COOK o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-03-12 published
Elva Margaret GILPIN (née ARMSTRONG)
In loving memory of Elva Margaret GILPIN April 19, 1927 to March 3, 2003.
Elva GILPIN, a resident of Spring Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital, Mindemoya on Monday, March 3, 2003 at the age of 75 years.
She was born in Gore Bay, daughter of the late Alf and Margaret (PHALEN) ARMSTRONG. Elva was a member of the Gospel Hall in Gore Bay, loved gardening, especially tending her flowers, knitting, quilting. She was a hard working farm wife and mother and will be fondly remembered for her pride, love and enjoyment of her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Beloved wife of Elwood GILPIN of Spring Bay. Loved and loving mother of Marie GRANT and husband Joe and Mary Anne HAYDEN and husband Jeff. Predeceased by two children Ronnie and Donna. Dear grandmother of Brandon and friend Tracy, Ryan, Krystal, Daniel and Holly and great grandmother of Jessica and Morgan. Loving sister of Clarence ARMSTRONG, Bill ARMSTRONG and wife Anne, Alfred ARMSTRONG wife Nelda (predeceased,) Ronnie ARMSTRONG and wife Barb and Alvin ARMSTRONG (predeceased.)
Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home on Thursday March 6, 2003. The funeral service was conducted on Thursday, March 6, 2003 with Pastor Alvin COOK officiating. Spring interment in Grimesthorpe Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home

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COOK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-14 published
COOK, Bernard James
Bernard died peacefully and with dignity at North York General Hospital on February 11, 2003, following a brief illness in his 81st year. Beloved husband of Edythe COOK and the late Gertrude (Trudy) COOK. Bernard will be greatly missed by his daughters Patricia HENRY (Mike) and Mary TOD (Ian) and sons David BINGHAM (Diane) and Bruce BINGHAM (Mary.) He leaves behind 9 grandchildren, Karen BOWES, Kim REEP, Lesley TOD, Brian TOD, Kate BINGHAM, Elizabeth BINGHAM, Michael BINGHAM, Mickey HENRY and Alex HENRY and great grand_son Jonathan REEP. Bernie COOK, a World War 2 veteran who served with the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals in England and Northern Europe, was a proud employee of Canadian Pacific Railway throughout his career and was respected by all. The family extends thanks to the excellent nursing staff at North York General Hospital. Friends may call at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles), on Friday February 14 from 2- 4 and 6 - 8 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Leo's Church (277 Royal York Road) on Saturday, February 15 at 10 a.m. Please join us for a reception following the mass to celebrate Bernard's life at 33 Elmhurst Avenue. Private family interment. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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COOK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-19 published
COOK, G. Bruce
Born 2nd February 1924, died 13th April 2003. Attended North Toronto Collegiate Institute, served 3 years in the Canadian Navy and was discharged as a Lt. Royal Canadian Navy (R). Graduated in Fine Arts with a B.A. from the University of Toronto and a Masters of Letters in Business from the University of Pittsburgh. Was a merchandiser for 10 years with Kent-Fairweathers. Taught at Parkdale Public School for 28 years and 2 years with Departmnet of National Defense in Soest, Germany. Retired in 1985. ''My last salutations are to them who knew me imperfect and loved me'' Tagore
No service by request, cremation.

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COOK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-05 published
Died This Day -- William Osser COOK, 1986
Monday, May 5, 2003 - Page R7
Athlete born at Brantford, Ontario, October 6, 1896; played 12 seasons with New York Rangers on line with brother Bun Cook and Frank Boucher; regarded as one of finest right wingers of era scored 223 goals and 132 assists in regular-season play, and 13 goals, 12 assists in playoffs; twice led National Hockey League in goals and tied for scoring title in 1927; died at Kingston.

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COOK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-12 published
GARDNER, John Herbert (Jack,) Q.C.
Died at Toronto on Saturday, May 10, 2003. Born at Bradford, Ontario on February 23, 1925, son of the late Thomas and Reita (COOK) GARDNER. Survived by his wife Ruth, daughter Jane, son Peter and Joan, grandchildren Ben and Kyle and brother Donald and Dorothy. John served in the Armed Services of Canada (Royal Canadian Artillery) from 1944. A graduate of Victoria College (Law '49) and University of Toronto Law School (1951), he was called to the Bar in 1953. John practiced law for over 50 years in Bradford and Toronto; and as a barrister, he practiced in all of the Superior Courts of Canada up to the Supreme Court of Canada. During a long and active life, he was active in the Home and School Association, North York and was a member of Bloor Street United Church for over 50 years, serving in many varied capacities. His greatest joy and personal satisfaction was in the service of others. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday, May 13. A Memorial Service will be held at Bloor Street United Church, 300 Bloor Street West, Toronto on Thursday, May 15 at 2 o'clock, followed by a reception. Donations to Bloor Street United Church Endowment Fund or Victoria College (University of Toronto) would be appreciated.

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COOK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-09 published
Harriet Ethel (FRY) KILLINS
By Sharon Anne COOK Wednesday, July 9, 2003 - Page A18
Wife, mother, aunt, grandmother, nurse, community activist. Born April 17, 1911, in Jordan, Ontario Died November 19, 2002, in London, Ontario, of old age, aged 91.
In the far-off jungle of Papua New Guinea, the brothers in the religious community called her "Florence" after Nurse Nightingale, because of the kerosene lantern Ethel carried each evening as she visited ailing boys in the residential school. Then well into her 60s, Ethel was a Canadian University Services Organization volunteer (along with her school-teaching husband), serving as the village's nurse, as well as running the infirmary at the school. The challenges were many. Ethel loathed driving, yet in Papua New Guinea in the early 1970s, she intrepidly took a battered car over the dirt tracks of the back-country to make her rounds to villages rarely seen by a doctor. Here, she worked with women to improve family nutrition and reduce infant mortality. She always had a sense of fairness, social equity, selflessness, and courage.
Yet Ethel didn't stand out in a crowd, although she was a tall, willowy and attractive woman. Her congenital deafness made her unusually shy in public. Not sure of what she might be missing in a crowded gathering, she was hesitant to voice her social, religious or political views. But she thought carefully about public and private issues, read widely and held to her convictions for good reason, whether popular or not, and voiced them well one-on-one.
Ethel (née FRY) was descended from one of Ontario's pioneer families: Her FRY ancestors had joined 16 other Mennonite families in 1800 to trek from Pennsylvania to southwestern Ontario. They took up a land grant and built an imposing two-story log-and-frame house.This building is now part of the Jordan Museum, and is filled with the pioneer objects, including jacquard-woven coverlets made by her grandfather, Samuel Nash FRY.
As a young woman, Ethel enrolled in the nursing program at Hamilton General Hospital just as the Depression was beginning. Graduating in 1934, she joined an earlier odyssey of nurses leaving Ontario for better wages and more job security. With several Friends, she found work in Albany, and later in Buffalo, New York A romance, started a decade earlier, was rekindled in 1939-40, when she returned to Canada and married the man who would be her partner for 62 years, Harold KILLINS.
With marriage, she became a busy farm wife, working alongside her husband during busy periods and raising three children, two sons and a daughter. In 1963, just as their own children were leaving home, Ethel and Harold accepted a second family, taking on the parenting of a treasured niece and nephew who had been orphaned. Most of the day-to-day nurturing fell to Ethel, and the respect and love returned to her testifies to the quality of the stable relationships she created for these two children in their adolescence.
Following their period in Papua New Guinea, Ethel and Harold settled in London, Ontario Ethel remained a community activist through a United Church Women's group, the Canadian Save the Children Organization, Operation Eyesight Universal, Amnesty International, Meals on Wheels, and the Unitarian Service Committee. She also worked for many years with a group of quilt-makers, who donated the profits from their work to international development projects. One memorable Christmas, well into her eighties, she made matching wall hangings for every woman in her family.
Public and private acts of kindness sustained the quality of her life through her final sad chapter, a six-year battle with Alzheimer's disease. Visited often by her admiring family, Friends, and most of all by her devoted husband, Ethel descended into her final rest with the assurance that, as she had nurtured and protected others, so she now found herself comforted.
Sharon is Ethel's daughter.

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COOK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-29 published
COOK, John Anthony
Died suddenly on July 26, 2003. Husband to Alexandra MONTGOMERY son of Jane and the late G. Norman COOK; father, with Marilyn COOK, of Norman COOK (Dalia) and Kirsten ZABA (Dwayne) and grandfather to Niki, Antony, Tristan and Jasmine. Brother of Diana WURTZBURG (Chris) and George COOK (Noreen.) John was a retired Director of RBC Dominion Securities, Past Chairman of the Canadian Opera Company and President of Lewa Downs Foundation Canada. He was the recipient of the first Ruby Award recognizing Opera Builders in Canada and was made an Honorary Citizen of Saskatchewan for his service to that province. John was a graduate of the University of Toronto, and Upper Canada College where he was recognized as athlete of the year. John loved life and lived it to the fullest. He will be remembered by all who knew him for his warmth, integrity, good humour and generosity. A service for family and close Friends will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday, July 31, 2003 at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 73 Simcoe Street, Toronto. A celebration of the life of this passionate and generous man will be held at a later date. Details will be announced in this column. The family gratefully declines flowers, and asks that donations be made to the Canadian Opera Company's Ring Cycle in John's memory. Canadian Opera Company, 227 Front Street East, Toronto, Ontario M5A 1E8. (416) 363-6671. Arrangements in the care of the Trull ''North Toronto'' Funeral Home and Cremation Centre 416-488-1101.

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COOK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-05 published
COOK, George Alexander
Died at home on Tuesday, December 3rd with courage and dignity. He was the son of Jane and the late George Norman COOK, brother of Diana WURTZBURG and the late John COOK. His love and companionship will be greatly missed by his wife Noreen, children John (Sarah), David and Kathy, and grandchildren Sam and Jane. Some years ago George retired from his practice of law in Toronto and moved to the family farm near Roseneath, Ontario. From childhood he loved this part of the country and was a well liked and familiar figure in the local community. George's many Friends both young and old will remember his integrity, loyalty and keen wit. A Memorial Service will be held in St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 73 Simcoe Street, on Tuesday, December 9th at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care or The Canadian Cancer Society.

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COOKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-20 published
He helped build a media giant
Newly graduated accountant brought order to Thomson Corp. in early days
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, May 20, 2003 - Page R7
The astute accountant who provided the financial wizardry to pull the fledgling Thomson Corp. through its shaky early days and see it become one of the world's greatest media enterprises, has died. Sydney CHAPMAN was 93.
With Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and Jack Kent COOKE, Mr. CHAPMAN helped transform a Depression-era Northern Ontario radio station and The Timmins Press into Canada's largest newspaper group.
By the 1970s, with the aid of Mr. CHAPMAN's guiding hand, Thomson Corp. owned 180 newspapers, including The Times of London, 160 magazines, 27 television and radio stations and interests in North Sea oil.
"He certainly did great things for my father in the early days when my father desperately needed a right-hand man of his calibre and his integrity," said Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON's son, Kenneth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON.
"Of all the things he did, the thing I will be most grateful to Sid for is the fact that he was there when my dad needed him and he never, ever let him down."
Mr. CHAPMAN was a newly graduated accountant working at Silverwood Dairies in London, Ontario, when he answered a help-wanted ad Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON had placed for a financial man. Soon after being hired, Mr. CHAPMAN moved to the northern Ontario town of Timmins to sort out the finances of the growing media company.
"I didn't have any equity in Silverwood's; I was just an employee and my superiors were not old," he is quoted as saying in Susan GOLDENBERG's book The Thomson Empire. "I wanted to join something that was going somewhere and have equity in it."
At the time, Mr. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Mr. COOKE and a secretary shared one room in a Toronto building. Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON began buying radio stations and newspapers in Northern Ontario in the 1930s and bought his first newspaper in Canada, The Timmins Press, in 1934.
"Roy was so busy on the telephone, he could hardly talk to me. I had been making $40 a week at Silverwood's and Roy agreed to pay me $45," Mr. CHAPMAN said of the initial meeting.
Mr. CHAPMAN also insisted on buying $10,000 worth of stock in the company. Mr. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, not keen on the idea of anyone but himself owning stock in his company, said he would discuss this proposal with Mr. CHAPMAN at the end of his first month.
"At that time, he asked if I had the cash and said, 'That settles it,' when I said I didn't. But I was determined to have that stock," Mr. CHAPMAN said.
The young accountant went to the Bank of Nova Scotia manager in Timmins, where he was working at the time, and asked for a $10,000 loan. For collateral, he offered his group insurance. It took more than two decades for Mr. CHAPMAN's investment to become worthwhile. "I didn't get any dividends for 22 years but when the company went public, there was a 30 to one split," Mr. CHAPMAN said.
Sydney (Sid) CHAPMAN was born on January 22, 1910, in Bromley, England, on the border of London. One of five children born to Robert CHAPMAN, a house painter who had been wounded in the First World War, and his wife Sarah, the family scraped by with little money. When Mr. CHAPMAN was still a young boy, the family packed up and emigrated to Canada, making their way to Toronto.
Not long after arriving in the new country, Robert CHAPMAN decided he didn't like the place and wanted to return home to England. His wife decided not to join him. Left to raise the children alone, Mrs. CHAPMAN took a job cooking and cleaning for a wealthy family. Sid got a job as an office boy at what is now Deloitte & Touche. While working there, he completed his high-school equivalency through Queen's University and went on to earn his chartered accountant certificate.
After spending five years at Silverwood Dairies, Mr. CHAPMAN began his long relationship with the THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON family. Arriving in Timmins, Mr. CHAPMAN found the business affairs of the newspaper and radio station in less than immaculate order.
Mr. CHAPMAN complained to Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON about the cramped office space and CKGB's accounts and files being stacked in the bathroom and having to keep all his own books in a suitcase.
"Yes, well, that's why we got you up here -- to straighten things out," Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON replied.
Mr. CHAPMAN did just that. He was so reliable that Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON put him in charge of his northern business at the end of 1940, less than a year after he was hired. In the early days, the job was a balancing act. "I used to say about Roy's motto of 'Never a backward step, ' that he had better not step backwards or he would fall in a hole," Mr. CHAPMAN said in The Thomson Empire.
Mr. CHAPMAN got involved in the northern community through the Kinsmen service club, eventually becoming its president. It was in Timmins where he met his future wife Ruby, who was born and raised in Northern Ontario. The couple married in 1948 and had two sons. The couple later moved to Toronto with the growing Thomson company.
Mr. CHAPMAN told his young bride that he intended to work long hours. Even his honeymoon was a business trip to look into the purchase of a newspaper in Jamaica, said his son, Neil.
"He loved to work," said Neil CHAPMAN. " There was always a love of what he was doing. There was no way he was going back to being poor."
His most gratifying business moment was travelling back to England in the 1960s to be part of the acquisition of The Times of London, said Neil CHAPMAN. He was so proud to be with Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and to be staying at the grand Savoy Hotel after his poor beginnings in life, Neil CHAPMAN said.
Mr. CHAPMAN's financial skill extended beyond the balance sheets. He played a large role in the addition of trucking and insurance to the Thomson empire. The origin of Dominion-Consolidated Truck Lines is said to have been linked to Mr. CHAPMAN's habit of eating breakfast at Kresge's, a five-and-ten-cent chain, in Timmins in the 1940s.
"I used to sit at the counter beside a trucker named Barney QUINN who wanted my advice on buying the trucking business of Ford cars from a Windsor widow.
"Although the trucks were rusty, with bald tires, and business was slow because of the war, I expected a revival in business and decided to go in on the venture," Mr. CHAPMAN said in The Thomson Empire.
Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON tried to dissuade him, saying he didn't know that business or have the money. After some persuasion, Mr. CHAPMAN convinced him to invest. They went on to buy smaller firms and consolidated them under Dominion-Consolidated.
Mr. CHAPMAN was also a force behind the acquiring of Scottish and York Insurance, growing out of his belief in consolidation and lowering expenses.
"He was a good and tough negotiator," said Toronto lawyer John TORY, who began working for Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON in the 1950s. "He negotiated a lot of deals for the Thomson group.... He liked to win."
Kenneth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said that what he learned most from his early days working with Mr. CHAPMAN was his positive attitude toward life and people. "He was an extremely positive person. He loved people."
Described as a cheerful and decent man, Mr. CHAPMAN retired from the position of senior financial vice-president at Thomson Newspapers in 1975, but remained as senior vice-president of the Woodbridge Co. and as a director of Thomson Newspapers until 1982.
After retiring from Thomson, Mr. CHAPMAN had no intention of slowing down. He commuted daily into his 80s to a private Bay Street investment office he ran with his two sons. While he was extremely hard-working, serious and focused, he did allow himself to have some fun. He enjoyed golfing and ballroom dancing.
"He loved to dance with his wife Ruby," Mr. TORY said. "They danced well together."
Mr. CHAPMAN, who died on May 9, leaves Ruby, his wife of 55 years, and sons Neil and Glen.
"Dad was a good judge of character and he certainly judged Sid well indeed," Kenneth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said. "He was so dedicated and so extraordinarily loyal."

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COOKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-22 published
MATHER, Naomi
Peacefully, at her home in Waterloo, surrounded by the love of her family, Naomi died early Monday morning, July 21, 2003. She was 20. Naomi struggled with Ewing's Sarcoma since January of 2002. Her indomitable spirit sustained all who knew her. Precious daughter of Susan (COOKE) and Fred MATHER and dearest sister of John. Naomi will be lovingly remembered by her Paternal grandmother, Ivey MATHER of Perth; her special friend Marjorie MALLORY, Aunts and Uncles, Marilyn CURRY of Headingly, Minnesota, Catherine and Richard FREEMAN of Vancouver, Lorna and Jim PEDEN and Sheila PRESCOTT (Dave McGRATH) of Perth; cousins, Tyler, Jennifer and Andrew CURRY, Harry and Gabby FREEMAN, Corinne, Trent and Colin PEDEN and Patricia PRESCOTT. Naomi's life included a wide circle of Friends, especially Cara DURST. Her Scottish Terrier Ghillie and Tabby cat Tamara had a special place in her heart. She was predeceased by Maternal grandparents, Roy and Edith COOKE and her Paternal grandfather, John MATHER. In Naomi's short life, she involved herself in many activities. She was a graduate of Waterloo Collegiate Institute and was enrolled in Science studies at Queen's University when she became ill. Some of her involvements and interests included Strathyre Highland Dancers, Children's International Summer Villages, working as a lifeguard and swimming instructor and playing the piano. Friend's and relatives are invited to share their memories of Naomi with her family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo from 7 to 9 pm this evening (Tuesday) and 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 pm Wednesday. A service to celebrate Naomi's life will be held on Thursday, July 24, 2003, 11 am, at Westminster United Church (The Cedars,) 543 Beechwood Drive, Waterloo, with Reverend John ANDERSON officiating. A committal service will follow in Parkview Cemetery Crematorium Chapel, Waterloo. Following the committal at the Cemetery, Friends and relatives are invited to return to Westminster United Church for refreshments and a time to visit with the family.In Naomi's memory, in lieu of flowers, donations to the Sarcoma Fund at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto or the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and can be arranged through the funeral home, phone (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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COOMBS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-17 published
COOMBS, Florence M.
Born in City of London, August 12, 1903, Old Blue of Christ's Hospital School, Horsham, England 1915-19, widow of the late James A. COOMBS, her much beloved husband, died peacefully on February 12, 2003 at Village Park Retirement Residence, Toronto. Mrs. COOMBS will be greatly missed by sons, James and Maurice, daughters-in-law, Dr. Susan COOMBS and Ms. Adrian COOMBS granddaughters Sarah and Jennifer, and granddaughter Victoria, her husband Jozsef SOS and great-grand_son Christian. Heartfelt thanks to all the staff and caregivers at Village Park Retirement Residence. Their gentle kindness was a great source of warmth and comfort to Mrs. COOMBS and to us all. The funeral will take place at Saint Thomas's Anglican Church, 383 Huron Street, Toronto, at 10: 00 a.m. on Wednesday, February 19, 2003, followed by interment at the Chapel of St. James-the-Less, 635 Parliament Street, Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations please to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada or Saint Thomas's Anglican Church.

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COONEY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
Nels PETERSEN
The family announces with sorrow his death in Arizona on Sunday, November 30, 2003 at the age of 73 years.
He was born in Wadena, Saskatchewan and married Iona (née COONEY) in Sudbury in 1950. After 25 years of service with the Region of Sudbury, Nels retired in 1989 and moved with Iona to Manitoulin Island. There they spent summers at Cedar Eden with their 5 children and 14 grandchildren and enjoyed winters at Cielo Grande Park, Mesa, Arizona with many Friends and relatives. He was always happiest tending to his flower and vegetable gardens and creating projects in his workshop. Nels was a hard worker, but took time to enjoy a round of golf, a game of pool, a good glass of wine and he always had a song in his heart. He will be remembered as a devoted family man and a good friend. Dear son of Peter and Elizabeth (both predeceased). Beloved husband of Iona (COONEY) PETERSEN of Sudbury. Loving father of Ken (partner Cathy KINSMAN) of Halifax, Kathy WOLYNSKY (husband George) of Sudbury, Kirk (wife Joyce) of Montreal, Mike (wife Debra predeceased) of Sudbury and Patty LAPLANTE (husband Paul) of Lively.
Proud grandfather of Ronnie, Laura, Nick, Graham, Kim, Elizabeth, Jessica, Amy, Jayson, Angela, Andre, Michelle, Amanda and Emily. Predeceased by sisters Herta and Elsie and brothers Andreas and Hans. Survived by his brother Peter (wife Millie) and Arne and sisters Margaret (husband Wilfred predeceased), Maren (husband Gordon predeceased) and Toody (husband Ron predeceased) all of Saskatchewan. He will be sadly missed as brother-in-law and uncle to his special Friends Martti and Gloria LUOMA of Coniston. Rested at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury. Funeral Mass at Christ the King Church on Friday, December 5, 2003. Cremation at Parklawn Crematorium.

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COONEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-27 published
COONEY, Roger Peter Patrick
Died suddenly of a massive and final heart attack in the arms of Elizabeth, his devoted wife of thirty years. Roger resided in St. Andrews, New Brunswick for the past 10 years. Born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, he was the son of the late William and Veronica (FARCAS) COONEY. Predeceased by brothers, James and Bernard; sisters, Helen COONEY and Jeannette BARLOW. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth (DICKSON/DIXON) COONEY; daughter, Kathleen sons, William and D'Arcy all at home; sister, Ruth CAVERLEY (William) of Don Mills; brothers, John COONEY (Brenda) of Markham, Gregory COONEY (Eva) of Oakville; nieces and nephews, John, Patricia, Theresa, Margot, Peter, Veronica, Marlene, Paul, Shannon, Erinn, Clifford, Karen, Steven and Renee; mother-in-law Peggy DICKSON/DIXON of St. Andrews; brother-in-law, James DICKSON/DIXON of St. Andrews. Resting at the St. Andrews Catholic Church, with visiting on Monday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9. The funeral will be held 12 noon on Tuesday from the church, with Reverend Bill BRENNAN officiating. Interment will take place at the St. Andrews Catholic Cemetery. For those who wish, donations to a charity of the donors choice would be appreciated. MacDonald Select Community Funeral Home, 20 Marks Street, St. Stephen, New Brunswick in care of arrangements. www.macdonaldfh.com

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COOP o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-11 published
Charles William Adrian COOP
Physician, radiologist and nuclear medicine specialist, pilot, hunter and gentleman farmer. Born 1921, in Kitchener, Ontario died December 11, 2002, in Nanaimo, British Columbia, of pulmonary fibrosis, age 80.
By Mary Neel COOP Thursday, September 11, 2003 - Page A24
Bill spent his childhood in Britain, but returned to Ontario to live after his father died. In 1940, he joined the Royal Canadian Air Force. After receiving his wings, just two days before turning 19, he went to England to take command of a Lancaster bomber with a crew of six. While he could easily handle piloting the bomber, leading his crew was a challenge. Bill took a "get tough" disciplined approach that was resented at first. He demanded total focus on any mission and allowed no idle talking. As a result of skill, good luck and leadership, his crew survived 40 missions.
Bill applied these principles of focus and discipline to every endeavour throughout his life. After graduating from University of Toronto's medical school in 1950, he was a general practitioner in Brampton for 12 years. He and his first wife, Barbara, had three children. He decided to become a radiologist and achieved both Canadian and U.S. board certification in radiology and nuclear medicine before joining Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital in Saint Thomas, Ontario
Flying remained Bill's life passion. He made local history in 1984 when he flew his single engine Cessna turbocharged 182 RG from Saint Thomas across the North Atlantic to England and back. He marked 50 years of flying when he was 68, and maintained his instrument rating until he was 75. He is known in Saint Thomas as the "flying doctor."
He taught radiology technicians and, for years, he'd run into his students in hospitals throughout Canada. He would inevitably get the same quizzical expression, and then, "Aren't you the Dr. COOP who was my teacher in Saint Thomas?" This scenario happened many times, but memorably on the day he died.
Bill was also passionate about his farm in Aylmer, Ontario, a place to breed and train springer spaniels, keep bees and cattle and raise vegetables. He had many award-winning spaniels and judged the Canadian national trials in 1976. He was an avid hunter, fisherman, as well as a lover of classical music and a patron of the National Ballet of Canada.
His interests evolved to scuba diving and underwater photography. My fondest memories of Bill were when we would dive together and he'd say, "honey, I'll meet you at the bottom." I would descend and then watch him float gracefully down as he checked his camera settings.
After retiring from full time practice in 1993, Bill moved to Nanaimo, British Columbia For his entire life, he maintained a healthy lifestyle and a superb level of fitness, controlling his weight through strict diet and regular exercise. He worked out at the Young Men's Christian Association in Saint Thomas where he was a director and board member. After retirement, he continued this regimen despite many joint replacements for osteoarthritis.
Bill was seriously injured when his vehicle slipped spontaneously from park to reverse and ran over him. Though his injuries were critical, and included a crushed pelvis and ruptured urethra, he survived, probably because he was so fit.
After two years and many surgeries, he was finally cleared to travel. We were bound for Australia on a freighter when he became acutely ill. The cause was thought to be an adverse side effect of medication intended to keep him free of urinary tract infection and well enough to travel. He struggled to get back to Canada, but it was too late to reverse his terminal illness. He reached home just five hours before he died.
Mary Neel COOP is Bill's wife.

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COOPER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-30 published
COOPER
-In loving memory of my husband, Roy, April 27, 1999.
Time cannot erase the memories.
-Missed, as ever, Lois.

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COOPER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-30 published
Shirley Eleanor COOPER
In loving memory of Shirley Eleanor COOPER who passed away peacefully at her home in Espanola on Sunday, April 27, 2003 at the age of 71 years.
Born July 15, 1931. Cherished wife of Burt. Loved mother of Sandra and husband Bill OLFERT of Espanola, Marilyn and husband Paul FORD of Naughton, Randy and wife Terri of Mount Albert. Special grandmother of Stacey and Sherry LEWIS, Carrie PATTY, Chris and Paula FORD, Thomas and Justin COOPER. Dear great grandmother of Brandon, Brady, Kyle, Kamryn. Missed by brother Bud and wife Pat Wilkin. Will be remembered by in-laws Nellie Thomas (husband Gordon predeceased) of Tehkummah, Jean and husband Bernie Harfield, both predeceased, Leonard and wife Betty Cooper of Mindemoya, Alvern Nighswander (husband Stuart predeceased) of Little Current, Max Cooper (predeceased) and wife Ellen of Little Current, Don and wife Karlene Cooper of Espanola. Aunt to many nieces and nephews.
Visitation was held on Tuesday, April 29, 2003. Funeral Service at 2: 00 p.m. Wednesday, April 30, 2003 both at Mindemoya Missionary Church. Burial in Mindemoya Cemetery.

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COOPER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-23 published
Moses LAVALLEE
In loving memory of Moses LAVALLEE, 77 years, who died peacefully at his daughter Karen's home in Wikwemikong, Thursday, July 10, 2003.
Moses LAVALLEE began his journey through life on March 10, 1926. At the young age of 16 he worked for the Canada Steam Ship Lines. At the age of 22 he journeyed to Toronto and worked on the construction of the Toronto Subway Line. He subsequently obtained a job with the City of Toronto and retired as a heavy equipment operator after 30 years of service in 1983. Moses had many interests including repairing old lamps, bed frames and chairs, to name a few. He worked with deer hides and made many beautiful pairs of men's and ladies' gloves. He also enjoyed traveling to pow-wows to watch his children and grandchildren dance.
Beloved husband of Rosemary (MISHIBINIJIMA) LAVALLEE of Sudbury. Loving father of Karen J. PHEASANT of Wikwemikong, Sharon LAVALLEE (Harvey BONDY) of Manitowaning and Tim LAVALLEE of Toronto. Survived by son-in-law Isadore PHEASANT Jr. of Wikwemikong, and his son Lloyd COOPER of Wikwemikong. Dear grandfather of Sophie PHEASANT (friend Peter JONES), Matthew PHEASANT (friend Jodi FOX), Jesse OSAWAMICK, Lisa LAVALLEE and Jenmee BONDY and great grand_son Ezra JONE. Dear son of the late Michael and Sophie LAVALLEE (both predeceased.) Dear brother of the late Liza PELTIER and the late Eva EWIIWE. Funeral mass was held in Holy Cross Mission in Wikwemikong on Monday July 14, 2003. Interment in the Buzwah Cemetery.

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COOPER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-05 published
COOPER
-In memory of Max, who passed away October 25, 2001.
We thought of you with love today,
But that is nothing new,
We thought about you yesterday,
and the day before that too.
We think about you in silence,
We often speak your name,
Now all we have are memories,
And your picture in a frame.
Your memory is our keepsake,
With which we'll never part.
God has you in his keeping,
We have you in our hearts.
-Remembered by Ellen, Steve, Susan and Colin, Tom and Robin, Gary and Shelley, Joe and Kim, Ron and Tracy and grandchildren.

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-15 published
GENDRON, Jacqueline (Jackie)
Jacqueline GENDRON (née COOPER) was born 18 September 1909, Toronto and died peacefully at Avalon Nursing Home, Orangeville, Ontario on Thursday, 13 February 2003 in her 94th year. She was predeceased by her husband 'Vince' and son Jim, her sisters Blanche PITMAN and Glad GILLEN, brother Jim COOPER and recently her daughter-in-law Margaret (Mrs. Michael GENDRON). She is survived by her sons Peter (Judy), Owen Sound and Michael, Brockville; grandchildren Greg, Steven, Mark (Shaune) and Andrea (Anthony); sisters Audrey IRWIN and Alma WILLIAMS (Al;) sister-in-law Barb COOPER; many nieces and nephews and several close Friends. Jackie lived life her way. She was a responsible stay at home wife and mother, roles of which she was proud. She was a good mom. She loved New Year's parties with Friends, played golf, curled, skied, volunteered and travelled in Europe, East Asia and Africa into her 80's. Her Friends meant a great deal to her. She will be remembered for her flair and skill in cooking, carpentry, ceramics, wood carving, sewing, millinery and home decorating. Jackie was awarded a life membership in the Lord Dufferin Chapter of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire after 35 years of dedicated service. She was a member of Westminster United Church. At Jackie's request she was cremated and a memorial service, for immediate family, will be held during the summer, followed by burial in the family plot at Forest Lawn Cemetery, Orangeville. Special thanks to the staff of both Lord Dufferin Centre and Avalon Nursing Home, Dr. MARIEN and Dr. VEENMAN. Your care and sensitivity were much appreciated. Arrangements by Egan Funeral Home Baxter and Giles Chapel, 273 Broadway, Orangeville L9W 1K8 (519-941-2630).

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-22 published
He founded Readers' Club of Canada
Nationalist visionary struggled financially to publish Canadian writers
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, April 22, 2003 - Page R7
In the early 1960s, when writers asked Peter and Carol MARTIN where to publish their manuscripts on Canada, the couple realized how few choices there were. Inspired, the Martins, both voracious readers, staunch nationalists and founders of the Readers' Club of Canada, decided to start their own press. In 1965, Peter Martin Associates came into being. Last month, Peter MARTIN died of lung cancer in Ottawa.
In an industry overshadowed by American companies, Peter MARTIN Associates was among the first in a wave of independent publishing houses to open during a time of rising Canadian nationalism.
Launched in a downtown Toronto basement on a shoestring budget, skeleton staff, idealism and enthusiasm, the company flew by the seat of its pants. Its employees were often young and new to the business. But many, including Peter CARVER, Michael SOLOMON and Valerie WYATT, went on to become Canadian mainstays.
"It really was a time of Canadian nationalism and those of us who believed in that cause could see what Peter and Carol were doing," said Ms. WYATT, a children's editor who spent four years with the company in the seventies.
During the 16 years before its sale in 1981, Peter Martin Associates published approximately 170 works, mainly non-fiction. Its presses put out I, Nuligak, the autobiography of an Inuit man; The Boyd Gang by Marjorie LAMB and Barry PEARSON; Trapping is My Life by John TETSO; and the Handbook of Canadian Film by Eleanor BEATTIE. Others who came through their doors included Hugh HOOD, Robert FULFORD, John Robert COLOMBO, Douglas FETHERLING and Mary Alice DOWNIE -- all to have their works published.
Started with small amounts of seed money from private investors and no government funding, Peter Martin Associates constantly struggled financially. At one point, for a bit of extra cash, the office became the designated nuclear-fallout shelter for the street. Pat DACEY, once the firm's book designer, lugged suitcases of books up the street to sell at Britnell's bookstore with summer employee Bronwyn DRAINIE.
Working at Peter Martin Associates was always fun, Ms. WYATT said. "You went in to work happy and you stayed happy all day."
Still, in a time when Canadian works received little recognition, she remembers finding it difficult to get media interviews for the author of Martin-published book.
Yet another title caused trouble with its subject. The company was putting out a collection of previously published sayings of former prime minister John DIEFENBAKER, called I Never Say Anything Provocative, edited by Margaret WENTE. Mr. DIEFENBAKER heard about the project, called Mr. MARTIN and threatened to sue. Mr. MARTIN stood firm.
"He handled it with such élan," said writer Tim WYNNE- JONES, then in the art department. "He was suitably dutiful, but not in awe. Mr. DIEFENBAKER was just over the top, as was his wont."
The book went to press and Mr. DIEFENBAKER did not go to court.
Once listed along with Peter GZOWSKI in a Maclean's magazine article on "Young Men to Watch," Mr. MARTIN was born on April 26, 1934 in Ottawa to a dentist father and a mother who drove an ambulance in the First World War. The younger of two sons, he attended Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario and the University of Toronto, where he earned a degree in philosophy.
During a year in Ottawa as the president of the National Federation of University Students, Mr. MARTIN met his first wife Carol. They married in 1956 and moved to Toronto. Three years later, they founded the Readers' Club in Featuring one Canadian book a month, it distributed works by Mordecai RICHLER, Irving LAYTON, Morley CALLAGHAN and Brian MOORE among others, and supplied its members with coupons. While continuing to run the Readers' Club (sold in 1978 to Saturday Night Magazine and closed in 1981), the MARTINs started Peter Martin Associates.
Throughout his career, Mr. MARTIN spoke out for Canadian publishing. Alarmed by the sale of Ryerson Press and Gage Educational Press in 1970 to American firms, he called a meeting of publishers to discuss problems in the industry. Named the Independent Publishers Association, the group started in 1971 with 16 members and with Mr. MARTIN as its first president. In 1976, it was renamed the Association of Canadian Publishers and continues today with 140 members. As a result of the group's efforts, Canadian publishing began to receive federal and provincial funding.
In the late 1970s, the MARTINs went their separate ways. Afterward, Mr. MARTIN published a small newspaper, The Downtowner, and owned a cookbook store with his second wife, Maggie NIEMI. In 1983, they moved near Sudbury, Ontario, where Mr. MARTIN did freelance book and theatre reviews, then moved to Ottawa in 1985 to work as president for Balmuir Books, publisher of the magazine International Perspectives and consulting editor for the University of Ottawa Press.
After a spinal-cord injury in 1997, Mr. MARTIN was left a quadriplegic, except for limited use of his left arm. Even so, he remained active, maintained a heavy e-mail correspondence and spent time in the park reading while seated in a bright-yellow wheelchair.
Mr. MARTIN leaves his children Pamela, Christopher and Jeremy and his wife Maggie NIEMI. He died on March 15.

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-30 published
Doctor gave the 'gift of life'
'Test-tube' baby expert helped introduce In Vitro Fertilization program at the University of Toronto
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, April 30, 2003 - Page R9
Nine months ago, a long-time patient of Dr. Alan SHEWCHUK offered the reproductive endocrinologist and infertility specialist a choice of pictures depicting her daughter to add to his collage of kids' photos from grateful parents. Upon choosing one, he flipped it over and read an inscription: "Thank you for the gift of life."
Dr. SHEWCHUK had unknowingly made an apt choice, one that spoke of the joy his work brought to his patients and their families.
"It was wonderful to have the experience [of having a child]. It was truly a great gift of life, "said the woman, who conceived under Dr. SHEWCHUK's care. Her reaction was typical of those he treated and it drove him: "They [his patients] were just so happy and that was the kick that he got out of it, "said Valerie SHEWCHUK, his wife of 42 years.
Dr. SHEWCHUK, who throughout his career directed the Toronto General Hospital's reproductive biology unit, helped start the University of Toronto's In Vitro Fertilization program, ran a private practice, taught medical school and co-founded a private infertility clinic -- with many activities overlapping -- died of cancer on March 29 at the age of 66.
Known as "Big Al" to many colleagues for his tongue-in-cheek persona of the grand old man of infertility treatment, the good-looking doctor worked briefly as a model and worked evenings at a variety store to pay his way through medical school.
After completing his training, Dr. SHEWCHUK practised family medicine in Toronto's Little Italy. There, in order to communicate with his patients, he learned Italian, adding to the French, German and Ukrainian he already knew. Three years later, he left to study obstetrics and gynecology, completing his residency in 1969. That year he became an associate staff member of Toronto General Hospital and a clinical research fellow in what was later named its reproductive biology unit.
Appointed a staff member at the hospital in 1972, Dr. SHEWCHUK attended more than 3,000 births during his career.
"He just loved delivering babies, "said his daughter Melanie, who worked with her father for 25 years. "He said, when you pulled out a baby, the baby was the most perfect thing in the world. And you hand it to the parents and the parents are just elated."
witnessing the joy of birth motivated Dr. SHEWCHUK to help those who suffered the sorrow of infertility.
"As each decade brought new things to the field of infertility, he kept up and tried to enhance people's fertility in the best way he could with the tools he had at the time, "said Nancy BRYCELAND, the nurse manager who worked with Dr. SHEWCHUK in the reproductive biology unit he headed from 1974 to 1988. One of those tools was in vitro fertilization. Dr. SHEWCHUK travelled with colleagues to Melbourne, Australia, late in 1983 to study the technique and in January, 1984, was among those who began the University of Toronto in vitro fertilization program located at Toronto General.
On June 21 of that year, Dr. SHEWCHUK told the Ontario Medical Association that a Toronto woman participating in the in vitro fertilization program was four-months pregnant, The Globe and Mail reported. In November, 1984, the program's first baby was born.
Dr. SHEWCHUK was born in Toronto on October 18, 1936, the middle of three sons of a schoolteacher of Ukrainian descent and a Ukrainian father who immigrated to Canada during the First World War. Interned in northern Ontario for two years because of his Austro-Hungarian citizenship, Dr. SHEWCHUK's father later worked as a house painter and carpenter.
Dr. SHEWCHUK was a gifted athlete who played quarterback in high-school football and turned down the chance to pursue professional baseball. Instead, he attended the University of Toronto medical school.
As an assistant professor with the school from 1976 to 1983, following time as a clinical instructor and lecturer, Dr. SHEWCHUK demanded a lot of his students, including standards of professional dress. The doctor, who himself wore a lab coat, required they wear a shirt and tie in the presence of patients and sent them home to change if they appeared otherwise.
"He was a great motivator, "said Dr. Matt GYSLER, a former student of Dr. SHEWCHUK's and now chief of obstetrics and gynecology at Credit Valley Hospital in Mississauga, Ontario "He made this area [reproductive medicine] sound interesting."
Appreciative patients brought babies and gifts of baking to his office.
"Dr. SHEWCHUK was like a father figure to his patients, "said Dr. Murray KROACH, chief of obstetrics and gynecology at the Toronto East General Hospital. "He had a presence that gave confidence and he was motivated very strongly to expand this area of reproductive biology."
Said one patient: "He was larger than life and had a magical quality." She remembers how Dr. SHEWCHUK told her that he had slept poorly the night before her ultrasound, worrying about the success of her pregnancy. "He balanced hope with reality," another said.
With a heavy workload, Dr. SHEWCHUK reluctantly stopped delivering babies in the late 1980s. In 1992, along with three others, Dr. SHEWCHUK established START, a private infertility clinic.
"Dr. SHEWCHUK was a great idea man, "said Dr. Carl LASKIN, one of the clinic's co-founders. "He was a real character who would never just accept that it was just by the book. The obvious was never the way he liked to think."
During clinical meetings when colleagues presented sound physiological reasons for a patient's problems, Dr. SHEWCHUK would often counter with an "off-the-wall" explanation. "Many times he would be absolutely wrong, "Dr. LASKIN said, "but he pushed everyone to think differently."
Two and a half months before his death, Dr. SHEWCHUK wrote a letter to a married couple who had seen him. In it, he encouraged them not to give up hope and reminded them that they could adopt. They would make wonderful parents. And he said that people like them were the reason he came to work. They had given him joy, said the man who himself brought joy to so many.
Dr. SHEWCHUK leaves his wife Valerie and children Melanie, Leslie and Alan.

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
Leafs trusted their doctor
Talented M.D. specialized in hand surgery. 'He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons.'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 3, 2003 - Page F10
Nothing about Jim MURRAY's hands indicated that he was a surgeon. Large and gnarled with undulating fingernails, those hands played bagpipes, patched up Toronto Maple Leafs and Team Canada players and restored form and function to other hands.
Dr. MURRAY, a plastic surgeon who was the first Canadian doctor to devote his practice to hand surgery, died last month at the age of 82.
"His hands looked more like those of a prize fighter than a surgeon. His fingers were bent, "said Robert McFARLANE, a retired plastic surgeon with a special interest in hands and a close friend of Dr. MURRAY. "It didn't seem to make a difference. He had tremendous skill."
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY brought together plastic and orthopedic surgeons to form a hand unit at Toronto's Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, the city's first. "His concept was to pull together the expertise of different surgeons, "said Paul BINHAMMER, once a student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at the hospital, now part of the Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
Dr. MURRAY assembled a highly skilled team. Among them were orthopedic surgeon Robert McMURTRY, who went on to become dean of medicine at the University of Western Ontario, and plastic surgeon and nerve expert Susan MacKINNON, who is now a professor in the United States.
But before rising to prominence in the field of hand surgery, Dr. MURRAY gained fame in hockey circles. Serving as one of the Toronto Maple Leafs team doctors from 1948 to 1964, he was greatly trusted by players. When cut during games on the road, they left their wounds unstitched until he could tend to them at home.
"He'd come at you with those fingers and they were just so big, you'd wonder how he was ever able to stitch as neat as he did," said former Leaf defenceman Bobby BAUN, who played professional hockey for 17 years.
Mr. BAUN estimates that Dr. MURRAY put in half of his 143 career stitches.
Under instructions from Leaf owner Conn SMYTHE, injured players were not to be rushed back into the lineup, according to Hugh SMYTHE, another Leaf doctor and Mr. SMYTHE's son. "This was a heavy and not always popular role, "he said.
During the 1964 Stanley Cup finals, it became especially challenging.
Entering Game 6, the Detroit Red Wings led the series against the Leafs 3-2. Playing in Detroit on April 23, with the scored tied at 3-3 in the third period, Mr. BAUN first was hit on his right leg by a slapshot from Gordie HOWE and then, after a faceoff, spun on the leg, which gave way.
X-rays delayed at Mr. BAUN's insistence showed a small broken bone, just above the ankle. He spent six weeks in a cast.
But that came after the series ended. During its sixth game, Mr. BAUN was tended to by Dr. MURRAY and other team doctors. After being carried off the ice, he asked Dr. MURRAY if he could hurt his leg any more. The doctor replied no. "Having someone like Jim tell me that, I could believe him, "Mr. BAUN said.
With his leg taped and frozen, Mr. BAUN continued playing. Within the first two minutes of the first overtime period, he scored the winning goal and kept the Leafs in the series.
Mr. BAUN didn't miss a shift during Game 7, and neither did teammate Red KELLY, who had torn knee ligaments during the previous game. The Leafs won the seventh game 4-0 and the Stanley Cup, their third in a row and their fifth during Dr. MURRAY's time with the team.
That year, Dr. MURRAY resigned and 20 years later joked to The Toronto Star that it was he who had led them to the five Stanley Cups.
If he took the connection between his presence and the Leafs' wins lightly, Punch IMLACH, then the team's coach, did not. Mr. IMLACH had become convinced that Dr. MURRAY brought the team good luck, the doctor told the Star in a 1972 story.
The newspaper was interviewing Dr. MURRAY about his appointment as a doctor to Team Canada for the Canada-Russia hockey series. In the article headlined "Good luck charm for Team Canada, " he recalled how during the 1967 Stanley Cup playoffs, Mr. IMLACH invited him to a Leaf game in Chicago, believing that he would bring the team good luck.
"If it had been anybody else but Punch, I'd have dismissed it as a joke. But he really needed to win and he honestly believed my presence would make a difference, "Dr. MURRAY was quoted as saying.
The Leafs won not only that game, but, with Dr. MURRAY in attendance for the remainder of the series, the Stanley Cup. The Leafs haven't won a Stanley Cup since.
And the Star's headline proved prophetic. Team Canada won the Canada-Russia series when Paul HENDERSON scored with 34 seconds left in the eighth game.
Born in Toronto on May 14, 1920, James Findlay MURRAY was the youngest of three children. His father ran a store at Yonge and Queen Streets in downtown Toronto and died before the birth of his third child.
Dr. MURRAY attributed his curvy fingernails to his mother's malnutrition when she was pregnant with him, said his youngest son Hugh. Within a few years, she had remarried, and his stepfather helped to raise him.
An avid athlete, Dr. MURRAY played football during his high school and university days, so much so that once, when forbidden by his mother to play for his high-school team because he had had pneumonia, he practised and played in secret.
That lasted until his picture appeared in the Star running for a touchdown. He was immediately placed on the disabled list.
Awarded the George Biggs trophy for sportsmanship, leadership and scholarship, Dr. MURRAY graduated from medical school in 1943 and spent two years in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps, finishing as a captain.
After a year of general practice in Belleville, Ontario, he trained in plastic surgery at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto with A. W. FARMER, whom many consider to be the father of Canadian hand surgery.
A humble man, who drove less-than-fancy cars, Dr. MURRAY was known for his ability to relate to everyone. "He was a doctor and an esteemed member of society, but it didn't matter to him," Hugh MURRAY said. "He considered himself an everyday person. He was as comfortable, if not more comfortable, dealing with just working guys."
In 1953, Dr. MURRAY joined the Toronto East General and Orthopedic Hospital as head of plastic surgery and organized a specialized hand clinic, according to Bernd NEU, another former student of Dr. MURRAY and now a plastic surgeon at North York General Hospital.
"It's because the hand is such an important part of the body, not just physically, but aesthetically, "Dr. MURRAY, a specialist in soft tissue and the reconstruction of flexor tendons, said in 1984 to explain the dedication of hand surgeons.
In 1983, Dr. MURRAY left Toronto East General, where he had been surgeon-in-chief since 1976, to head the hand unit at Sunnybrook Medical Centre, taking a cut in pay to do so.
At the time, plastic surgeons could earn $2,000 for a face-lift and $106.50 for a carpal-tunnel release.
Dr. MURRAY derived great satisfaction from the help his hands gave others. Once in a clinic at Toronto East General, he and Dr. NEU came upon a patient with only a thumb and little finger on one hand.
"This is a wonderful hand, "he told Dr. NEU. " Look at how dirty and callused it is."
After several surgeries, Dr. MURRAY had restored the worker's hand to the point where the man could use it once again to earn a living.
"What to other people would look like a devastating loss, to Dr. MURRAY and the patient, this was a hand to be proud of, Dr. NEU said.
As a hand consultant beginning in 1974 at the Downsview Rehabilitation Centre of the Workers' Compensation Board, Dr. MURRAY treated those injured in industrial accidents, often surmounting language barriers to do so.
"He could speak to them [the patients] in basic English, so they could understand how seriously he took their problems, and how everything was being done that could be done for them, "Dr. NEU said.
In a 1996 letter to Dr. MURRAY, another of his former residents recalled how once on rounds, the doctor lifted the sheets to examine a paraplegic patient, only to find the man soiled. Instead of calling for hospital staff to clean the man, Dr. MURRAY performed the task himself.
"That little lesson reminded me that being a doctor is not just being a cutter, "the physician wrote.
Not only did he have a natural way with people, Dr. MURRAY was a gifted surgeon.
"He was a talented person with original ways of doing things," Dr. McFARLANE said. "He had a unique technical approach. That's what made him different from other surgeons."
Appointed a lecturer at the University of Toronto in 1953, Dr. MURRAY was first an assistant and associate professor, becoming a full professor in 1979. He developed the first hand surgery fellowship training program in Canada in 1981, Dr. NEU said.
As well as teaching at the university, Dr. MURRAY trained surgeons during two trips to Southeast Asia as a volunteer with Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc. Medico and led a group of hand surgeons to study techniques in micro-surgery in China during the late 1970s.
At the medical meetings Dr. MURRAY often attended, he impressed Dr. McFARLANE with his ability to discuss surgery. "He had a very common-sense approach to a surgical problem, and when everyone had something to say about a problem, he would get up and clarify it very nicely, "Dr. McFARLANE said.
A founder of MANUS Canada, a society of hand surgeons, once a president of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Dr. MURRAY was honoured by the U.S. society at "Murray Day" in 1990 with tributes from past presidents.
Stricken with Alzheimer's disease toward the end of his life, Dr. MURRAY died in Collingwood, Ontario, on April 4. He leaves his wife of 57 years, Shirley, and his children, John, Bill, Claire and Hugh.

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-12 published
Three cheers for a funny fellow
Like his hapless Canadian hero, he often found himself in hilarious situations
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, June 12, 2003 - Page R9
Once in the middle of an interview at the Toronto airport, writer Donald JACK left to fetch a document from his car. Notorious for a sense of direction so poor he found it difficult to navigate through a city park, let alone the airport's massive parking lot, Mr. JACK took so long to find his vehicle that by the time he returned the interviewers had gone.
Like Bartholomew Bandy, the hapless hero of The Bandy Papers, Mr. JACK's eight-volume comic-novel series describing an Ottawa Valley boy's adventures during both world wars and between, the author often found himself in hilarious situations, made the more so by his telling.
A three-time winner of the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour, Mr. JACK died last week at his home in England. He was Listeners were reduced to tears of laughter by his tales of construction disasters while having a villa built in Spain; a house sale falling through on closing day; and an aging bright yellow car named Buttercup, whose sun roof shattered soon after it was searched for drugs at the Spanish-French border, showering Mr. JACK with glass, insects and rust.
Once, while being toured with his daughter around the offices of his publisher, McClelland and Stewart, Mr. JACK entered the boardroom and shouted with surprise. There on the carpet lay a large amount of dog excrement left by an employee's pet. In his Bandy-like way, the writer very nearly stepped into it.
"If you could choose one author out of the entire world who during a visit to his publisher would stumble across this, it would be Donald JACK," said Douglas GIBSON, president and publisher of McClelland and Stewart, who knew the writer for more than 30 years.
"Things would go wrong for Don, very seldom caused by himself," said Munroe SCOTT, a close friend of more than 45 years. "He would narrate all this stuff either in person or in a letter and make it all hilarious, because he always saw, in retrospect at any rate, the funny side of things. You'd be doubled up with laughter."
Despite Mr. JACK's incident-prone nature, it would be a mistake to see Mr. JACK as a buffoon, said Mr. SCOTT, also a writer. "He was enormously well read, erudite and could handle the language with aplomb at many levels. He could make me feel like a Philistine."
Said author Austin CLARKE, who was Mr. JACK's neighbour for five years during the 1960s. "He was a quiet, reserved, retiring kind of man. You would never have known he was a writer."
Mr. JACK's Leacock medals came for three volumes of The Bandy Papers: Three Cheers for Me, in 1963, That's Me in the Middle, in 1974 and Me Bandy, You Cissie, in 1980. Published between 1963 and 1996, they still enjoy a loyal following, including a Web site which draws mail from around the world. Six of the eight volumes were recently reissued by McClelland and Stewart.
Drawn from Mr. JACK's fascination with the First World War, the rural people he met in the Ottawa Valley and his time in the Royal Air Force, The Bandy Papers feature the blundering Bartholomew Wolfe Bandy, who in the first volume, Three Cheers for Me, inadvertently becomes a hero, despite capturing his own colonel by mistake.
Ensuing volumes follow Mr. Bandy's adventures through to the Second World War. Although devastatingly funny, they also describe war's horrors and the realities of the home front, and lampoon war's leaders.
Mr. Bandy encounters and influences historical figures, such as then British minister of defence Winston Churchill, and generously offers him use of the altered Bandy phrase "blood, sweat, toil and tears."
While best known for The Bandy Papers, Mr. JACK wrote countless documentary film scripts, stage, television and radio plays, as well as two non-fiction books: the history of a Toronto radio station, Sinc, Betty and the Morning Man, and another about medicine in Canada, Rogues, Rebels and Geniuses.
His third play, The Canvas Barricade, won first prize in the Stratford Shakespearean Playwriting Competition in 1960. Produced in 1961, it was the first, and remains the only, original Canadian play performed on the main stage of the Stratford Festival.
Mr. JACK, however, did not see much of its opening. He left the auditorium for the lobby. "During the performance, we'd be aware of a crack of light from a door opening slightly and a white face would stare through, then vanish for a while, before another door would open a crack, and the same apparition would fleetingly appear," Mr. Scott said.
Born on December 6, 1924 in Radcliffe, Lancashire, England, Donald Lamont JACK was one of four children of a British doctor and a nurse from Prince Edward Island. After attending Bury Grammar School in Lancashire and Marr College in Scotland, he gained enough qualifications to attend London University.
While stationed in Germany with the Royal Air Force in the last year of the Second World War, Mr. JACK attempted short-story writing, but thought he lacked talent. After his mother asked him, "Isn't it about time you left home?" Mr. JACK immigrated to Canada in 1951.
Interspersed with jobs as a member of a surveying crew in Alberta and a bank teller in Toronto, Mr. JACK studied at the Canadian Theatre School in Toronto run by Sterndale BENNETT. There he wrote two plays, one of which drew praise from theatre critic Nathan COHEN and a job offer from a film Company. Mr. COHEN later wrote Mr. Scott, decrying Canadian theatre's "shameful treatment" of Mr. JACK, which largely ignored him.
A theatrical background enhanced Mr. JACK's writing, according to Mr. Gibson. "His dialogue was terrific and his scene-setting was excellent."
After leaving the school, with the encouragement of his wife, Nancy, whom he married in 1952, Mr. JACK worked in the script department of Crawley Films in Ottawa. Two years later in 1955, the company's head, Budge CRAWLEY, let him go because he thought Mr. JACK would never make a good writer.
A dry first year of freelancing followed, until in 1957 Mr. JACK sold the play version of his novelette Breakthrough, published in Maclean's, to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television. It became the first Canadian television play to be simultaneously telecast to the United States.
He never looked back. By 1972, A Collection of Canadian Plays, Vol. 1, which included Exit Muttering by Mr. JACK, noted he had written 40 television plays, 35 documentary film scripts, several radio plays and four stage plays. The works included Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Armed Forces training films for the National Film Board and often demanded a great deal of research.
Mr. JACK wrote with military discipline, beginning at 9 a.m., taking tea at 11 a.m., lunch at 1 p.m., tea again at 3 p.m. and finishing at 5 p.m. "All my life, I swear, that routine never altered," said one of his daughters, Lulu HILTON.
Persisting in writing drafts in pen and ink long before adopting the typewriter and, much later, a word processor, Mr. JACK often developed storylines while walking. A 1959 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation press release explains Mr. JACK's dedication: "My self-discipline is to keep reminding myself of how lucky I am to be able to be the only thing I ever really wanted to be -- a writer."
During the early 1980s, Mr. JACK and his wife returned to England to be near their daughters who had emigrated there, and their grandchildren. Mr. JACK missed Canada's open spaces and its classless society, and visited often.
At the time of his death, he was working on the ninth volume of The Bandy Papers. He died on or about June 2 of a massive stroke at his home in Telford, Shropshire, England. He leaves his two daughters, Maren and Lulu, six grandchildren and one great-grandchild, a brother and a sister. His wife Nancy died in 1991.

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
Lacrosse champ endured racism
Legendary player was subjected to slurs, but he didn't respond. 'It's because you were beating them they were saying it'
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, June 28, 2003 - Page F9
Before every Brantford Warriors lacrosse game in 1971, Ross POWLESS, the team's former player and coach, a member of the Canadian, and later, the Ontario lacrosse halls of fame, crossed the floor to speak with coach Morley KELLS.
As they chatted, Mr. POWLESS wagged his finger at Mr. KELLS, now an Ontario Member of Provincial Parliament. To the spectators above, it looked as if he were advising the coach on the upcoming game.
"I kind of laughed, because I knew what was taking place," Mr. KELLS said. "You could always see them up in the stands nodding, thinking, 'Ross has things straightened out.' I didn't mind a bit."
Known for his sense of humour as well as his playing and coaching, Mr. POWLESS died recently at the age of 76.
From 1945 to 1961, he played intermediate and senior level lacrosse in British Columbia, New York State and Southern Ontario, scoring 294 goals and 338 assists during his Senior A career. He contributed to three Mann Cup wins, lacrosse's national championship, for the Peterborough Timbermen from 1951 to 1953.
During the 1953 Cup finals, Mr. POWLESS won the Mike Kelly Award as the most valuable player of the series. Also, he was twice given the Tom Longboat Award as the top Indian athlete in Canada.
Born a Mohawk on the Six Nations Reserve of the Grand River Territory in Southwestern Ontario, Mr. POWLESS came from a family of talented players. One of his grandfathers, his father and several uncles played on Six Nations teams or with the travelling Mohawk Stars, according to lacrosse historian Stan SHILLINGTON.
And Mr. POWLESS was patriarch to another. Four of his sons played Senior A lacrosse. One of them, Gaylord, joined him in the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 1990, making them the only father and son pair in the hall.
Ross POWLESS played what his people call "the game the Creator gave us" with skill and ease.
"He was a great, great player," said close friend and former teammate Roger SMITH, also a member of the Canadian and Ontario lacrosse halls of fame. "He could do it all. He could play defence, offence. He scored a lot of goals, he was a great team player, a great checker, a good corner player, a good loose-ball man. He was one of the best."
A large man, standing above six feet and weighing more than 200 pounds, Mr. POWLESS played an especially strong defensive game. "He wasn't fast, but he knew where to cut you off at the pass," said Mr. KELLS, who played against him.
"Ross's attitude was that sooner or later you had to show up heading for the net, so he would be there waiting for you. If anyone had a natural understanding of how the flow of the game should be and how to control it, it was him."
Mr. POWLESS played with handmade hickory sticks, disdaining the later mass-produced plastic sticks as "Tupperware."
A gifted coach who got the best out of his players, he led many teams to divisional and national championships. One of his prouder moments came when he coached six of his sons, including Gaylord, on the 1974 Ontario First Nations Team. The team won the All-Indian Nations Lacrosse Tournament in B.C.
Born on September 29, 1926, in the log cabin his carpenter father built in Ohsweken, Ontario, Alex Ross POWLESS was one of eight children. Although the family lived without running water or hydro, he later told his children that he never felt poor because there was always food on the table.
After his mother died in 1932, Mr. POWLESS attended residential school in nearby Brantford until Grade 8 and then high school for one year. In 1945, at the age of 18, he headed to Vancouver to play on Andy PAULL's Senior North Shore Indians team.
For the next five years, Mr. POWLESS played for intermediate teams in Buffalo, Brantford and Huntsville, Ontario, taking seasonal jobs to support himself. In 1951, he joined the Senior A Peterborough Timbermen.
By 1954, Mr. POWLESS and his wife Wilma, whom he married in 1948, had moved their growing family, which would eventually number 14, back to the family homestead in Ohsweken. There, they lived without electricity until 1957 and without running water until a new house was built in 1970.
Mr. POWLESS continued playing Senior A lacrosse for Hamilton and St. Catharines, and as a pickup player for the Timbermen in the 1956 Mann Cup finals, then moved to Senior B and intermediate teams until he retired from playing in 1961.
Lacrosse was important to a lot of people, but it was extra important to him, Mr. POWLESS told Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in January.
Richard POWLESS, another son from the 1974 team, said: "It opened up the world to him. Back in those days, there weren't many Indians playing in the wider world. It got him off the reserve, and he had the talent to go places, and it was recognized."
Often the wider world greeted Mr. POWLESS with racial slurs. The crowd and members of opposing teams called him blanket-ass and wagon-burner and squirted drinks on him.
"You'd get used it, it wouldn't bother you. They wouldn't be saying that if they were beating you. It's because you were beating them they were saying it," Mr. POWLESS told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Richard POWLESS said, "He didn't react to it, he didn't respond to it, it was just part of the burden he had to carry."
Still, Ross POWLESS credited lacrosse with helping him make white Friends across the country. Some of them stood up for him. Once during tryouts for the Timbermen, he entered a bar in Peterborough with some members of the team. Because he did not have a blue card indicating that he had given up his Indian status, he could not drink legally and was refused service.
The Timbermen left the bar saying, "If he's not good enough, we're not good enough neither," author Donald M. FISHER quotes Mr. POWLESS's recollection in Lacrosse: A History of the Game.
Mr. POWLESS was proud of his heritage and maintained its traditions.
However, he did not teach the Mohawk language to his children. Scarred by his experience in residential school, where he was punished for speaking his mother tongue, he and his wife decided not to pass it on. Instead, he told his children that it was a white man's world, and to live in it successfully, they needed to excel in English.
At times, Mr. POWLESS acted politically. In 1959, a group of Mohawks, including him, tried to reinstate the traditional native government. "He was a firm believer in our own system and our own way of doing things," Richard POWLESS said. "When he believed in something, it wasn't just talk and that's the way he raised us."
Mr. POWLESS had settled into carpentry after his return to Ohsweken in 1954, a trade he practised for the next 30 years.
Earning a reputation as a hard worker, he soon became a foreman and, among other projects, worked on the Burlington Skyway Bridge.
Always an avid hunter, fisherman and pool player, Mr. POWLESS worked as a building inspector on the Six Nations Reserve until his retirement in 1991, served as a band councillor for eight years and helped to start Six Nations minor lacrosse and hockey leagues. In 1997, the Ontario Municipal Recreation Association gave him a volunteer service award.
Like many players, Mr. POWLESS was buried with lacrosse sticks. He had told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation of his intention, saying, "I want to play with my dad, my sons, my uncles and my nephews."
Mr. POWLESS died on May 26 in Paris, Ontario, of cancer. Sons Victor, Gaylord and Gregory predeceased him. He leaves Wilma, his wife of 55 years, 11 children, 27 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-25 published
A patriarch of the Jain community
He raised funds for the first Jain centre in Canada, and helped North Americans to understand an ancient faith
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, July 25, 2003 - Page R13
During the preparation of the Toronto Jain community's new centre, a trustee became too busy to accept a delivery of carpet. He called Bapuji.
Mohanlal MEHTA, known to everyone as Bapuji, which means father in Gujarati, then in his 70s, drove through pouring rain to help.
"He came to my office and picked up the key. He was right there, getting the carpet unloaded, made sure it was done and gave me back the key," said Ramesh JAIN, a close friend of Mr. MEHTA for more than 20 years.
"That was a typical example of his dedication." Mr. Jain said. "He never shirked the responsibilities given to him or that he took on voluntarily."
Mr. MEHTA, a founding trustee, leader and patriarch of the Toronto Jain community, which sought his blessing for its ventures, died recently at the age of 88.
Originally from Zanzibar, but of Indian origin, Mr. MEHTA was addressed as Bapuji by his immediate family as its patriarch, but also by the Jain community, Friends, Canadian neighbours and clients of his sons' businesses out of respect for his role as a community elder. In the same tradition, Mahatma Gandhi was also referred to as Bapuji.
Jainism originated in the Indus Valley between approximately 3000 and 5000 British Columbia and is one of the world's oldest religions. Among its traditions, it holds that local members run their communities and carry out many of its rites. Jainism's precepts include non-violence, non-attachment to possessions and the acceptance of all points of view. Throughout his long life, Mr. MEHTA lived his religion.
In contributing to the North American Jain community, he translated Jain texts into English, travelled to centres in Ontario and the northern United States to say wedding prayers, conducted ceremonies for the dead, visited members in hospital and explained the Jain philosophy to other faith communities.
And until 1988, he represented the Jain community on the Ontario Multi-Faith Council on Spiritual and Religious Care, which consults with and advises public institutions and government on different faiths.
"He was a very noble, spiritual and divine person, free from prejudices, biases and anger. These are the qualities a real Jain would have and he had them," said Prakash MODY, a Jain community volunteer and representative on the Council. "He was a very nice, helpful person. He would give guidance any time and help as much as possible, even going out of his way to contact people and get things done, not only for Jains, but for any other person."
In 1980, Mr. MEHTA helped raise funds to establish the first Jain centre in Toronto, also the first in Canada. Previously the 150-member community had gathered in apartment buildings, basements, libraries and schools.
When the community, which now numbers 450, outgrew its first quarters, Mr. MEHTA was again among those who canvassed door to door to raise funds. With the money, the community helped pay for a $1-million building, which was soon mortgage-free.
"Wherever we went, people would not refuse or deny him," Mr. JAIN said. "His vision was for the community at large and he had no agenda. His agenda was strictly servicing the community."
Mr. MEHTA was born in Zanzibar, then a British protectorate, off the east coast of Africa on October 15, 1914. His parents had left their homeland in Gujarat province in India by dhow for Zanzibar in their early teens. There, the elder Mr. MEHTA changed the family name of NAIDA to MEHTA to reflect his profession of bookkeeper.
The youngest of six children, at the urging of an elder brother, Mr. MEHTA learned English and graduated from the School of Commerce in Zanzibar in 1932. Married in 1935 to Dhanlaxmi GANDHI, he worked as a government administrator, first for the health department on the island of Pemba. There he lived in two small rooms with his wife and their newborn son and the community's only artificial light.
Upon returning to Zanzibar, Mr. MEHTA joined the police department, again as an administrator and rose to assistant superintendent in 1963. Required to wear a gun, he complied, but said he would never use it.
Mr. MEHTA placed high value on education and emphasized that his four children should attend university. One became a doctor, another an electrical engineer and a third received a B.A. The fourth became a successful businessman. At home he spoke fluent English to them.
Following the death of his eldest brother in 1942, Mr. MEHTA raised one of the surviving eight children and helped him start a business.
During the Second World War, Mr. MEHTA headed Zanzibar's field-ambulance unit. Although the island went untouched by bombing, during drills, Mr. MEHTA checked the streets for casualties. For his services, he was awarded a government commendation.
After the Zanzibar Revolution in 1964, Mr. MEHTA arrived at work to find a new commissioner, installed by the revolutionary government. Fortunately, Mr. MEHTA knew his new boss well and kept his job.
In 1967, Mr. MEHTA retired, and he and his wife left to live in India with one of their three sons, accompanying him to Canada in 1971.
Mr. MEHTA loved his new, adopted country.
"He saw the Canadian values of live-and-let-live and the freedom of choice and he said, 'This is our country. We are Canadians,' said son, Chandrakant MEHTA.
Intelligent, curious and strong-willed, Mr. MEHTA owned little. Throughout his life, he never owned a house or car, or held a bank account or insurance policy. He owned two suits and four shirts.
Mr. MEHTA died on June 25. He leaves his wife Dhanlaxmi, daughter Tarla, sons Surendra, Chandrakant and Navin, plus grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-04 published
News editor was expert adventurer
Globe journalist was known for attention to detail, knife-sharp instincts and wit
By Luma MUHTADIE Monday, August 4, 2003 - Page R5
In The Globe and Mail newsroom, he was known as "Snapper."
Some say it was because Alan DAWSON could get to the heart of a story or make a headline decision in a snap. Others say it was because he demanded instant action from those around him. And a few refer to his getting a little "snappish" around deadline.
Whatever the take on his nickname, Mr. DAWSON was seen by all as a small and quirky, yet assertive newsman, with knife-sharp instincts, a keen attention to detail and a biting wit.
Mr. DAWSON died in his sleep last Sunday -- at the age of 86 two days after checking into Nanaimo General Hospital with undetected bronchial cancer.
During his 34-year tenure at The Globe, Mr. DAWSON worked his way up the chain of command from senior slot man, reigning over the editing process, to news editor and then assistant managing editor. During his last few years at The Globe he helped choose and implement the computer system that made The Globe the first Canadian newspaper to enter the technological age.
Mr. DAWSON is best remembered for his gifts as a news editor on the front lines.
"He had incredible instincts," said Clark DAVEY, who worked with Mr. DAWSON for 27 years at The Globe and Mail. "You could put a pile of stories in front of him and he'd pick out the four or five most important ones -- and he was right 99 per cent of the time," Mr. DAVEY said.
As deadline approached one evening in the 1960s, Mr. DAWSON picked up a review, written by the paper's drama critic Herbert WHITTAKER, of a production of Oklahoma! at the Royal Alexandra Theatre. Mr. WHITTAKER's first line was an admission that the musical had been revived so many times that there was nothing left to say. So Mr. DAWSON cut only the first sentence off and ran it to print.
When Mr. WHITTAKER saw his one-line review the following morning, he was livid.
But the phones started ringing and letters poured in, congratulating Mr. WHITTAKER for his witty criticism of the playhouse for overloading its bill with revivals.
Mr. DAWSON was also an adventurer outside the newsroom, with a passion for fishing and game hunting. As a news editor his pages often featured obscure articles on these hobbies, and he wrote a weekly hunting column for The Globe.
In a detailed, first-person account of an expedition in the Northwest Territories, published on September 25, 1959, Mr. DAWSON proudly described travelling "nearly 6,000 miles in one week by car, train, airliner, truck, bush plane, outboard skiff, musking buggy and on foot" to become "the first successful wild buffalo hunter of the 20th century."
Prior to that trip (and since 1893), the government had banned buffalo hunting because Canadian herds had dwindled almost to extinction. But a spill of thousands of animals from Wood Buffalo National Park into Fort Smith prompted authorities to sanction a hunting expedition for the first 10 people to apply.
"The opportunity came across the news desk, but he made sure he sent his own entry in before he ran the story in the paper," recalled his wife, Marilyn DAWSON, with a laugh.
One of Mr. DAWSON's prized possessions was a rifle crafted by his closest friend, Harry HICKEY, who owned Holman and Hickey Custom Gunsmith, a shop in Toronto, for 30 years.
"He knew guns inside out," his wife said, "And if someone misidentified a gun in a story, he would go ballistic."
Many readers derided him for describing his hunting techniques and successes. In a letter to the editor, one reader referred to Mr. DAWSON as "nothing more than a pasty-faced, beady-eyed killer."
Mr. DAWSON took the critique with a grain of salt and a smile. During a Halloween costume party for the newsroom that followed, he showed up in his hunting garb, toting a shotgun with a toy tiger dangling by its tail from the end of the barrel. He'd applied a pasty flour mixture to his face and sequins around his eyes.
"DAWSON's face was a sight to behold... the ultimate pasty-faced, beady-eyed killer had been created," recalled Wilfred SLATER, who worked alongside Mr. DAWSON on The Globe's copy desk for 25 years.
Alan DAWSON was born in Toronto on December 24, 1917, to S.B. and Anne Beatrice DAWSON. His father was publisher of The Stratford Beacon in Stratford, Ontario, before becoming badly injured in a vehicle accident. The family moved around a lot before returning to Toronto, where Mr. DAWSON graduated from Jarvis Collegiate.
Given the scarce employment opportunities in the Depression era, Mr. DAWSON hitched a ride on a series of freight trains heading to Northern Ontario, working in lumber camps during the day and sleeping in local jails to stay sheltered from the cold.
He returned to Toronto in 1936 and worked six days a week as a copy boy at The Toronto Daily Star, earning a dollar a day.
He remained at the Star until 1948, but it was a period broken by three years as a flight engineer with the Royal Canadian Air Force -- he carried out 31 raids over Germany with a crew that returned alive.
Mr. DAWSON came to The Globe in 1948, because they offered a dollar more per week and he needed the money to support his first wife and his son, Alan David DAWSON.
As an editor in 1963, he hired a young reporter in the women's department named Marilyn COOPER, who later became features editor. They married in 1970.
The two enjoyed many hobbies together. They bought an old farmhouse on a 10-acre plot north of Pickering, Ontario, and renovated it themselves; they took their dogs on long walks, and made regular trips to an old-fashioned fishing camp called Marathon in the Florida Keys. They also bought a recreational vehicle and drove around the continent from Newfoundland to Manitoba, Alaska to Colorado, each time following a different route.
"He was a type-A personality -- go, go, go," recalled his wife. "And when he retired he wanted to do something as well."
The couple eventually settled on Vancouver Island in 1994, and Mr. DAWSON went on his final fishing trip three years ago. Mr. DAWSON didn't want an elaborate funeral. He told his family he did not want to be buried because he was claustrophobic, opting for a private cremation with his ashes scattered along the water insisting the water be warm rather than cold.
His wife has decided to go on with the couple's yearly August roast-beef barbecue that the two had already planned for their Friends before Mr. DAWSON died. She says she'll do everything precisely the way he liked it -- with a special request to the butcher that the beef be hung for four to five weeks ahead of time so it's extra juicy and turned slowly on a rotisserie over charcoal on the special day.

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-19 published
KRUGER, Lorna
Died peacefully on Sunday, August 10, 2003, at the Vera Davis Centre, Bolton, in the company of her care-giver and dear friend Janet SHEEHAN. Born in Carlton Place on November 2, 1918. Attended Alma College and the University of Toronto. Graduated in 1941 in Occupational Therapy. After being Director of the Occupational Workshop Lorna went on to head the Toronto Rehabilitation Centre, where she planned and supervised the construction of the new facility which opened in 1963. After which she then retired. Lorna spent many happy years in Toronto, Georgian Bay and at the log house called Robinswood in Caledon with her husband, Klaus Rolph KRUGER, whom she married in 1960 and who predeceased her in 1998. She was a lover of art and music, was a talented painter and played piano with enthusiasm at family gatherings. She enjoyed fishing and a variety of family pets. Her niece and nephews remember with great love, her kindness and generosity. Lovingly remembered by her sister F. Bernice COOPER and her husband John; Jim, Maureen, Stephanie, Jeff and Jane COOPER; Peter and Cathy COOPER; Ross, Lynn, Cristan, Harley COOPER and Christine, Tom and Jill COOPER. A family service will be held in Cognashene, Georgian Bay on Friday, August 22 at 3 o'clock. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Vera Davis Centre, 80 Allan Drive, Bolton L7E 1P7 or the Canadian Diabetes Association, One Bartley Bull Parkway, Suite 20, Brampton L6W 3T7. Arrangements by Egan Funeral Home, Bolton (905-857-2213). Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-23 published
Artist focused on geometric shapes
Sculptor helped to design precast concrete panels that sheathe the University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, August 23, 2003 - Page F8
Robert DOWNING thought that he needed lessons in order to become an artist. Entering a storefront studio in his hometown of Hamilton, he paid the $1 fee and was asked what he wanted to make. When he replied that he didn't know, the studio owner told him to come back when he did and gave him back his buck.
Turning to the door, Mr. DOWNING realized that whatever he did was in his own hands. Deciding upon this as the subject of a sculpture, he paid again and, in clay, fashioned a hand with a spike through it. Upon seeing the sculpture, the studio owner returned Mr. DOWNING's dollar, saying, "You don't need me. You know what you want to do."
A creator of sculptures, paintings, prints, photographs and digital art, Mr. DOWNING has died at the age of 67.
His work appeared in the Ontario Centennial Art Exhibit, the National Art Gallery of Canada Sculpture '67 Exhibit and at Habitat during Expo 67. In partnership with sculptor Ted BIELER, Mr. DOWNING designed the precast concrete panels that sheathe the University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building and, on his own, designed two of its interior concrete-sculpted walls.
In 1969, he was the first Canadian to have a solo exhibition at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London.
His work is also found in the National Art Gallery of Canada, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the University of Saskatchewan's gallery and the Singapore National Museum among many others and were included in 77 exhibitions in seven countries. As well, he completed 16 commissions in three countries.
Largely self-taught, Mr. DOWNING, a one-time police officer, burst onto the scene during the late '60s with his Cube Series in aluminum and Plexiglass. A highly intellectual artist, who often explored sophisticated mathematical concepts in his work, he created 108 cube-related sculptures for the series. Seventy-four appeared in the Whitechapel show and the British Arts Council purchased one, The Cube Turned Inside Out Revealing the Relationship of the Sphere.
Mr. DOWNING's work remained centred on geometric shapes throughout his career. "I am one of those people who views geometry as a divine expression of integration between the physical and the spiritual," he wrote in a brochure. He attributed his interest in organic geometry to the works of sculptors Eli Bornstein and Tony Smith, and the Art and Technology Movement.
Despite his intellectual bent, spirituality figured large in Mr. DOWNING's art and provided his inspiration to pursue it. When he was a Hamilton policeman, he was relaxing after a shift. "I suddenly became conscious of the warm glow of a transparent rose-coloured light completely surrounding me," he wrote in his memoirs, Feeling My Way.
"I was still aware of my body, but I felt myself to be extended into and penetrated by this light, which simultaneously caused me to feel radiant pulsations of pure love. It was as though I, somehow, had transcended the physical plane and, for a brief moment of time, experienced a cosmic level of infinite bliss."
Thereafter, Mr. DOWNING felt a new sensitivity to life and found himself in an almost trance-like state when observing the world around him. He left the police force -- and his family -- to become an artist. He maintained, "I've been given to make art in celebration of life as a humble song of praise to the Divine Creator of All."
Mr. DOWNING was born on August 1, 1935, in Hamilton, one of two children of a Canadian Westinghouse labourer and a housekeeper. When he was young, the family lived in a tent while waiting for housing.
In early adolescence, bedridden with a bout of rheumatic fever, Mr. DOWNING discovered that he enjoyed working with his hands by threading macaroni and constructing lilac-shell pictures.
Leaving school at 15 with a Grade 8 education, Mr. DOWNING delivered telegrams before joining the Canadian navy for five years. There he worked in food stores and as a photographer. After the service, Mr. DOWNING joined the Hamilton Police Force.
Early in his art career, Mr. DOWNING became discouraged by his attempts to sell his work in Toronto. He hit the road, travelling to Montreal and then to Vancouver, where he sold his first sculpture in 1962.
Still seeking a direction, he moved with his second wife to California, where they ran an antique shop. Mr. DOWNING experimented with d-Lysergic Acid Diethylamide and yoga, and participated in a couple of shows.
Returning to Toronto, Mr. DOWNING approached Mr. BIELER, who taught at the University of Toronto, for instruction. With Mr. BIELER's encouragement, he began his exploration of the cube. "He used whatever was available to dig into this and then came up with some quite interesting stuff," said Mr. BIELER, now a professor at York University in Toronto.
Selling his house to pay for shipping his sculpture to Whitechapel Art Gallery, Mr. DOWNING ended up after the show emotionally and financially exhausted. To recover, he spent a year studying the sitar.
After the bubble of government funding for art during Canada's centennial period burst, Mr. DOWNING and other Canadian artists found themselves short of work and money.
"By the end of 1972, my commissions and sales of art had completely evaporated," he wrote in a preamble to his Fibonacci Series. The only job he could find was teaching at an Ontario private school.
Throughout his career, Mr. DOWNING taught at several institutions, including U of T, the Ontario College of Art and the Banff School of Fine Art, all the while living a hand-to-mouth existence. Still, despite a lack of money and critical attention, he created prolifically, in series that often overlapped, carefully recording his creative process and organizing his works.
During the '70s, influenced by Mr. Bornstein's work, Asian philosophy, crystals and numerology, he explored the hexagon, producing a trial printing set for children and his I'Ching Series, a notebook in which he placed a diary-like record beside a tangram (a Chinese puzzle consisting of five triangles, a square and a rhomboid) based on a computer printout.
While in hospital in 1974 with a heart attack, Mr. DOWNING worked with construction paper and scissors and formed a three-dimensional shape that led to the Fibonacci Series, also called the Nothing Series. The 24 solid-steel castings and eight metal powder and fibreglass life-sized sculptures reflect a system Mr. DOWNING said he discovered, of combining squares, equilateral triangles and pentagons. Some of the works' proportions contained the Fibonacci ratio. (In the Fibonacci sequence -- 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 etc. -- each successive number is equal to the sum of the preceding two numbers.)
When discharged from the hospital, Mr. DOWNING was unable to pay his mortgage. He sold the house and moved with his third wife and family to California, where he lived from 1974 to 1978. He taught at California State College in Long Beach and continued with the Fibonacci Series.
Entering the '80s, Mr. DOWNING turned to conceptual/performance art. In conceptual art, the works themselves are not considered important, but are intended to examine the language and system of art. Performance art presents actual events as art to a live audience, as opposed to the illusions of events presented by theatre.
For the series Art Isn't? Mr. DOWNING used a Canada Council grant to solicit work from the presidents of Canada's top 500 companies. Asked by the council to reimburse the money because he had not used it to create art, Mr. DOWNING agreed to send a monthly cheque for 10 per cent of his income. The amount came to $2.
The Canada Council responded with a request for a bigger cheque and Mr. DOWNING complied. Using a photocopier, he enlarged a $2 cheque and sent it off.
"He was desperately honest and he would not put up with bullshit at all," sculptor and artist Gord SMITH said. "He stayed on top of the Canada Council.... He believed passionately in the culture and knew it was going down."
Also during the '80s, Mr. DOWNING produced many Documeditation works, which included Transentials in Space, the work he said in 1992 was the most significant of his life. Describing it as a visual literacy program, he spent two years developing the three-volume work.
Always an outspoken advocate for his calling, Mr. DOWNING helped to found Canadian Artists Representatives in 1967. Driven, brilliant, often difficult and prickly, he was frustrated by his inability to qualify for grants from the Ontario government. He lacked the formal training the government required and went to the offices of the Minister of Culture and Citizenship to state his case. Screaming, " This isn't art?" Mr. DOWNING hurled his portfolio to the ground. The minister's office called the police.
Mr. DOWNING described his Closet Art, from 1984 to 1987, as "an installation piece which outgrew the confines of two large storage closets and raised the question of how practical it was for a senior artist to continue playing the role of an unpaid custodian of earlier work that had long proven itself to qualify as legitimate cultural property."
He donated the works to the Art Gallery of Hamilton, counting the 250-page record of his negotiations with the gallery as a Documeditation. "Coming back to these [donated] works again and again one is reminded of the expansive scope of Mr. DOWNING's thinking, of the evolving nature of his practice," said the gallery's chief curator, Shirley MADILL.
Mr. DOWNING left Canada once again to make a living in the late '80s, working and teaching in Botswana and Singapore. Returning because of ill health, he spent his last years largely confined to his apartment. He found a creative outlet, producing computer-generated images, once again exploring geometric forms. In 1998, as artist-in-residence at the U of T, he developed a Web site containing a retrospective of his work.
Always outspoken, a quality that alienated many, in the spring of 2002, he published an Internet manifesto announcing his resignation as a practising Canadian artist. In it, he chastized business, government, galleries and academia for not supporting artists in general and him in particular.
At his death on July 22, Mr. DOWNING had not sold his work in Canada for the past 15 years. Still he continued to promote it, even receiving a posthumous rejection.
"Robert's first love was his art, and his life was his art, and that's the beginning and end of it," said his fourth wife, Mickey DOWNING.
Mr. DOWNING leaves his wife, Mickey, two ex-wives, children Michael DOWNING and Sara ROBINSON, and three grandchildren.

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-04 published
Artist and portraitist refused to compromise
Works in his trademark use of colour hang in the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital and in private collections
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, September 4, 2003 - Page R9
When the director of the University of Toronto's Hart House Gallery needed a portrait of Hart House warden Dr. Jean LENGELLÉ, she called artist Gerald SCOTT.
"In this case, Gerry was a perfect fit for Jean, because Jean wanted something that was not staid and traditional, which is certainly Gerry," said the director, Judi SCHWARTZ.
"He [Dr. LENGELLÉ] liked the patterning approach that Gerry took, and the two of them got along very well."
Mr. SCOTT painted the 1977 LENGELLÉ portrait and countless others in the manner of his friend and mentor, Group of Seven artist Fred VARLEY.
"Gerry placed colours together that you wouldn't think of, and when you stand back from the painting, you get the effect of the work, and when you get closer to it, you start to notice the colours," Ms. SCHWARTZ said of the LENGELLÉ portrait.
One of the foremost Canadian portrait painters, whose works hung in the inaugural exhibition of Toronto's prominent Greenwich Gallery along with those of Michael Snow, Graham Coughtry and William Ronald and are found in the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital and numerous private collections, Mr. SCOTT died of cancer at the age of 76. Along with Dr. LENGELLÉ, Mr. SCOTT's subjects included a Bermudan prime minister and a Baroness Rothschild. One of six children, whose father worked as a building engineer and car salesman, Gerald William SCOTT was born in Saint John. Although his birth certificate reads September 30, 1926, Mr. SCOTT always said it was wrong and he was born in 1925. To help support his family during the Depression, Mr. SCOTT danced on the city's docks, missing school to do so. After service in the Canadian army during the Second World War, he returned to Toronto where his family had settled.
There he met and married the Italian countess Josephine Maria INVIDIATTA. An English teacher who recognized her husband's gifts, she taught Mr. SCOTT to read. Thereafter, he read incessantly, devouring all types of material. Countess INVIDIATTA also encouraged Mr. SCOTT to attend the Ontario College of Art, now named the Ontario College of Art and Design.
Graduating from the college in 1949, Mr. SCOTT won the Reeves Award for all-round technical proficiency in drawing and painting. After a short career in advertising and turning down an opportunity to do a cover for Time magazine, he focused on fine art.
Mr. SCOTT taught at his alma mater part-time from 1952 to 1958 and full-time for a period beginning in 1963. And he participated in shows at both The Roberts Gallery and The Greenwich Gallery, later renamed The Isaacs Gallery.
While other artistic styles, such as abstract expressionism came and went, Mr. SCOTT continued with portraiture. "He didn't want to compromise his style," said his son Paul SCOTT. "He didn't follow trends."
Lacking the time to develop a body of work for a show, and with a self-effacing temperament which disliked the gallery scene, by the mid-eighties Mr. SCOTT no longer exhibited his work, sticking to commissions and teaching, and writing plays and poetry.
Teaching took up much of Mr. SCOTT's time, and he was known as a good one. For 25 years, he taught at the Three Schools of Art and later at the Forest Hill Art Club, both in Toronto.
"He was an inspirational teacher," said Michael GERRY, a student of Mr. SCOTT for six years and now an instructor at Central Technical High School in Toronto.
"He was one of the few people around who understands the vocabulary. He really knew his lessons. Not only was he skillful, he was thoughtful, unusually thoughtful. Colour and temperature were his specialty."
Said his friend and fellow artist Telford FENTON, "He had wonderful use of colour. It spoke to you."
A deliberate, patient and methodical instructor, popular with Rosedale matrons, Mr. SCOTT taught his students to observe colour. "He could see colour everywhere," said Joan CONOVER, who served as a portrait model for Mr. SCOTT. 'They're [the colours] there, Joanie,' he would say to me. 'All you have to do is stop looking. Close your eyes and then open them, very quickly. Close them, open them again, and you'll get a brief glimpse [of the colours].'"
Mr. SCOTT also demonstrated painting for his students. "Most teachers would not demonstrate," said another SCOTT student Roger BABCOCK. " His demonstrations were like a Polaroid picture. They would form before your eyes."
When students complained of lack of subjects, Mr. SCOTT told them how he stayed up nights painting works of his hand.
As he taught, Mr. SCOTT discussed the Bible, religion or politics. But he would not discuss his war experiences, according to Ms. CONOVER. "It made his stomach hurt," she said.
Mr. SCOTT used his right thumb for certain strokes, and was highly critical of his work, only signing it with persuasion.
Good Friends since the fifties with Mr. FENTON, the pair was known as the Laurel and Hardy of the art world.
Once, they sold the same painting to three different clients, eventually making good to all three. Another time while sailing, Mr. SCOTT's boat crashed into the dock of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club. Always charming Mr. SCOTT ended up in the club's bar, along with those of his party, treated to a round of drinks.
Mr. SCOTT continued working until he suffered a heart attack three years ago.
He died on July 13 and leaves his partner Joyce, two ex-wives, children Paul, Sarah, Hannah, Rebecca, Aaron, Amelia Jordan, Jarod and Dana, and five grandchildren. His first wife, Josephine, and a son, Simon, predeceased him.

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-31 published
The dean of Canadian sociology
The first chair of a new University of Toronto department trained a generation of scholars
By Carol COOPER, Special to the Globe and Mail Friday, October 31, 2003 - Page R13
In 1938, with a doctorate in political science and anxious to achieve his dream of becoming a professor, Samuel Delbert CLARK reluctantly took the only position available to him at the University of Toronto, as its first full-time lecturer in sociology.
In doing so, S.D. CLARK became one of the country's early anglophone sociologists. During his career, his immense intellect, painstaking scholarship and prolific writing brought credibility and respect to the fledgling discipline. At a time when Canadian universities had few sociology departments, Prof. CLARK trained a generation of sociologists who spread out across the country, establishing sociology departments in other centres. And as an administrator at U of T, Prof. CLARK brought leading sociologists to the school.
The first sociologist born, raised and trained here, Prof. S. D. CLARK has died at the age of 93.
Incorporating the staples theory of his mentor, leading Canadian political economist Harold INNIS, the work of American historian F. J. TURNER, and sociologists Carl DAWSON and E. C. HUGHES of McGill University, among others, Prof. CLARK developed his own approach.
He studied social change on Canada's economic frontiers such as the fur trade, Western wheat farming, and the lumber and mining industries. He traced the development of those communities as the residents there, far from the cultural and financial institutions that controlled their lives and contending with distance and poverty, took their communities through a period of simultaneous disorganization and reorganization. From the struggle emerged new organizations and religious sects, such as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Social Credit Party.
Reflecting his university training in history, sociology and political science, Prof. CLARK brought a multifaceted approach to his research.
"He looked at things that were happening in Canada almost uniquely and tried to understand them and not to reduce it to some simplistic international generalization," said William MICHELSON, the S. D. Clark professor of sociology at the University of Toronto. "He really wanted to look into a multiplicity of factors."
Not everyone liked Prof. CLARK's approach to sociology, but nor did Prof. CLARK favour the Chicago School approach then taught at McGill University. Although he later altered his research methods, Prof. CLARK at first viewed the American approach dimly, seeing it as one of doorbell-ringing in order to ask stupid questions, one that scientifically quantified what happened in the present without exploring the past. Instead, he pored over archival material, studying the development of Canadian society from a historical perspective.
Books by Prof. CLARK, such as The Social Development of Canada, drew fire from historians, who challenged his theory and said sociology and history were incompatible. But the publications brought attention to the new discipline.
Born to a farming family on February 24, 1910, in Lloydminster, Alberta., Samuel Delbert CLARK was the second of five children. The family of Northern Irish descent had been established in Ontario since 1840 until it moved West in 1905.
Showing an early aptitude for school and a strong interest in history, Prof. CLARK graduated from the University of Saskatchewan with an honours B.A. in history and political science and an M.A. in history. Brushing aside suggestions that he become a high-school teacher and politician, Prof. CLARK aimed instead for a university position.
He entered University of Toronto in 1931 to do a doctorate in political science and economic history. While the studies proved dry and disappointing, it was there that he first met Harold INNIS, read the works of Marx, Engels and North American left-wingers, and attended meetings of the radical League for Social Reconstruction. Disillusioned with his studies and short of funds, Prof. CLARK accepted a Saskatchewan Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire scholarship and headed for the London School of Economics in 1932. At the school, he received his first exposure to sociology, including the works of Prof. DAWSON at McGill.
After leaving London in 1933, Prof. CLARK arrived in Montreal, again strapped for cash. Hoping to collect a debt from a friend, who was then studying at McGill, Prof. CLARK stopped by his house. With the friend not home, Prof. CLARK then visited Prof. DAWSON, who offered him a research fellowship. After working on a project studying Canadian-American relations for two years and receiving an M.A. in sociology, Prof. CLARK returned to Toronto to continue his doctorate in political science.
In 1937 he accepted an appointment to teach political science and sociology at the University of Manitoba and stayed a year before returning once again to University of Toronto to complete his thesis and begin his career there.
As a proponent of a more British style of sociology, Prof. CLARK was favoured for the job over another Chicago-trained candidate, setting the academic direction for the school. Sociology was then run as a section under the department of anthropology, to be transferred a year later to the department of political economy. Except for occasional leaves, Prof. CLARK remained a fixture on campus, impeccably dressed in a woollen suit and sporting a pipe, until his retirement in 1976.
Shy and quiet, Prof. CLARK constantly cleared his throat and jingled the change in his pocket while lecturing.
"He never cracked a joke.... It was serious scholarship. You had to ask serious questions," recalled retired York University sociology professor Edward MANN, an early undergraduate student and later a doctoral student of Prof. CLARK. " Their [ INNIS and CLARK] religion was scholarship."
In that vein, Prof. CLARK never talked to the press about daily issues, saying it cheapened the discipline. And he practised rigorous scholarship.
"He had a tremendous amount of integrity," said Lorne TEPPERMAN, a University of Toronto sociology professor and former student of Prof. CLARK. " This was a guy who knew what he stood for, what he believed in. He was uncompromising. He had very high standards for himself and other people."
During the fifties, Prof. CLARK, an admirer of Lester PEARSON, exchanged his membership in the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation for that of the Liberal Party, the one endorsed by his wife, Rosemary. A graduate in economics from Columbia University, she edited all his works. By the sixties, Prof. CLARK had begun to study social change and urbanization, writing The Suburban Society and later, The New Urban Poor. Despite altering his research methods, dropping his historical research and adopting the American style of conducting questionnaires to collect data, he stopped short of tabulating them, arguing in The Suburban Society that "to lay claim to scientific precision... would be to falsify the competence of sociology."
And the man who studied social change became buffeted by it. While the sociology section had remained small during the forties and fifties, it ballooned during the sixties, becoming an independent department in 1963 with Prof. CLARK as its appointed head.
A capable administrator, Prof. CLARK brought feistiness to the job. "He was a very honest man," said Prof. TEPPERMAN. "He wasn't afraid on an argument, he wasn't afraid of a fight. If he liked you, he really liked you and if he didn't like you, he really didn't like you."
With the huge increase in sociology-department enrolment but small number of sociology graduates, Prof. CLARK looked outside the country to fill teaching positions. Most either came from the United States, or had been trained there.
While some scholars hailed Prof. CLARK for having eschewed American-style sociology and maintaining a Canadian approach, the young and sometimes radical newcomers with a markedly different approach regarded him as an oddball and an anachronism. And as an older, white, staunch Liberal Party-supporting male at the centre of an old-boy network, he represented everything they were fighting against. Accustomed to a more democratic academic culture at other schools, the new staff agitated for a greater say in the running of the department. When Prof. CLARK resisted, he was pushed out, and the chair became an elected position. He remained at the university until his retirement in 1976.
Outside of the university, throughout his career, Prof. CLARK served as an editor of The Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science, and as president of the Royal Society of Canada. In addition, he was appointed an Officer in the Order of Canada.
Despite the recognition he received, Prof. CLARK always felt that his older brother who took over the farm was the family success, according to his son, Edmund. And he enjoyed such simple pleasures as hockey. Once, while attending a dinner party at Claude BISSELL's house, then the president of U of T, Prof. CLARK asked where the television was and sat down to watch the hockey game. When questioned later, Prof. CLARK replied, "Anyone stupid enough to hold a party on a hockey night deserved to have the guests watch television in the den."
S.D. CLARK died on September 18. He leaves his wife, Rosemary, sons Edmund and Samuel, nine grandchildren and a sister, Grace. His daughter Ellen predeceased him.

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COOPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-26 published
He was the voice of the land
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation broadcaster oversaw radio programming that connected the country's isolated agricultural and fishing communities
By Carol COOPER, Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, December 26, 2003 - Page R15
It wasn't a great beginning. Racked with nerves during his first on-air stint for a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Winnipeg radio agricultural show in 1944, Bob KNOWLES gabbled the market reports in a record three minutes, instead of the scheduled 10, with the result that his boss had to spend the next seven minutes rereading them.
"I don't suppose anyone made any sense out of anything I'd read," Mr. KNOWLES told the Regina Leader Post in 1981.
Many voice and elocution lessons later, Mr. KNOWLES became an accomplished and well-loved farm broadcaster, who won the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation farm department's Cowhide Trophy for proficiency in broadcasting in 1951 and then rose through the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ranks to become the national supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts.
Mr. KNOWLES, who in that capacity, oversaw programs such as Country Calendar, Country Magazine, Summer Fallow and the daily agricultural noon-hour shows, died in his sleep recently. He was 83.
Farm shows on radio and television offer up-to-date market information, advice on growing crops and raising animals, and news on the latest agricultural research from the universities to their busy and isolated rural audience. In days gone by, when many more Canadians made their living from the land without modern communication methods, radio farm shows were particularly important.
As national supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts, and chair of National Farm Radio Forum's executive committee for a number of years, Mr. KNOWLES contributed to one ground-breaking Canadian show. Launched in the early forties as an adult-education program for farmers, Farm Radio Forum brought farmers, their wives and often their children together in an early version of interactive radio. Gathering weekly throughout the winter in living rooms, kitchens and community halls across the country, they listened to the show's broadcasts.
After hearing a panel discussion, the group discussed questions presented in study guides. A secretary recorded answers, which were sent back to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, some to be aired the following week. Their responses helped shape agricultural policy across the country and initiated several projects, said Rodger Schwass, a former national secretary of Farm Radio Forum and professor emeritus from York University.
As its chair during the late fifties and early sixties, Mr. KNOWLES helped choose show topics and panelists and became involved in one of its projects, Radios for India.
Forums across Canada raised money to help start a radio forum in India, one of several countries, including Jamaica, Belize, Ghana and Nigeria that adopted the Canadian idea. When the head of Indian radio came to Canada for three months to study radio forums, Mr. KNOWLES shepherded him around the country. In turn, Mr. KNOWLES participated in a training program in India. Radio forums became the chief means of disseminating information during India's Green Revolution, which ended up doubling the country's food production.
Robert Gordon KNOWLES was born on February 5, 1920 to Gordon and Catherine Finn KNOWLES on the family's homestead in Rutland, Saskatchewan. The family had settled there from Ontario in 1907, in the town that no longer exists, roughly 160 kilometres west of Saskatoon. Affected by mild cerebral palsy resulting from a difficult birth, Mr. KNOWLES walked with a mild limp and was unable to use his right hand.
Although Mr. KNOWLES wanted nothing more than to become a farmer, his father feared his son's disability would make that difficult. Instead, he encouraged Mr. KNOWLES to continue his education. Upon completing his B.Sc. in agriculture at the University of Saskatchewan in 1942, and with a low service rating because of his disability, Mr. KNOWLES did not enlist during the Second World War. Instead, he completed his master's degree in agriculture at the university in 1944, where he had met Pat APTED, an honours graduate in arts and biology, whom he married in 1943.
With so many men overseas, Mr. KNOWLES had three job offers upon graduation: as a district agriculturalist in Alberta, as a land inspector for the Canadian Pacific Railway, or as a western farm commentator with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. He chose the people's network. "At that time, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation was only eight-years-old and it seemed like a very glamorous position," Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon Daily News in After his first position in Winnipeg, he transferred to Edmonton for a similar job, staying nine months, before returning to Winnipeg as regional farm-broadcast commentator in 1950.
Of his early days in broadcasting, Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon paper, "I made my work pass the following test: Is it of interest and value to the farmer to know about this and why? I think I did all right because I've been criticized equally by all farm organizations at one time or another."
In 1954, Mr. KNOWLES and his family packed up and moved to Toronto, where he became the assistant supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts and 19 months later, the supervisor.
Not only did he manage the section's budget, set its policy and advise regional announcers across the country, but at least once provided the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation with a breaking story.
In 1963, Mr. KNOWLES and most of the network's farm department were on a flight that crashed during landing at Toronto International Airport.
Uninjured, Mr. KNOWLES left the plane to be put into a holding room with fellow passengers. Once there, he demanded to call home to reassure his wife and young family. Granted the privilege, he immediately called the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's newsroom.
In 1967, with a major network restructuring under way, Mr. KNOWLES took a three-year leave of absence to work for the Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome on the development of farm broadcasts.
Upon returning to Canada, he found his job had disappeared. Mr. KNOWLES took the only Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Radio farm commentator's job available, where he reported, wrote and delivered approximately 6,000 broadcasts for Radio Noon in Regina, until his retirement in 1980.
Said Bonnie DONISON, producer of Radio Noon. "Because he was so friendly and warm, people really liked to talk to him and And he held some interesting interviews, once with a trouserless federal minister of agriculture, Otto LANG. Mr. LANG had ripped his pants getting out of a taxi, so he removed them, sent them aside for mending and carried on, recalled Gerry WADE, a fellow farm-broadcaster who worked with Mr. KNOWLES in Regina.
Of his broadcasting career, Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon Daily News, "I can honestly say that during all of my time as a journalist, there never was a day I didn't want to go into work."
Mr. KNOWLES also helped create the Canadian Farm Writers Federation and was inducted into the Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame in 1990.
He died on November 5 in Ottawa. His first wife Pat, predeceased him in 1997. He leaves his second wife Marney, children Tony, Laura, Alan and Janet, seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

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