually complained about something Mr. BAIN had written was when he filed an end-piece to a royal tour and suggested that the institution wasn't appropriate to the Canadian circumstances.
"Dic, as a devoted monarchist, was moved to say, 'Did you have to?' The fact is I felt I did -- and he, despite strong feelings, didn't say, 'You can't.' "
When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY appointed him to the Senate in 1985, he decided to sit as a Conservative out of courtesy.
Mr. MULRONEY described him yesterday as "a marvellous man, rigorous, thoughtful, with a disciplined approach to life and a very warm human touch to everything he did.
"When he cut people up, including me, there was no malice to it, no ad hominem attack, he was never bitter or partisan in any way.'The full impact of Senator DOYLE's presence as editor was probably first felt by The Globe's readers on March 20, 1964, when a front-page editorial appeared under the heading, Bill of Wrongs.
It was prompted by legislation proposed by Ontario's Conservative attorney-general, Frederick CASS, which empowered the Ontario Police Commission to summon any person for questioning in secret deprive him of legal advice; and keep him in prison indefinitely if he refused to answer.
"For the public good," the editorial stated, the Ontario Government "proposes to trample upon the Magna Carta, Habeas Corpus, the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Rule of Law.
"Are we in... the Canada of 1964 -- or in the Germany of 1934?
"This legislation is supposed to be directed against organized crime. In fact, it is directed against every man and woman in the province."
Soon after, Mr. CASS resigned.
Senator DOYLE's skills as a writer were particularly evident on an election night when the paper would present an editorial on the results between editions. Alastair LAWRIE, now retired as an editorial writer, recalled that once the results were known, Senator DOYLE would stand in silent thought for maybe a minute and a half and then start to dictate. In a matter of a few minutes, he would complete a reasoned editorial that scarcely required the addition of a comma.
Senator DOYLE preferred to work in anonymity, only accepting honorary degrees and later the seat in the Senate near the end of his newspaper career.
He sat on no boards, belonged to no important clubs, almost never appeared on television or radio, didn't sign petitions and seldom gave speeches. When he met a politician, there were usually witnesses.
He didn't hold a driver's licence and for years arrived at the old Globe office on King Street by streetcar. When The Globe moved to its present office on Front Street, Senator DOYLE took a taxi.
Retired Ottawa Citizen publisher Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and a close friend of Senator DOYLE, suspected "he didn't trust his Irish temper [to drive] and that was probably to the common good."
Mr. DAVEY said Senator DOYLE's low public profile "was part of his own protection against conflicts on his own part. The Globe was his church. Journalism was his religion.
"I think that Dic, in the context of his time, probably had a greater influence on Canadian journalism than any other single individual," Mr. DAVEY said.
"It was Dic's execution that made the Report on Business what it became and is. He was the moving force from within The Globe often unseen -- in the whole question of conflicts of interest as they affected journalists.
"He was really the wellspring of that kind of thinking and, of course, what The Globe did affected very directly what a lot of other organizations did."
Born in Toronto on March 10, 1923, Dic DOYLE seemed destined to get ink on his hands. He said in 1985 that he had decided on a newspaper career at age 7 and joined the Chatham Daily News as a sports reporter after he graduated from Chatham Collegiate Institute. He was promoted to sports editor, city editor and then news editor.
During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and served with the 115 (Bomber) Squadron (Royal Air Force) at Ely, near Cambridge in England. He was discharged at the end of the war with the rank of flying officer.
He was 23 and felt that life was passing him by, so rather than attending university, as other returning air-force officers were doing, he returned to the Chatham paper. It was a decision he said he later regretted.
He came to The Globe in 1951, initially as a copy editor, the only job available. His first byline appeared in The Globe in December of 1952 over a story about milk bottles.
In the same year, he also wrote a book called The Royal Story, a labour of love that proved to be a standard treatment of the monarchy, and which he was the first to acknowledge, replowed already well-tilled soil.
(The Royal family had a special status at The Globe under Senator DOYLE. One former senior editor, the legendary Martin LYNCH, told of being taken off the front-page layout after he replaced a picture of Princess Margaret, which appeared in early editions, with a photograph of a prize-winning pig.
When The Globe decided to publish a weekly supplement in 1957, Senator DOYLE became its first editor, with a staff that had no experience in the weekly field. The paper was laid out on the carpet of the managing editor's office after he had gone home.
It shrunk over the years because, Mr. DOYLE said, it was ahead of its time. It died in 1971.
From there, in 1959, he became managing editor of the newspaper and then editor in 1963. He stepped aside in 1983 to take on the role of editor emeritus and to write a column -- an experience, he said two years later, that left him chastened. "The guy [columnist] out there has his problems."
Former Globe publisher A. Roy MEGARRY, said, "In my opinion, no one -- including the seven publishers that Dic has served with during his time at the paper -- had made a more positive and lasting impression on The Globe than he has."
Likely among the greatest tributes paid to him as an editor came from the Kent Commission established by the federal government in 1980 to investigate the ownership of Canada's daily newspapers after the Ottawa Journal and the Winnipeg Tribune folded in virtually simultaneous moves by the Thomson and Southam chains.
In its report, the commission credited Senator DOYLE with "adhering to an ideal of press freedom that often tends to get lost in the management of newspapers....
"To a great extent, the editor-in-chief of The Globe belongs to a breed which unfortunately is on its way to extinction.
"The Globe and Mail testifies to the influence that continues to be exerted by a newspaper with a clearly defined idea of its role and substantial editorial resources. It is read by almost three-quarters of the country's most important decision-makers in all parts of Canada and at all levels of government. More than 90 per cent of media executives read it regularly and it tends to set the pace for other news organizations."
The Globe and Mail was bought by Thomson Newspapers in 1980. Senator DOYLE made no secret of the fact that he would have preferred having the newspaper bought by R. Howard Webster, who owned it before it became part of the Financial Post chain. However, in 1985 he said that Thomson was the best alternative among the others in the field.
When Prime Minister MULRONEY named him to the Senate, he became the first active Globe journalist to receive such an appointment since George BROWN in 1873. As an editor and a columnist, Senator DOYLE had often preached Senate reform and had opposed patronage appointments.
His acceptance prompted a flow of letters to the editor that favoured and disapproved of the appointment in about equal measure.Senator DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. Funeral arrangements have not been announced.

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DAVEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-04 published
News editor was expert adventurer
Globe journalist was known for attention to detail, knife-sharp instincts and wit
By Luma MUHTADIE Monday, August 4, 2003 - Page R5
In The Globe and Mail newsroom, he was known as "Snapper."
Some say it was because Alan DAWSON could get to the heart of a story or make a headline decision in a snap. Others say it was because he demanded instant action from those around him. And a few refer to his getting a little "snappish" around deadline.
Whatever the take on his nickname, Mr. DAWSON was seen by all as a small and quirky, yet assertive newsman, with knife-sharp instincts, a keen attention to detail and a biting wit.
Mr. DAWSON died in his sleep last Sunday -- at the age of 86 two days after checking into Nanaimo General Hospital with undetected bronchial cancer.
During his 34-year tenure at The Globe, Mr. DAWSON worked his way up the chain of command from senior slot man, reigning over the editing process, to news editor and then assistant managing editor. During his last few years at The Globe he helped choose and implement the computer system that made The Globe the first Canadian newspaper to enter the technological age.
Mr. DAWSON is best remembered for his gifts as a news editor on the front lines.
"He had incredible instincts," said Clark DAVEY, who worked with Mr. DAWSON for 27 years at The Globe and Mail. "You could put a pile of stories in front of him and he'd pick out the four or five most important ones -- and he was right 99 per cent of the time," Mr. DAVEY said.
As deadline approached one evening in the 1960s, Mr. DAWSON picked up a review, written by the paper's drama critic Herbert WHITTAKER, of a production of Oklahoma! at the Royal Alexandra Theatre. Mr. WHITTAKER's first line was an admission that the musical had been revived so many times that there was nothing left to say. So Mr. DAWSON cut only the first sentence off and ran it to print.
When Mr. WHITTAKER saw his one-line review the following morning, he was livid.
But the phones started ringing and letters poured in, congratulating Mr. WHITTAKER for his witty criticism of the playhouse for overloading its bill with revivals.
Mr. DAWSON was also an adventurer outside the newsroom, with a passion for fishing and game hunting. As a news editor his pages often featured obscure articles on these hobbies, and he wrote a weekly hunting column for The Globe.
In a detailed, first-person account of an expedition in the Northwest Territories, published on September 25, 1959, Mr. DAWSON proudly described travelling "nearly 6,000 miles in one week by car, train, airliner, truck, bush plane, outboard skiff, musking buggy and on foot" to become "the first successful wild buffalo hunter of the 20th century."
Prior to that trip (and since 1893), the government had banned buffalo hunting because Canadian herds had dwindled almost to extinction. But a spill of thousands of animals from Wood Buffalo National Park into Fort Smith prompted authorities to sanction a hunting expedition for the first 10 people to apply.
"The opportunity came across the news desk, but he made sure he sent his own entry in before he ran the story in the paper," recalled his wife, Marilyn DAWSON, with a laugh.
One of Mr. DAWSON's prized possessions was a rifle crafted by his closest friend, Harry HICKEY, who owned Holman and Hickey Custom Gunsmith, a shop in Toronto, for 30 years.
"He knew guns inside out," his wife said, "And if someone misidentified a gun in a story, he would go ballistic."
Many readers derided him for describing his hunting techniques and successes. In a letter to the editor, one reader referred to Mr. DAWSON as "nothing more than a pasty-faced, beady-eyed killer."
Mr. DAWSON took the critique with a grain of salt and a smile. During a Halloween costume party for the newsroom that followed, he showed up in his hunting garb, toting a shotgun with a toy tiger dangling by its tail from the end of the barrel. He'd applied a pasty flour mixture to his face and sequins around his eyes.
"DAWSON's face was a sight to behold... the ultimate pasty-faced, beady-eyed killer had been created," recalled Wilfred SLATER, who worked alongside Mr. DAWSON on The Globe's copy desk for 25 years.
Alan DAWSON was born in Toronto on December 24, 1917, to S.B. and Anne Beatrice DAWSON. His father was publisher of The Stratford Beacon in Stratford, Ontario, before becoming badly injured in a vehicle accident. The family moved around a lot before returning to Toronto, where Mr. DAWSON graduated from Jarvis Collegiate.
Given the scarce employment opportunities in the Depression era, Mr. DAWSON hitched a ride on a series of freight trains heading to Northern Ontario, working in lumber camps during the day and sleeping in local jails to stay sheltered from the cold.
He returned to Toronto in 1936 and worked six days a week as a copy boy at The Toronto Daily Star, earning a dollar a day.
He remained at the Star until 1948, but it was a period broken by three years as a flight engineer with the Royal Canadian Air Force -- he carried out 31 raids over Germany with a crew that returned alive.
Mr. DAWSON came to The Globe in 1948, because they offered a dollar more per week and he needed the money to support his first wife and his son, Alan David DAWSON.
As an editor in 1963, he hired a young reporter in the women's department named Marilyn COOPER, who later became features editor. They married in 1970.
The two enjoyed many hobbies together. They bought an old farmhouse on a 10-acre plot north of Pickering, Ontario, and renovated it themselves; they took their dogs on long walks, and made regular trips to an old-fashioned fishing camp called Marathon in the Florida Keys. They also bought a recreational vehicle and drove around the continent from Newfoundland to Manitoba, Alaska to Colorado, each time following a different route.
"He was a type-A personality -- go, go, go," recalled his wife. "And when he retired he wanted to do something as well."
The couple eventually settled on Vancouver Island in 1994, and Mr. DAWSON went on his final fishing trip three years ago. Mr. DAWSON didn't want an elaborate funeral. He told his family he did not want to be buried because he was claustrophobic, opting for a private cremation with his ashes scattered along the water insisting the water be warm rather than cold.
His wife has decided to go on with the couple's yearly August roast-beef barbecue that the two had already planned for their Friends before Mr. DAWSON died. She says she'll do everything precisely the way he liked it -- with a special request to the butcher that the beef be hung for four to five weeks ahead of time so it's extra juicy and turned slowly on a rotisserie over charcoal on the special day.

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DAVEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-10 published
The backroom brain of the Canadian Football League
For 37 years, he was 'Facts Fulton,' the head-office man who made things work and who wrote the complex rules that govern the Canadian Football League
By Dan RALPH, Canadian Press; Globe and Mail files Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - Page R5
For 16 years, former Canadian Football League commissioner Jake GAUDAUR never relied on a computer to draw up the league's regular-season schedule. Instead, he looked to Greg FULTON to do it in his head.
"We used to run it [the Canadian Football League schedule] in the computer for days," said Mr. GAUDAUR, who served as league commissioner from 1968 to 1983. "But in the final analysis, Greg would always have it worked out in his mind."
Mr. FULTON, who spent 54 years with the Canadian Football League as a player, statistician and historian, died in Toronto on Monday. It was his 84th birthday. The cause of death was not provided but he reportedly suffered a stroke last week that caused him to fall into a coma from which he never emerged.
"He worked behind the scenes and received so little credit," Mr. GAUDAUR said. "There was no one in Canadian history who knew as much about the league as Greg did."
Doug MITCHELL, who succeeded Mr. GAUDAUR as Canadian Football League commissioner in 1984, marvelled at Mr. FULTON's ability to draw up a Canadian Football League schedule.
"He did it on a sort of a blackboard," he recollected. "What the computer kicked out invariably never worked but Greg's schedules always did. It really was incredible."
Current Canadian Football League commissioner Tom WRIGHT said Mr. FULTON's passion and commitment were an inspiration. "While he served our league with distinction and honour, he will best be remembered for the warmth of his smile, the wit of his stories, and the depth of his recollections."
Mr. FULTON, a Winnipeg native, moved to Calgary in 1930 and began his career as a player with the Stampeders in 1939. During the Second World War, he served with the Calgary Regiment of the First Canadian Armoured Brigade and participated in the abortive Dieppe raid on August 19, 1942.
Returning home in peacetime, he attended the University of Alberta to get a bachelor of commerce degree and soon after found a job with Revenue Canada.
So, how exactly did a Calgary tax man end up as one of the Canadian Football League's most influential people? It started with a love affair for facts and figures that first led to a part-time job in Calgary as a statistician for the Stampeders. When Clark DAVEY, who was later appointed to the Senate, was appointed in 1966 as the Canadian Football League's first full-time commissioner, he lured Mr. FULTON to Toronto.
Sen. DAVEY "made some quick enemies because he was outspoken and the job wasn't really ready for him," Mr. FULTON told former Globe and Mail sportswriter Marty YORK. So 54 days after he took the job, much of which consisted of feuding with Canadian Football League officials, Sen. DAVEY resigned. Mr. FULTON was kept on under Mr. GAUDAUR, Sen. DAVEY's successor.
"Jake usually approaches me every day to ask me something," Mr. FULTON once said in an interview. "A lot of the times, I think he knows the answers to the questions he is asking, but I think he might feel better if he hears something from me. I guess you could call me his confidant, but there are times when I do mention something that he has overlooked and that often can have an effect on the league and the fans."
What was most important, wrote Marty YORK in 1981, was Mr. FULTON's status as assistant commissioner -- a title he did not hold but a role he filled seven days a week. A walking Canadian Football League encyclopedia, he was soon nicknamed Facts Fulton. He was also known as Jake GAUDAUR's memory bank.
When Mr. GAUDAUR became commissioner, he delegated a number of the commissioner's key duties to Mr. FULTON who already administered the pension funds and had the challenging task of drawing up the Canadian Football League schedule. Consequently, the nine Canadian Football League general managers became accountable to Mr. FULTON.
He was authorized to issue orders, regulations and memoranda to all club officials, including coaches and players. Also, he was responsible for roster control, player personnel, registration of all contracts, waiver procedures, negotiation lists and draft lists.
"He did the work of three people but the last thing he wanted to do was talk about it," Mr. GAUDAUR said.
At the same time, however, Mr. FULTON was a confessed nag. "I wouldn't be doing my job if I wasn't," he once said.
Managers of Canadian Football League clubs across the country sometimes came to dread the sound of the phone ringing. "He'll bug you when he calls to remind you that you didn't do such-and-such a thing," said Montreal Alouette general manager Bob GEARY in 1981. "It gets on your nerves sometimes, but I guess if he didn't do that kind of stuff, no one would, and we'd be suffering more than we do."
Mr. FULTON was also something of a Canadian Football League policeman who had to lay down league laws. At one time, Canadian Football League clubs were strictly limited about who could attend training camps. Under the terms of an agreement with the Canadian Football League Players Association, clubs were allowed to conduct pre-training-camp practices only for rookies, quarterbacks and veterans who had surgery the previous year. Veterans were allowed to work out on their own, but coaches were forbidden to order them to participate. In a case in which the Argo felt they had good reason to start camp early, Mr. FULTON had to consult his regulations.
"I told them it was fine," he decreed. "As long as the veterans were running around on their own."
Clubs that violated pre-training-camp rules by practicing with veterans faced fines, he said.
All things considered, though, it was drawing up the schedule that was Mr. FULTON's most time-consuming job. It was also the one for which he suffered the most criticism.
"I've never yet been able to satisfy everyone with the schedule," he said. "I'm convinced that that's impossible because of the uniqueness of our league. We only have nine teams, which means that one team has to sit out every week. Also, because some of our clubs play in stadiums where baseball and soccer are played, I have to work the schedule around that too."
In 1990, Mr. FULTON received the first Commissioner's Award for his contribution to football in Canada. Five years later, he was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in the builder's category. In 1995, he was named the honorary secretary-treasurer and was active in head office as a consultant and historian until his death.
Mr. FULTON, who was reappointed by the Canadian Football League to his primary role about 10 times eight times, sometimes felt guilty about his job because he puts it ahead of everything else in his life.
"I've never been able to take an extended holiday," he said in 1981. "But I wouldn't change it for anything in the world... I'm one of those rare people who actually enjoys his job."
To a sometimes troubled league, he was a godsend.
"Thank goodness we have a guy like him," Bob GEARY told Marty YORK. "I hate to think what would happen to us if he wasn't around."
Mr. FULTON leaves children Robert, Byrne and Rebecca. He was predeceased by wife Angela BOMBARDIERI in 1990. Funeral details are pending.

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DAVEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-10 published
FULTON quietly kept the Canadian Football League in running order
By Stephen BRUNT, Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - Page S8
Less than a month back, during Grey Cup week, Greg FULTON picked up his phone to answer a few questions from a reporter.
Frail health had kept him from making the trip to Regina, but in conversation he was sharp as a tack and again proved himself to be a one-man encyclopedia of Canadian football history.
Paul MARTIN, the prime minister to be, was going to make a much publicized pregame appearance at Taylor Field, fresh from the Liberal leadership convention.
Aside from Pierre TRUDEAU, FULTON was asked, did he remember any other prime minister taking the time to attend the Grey Cup? "Well," he said, "I don't remember Mackenzie KING being there. Or Louis SSAINTURENT."
Of course, he knew because he was there. It seemed he was always there -- a player beginning in Winnipeg in 1939, a statistician and treasurer for the Calgary Stampeders from 1950 to 1966, a fixture in the Canadian Football League office from 1967 on, and, finally in his last job, the Canadian Football League's honorary secretary and official historian, a title surely unique in all of pro sports.
The National Football League still has a few owners with connections to the game's early days, and in hockey and baseball there are at least a handful of sportswriting elders who still remember when. But only the Canadian Football League actually employed someone who had an inside view extending back more than 60 years.
Considering how tumultuous some of those seasons have been and considering the game's highs and lows and the cast of strange and wonderful characters who came and went, what a tale FULTON could tell.
He was 84 when he died on Monday, and with him, sadly, is lost much of the anecdotal story of the league. (Commissioner Tom WRIGHT, who during his relatively short term on the job had come to appreciate FULTON's special role, planned to have FULTON's memories committed to tape and transcribed. Sadly, that didn't happen before FULTON fell ill.)
FULTON's tenure with the league office was perhaps the only significant legacy of Keith DAVEY's 54-day reign as commissioner in 1967. Davey lured FULTON to Toronto from Calgary to act as the league's treasurer. When Jake GAUDAUR took over from DAVEY, he decided to keep FULTON on.
"It would be the most important decision I would make," GAUDAUR says now, which, given the events of his 16 years in office, is quite a statement. Every subsequent commissioner -- and there have been a bunch -- endorsed and echoed that original decision.
Not that anyone on the outside would really understand. "All of those beneficial things he did for the league were all out of public view," GAUDAUR said. "He never received any sort of media credit, nor did he want any. Clearly, it was a labour of love for him. That's kind of corny to say that, but I really believe it was."
In those early days, the league was a two-man, two-secretary operation. FULTON, an accountant by profession, kept the books, kept an eye on club finances and kept the minutes during league meetings -- all during a period when the game grew into a multimillion-dollar sports business. He was also charged with producing the schedule every year, a trickier proposition than it might seem, given the uneven number of teams, the east-west split and the importance of certain dates in certain places.
At one point, GAUDAUR remembers, they turned the task over to a computer. And then, after the computer coughed out its work, they handed it to FULTON, who fixed it. "He had what I consider to be a computer mind," GAUDAUR said. "It was an incredible mind."
The Canadian Football League took a turn for the worse after GAUDAUR left the post. Commissioners came and went, the league at times teetered on the brink of insolvency, the disastrous U.S. expansion played itself out and the owners at times resembled a bag of mixed nuts.
But there was always FULTON, quietly keeping things in running order, breaking the tension with his wry, quiet sense of humour, loyal first and foremost to the game he loved.
"He was a remarkable person," GAUDAUR said. "It really was a pleasure to be around the guy."
Several generations of those who spent time in the Canadian Football League orbit share those sentiments and mourn the loss.

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DAVID o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
TEPER, Morris
On Wednesday, March 5, 2003 at his home. Morris TEPER, beloved husband of the late Esther TEPER. Loving father and father-in-law of Luba and Johnny GREENSPAN, Helena BEN- DAVID, Irv TEPER and Karen HACKER. Dear brother of Zvi TEPER. Devoted grandfather of Joy and Nathaniel, Kyle, Koryn, Shelly, Jonathan, Maya, Robin, Sean, and Mattie. Devoted great-grandfather of Jordan ELY. At Beth Tzedec Synagogue, 1700 Bathurst Street for service on Thursday, March 6, 2003 at 2: 30 p.m. Interment Driltzer Young Men's Society Section of Dawes Road Cemetery. Shiva 3 Newgate Road. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Morris TEPER Memorial Fund, c/o the Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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DAVID o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-25 published
GIBSON, James Alexander, C.M., M.A., M.Litt., (D.Phil.Oxon,) LL.D President Emeritus, Brock University
After a long and useful life, clear-headed to the end, died in Ottawa on October 23, 2003. Born in Ottawa in 1912, elder son of John Wesley GIBSON and Belle Crawford McGEE; school and college in Victoria, Rhodes Scholar from British Columbia in 1931; Foreign Service Officer, Department of External Affairs (1938-47); served with the Prime Minister on missions to Washington, Quebec Conferences, San Francisco, London and Paris.
Original member of Faculty of Carleton College, (1942); from 1952, first Dean of Arts and Science, Carleton University; later Dean of Arts and Deputy to the President; in 1963, named Founding President of Brock University.
A founding member of the Canadian Association of Rhodes Scholars, he held various offices and served as editor of the newsletter for 19 years. For over 60 years, he was a member of the Canadian Historical Association and of the Canadian Institute for International Affairs, as well as national and regional voluntary organizations.
He is survived by his daughters, Julia MATTHEWS and Eleanor S. JOLY (Gerald,) and his son Peter James; grandchildren Alison MATTHEWS- DAVID (Jean Marc), Colin MATTHEWS (Nathalia), Micheline, Nina (Jean-Marc BERNIER) and Gerald JOLY, Anna GIBSON (Robert) and Hilary TERHUNE (Peter;) two great-grandchildren. His wife Caroline died in 1995; also surviving are his brother William and his sister Isobel SEARLS in Victoria.
Memorial services will be held in Ottawa (December) and in St. Catharines at Brock University on November 7th, at 3 p.m. If desired, memorial remembrances may be made to the James A. Gibson Library, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1.

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DAVIDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-07 published
The unsung hero of Walkerton
The public-health inspector issued a boil-water advisory and personally drove samples to a distant lab as the crisis unfolded
By Allison LAWLOR Friday, February 7, 2003, Page R13
David PATTERSON, the public-health inspector who sounded alarm bells about tainted water in Walkerton, Ontario, where seven people died of E. coli poisoning in May, 2000, has died. He was He died of rare complications related to rheumatoid arthritis, said his wife, Sharon Patterson.
"He was extremely dedicated. I feel he gave his life to public health for 33 years," said Jim PATON, the Grey Bruce Health Unit's director of health protection and Mr. PATTERSON's long-time colleague and friend. Mr. PATTERSON worked at the health unit for 30 years. He retired just a few months after the E. coli tragedy hit the Western Ontario town.
"He has been described as the unsung hero of Walkerton," Mr. PATON said.
When a worried local doctor alerted him about cases of diarrhea in people from Walkerton, Mr. PATTERSON launched the initial investigation to determine the cause of the illness.
Although he initially suspected a problem with bad food, the common source for E. coli infections, Mr. PATTERSON also called the manager of the municipal water supply and asked if there were any problems with the water. The manager, Stan KOEBEL, repeatedly assured him that the town's drinking water was fine.
As the illness spread through the community, Mr. PATTERSON became convinced that the municipal water supply was the only plausible source of the infection.
He quickly wrote out a boil-water advisory for the town on the afternoon of May 21, 2000, the Sunday of the Victoria Day weekend. The advisory, urging residents to boil their tap water, was not lifted until December 5, 2000.
Later on May 21, Mr. PATTERSON and his wife drove 21 samples of Walkerton water to a laboratory in London, Ontario, arriving after midnight. On their trip home, in the dead of night, they almost hit a deer.
Tests confirmed that the municipal water system was contaminated with E. coli and fecal coliform bacteria.
"It was just astounding what that man did," said Dr. Murray McQUIGGE, the former medical officer of health at the Bruce-Grey-Owen Sound Health Unit, who left the health unit in March, 2002. (The health unit changed its name in 2001.)
In addition to the seven people who died from the E. coli infection, 2,500 people in Walkerton became ill, some seriously.
"I believe he did the very best he could have under the circumstances," Bruce DAVIDSON of the group Concerned Walkerton Citizens said.
Mr. PATTERSON confronted Mr. KOEBEL to find out what had gone wrong. The details of how Walkerton's water became contaminated with E. coli were revealed at a public inquiry that opened in the town in October, 2000, five months after the contamination came to light.
"When Mr. KOEBEL learned from test results for the samples collected on May 15 that there was a high level of contamination in the system, he did not disclose the results to the health officials in the Bruce-Grey-Owen Sound Health Unit who were investigating the outbreak of illnesses in the community. Instead, he misled them by assuring them that the water was safe," Mr. Justice Dennis O'CONNOR wrote in Part 1 of his report of the Walkerton inquiry.
Mr. PATTERSON's meticulous record-keeping and detailing of the events around the tragedy proved to be a valuable source of information at the inquiry. In the first weekend that the water crisis unfolded, he compiled close to 80 pages of notes, documenting the times and contents of each conversation he had, Mr. PATON said.
While Mr. PATTERSON was scheduled to take early retirement in the fall of 2000, he remained with the health unit on contract to help with the exhaustive inquiry. Taking the stand at the inquiry was emotionally difficult for Mr. PATTERSON, particularly when lawyers tried to attack his credibility.
"He was a gentleman during the inquiry," Dr. McQUIGGE said, adding that his colleague often had to bite his tongue.
A quiet and private person, Mr. PATTERSON didn't seek the spotlight and said little to the mews media during and after the inquiry.
"Walkerton took its toll on everybody," Dr. McQUIGGE said. "It was tremendously taxing."
David PATTERSON was born on November 2, 1950, in Owen Sound, Ontario He was the second of four children to Fred and Mary PATTERSON. He was raised in the small community of Tara, south of Owen Sound, where he also raised his family. His father owned a business installing tile drainage for local farmers. As a teenager, Mr. PATTERSON worked with his father during the summers.
It was as a young teen that he developed his lifelong hobby of restoring old cars to mint condition; most of them were 1932-34 Fords. He enjoyed taking his cars out to local fairs and other events and last fall chauffeured his daughter to her wedding in one.
After graduating from Chesley District High School, he attended Ryerson Polytechnical Institute in Toronto, where he studied public-health inspection. He graduated in 1970, and the same year passed the tests to become a certified public-health inspector. That year, he also married his high-school sweetheart Sharon. They had two children.
Mr. PATTERSON started work at the age of 19 at the health unit in Owen Sound, where he worked the length of his public-health career.
He began as a public-health inspector and was promoted to a supervisory position first in 1982 and then in 1989, when he became assistant director of health protection with the Bruce-Grey-Owen Sound Health Unit.
In the mid-1990s, Mr. PATTERSON and the health unit were involved in a high-profile court case in which they took a local farmer to court for selling unpasteurized milk. Mr. PATTERSON couldn't stand the thought that people could be put at undue risk for drinking the unpasteurized milk, Dr. McQUIGGE said.
"This [public health] was his calling," Dr. McQUIGGE said. "He was passionate about it."
After the Walkerton inquiry wrapped up, Mr. PATTERSON left the health unit and went to work for the local conservation authority reviewing people's applications for government grants to improve their water systems.
Mr. PATTERSON preferred life in small-town Ontario to that in a big city. He enjoyed the outdoors and frequently went on canoeing, hiking and hunting trips with his family.
"He felt strongly about protecting the outdoors," said Sharon, his wife. "He was just a very dedicated person -- he really believed in things."
Mr. PATTERSON leaves his wife, son Michael, daughter April and his parents.
David PATTERSON, born on November 2, 1950, in Owen Sound, Ontario, died on January 10, 2003, in Owen Sound.

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DAVIDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
JAMIESON, Joseph Thoburn
Died suddenly, February 25, 2003, in hospital, at Cranbrook, British Columbia. Beloved and loving husband of Ellen Cameron (McFARLANE,) his wife of 45 years. Sadly missed by his two sons, Joseph Alexander (Alec); and Michael Douglas (Laura SALEM), cherished ''Papa'' of Kathleen all of Calgary. Lovingly remembered by his sister Norah (wife of the late Don CARR,) Manotick, Ontario brother, William R. (Pamela MacDOWELL,) Rideau Ferry, Ontario. Predeceased by his sister Catherine E. DAVIDSON, Aberdeen, Scotland. ''Uncle Joe'' will be forever loved and never forgotten by his nieces and nephews Susan WINTER (Bill;) Mary McLAUGHLIN (Peter) and Shannon; Scott (Joanne), Jacqueline and William; Jane Jamieson and other nieces and nephews. Predeceased by very special grandniece Lindsey WINTER. Born at Almonte, Ontario, January 24, 1927, son of the late William Algernon and Catherine Isobel (COCHRAN) JAMIESON. Primary and secondary education at Almonte. Graduated, as a Textile Engineer, from Philadelphia Institute of Technology, 1949. Moved west to British Columbia upon his retirement, in 1991. Following a productive 26 year career, with Canadian General Tower Ltd. of Cambridge Ontario, Joe and Ellen spent many happy years at Nelson, Marysville and Cranbrook, British Columbia. Traveling with Ellen he enjoyed frequent trips back to visit their special Friends in Ontario. Joe seemed to particularly look forward to his fall hunting excursions to visit the Happy Hopeful Hunt Club on Pakenham Mountain. Family members and close Friends have been recipient of the product of his sculpted wood bird carving endeavors of his retirement years. Joe will live forever within the hearts of those of us who loved him. Missed by many.

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DAVIES o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Arthur Thomas H. BREATHAT
In loving memory of Arthur "Art" BREATHAT, a resident of Evansville, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Thursday, June 5, 2003 at the age of 50 years.
He was born in Sudbury, son of Gerald BREATHAT and Pauline (CRANSTON) VANEVERY. He worked as a machine operator at the Lafarge Quarry, Meldrum Bay for the past 9 years. Art enjoyed hunting, fishing and a good game of cards.
Dearly loved husband of Marilyn (DAMPIER) BREATHAT of Evansville. Loving father of Cheryl Lee BREATHAT and Aaron PHILLIPS and Arthur James BREATHAT. Dear brother of Robbie and Judy BJORKLUND of Spring Bay, Bonnie and husband Dave PATTERSON of Hornepayne and Peggy FARQUHAR and Jim DAVIES of North Bay. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Friends and relatives were received at the Culgin Funeral Home on Monday, June 9. There will be no funeral service and cremation will follow.

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DAVIES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-19 published
He gave his city artistic merit
Windsor gallery's longtime director built a fine collection in his pursuit of 'communal pride'
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, July 19, 2003 - Page F9
Canada's art world is lamenting the end of an era with the demise of Kenneth SALTMARCHE, founding director of the Art Gallery of Windsor, who died in Toronto on July 3 at the age of 82.
An accomplished artist, Mr. SALTMARCHE ultimately made his greatest mark as an arts administrator and is being remembered as one of the last of a dying generation of artists-turned-gallery directors who revitalized the art scene across the country.
Hired in 1946 to oversee operations of what was then the Willistead Art Gallery in Windsor, Ontario, he transformed the facility from a room on the second floor of the municipal library into a leading regional institution that possessed an astute collection of nearly 3,000 works by the time he retired in 1985.
"The gallery really had a very simple and rather primitive beginning, and he built it from absolute scratch, from zero," said Bill WITHROW, former longtime director of the Art Gallery of Ontario. "I was always impressed with that fact."
As a collector, Mr. SALTMARCHE is remembered for having "a good eye" and for acquiring many works by artists initially considered out of the mainstream, such as Harold Town and Prudence Heward. Over time his judgment was proved sound as a favoured artist's reputation would soar, along with the market value of his or her works.
He concentrated on attaining both historical and contemporary Canadian works, including numerous canvases of the Group of Seven, thus laying the foundation of the gallery's present collection of more than 5,000 pieces.
"He often collected against the current, which means you can make a dollar go a lot further," said David SILCOX, managing director of Sotheby's Canada. "He bought people when they weren't popular -- he was very intelligent that way."
Alf BOGUSKY, director of the Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery, calls the collection Mr. SALTMARCHE assembled a "magnificent accomplishment" that reflects "the beautiful story of the development of Canadian painting, as represented by the earliest formal portraiture by British and French artists right through to the contemporary period of the Seventies."
Known for his energetic vision, Mr. SALTMARCHE had a knack for drumming up community involvement through innovative programs such as Art in the Park, now a long-established annual event in Windsor. Aided by his wife Judy, he made the gallery a vibrant centre of cultural life and charmed volunteers and patrons alike to new heights of involvement and philanthropy.
Aware of the advantages of being situated at Canada's southernmost border point, he cultivated friendly relations with the Detroit Institute of Arts, situated across the river and a few city blocks away, even sending over exhibitions of Canadian art. In the mid-1950s, he scored a major coup by persuading his U.S. counterparts that a key work languishing in their collection would have a much more appreciative home in Canada.
As a result, the Detroit Institute of Arts donated A Side Street Group of Seven stalwart Lawren Harris's celebrated 1919 painting of a snow-covered Toronto street -- to the Willistead gallery as a gift in commemoration of Windsor's 100th birthday. (Tom Thomson's 1914 painting Algonquin Park came into the gallery's possession in the same period.)
When nine previously unknown early 19th-century watercolours by early bureaucrat-painter George Heriot appeared on the market in 1967, Mr. SALTMARCHE was determined to acquire them despite their "distinctly Old Master price tag" exceeding $45,000. He quickly raised three-quarters of the sum from Windsor residents, then convinced the Canada Council into making an exceptional grant of $10,000 to complete the purchase.
Mr. SALTMARCHE saw collecting as "an art museum's primary function," and once wrote: "Communal pride -- whether civic or national in scale -- is engendered by the owning of works of art of outstanding value and is a completely natural reason for assembling a permanent collection."
He struggled with the library board for years to make the gallery an autonomous institution, and his eventual success was seen as a milestone by directors of other regional galleries. In the early 1970s, he moved the gallery into a historic renovated brewery building. It later ceded those premises to the province (for use as a casino) and moved into a prominent new downtown building in 2001.
Born September 29, 1920, in Cardiff, Wales, Kenneth Charles SALTMARCHE arrived in Windsor with his family at the age of four, and moved with them to the village of Vienna, south of London, Ontario, during the Depression. It was in Vienna's one-room schoolhouse that he encountered the travelling exhibition of Group of Seven reproductions that inspired him to dedicate his future to art. "He always told me that seeing that show was the pivotal point in his passion for art," said his son Noel.
A graduate of the Ontario College of Art, he began programming at the Willistead Art Gallery about 1946; he also began to write art and music criticism for the Windsor Daily Star and painting landscapes, still lifes and family portraits. In 1947, he married Judith DAVIES, and they had Noël and his twin brother David two years later. His family often joined him on painting expeditions around the world, some of which resulted in solo exhibitions of art.
He was a member of the Order of Canada and held an honorary law degree from the University of Windsor. As well, he was the founding president of the Ontario Association of Art Galleries and a founding member and past president of the Canadian Art Museum Directors Organization.
Soon after Judith died in 1992, he painted a series of watercolours "and that was the last work he did," Noël said. Afflicted with senile dementia, he spent his last years in several retirement homes and then a nursing home, Castleview Wychwood, in Toronto.
Predeceased by brothers Ronald and Leslie as well as his wife, Mr. SALTMARCHE leaves Noël and David, daughters-in-law Deb and Anita, and four grandchildren, all of Toronto.

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DAVIES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-10 published
JACKSON, Berners Archdale Wallace " Barney"
Died peacefully after a short illness on October 9, 2003 at his home. Predeceased by his only love, Evelyn Maire (née DAVIES.) Loving Father to Michael, Jane and Katherine, Grandfather to Todd, Seana, Andrew and Christine, Great Grandfather to Jacob. Professor Jackson was the son of the late Lloyd JACKSON, former mayor of Hamilton, and his wife Susan. He was educated at Hamilton public schools, and later attended Pickering College in Newmarket as a student, moving on to become a Master at Pickering for 13 years. He attended McMaster University where he earned his B.A. and M.A. He then attended Oxford University where he earned his D, Phil Oxon. For 25 years he had a distinguished career at McMaster University as a Professor in the English Department. At various times he served as a member of the University Board of Governors, The Senate, and as President of the McMaster Faculty Association. He was the founding Director of the Shakespeare Seminars at Stratford, which he held for many years, and served as a member of the Board of Governors of the Festival Theatre. He was the editor of several texts of Shakespeare's plays, and contributed a ''much-admired'' annual review of the Straford season for ''The Shakespeare Quarterly.'' A devoted golfer, he was a member of the Royal Canadian Golf Association and worked on the Committee for the Canadian Open. A memorial service to be held on Tuesday, October 14 at 2 p.m. at the Marlatt Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 195, King Street West, Dundas, Ontario. (905) 627-7452. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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DAVIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Marilyn Joanne (Mandy) BELLEROSE
In loving memory Marilyn Joanne (Mandy) BELLEROSE, September 30, 1941 to December 15, 2003.
Mandy BELLEROSE, a resident of Providence Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Monday, December 15, 2003 at the age of 62 years.
She was born in Carnarvon Township, daughter of the late Albert and Anne (McFARLANE) DAVIS. Mandy had worked with the developmentally handicapped for over 15 years. She enjoyed bingo, going to the casinos, crosswords and knitting. Her greatest love and the most pleasure she had in her life was her family. Although she will be sadly missed, many fond memories will be cherished by her entire family and Friends.
Dearly loved wife of Donald BELLEROSE, loving and loved mother of Kelly SMITH and his wife Marie of Hensall, Debbie WHITE/WHYTE and her husband David of Brampton and Ray SMITH of Providence Bay and step-children Dawn of Sault Ste. Marie, Michael and his wife Terry of Sudbury and Darrin and partner Shawna of Sault Ste Marie. Proud grandmother of Kasaundra, Tiffany, Kristi, Melissa and Bryan. Dear sister of John DAVIS, and his wife Cindy of Spring Bay. Fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews, and many cousins and Friends. Predeceased by infant daughter Mary Ann HEBERT and brother Joseph Morlyn DAVIS.
Friends may call at the Lady of Canada Catholic Church, Mindemoya after 7 p.m. on Wednesday, December 17, 2003. The funeral service will be conducted at the church on Thursday, December 18, at 3: 00 p.m. with Father Robert Foliot officiating. Interment in Providence Bay Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home.

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DAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-08 published
Photographer, reporter and royal press attaché
After years at The Globe and Mail, he went on to craft speeches for William DAVIS and to co-ordinate royal tours
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, January 8, 2003, Page R5
John GILLIES, a former reporter at The Globe and Mail, who later served as press attaché for the royal tours in the 1970s, died recently at his home in Mississauga, Ontario He was 74.
Known as "a two-way man," Mr. GILLIES was both a reporter and photographer at The Globe throughout the 1960s. He travelled extensively around Ontario, covering everything from fires and train derailments to inquests and trials.
Reporting was in his blood, said Rudy PLATIEL, a fellow two-way man who worked with Mr. GILLIES at The Globe.
He loved digging up stories and talking to people, Mr. PLATIEL recalled.
"For John, the worst time was when nothing was panning out, and he didn't get a story.
"We were sort of the generalists in the sense that we were ready to take on any story," Mr. PLATIEL added. "I think he enjoyed not knowing what was coming up next."
After more than a decade at The Globe and Mail, Mr. GILLIES left the paper for a job with the Ontario government.
Working as a communications officer in the Ministry of Education, his job, among others, was to field media calls and write speeches.
He frequently wrote them for William DAVIS -- who would later become the Premier of Ontario -- when Mr. DAVIS was the education minister. Mr. GILLIES spent 20 years working for the government before retiring in the late 1980s.
Of all the press officers at Queen's Park at the time, Mr. GILLIES was the most up-front, said Rod GOODMAN, a former ombudsman of The Toronto Star.
"If he knew something, he would tell you," Mr. GOODMAN said. "He was very straight and very honest."
During the 1970s, on leaves from the Ministry of Education, Mr. GILLIES served as press co-ordinator for the royal tours to Canada.
He would ride on the press bus, following the Royal Family on their visits to various parts of the country, arranging interviews and ensuring that things ran smoothly for the press.
"Several times, he got to meet the Queen," said his daughter, Laurie SWINTON. "He always said Prince Philip was a real card."
Her father was not known for his impeccable style: Ms. SWINTON recalls a photo taken of him standing with the Queen, wearing a rumpled $29 suit from a local department store. It was not uncommon for Mr. GILLIES to be seen with a crooked tie and untucked shirt. "He was probably one of the only guys at Queen's Park that dressed worse than me," said author and broadcaster Claire HOY.
John GILLIES was born in Toronto on March 4, 1928, the only son of George and Sarah GILLIES. The family lived in a tiny row house in the city's west end. His father worked in the rail yards, and his mother in a chocolate factory, often bringing home boxes of candy for her only son.
Not fond of school, Mr. GILLIES dropped out in Grade 10.
Later, in search of work, he walked into the office of the weekly newspaper in Port Credit (now a part of Mississauga), telling them he needed a job and would do anything. It just so happened that they required a sports editor and hired him.
"He just sort of fell into writing," Ms. SWINTON said.
In 1954, when Hurricane Hazel ripped through Toronto, killing 81 people, Mr. GILLIES's instinct was not to seek shelter in the basement of his home, but to hit the streets to talk to people and gather stories.
When Mr. GILLIES reached an area of the city where a number of new townhouses had been wiped out, a police roadblock met him, recalled his son, Ken GILLIES. A friend who was with him at the time pulled a badge from his coat pocket and flashed it at the officer. After police let the pair through, Mr. GILLIES turned to his friend and asked where he got the badge. "From my kid's Cheerios box this morning," his friend replied.
An avid golfer, it was on the greens in Port Credit that Mr. GILLIES met Frances SMITH, a woman who shared his passion for golf.
The couple married in 1954, and later had three children. Ms. GILLIES died of cancer in 1984.
A helpless optimist when it came to golf, Mr. GILLIES was known to go out under the most dire conditions. He would look at a dark, looming sky and declare that it was clearing, Ken GILLIES recalled. By contrast, said Mr. HOY, the task of getting Mr. GILLIES on the greens when he hadn't scheduled a golf game was next to impossible.
"I don't know anyone else who was that structured," Mr. HOY added, noting that his golfing buddy stuck to his weekly schedule, where each day was dedicated to a particular task. For example, shopping was done not on Thursday but on Saturday. "He had this one little idiosyncrasy," Mr. HOY joked.
A good-hearted man who was also a big lover of dogs, Mr. GILLIES was known to carry a stash of dog biscuits on his daily walks to give to the neighbourhood pooches. "He was a very simple guy," said his son Ken. "He didn't like a lot of ceremony and fanfare."
Mr. GILLIES leaves his three children, Don, Ken and Laurie, and two grandchildren, Corey and Grace.
John GILLIES, reporter / photographer, communications officer born in Toronto on March 4, 1928; died in Mississauga, Ontario on December 4, 2002.

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DAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-18 published
Former Member of Provincial Parliament, journalist Frank DREA dead at 69
By Jonathan FOWLIE Saturday, January 18, 2003, Page A25
Frank DREA, Progressive Conservative Member of Provincial Parliament of 14 years and a journalist best known for his consumer advocacy column in the Telegram, died Wednesday.
He was 69.
"He accomplished a great deal and was very tenacious," his wife Jeanne said last night.
"He used to say, 'What's the use of having power if you don't use it to help people?' He did, and I think that's how he'd like to be remembered."
First elected to office in 1971 as the Member of Provincial Parliament for Scarborough Centre, Mr. DREA was known as a crusader who often fought for the underdog.
In 1977, Mr. DREA was appointed to the cabinet of then premier Bill DAVIS, where he served as Minister of Correctional Services, of Consumer and Commercial Relations and of Community and Social Services.
During his time in politics, he worked to reform Ontario's prison system, introduced legislation to protect workers and tradespeople and helped to modernize the insurance industry.
Mr. DREA opted to leave politics in 1985 after Frank MILLER took over as premier and shuffled him out of the cabinet.
An avid horse-racing fan, Mr. DREA was named chairman of the Ontario Racing Commission later that year.
"Frank was tough, but he was fair," Premier Ernie EVES said in a statement yesterday.
"He will be missed by colleagues from both sides of the house," added Mr. EVES, who worked with Mr. DREA for a number of years during the early 1980s.
Toronto Sun columnist Peter WORTHINGTON, who worked with Mr. DREA at the Telegram before it folded, remembered Mr. DREA last night as an aggressive and driven reporter.
"He was certainly one of the Telegram's strongest street reporters," Mr. WORTHINGTON said.

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DAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-05 published
Died This Day -- John Harvey MILLER, 1987
Wednesday, February 5, 2003, Page R7
Journalist and speechwriter, political aide born in Melbourne, Australia, in 1934; in 1957, arrived in Canada; worked at various times for The Globe and Mail, the Toronto Telegram, Canadian Magazine and The Toronto Star; in 1970, became press officer for Tory government led by Premier Bill DAVIS; appointed key aide to DAVIS, writing his major policy addresses; died of cancer.

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DAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-03 published
ENNIS, Lillian
On Saturday, March 1, 2003, at Kensington Gardens, in her 85th year, after a long and full life. Beloved wife of the late Dr. Julius ENNIS. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Paul and Laura, Jon and Janice, Nancy and Monica, and Barry and Karen. Dear sister and sister-in-law of the late Sonia and David GARFIELD, Al and the late Doris JANIS, the late Pearl and Dave DAVIS, Ruth and Josh SEGAL, Bunny and Edith ENNIS, and Rita and Marvin WEINTRUAB. Devoted grandmother of Simon, Joshua, Miriam, Naomi, Isabelle, Sam, and Julie. She will be missed by her devoted nieces and nephews and her many Friends. The family is grateful for the attentive care given by Dr. Anne BIRINGER. Special thanks to everyone at Kensington Gardens. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (one light west of Dufferin), for service on Monday, March 3, 2003, at 12: 30 p.m. Interment Chevra Mishnayis Section of Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva 8 Conrad Avenue, through to Wednesday evening. If desired, donations may be made to the Lillian Ennis Memorial Fund c/o the Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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DAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-22 published
DAVIS, Harry
Born September 12, 1917, died peacefully in the Univeristy of British Columbia Hospital Emergency Care unit on March 17, 2003. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, Muriel, sister Lena, daughter Ellen, son Eric (Deanna), and grand_sons Sam, Eli, and Mischa. A Memorial Service will be held on Sunday, March 23 at 12: 00 p.m. in the Garden Room, ground floor of the Purdy Pavilion Extended Care, Univeristy of British Columbia Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver. Wise, idealistic, courageous, and gentle, Harry loved life; he could usually be heard singing or whistling a tune. The kindest of men, he always tried to make the world a better place. It is poorer without him. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Canadian Seaman's Union Film Project, 33844 King Road, Abbotsford, British Columbia, V2S 7M8.

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DAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
Cardinal felt at ease with politics, power
Corporate Friends, conservative image concealed complexities, contradictions
By Michael VALPY Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page A9
Gerald Emmett CARTER presided over the Roman Catholic Church in Toronto for 12 years with panache, deftness, wit and worldliness too much worldliness, some of his critics thought.
The retired cardinal archbishop, who died at 91 yesterday morning after a brief illness, chummed with the powerful of business and politics and became the most influential cleric in Canada.
He was a personal friend of Pope John Paul 2nd. His weight was felt in Vatican circles and his administrative expertise -- and connections with the elite world of corporate finance -- were valued by the church's governing Curia.
He raised millions of dollars for charity through his annual cardinal's dinner, pressed governments for social housing and worked energetically to improve race relations in a city being transformed from a WASPy bastion into a multicultural and multiracial metropolis. His was the largest and wealthiest English-speaking diocese in Canada.
In the North American church's tumultuous years after the 1961-65 Second Vatican Council, the most significant reassessment of the Catholic Church since the 16th century, Cardinal CARTER was branded a conservative by many Catholic liberals. It was a superficial label for a complex and astute pastoral theologian and a man whose intelligence was described as commanding.
The conservative label, for one thing, did not take into account Cardinal CARTER's publicly tepid response to Pope Paul 6th's reaffirmation of the church's opposition to birth control.
Or that he once said Catholics were "not required to agree with [the Pope's] every word or act." Said the cardinal: To think that a good Catholic is obliged to agree with the Pope on everything "would, at the very least, make for a very dull church."
But he strained ecumenical good fellowship in Ontario by relentlessly and, eventually, successfully -- prodding the provincial government to legislate full financing for the Roman Catholic separate school system. He intervened in the Newfoundland constitutional referendum on ending public financing of denominational schools.
He publicly defended his church's rules for an all-male, celibate priesthood. He wrote a pastoral letter calling Dr. Henry MORGENTALER's abortion clinic an "abomination" and calling on Christians to oppose its operations. But he also ordered his priests to stop distributing literature of militant anti-abortion groups.
When the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops swung to the left in its criticisms of the national government's fiscal policies, Cardinal CARTER bluntly took the opposite direction.
And he objected to the conference's decision in 1984 to study a plan to give women and girls a more prominent role in the church and attracted noise and notoriety three years later when he ordered a suburban Toronto church not to allow a teenaged girl to be an altar server at mass.
Cardinal CARTER, a Montreal typesetter's son who made his mark as an academic and teacher before climbing the church's ranks, looked stern in public, gave arid homilies and was known to intimidate his priests.
But he was mischievous and funny in private, played a superb game of tennis and was a sought-after dinner guest in the homes of Toronto's business and political elite.
He was, among other things, credited with converting Conrad BLACK to Catholicism, and his name often appeared in the press alongside those of political leaders such as former Ontario premier William DAVIS, prompting Globe and Mail columnist Orland FRENCH to write: "His presence at glittering Tory functions is overly noticeable and it would be fair to speculate that he discussed with the Premier the advantages of extending funding to separate schools."
Born in Montreal in 1912, Cardinal CARTER was a priest for nearly 66 years and a bishop for 40 years. His brother Alexander, who died last year at 93, had retired as bishop of the Ontario diocese of Sault Ste. Marie. Two sisters were nuns, one of them the head of her order.
Cardinal CARTER was educated at the Grand Seminary of Montreal and the University of Montreal. He spent the first 25 years of his priesthood working in various educational fields in the province of Quebec.
In 1939, he founded St. Joseph's Teaching College in Montreal and was its principal until 1961. For 15 years, he was English commissioner for the Montreal Catholic School Commission. He was a professor of catechetics -- the formation of faith -- for 25 years.
He was installed as the first auxiliary bishop in the diocese of London, Ontario, in 1961 and became the eighth bishop of London in 1964.
In 1971, he headed the International Committee for English in the Liturgy, which was responsible for translating Latin texts for the mass and the sacraments.
In 1977, he was elected a member of the Permanent Council of the Synod of Bishops in Rome, which sets the topics for the International Synod of Bishops in Rome every two or three years.
Pope John Paul named him a cardinal, one of only four in Canada, in May of 1979, a year after he became archbishop of Toronto.
From the moment he was installed as archbishop, promising to serve all who "would like to see Toronto as something more than an asphalt jungle," Cardinal CARTER put his job in the spotlight and, very often, himself in the hot seat. He tackled controversial issues with a candour that won him arrows and acclaim from politicians, minority groups, the church laity and sometimes fellow clergy.
At the same time, he was loyal to the Pope and to the official teachings of the church, declaring in 1979 that the time had come to end the dissent within the church that had followed Vatican 2 and turn the 1980s into a time of reaffirmation of faith.
"We have had enough of confusion, enough of confrontation, enough of dissent. We are the believers. Those who go looking for dissent are not Catholic."
His ties with the Pope were personal. John Paul, as archbishop of Krakow, had visited Cardinal CARTER in London, Ontario, and had him stay as a houseguest in Poland. Cardinal CARTER, in turn, was host to the Pope at his Rosedale home when the pontiff visited Toronto in 1984.
His funeral will be held at 10: 30 a.m. Thursday in St. Michael's Cathedral, Toronto.

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DAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
EUSTACE, David Fox
Born Dublin, Ireland October 31, 1931, died peacefully, at home in Toronto, on May 29, 2003. Brother to Roland EUSTACE, Hope DAVIS and Ruth DEVLIN. Cherished husband of Roberta EUSTACE and father of Steven, Gary, (Lynn,) James, (Mary,) and Talbot EUSTACE. Beloved Grandfather and sage of Tara, Connor, and Gemma EUSTACE. A true renaissance man. He will be missed by his many Friends who have known him as a writer, filmmaker, creative thinker, businessman, insurance executive, magician, a lifelong movie buff and lover of fine books. Special thanks to Dr. Patrick SKALENDA and Beata ROLLINS for palliative care. The celebration of a life well lived will be held at home on Sunday, June 1st between 2-6 p.m. Donations, in lieu of flowers, can be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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DAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-07 published
MORGAN, Margaret Kathleen (née DAVIS)
Died in her sleep at her home in Toronto on Thursay, June 5, 2003. Beloved wife for 56 years of the late Robert MORGAN. Dear mother of Robert Davis MORGAN (Karen) and Lynn CANTOR. Proud grandma to Scott MORGAN (Nicole), David MORGAN, Adam CANTOR and Sarah Alexandra CANTOR. Predeceased by her older brother, Gordon DAVIS, and her twin Frederick DAVIS. Best pal of Marian CARTER for 75 years. Margaret was born in Winnipeg in 1915. Before her marriage she worked for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Winnipeg. Her marriage to Bob took her to Halifax, Saint John, Ottawa, Edmonton, London, Ontario and finally Toronto where a lifelong love of the ballet led her to become involved with the newly formed National Ballet of Canada. She founded the National Ballet's ''Paper Things'' store, and was President of the Volunteer Committee. She was a Past-President of the Southern Ontario Unit of the Herb Society of America, a member of the Toronto Herb Society, and a Governor of Sunnybrook Hospital. Her joyful spirit and sense of fun will be sadly missed by her vast network of Friends who played bridge with her at the York Club, golfed with her at The Toronto Hunt, marveled at her creative talents with The Garden Club of Toronto, and partied with her at Goodwood, Longboat Key and Muir Park. She loved life and she lived with amazing grace.
A memorial service will be held at Lawrence Park Community Church, 2180 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, on Tuesday, June 10 at 2 o'clock p.m. In honour of Margaret's commitment to the ballet, donations in her memory may be made to Development, Special Gifts, The National Ballet of Canada, 470 Queen's Quay West, Toronto, Ontario M5V 3K4. Arrangements in the care of Trull 'North Toronto' Funeral Home andCremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence) 416-488-1101

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DAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-15 published
Radio pioneer built network
He founded Ontario's first French-language radio station in 1951 when his local station denied francophones airtime.
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Monday, June 16, 2003 - Page R7
He started in business as a butcher, and later was a soldier and a hotelier, but Conrad LAVIGNE's first love was show business. Whether he was operating the television stations in Northern Ontario that became the largest privately owned television broadcast system in the world, appearing at the staid proceedings of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, or at conventions, Mr. LAVIGNE often delighted those within earshot with jokes, stories, witty comments -- even singing.
Like the time he sang grace during the annual meeting of the Association for French Language Broadcasters in the 1970s.
"Members of the head table, including myself and Premier Bill DAVIS, walked into the room and stood behind our chairs," recalls Pierre JUNEAU, chairman of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission from 1968 to 1975.
"Mr. LAVIGNE, who was chairman of the French-language broadcasters group, began singing grace in French, and with his very strong voice. People felt sort of strange with this."
When he was done, Mr. LAVIGNE looked at Premier DAVIS and quipped: "Well, Mr. Premier, this is to show you that when you are chairman, you can do whatever you like."
J. Lyman POTTS, former vice-president of Standard Broadcasting, remembers the time in the early 1960s when Mr. LAVIGNE appeared before the Board of Broadcast Governors -- predecessor of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission -- in support of a radio or television station licensing application.
At the beginning of his presentation, Mr. LAVIGNE expressed his regrets that Board of Broadcast Governors member Bernard GOULET had died at few days earlier. Then, without skipping a beat, he looked toward the ceiling and said: "If Bernie were here today, I think he would vote for my application."
"It broke up the room," says Mr. POTTS. "If ever a meeting got dull he'd liven things up. It was a joy to find him at meetings. He was a unique personality."
Mr. LAVIGNE, who was born in the small town of Chénéville, Quebec, on November 2, 1916, and raised in Cochrane, Ontario, died in Timmins, Ontario on April 16 following a lengthy battle with emphysema. He was 86.
Friends, family and business associates say Mr. LAVIGNE had show business in his blood in his late teens. On many evenings, the young man who moved to Timmins from Cochrane at age 18 to open a small grocery store and butcher shop with his uncle would act in plays in the hall of a local church. But he didn't get into the entertainment business in a big way until after he helped Canada's war effort, got married and started his life as an entrepreneur in the hotel business.
In 1942, he sold his butcher shop and enlisted in the Canadian infantry. He became a commando training officer while stationed at Vernon, British Columbia, and in 1944 headed overseas. While on a furlough from Vernon he returned to Timmins and married Jeanne CANIE. The couple raised seven children.
Mr. LAVIGNE returned to Canada in 1946 and bought the Prince George Hotel in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, which at the time was a booming gold-mining town. He sold the business in 1950.
He entered the world of media and entertainment by founding CFCL, the first French-language radio station in Ontario in 1951, in what, essentially, was his way of ensuring the area's large French-speaking population had a voice in the North.
Michelle DE COURVILLE NICOL of Ottawa said her father launched the station after a group of francophones that he was part of in Kirkland Lake was told by the manager of an English-language radio station that they would no longer be given regular air time to discuss issues of interest to French people.
"He was very proud of being a francophone," says Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL. " When he was told that his compatriots would no longer be welcome on the local station he said, 'Oh, ya!' and got the idea of starting a French-language radio station. He moved to Timmins, applied for a licence and got it."
CFCL soon attracted a faithful audience, especially in Northwestern Quebec, where it could be heard more clearly than French stations in Montreal.
In a 1988 interview with Northern Ontario Business, Mr. LAVIGNE remembered the time he hired a relative unknown named Stompin' Tom CONNORS to perform live on CFCL. The radio station was located above a jewellery store and the pounding from Mr. CONNORS's size-11 boots caused china to fall off the shelves in the store below.
Radio was his first love until the mid-1950s when, on a business trip to southern Ontario, he saw his first television broadcast, on WHAM from Rochester, New York He fell for the concept of television and he and an engineer friend drove to Rochester and learned everything they could about the magic medium of television.
Back in Timmins, Mr. LAVIGNE bought a hill in the north end of the town, named it Mont Sacré-Coeur, built a road to the foot of his hill, and began blasting rock and working in earnest to put a television station on the air. By 1956, CFCL-television was a reality.
"There was always the fear of failure because of the sparse population," Mr. LAVIGNE said at the time. "But we had an engineer with us named Roch DEMERS, who later became president of Telemedia, and together we started putting up rebroadcasting stations between 1957 and 1962."
Kapuskasing's rebroadcasting station was the first such facility in Canada, and it added another portion of the sparsely populated northeastern Ontario market to the growing station's network. Eventually, Mr. LAVIGNE built rebroadcasting stations in Chapleau and Moosonee, Ontario and Malartic, Quebec, and by the time expansion was completed, CFCL-television served 1.5 million people. Eventually, he built the station into the world's largest privately owned system.
For many years he appeared on a very popular CFCL program known as the President's Corner, during which he would sit on camera in a comfortable chair and read and respond to letters from viewers.
Between 1962 and 1970, Mr. LAVIGNE's television network entered the world of high technology with its own microwave network. Mr. LAVIGNE had the northeastern Ontario television market virtually all to himself for about 20 years until the Canadian Television Network (CTV) arrived on the scene. He reacted by building new stations in North Bay and Sudbury with a rebroadcasting station in Elliot Lake to serve Manitoulin Island. Expansion continued in 1976 with the purchase of a bankrupt television station in Pembroke, in the Ottawa Valley. Eventually, Mr. LAVIGNE's private network stretched from Moosonee to Ottawa, and from Hearst to Mattagami, Quebec
"When we first started we had the market all to ourselves," he told Northern Ontario Business. "We had 20 hours a week of local programming, and it was beautiful. We gave the North a unified voice. One time, during a forest fire near Chapleau, our messages arranged for accommodations for 1,000 people in Timmins."
Mr. LAVIGNE divested himself of his broadcasting holdings in 1980, primarily because he was refused permission to operate a cable television service in the North. He remained a director of Mid-Canada Television, the network that grew from his little Timmins station in 1956, and was chairman of the board of Northern Telephone Ltd. For a number of years, he served on the board of the National Bank of Canada, and for 10 years served on the board of ICG Utilities (formerly Inter City Gas.)
His life after broadcasting also included 20 years as a property developer in the Timmins area.
"He was always a physically active person," says Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL. "In the years he was setting up his television stations he would often go out with the engineers. He was not as happy sitting behind his desk."
Mr. LAVIGNE was elected to the Canadian Broadcasting Hall of Fame in 1990. His wife died in 1995. He leaves Ms. DE COURVILLE NICOL and six other children, Marc, Andrée, Nicole, Jean-Luc, Pierre and Marie-France.

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DAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-02 published
DAVIS, Curtiss Gridley
Born August 31, 1916 in Rochester, New York died after a long and courageous battle, on July 31, 2003 at the Guelph General Hospital. He was a resident for the past year at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph. Predeceased by his first wife Grace TURNER. Lovingly remembered and missed by his wife Audrey LIVERNOIS. Dearly loved father of Natasha VAN BENTUM (Henri) and Bruce Gridley DAVIS (Janet WRIGHT,) of Vancouver. Stepfather of John LIVERNOIS of Guelph, and Laurie STATHER of Belleville; dear brother of Joyce LOVETT (Bob) of Kitchener and Jim DAVIS (Mary) of Maple grandfather of Rachel DAVIS, Celine and Jacob RICHMOND, Nicole STATHER, Michael STATHER (Tabitha), Ryan STATHER, and Ali and Becky LIVERNOIS; and great grandfather of four. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. During World War 2, he served with the Toronto Scottish Regiment in England and Europe. He will be remembered for his thirst for knowledge and as a gifted writer and reader. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, August 6, 2003, at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 20 Quebec Street, Guelph, with the Reverend Thomas KAY officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Knox Church, or to the charity of your choice. (Arrangements entrusted to Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (416) 822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com).

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DAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
DAVIS, Curtiss Gridley
Born August 31, 1916 in Rochester, New York died after a long and courageous battle, on July 31, 2003 at the Guelph General Hospital. He was a resident for the past year at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph. Predeceased by his first wife Grace TURNER. Lovingly remembered and missed by his wife Audrey LIVERNOIS. Dearly loved father of Natasha VAN BENTUM (Henri) and Bruce Gridley DAVIS (Janet WRIGHT,) of Vancouver. Stepfather of John LIVERNOIS of Guelph, and Laurie STATHER of Belleville; dear brother of Joyce LOVETT (Bob) of Kitchener and Jim DAVIS (Mary) of Maple grandfather of Rachel Davis, Celine and Jacob RICHMOND, Nicole STATHER, Michael STATHER (Tabitha), Ryan STATHER, and Ali and Becky LIVERNOIS; and great grandfather of four. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. During World War 2, he served with the Toronto Scottish Regiment in England and Europe. He will be remembered for his thirst for knowledge and as a gifted writer and reader. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, August 6, 2003, at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 20 Quebec Street, Guelph, with the Reverend Thomas KAY officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Knox Church, or to the charity of your choice. (Arrangements entrusted to Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (416) 822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com).

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DAVIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-27 published
DAVIS, Harry
Died Vancouver, March 17, 2003. There will be a memorial to celebrate the life of Harry DAVIS (born Montreal, September 12, 1917,) on Sunday, October 5th from 11 to 1 p.m. at the Canadian Legion, 5455 de Maisonneuve West, Montreal.

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DAVISSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
Father figure to the Canadian stage
British-trained Stratford character actor never craved starring roles
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, October 16, 2003 - Page R11
For Mervyn " Butch" BLAKE, entering a theatre was a magical experience, something he never tired of during an acting career that spanned close to three-quarters of a century. Mr. BLAKE, one of the most loved members of the Stratford Festival Company, died on October 9 at a Toronto nursing home after a long illness. He was 95.
"Theatre seems to give me life," Mr. BLAKE said in 1994. "I just feel marvellous when I enter the theatre... it's one of the things which keeps me going."
Over his long stage life that included 42 consecutive seasons with the Stratford Festival of Canada, Mr. BLAKE "had the distinction of playing in every single play of Shakespeare's," said Richard MONETTE, Stratford's artistic director.
"He had a great life in the theatre," Mr. MONETTE said.
Adored by both audiences and fellow actors, the veteran actor was known across Canada for his enormous talent and generosity of spirit. When he wasn't working at Stratford, he acted on the country's major stages and in television and film.
For seven seasons, he toured with the Canadian Players, bringing professional theatre to smaller towns. And in 1987, he won a Dora Mavor Moore Award for best performance in a featured role in a production of Saturday, Sunday, Monday at what was then called CentreStage (now CanStage).
"Everyone loved Butch without exception," said John NEVILLE, a former Stratford's artistic director.
Mervyn BLAKE was born on November 30, 1907, in Dehra Dun, India, where his father was a railway executive.
His father wanted him to become an engineer but after falling in love with the theatre, Mr. BLAKE was able to persuade his father to allow him to study at London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. In 1932, he graduated and soon made his professional stage debut at the Embassy Theatre in London
During the Second World War, he served in the British Army as a driver. It was during the war years that he is said to have got his nickname Butch. A witness to the horrors of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, Mr. BLAKE was present at the liberation of the camp by British troops. It was an experience that haunted him for the rest of his life.
At the war's end, he returned to England and to the stage. He married actress Christine BENNETT and spent the years between 1952 and 1955 at the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon. There he worked with many of the great British actors such as Sir Laurence OLIVIER, Sir Michael REDGRAVE and Dame Peggy ASHCROFT.
Despite his success on the British stage, he decided to join the Stratford Festival of Canada, then in its fifth season. With his family in tow, Mr. BLAKE moved to Canada and in 1957 appeared in a production of Hamlet with Christopher PLUMMER in the title role.
"He wasn't a leading actor," said actor and director Douglas CAMPBELL. "He was a supporting player. As a supporting player you couldn't get better."
Mr. BLAKE always saw himself as a character actor who never cared that much about starring roles, said Audrey ASHLEY, a former Ottawa Citizen theatre critic and author of Mr. BLAKE's 1999 biography With Love from Butch.
"He was one of those actors you never had to worry about," Ms. ASHLEY said. "You knew Butch was always going to do a good job."
Known for his unfailing good nature and even temper, he enjoyed re-telling gaffes he had made on stage. Mr. MONETTE remembers one performance where Mr. BLAKE appeared on stage as the Sea Captain in Twelfth Night. The character Viola asks him, "What country, Friends, is this?" And instead of responding "This is Illyria, lady." Out of his mouth popped, "This is Orillia."
To the younger actors at Stratford, Mr. BLAKE was a father figure. "He was very fond of the young actors and would take them under his wing," Ms. ASHLEY said.
Stephen RUSSELL remembers arriving at Stratford for his first season in the mid-1970s. He was placed in the same dressing room as Mr. BLAKE, an experience he still holds close to his heart.
"He was one of the most generous human beings," Mr. RUSSELL said.
One of the areas Mr. BLAKE was most helpful in was teaching fellow actors how to apply stage makeup. He loved makeup and on his dressing-room table he had an old rabbit's foot that he would use to apply his face powder, Mr. RUSSELL said.
Aging didn't stop him from applying his own elaborate makeup. Playing the role of old Adam in As You Like It required him to go through the same makeup ritual when he was 70 years old as it did when he performed the role years earlier as a much younger man.
Aside from the stage, one of Mr. BLAKE's passions was cricket. During his first season in Stratford, he played on the festival's team and was responsible for starting a friendly, annual cricket match against the Shaw Festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake.
Each season, members of the two acting companies would come together for a civilized afternoon of cricket and tea. The Stratford team still goes by the name of Blake's Blokes.
In honour of his talent and dedication to the theatre, Mr. BLAKE was appointed a member of the Order of Canada in May, 1995.
"When he entered, the stage just lit up," Mr. RUSSELL said.
Mr. BLAKE leaves his wife Christine BENNETT; children Andrew and Bridget; and stepson Tim DAVISSON.
Details of a memorial service to be held in Stratford, Ontario, have yet to be announced.

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DAVY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-25 published
DENURE, Frederick Calvin
Died July 22, 2003, age 70, in Lindsay, Ontario, his home since Fred DENURE was a remarkable, generous friend to many and a devoted husband of forty-six years to his one and only Dorothy Ann. His drive, energy and sense of humour will be greatly missed by all who knew him, especially his children Raymond, Steven and Susan. His nine grandchildren have lost a bright spark in their lives
a grandfather whose support and inspiring curiosity showed them that the world is what you make of it.
Fred, founder of DeNure Tours and numerous other business ventures, was an intrepid, inquisitive traveler who always had his eye open for an opportunity or an interesting conversation. Travel was a vocation, but his greatest pleasure was trips taken with his family and good Friends.
The family would like to thank Doctors READY, PERRY, MOULTON and DAVY and the staff at Sunnybrook and St. Michael's Hospital. A very special thanks to the second floor medical south nurses at the Ross Memorial Hospital who ensured that Fred was well looked after in his final days.
A service in celebration of Fred's life will be held at 2 p.m. at Cambridge Street United Church on July 29, 2003 in Lindsay.
Donations in Fred's honour can be made to the Palliative Care Unit at Ross Memorial Hospital in Lindsay.
Arrangements entrusted to Mackey Funeral Home, Lindsay 705-328-2721.

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