CLAESSENS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
LAMONT, Jean Annette (ROBINS)
Jean died peacefully, on Tuesday, October 14, 2003 in Toronto, with her children Doug and Anne at her side; in her 84th year. Predeceased by her loving husband and friend of 53 years, Bruce Maitland LAMONT, a former senior international executive with Royal Bank of Canada. Survived by son, James Douglas and his wife Kathy, stepchildren Melissa and August and step-great granddaughter, Elizabeth; and daughter Anne and husband Christopher JAMES and their daughter, Kathleen. Cherished sister of Joan BAILEY and her children, Robin (Marie,) Joanne (Ken HOLT,) John (Clare) and Janet (Heino CLAESSENS) and their families. Remembered by sisters-in-law Pauline FLYNN (Hank) and Meribeth LAMONT and their families and the extended LAMONT clan. Special thanks to cousin Joanne HOLT for all her support and help over the last few years. Thank you to the staff and Mom's new Friends at the Kingsway Retirement Residence, Etobicoke for their Friendship and support in making the Kingsway her home away from home. A graduate of MacDonald Hall, Guelph University (1940) and Toronto Western Hospital School of Nursing (1943) she was always proud of her accomplishment as one of Canada's first female nursing flight attendants with Trans Canada Airways. Mom was an avid bridge player and golfer, a social dynamo who cherished her wide circle of Friends. A celebration of her life will be held on Saturday, October 18, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 89 Dunn Street (at Lakeshore Road), Oakville. If desired, in lieu of flowers, donations in Jean's memory to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.
Mom, a Grand Slam and a hole-in-one to you. Love always.

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CLAIR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-09 published
Hugh THIRD
In loving memory of Hugh THIRD, who passed away Wednesday, July 3rd, 2003 at the Sudbury Regional Hospital - Laurentian Site.
Beloved husband of Lois (CLAIR) THIRD of Sudbury. Loving father of Lisa Gladstone and Krista THIRD both of Toronto and David THIRD (fiancée Jody LANDRY) of Val Caron, stepchildren Christina DEMJEN (husband Attila) of Keswick and Gregory MUCIN (wife Lisa) of Sudbury. Cherished grandfather of Molly, Tyler, Amy, Ric and Holly. Dear son of William and Eunice THIRD predeceased. Dear brother of George of Little Current, Elaine McGAULEY (husband Dwight predeceased) of Tehkummah and Ed predeceased (wife Lilly of Gore Bay). Sadly missed by nieces and nephews.
A celebration of Hugh's life was held at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home on July 7th, 2003. Cremation at the Parklawn Crematorium.

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CLAPPISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
MATHERS, Andrew Sherlock
Died of a heart attack early Friday morning. Husband of Suzanne. Father of Drew, Mary and Jane. Andrew will be missed by his brother John (Joan); niece Janet; nephews Eric, Ian and Scott; step-siblings Susan GARRARD, John and Charles LENNOX; and by sister-in-law Jane CLAPPISON. Private Cremation. A Memorial Service will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation.

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CLARIDGE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-22 published
Patricia Joan STERRITT
In loving memory of Patricia Joan STERRITT (née MORRIS) a resident of Manitowaning, died at Laurentian Hospital, Sudbury, on Sunday, October 19, 2003 at the age of 69.
Pat was born in Brampton, daughter of the late Gilbert and Mona (TRIMBLE) MORRIS. Will be dearly missed by her loving husband Malcolm SINCLAIR STERRITT and her children Richard (Rick) STERRITT of Brampton, Wendy (GRAY/GREY) and husband Jim of Palgrave, Robert and wife Lorie of Caledon East, Carl and wife Karen of Alton. Her six grandchildren Mandy, Laura, Nicole, Samantha, Jake and Benjamin will miss their "Nanny"
Predeceased by brothers Robert and Brian and survived by dear sister Virginia and husband Yvon GALIPEAU of Milton, Gail GRIFFITH of Brampton, Mary (CLARIDGE) and husband Hap of Salmon Arm, BC, Julie (CAMPBELL) and husband Brian of Brampton, brothers John, of Brampton and Grant and wife Pam of Chatham. Visitation was held on Monday, October 20, 2003. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, October 21, 2003 all at St. Paul's Anglican Church, Manitowaning, Ontario. Reverend Canon Bain PEEVER officiating. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery.

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CLARK o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
Gerald (Jerry) Norbert LOOSEMORE, (C.D. with Bar)
The family announces with sorrow his passing on May 1, 2003 in his 64th year. He was born in Killarney to the late Norbert and Ruby (PATTERSON) LOOSEMORE and attended Saint John de Brebeuf School and Little Current High School prior to joining the Royal Canadian Signal Corps in 1959. After a 25 year career, he retired from the Canadian Armed Forces Communications Command with the rank of Master Warrant Officer and subsequently joined the Communications Security Establishment for an additional thirteen years during which he was instrumental in the modernization of the NORAD communications system. Jerry was made Scouter in 1978, a member of Royal Canadian Legion Branch #177, and he had an extensive repertoire of Newfoundland folk music. He returned to Manitoulin Island to pursue his interest in genealogy. He is survived by his wife, the former Evelyn PECK, his son Christopher (Gayelene,) and daughter Melissa (Donnie) CLARK. He will be dearly missed by his sister Patricia and brothers Peter (Vivian), Harold (Laurine), Michael (Ann), and James (Bernice). He will be lovingly remembered by his mother-in-law Erma PECK, sisters-in-law Phyllis MARSHALL, Beverly (Everett) MORPHET, and brothers-in-law Iliff (Jane) PECK and Warren (Gail) PECK. He is also survived by nieces, nephews, great nieces and great nephews. Jerry will be remembered by his family and Friends for his generosity, his storytelling, and his sense of humor. A memorial service celebrating his life will be officiated by Mr. D. J. LAROUCHE at the graveside at the St. Bernard's Catholic Cemetery, North Channel Drive, on Saturday, May 17, 2003 at 3 p.m. with Interment.

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CLARK o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
John CLARKE VANEVERY
Clarke VANEVERY, a resident of Meldrum Bay, passed away at Mindemoya Hospital on Friday, June 6, 2003 at the age of 72 years.
He was born in Gore Bay, son of the late John Wesley VANEVERY and Ada Elizabeth Christina (CLARKE) VANEVERY. He timbered for many years as a way of supporting his lifelong passion, farming. He also enjoyed the annual family hunt, snowmobiling, and many other outdoor activities. His greatest love was spending time with his family and in particular his grandchildren. Clarke took an avid interest in all of his grandchildren. With the boys the number one passion was hockey. On any given Sunday, Clarke would be there cheering them on. With his granddaughters his relationship was of a more caring nature. Last summer he and his oldest granddaughter Elizabeth set up house together in Meldrum Bay as she experienced her first summer job. Then there is Caroline. The entertainer, speechmaker extraordinaire, figure skater and all around treasure. Last but not least is our miracle baby, Rachel, a shining light in a difficult time. His whole being would lighten up when she was with him. He was a loving and caring husband, father, grandfather, brother, uncle and friend and will be sadly missed. Many fond memories will be cherished by all who knew him. Predeceased by his beloved wife Shirley (McCAULEY) VANEVERY in 2002. Loving father of John (wife Wendy) or Gore Bay, Lyle (wife Janice) of Lively and Joan SHEPPARD (husband Willis) of Mindemoya. Loving and loved grandfather of Elizabeth, Colin, Caroline, Graham, Evan, Owen and Rachel. Dear brother of Blanche VANEVERY, Bill (wife Pauline) VANEVERY, Maude Falls (husband Matt,) Helen Clarke, Dale VANEVERY (wife Joan,) Jim VANEVERY (wife Helen,) Don VANEVERY (wife Rose.) Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home on Saturday June 7. The funeral service was held in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel on Sunday, June 8 with Erwin THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON officiating. Interment to follow in Meldrum Bay Cemetery.
also linked as linked as CLARK

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CLARK o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
CHRIS CLARK - October 1973 to November 1999
I Remember
The day he was born
His colic in the night
His first taste of cereal
His ability to climb out of his bed
His sneaking up through the bottom of the bed to a warmer place
His first steps
His love of being out of doors
His love for his grandparents
His Friendship with his Cousin Rob
His love of playing in the sand with his Tonka trucks
His way of creating solar calculators from battery ones
The day we brought home his sister
His love of his dog
His first day of school
His love of Lego and building
The lost screw drivers run over by the lawn mower
The missing cars and back road adventure
This car smells like a swamp
Spin marks on the grass
A broken foundation, "It had no brakes, Dad"
Green garage doors that used to be white
Lost tools, "Dad you never had one"
Lost drills, How can it hide in a wall?
Too loud music vibrating china out onto the floor
I remember his good Friends and how they stayed 'til he left
I do remember and I won't forget.
Dad

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CLARK o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-26 published
CLARK
-In loving memory of Chris.
But God
I know not, but God knows-
Oh, blessed rest from fear!
All my unfolding days
To Him are plain and clear.
Each anxious, puzzled "why?"
From doubt or dread that grows,
Finds answer in this thought:
I know not, but He knows.
I cannot, but God can--
Oh, balm for all my care!
The burden that I drop
His hand will lift and bear.
Though eagle pinions tire,
I walk where once I ran,
This is my strength to know
I cannot, but He can.
I cannot see, but God sees--
Oh, all sufficient light!
My dark and hidden way
To His is always bright.
My strained and peering eyes
May close in restful ease,
And I in peace may sleep.
I see not, but He sees.
-Steve and Brenda, we hold you in our hearts and in our prayers.
With love from your church family.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-11 published
Don MacKINNON
By Bill HALEWOOD, Bill HARRIS Tuesday, February 11, 2003, Page A20
Husband, father, businessman, veteran. Born April 7, 1925, in Longueuil, Quebec Died April 16, 2002, in Kingston, following surgery, aged 77.
'You're not 18."
"Are you calling me a liar?"
Don enlisted when he was 16. Any kid who could contradict an enlisting officer must have had that certain bravado the army was looking for.
He grew up in St. Lambert, Quebec, across the river from Montreal. As a young boy, before the St. Lawrence Seaway was built, the river was his life. Riding the ice flows was a dangerous sport. He was very athletic, excelling in swimming, hockey, football and skiing.
The war broke out and his brother enlisted. Don was bored so he did, too. He had just finished Grade 9.
He did his basic training at Trois-Rivières then volunteered to join a new elite unit to train as a commando. This combined force of Canadian and American soldiers was to form the First Special Services Force, later called The Black Devils Brigade.
Don went with the brigade to the Aleutians to chase out any remaining Japanese forces, then back to the United States and on to Sicily and Italy via North Africa.
The unit was under the overall command of General Mark CLARK and the immediate goal was the capture of Monte Cassino. Their first battles were to take Monte La Defensa and then Monte Majo in February, 1943, in order to block the German supply line to Cassino. Here Don was wounded -- his foot was blown off. It took two platoon members 12 hours to carry him on a stretcher to a field hospital. The stretcher was dropped every time they came under fire. Don was in poor shape, having lost a lot of blood, and remembers the padre reciting the 23rd Psalm over him.
He was in hospital in Italy for more than a year, then back in hospital in England in June, 1944, and home to Canada by August, 1945. Canadian doctors saw the need for further amputation.
He was now 19 and his father said to him, "What are you going to do with your life? You have no education and you can't dig ditches." Don went back to finish high school and then to McGill to obtain a B.A. under a program sponsored by the Department of Veterans Affairs. At McGill, he met his wife Heather; they later had two daughters, Beth and Janet.
Don had a business career in advertising, communications, and public relations which took him to Montreal and England.
With his artificial leg, he learned to ski again, and was better on one leg than many a skier on two. He was the second Canadian amputee to ski with specially built equipment. He was physically imposing in a handsome, broad-shouldered, athletic way that seemed to suppress the difficulty of getting through life on one leg. He was a model of courage and prowess in life and work and sport. He played a very good game of golf. Don's spirit was exemplary and his sense of humour allowed him to laugh when he fell in a sand trap; others would have expressed the miseries of frustration. His was a noble equanimity with iron discipline behind it.
On his retirement, Friends encouraged Don and Heather to move to Port Hope, Ontario, where they had some of the happiest years of their life together. He was a generous and sincere friend who generated respect and admiration. He was also a passionate Canadian who stayed politically engaged and applied his liberal perspective to public events inside and outside Canada. His day was made when he, along with his Friends, erected a flag pole on his front lawn.
Don's was an active life in business; in retirement he volunteered with the Navy League Sea Cadets. After he died, his artificial leg was sent to Honduras.
Bill HALEWOOD and Bill HARRIS are Friends of Don.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-05 published
CLARK, Reginald Harold, 1928-2003,
B.Sc., PhD (Imperial College, London),
Professor Emeritus, Queen's University
Died peacefully at Providence Manor, Kingston on Tuesday, April 2, after a long illness. Survived by his wife, Oris, children, Natalie (Mark) REYNOLDS of Adelaide Australia, Adrian, Stefanie (Petrus BOOTS) and grandchildren Aidan, Evan, Liam REYNOLDS and Samsara BOOTS. Also survived by brother Norman (Gwen,) London England and brother-in-law John WATSYK, Thunder Bay.
Dr. CLARK came to Canada in 1955 and joined Queen's University in the department of Chemical Engineering, serving as head of Department from 1961-1970, and continuing until his retirement in 1992. He was the President of the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering, 1967-1968.
Cremation has taken place. There will be a memorial service at Robert J. Reid and Sons Funeral Home, 309 Johnson Street (at Barrie St.), Kingston, on Monday, April 7 at 7: 00 p.m. The family will receive Friends prior to the service from 6: 30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Providence Continuing Care Centre Providence Manor Site or Partners in Mission Food Bank.
Online Guest Book reidfuneralhome.com 613-548-7973

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-26 published
SWINDELL, Gerald S.
Passed away peacefully at the Veterans' Wing of Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre in Toronto on July 17, 2003 at the age of 88. Gerry was predeceased by his first wife, Jean WARRINGTON, in 1947, and by his second wife of more than 40 years, Bettie BROCKIE, in 1990, and by his sister Elaine, brother Charles and son-law Andy CLARK. He is survived by his three children, Sharon, Gerry and Carol, his granddaughter Christine MAKI, his sisters Geraldine REES and Marie SMITH, his brothers-in-law Bill BROCKIE and Don SMITH and several nieces and nephews and their families.
Although Gerry was born in Grenfell, Saskatchewan and died in Toronto, he spent most of his life in Winnipeg, Manitoba. A graduate of the University of Manitoba, Gerry spent his entire business career with Wood Gundy, joining the firm in 1938 and retiring as a Vice President and Director in 1974. During the Second World War he served as a Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Navy. He was an active and enthusiastic member of the Manitoba Club and served as its President in 1975 and 1976. He was also the Chairman of the Board of the Winnipeg Stock Exchange from 1969 to 1972 and was active throughout his business career with a number of charitable organizations.
For relaxation he enjoyed the company of his wife and their many good Friends, frequent dinners at Rae and Jerry's, annual trips to Camelback Inn in Scottsdale, Arizona, golf at the St. Charles Country Club and billiards at the Manitoba Club. Unfortunately, his retirement years were marred by the debilitating effects of Paget's Disease and the untimely death of his beloved wife Bettie. Our thanks to the staff at Deer Lodge Hospital Veterans' Wing and We Care in Winnipeg and at Sunnybrook K Wing and Selectcare in Toronto for all their help in his final years. Although he moved to Toronto in 1997 to be closer to his children, his heart always remained in Winnipeg. He returns there now. A graveside service will be held at Garry Memorial Park, 1291 McGillivray Blvd., Winnipeg on Tuesday, July 29th at 2: 30 p.m. followed by a reception at the on site funeral home. In lieu of flowers, donations to a charity of choice would be greatly appreciated.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Professor played a role in defeat of SSAINTURENT government
By M.J. STONE Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page R5
Nearly four decades after Louis SSAINTURENT had been Prime Minister of Canada, McGill professor James MALLORY was surprised to discover how influential he had been in the defeat of Mr. SSAINTURENT's Liberals in 1957. The revelation occurred in 1992 when the cabinet papers of the SSAINTURENT government, which had been sealed for 35 years, were made available to the public.
Unknown to Professor MALLORY, a radio interview he gave in the wake of the 1957 election had caught the Prime Minister's ear. The Liberals had been reduced to 105 seats in the House, seven fewer than the Conservatives. But the Grits were still in a position to form a minority government with the aid of the 25 elected members of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, later to become the New Democratic Party.
Mr. SSAINTURENT found himself at a crossroads. While his party was clearly in decline, the Conservatives were on the rise and many questioned whether the Liberals still had a legal mandate to govern. When Mr. SSAINTURENT arrived in cabinet that morning, Prof. MALLORY's radio interview was still ringing in his ears.
Prof. MALLORY, who died in Montreal on June 24, said in the interview that if the Liberals continued to govern it would result in a constitutional crisis. He believed it was the responsibility of John DIEFENBAKER and the Conservatives to form a government. The cabinet papers clearly reflect Prof. MALLORY's influence over the Prime Minister that morning. Mr. SSAINTURENT demanded a copy of the MALLORY interview and after carefully studying the radio transcripts, he handed the rule of government over to the Tories.
Highly regarded as the foremost expert in Canadian legal and federal structures, Prof. MALLORY was often called on to advise governments about constitutional procedures. McGill professor Charles TAILOR/TAYLOR said another good example occurred in 1979.
"Joe CLARK's Conservatives had just lost a parliamentary vote," Prof. TAILOR/TAYLOR recalled. "The governor-general, Ed SCHREYER, telephoned McGill's political science department, looking for Jim. It caused something of a stir when he couldn't be found immediately. SCHREYER was frantic for MALLORY's advice. The governor-general was unsure how to proceed.
"Jim was eventually found and consulted. His advice was that the Conservatives should call an election -- exactly what Joe CLARK did."
The son of a county sheriff, James Russell MALLORY was born on February 5, 1916. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of New Brunswick in 1937 and later studied law at Edinburgh and Dalhousie universities.
He met his American-born wife, Frances KELLER, in Scotland, and the couple married in 1940. They had two sons: James and Charles. Prof. MALLORY joined the faculty of the University of Saskatchewan in 1941. Later, he taught at the University of Toronto and Brandon College before moving to McGill in 1946.
A respected scholar and lawyer, Prof. MALLORY was an "old-school" professor who taught at McGill for 45 years. His reputation as a constitutional expert was solidified in 1954 when he published Social Credit and the Federal Power in Canada. The quintessential text mapped out the constitutional parameters of federal/provincial relations.
"James MALLORY was a discreet and modest man," McGill professor Sam NOUMOFF recalled. "He had a profound understanding of morality and he was incapable of self-promotion. He worked on university committee after committee while holding many teaching responsibilities.
"Jim wasn't the sort of man who sought public approval, he just did things because they were the right thing to do."
His son James, who lives in Britain, summed up his father's idealism: "He had a bloody-minded stubbornness. It would manifest sometimes in allowing discussions to go on and on. Then he would do exactly what he intended to do in the first place. Somehow it never impaired his reputation as a genuine democrat."
Prof. MALLORY was the founder of both the Canadian Studies program at McGill and the Canadian Association of University Professors. After retiring in 1982 he was appointed professor emeritus and continued to teach for another 10 years. In 1964, he was elected to the Royal Society of Canada and was later awarded the Queen's Silver Jubilee Medal in 1977.
In 1995, McGill founded the James R. Mallory lecture series, a one-day event that features a special guest who lectures about Canadian issues. Past guests have included Bob RAE, Peter WHITE/WHYTE and Phyllis LAMBERT. The organizers of the event say that this year's lecture will focus on Prof. MALLORY's legacy.
Prof. MALLORY died 11 weeks after the death of his wife on what would have been their 63rd anniversary.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-20 published
MacDONALD, Catherine Mildred (née JOHNSON)
Died peacefully at home, on August 19, 2003, in her 87th year, surrounded by those she loved. Daughter of the late Michael and Catherine JOHNSON. Cherished wife and constant companion of Martin for over 61 years. Devoted mother of Stephen, David and Jody, Bob and Moira, Tom and Lise Anne, Andrew and Ellen, and Paul. Loving grandma of Kaeli, Liane, Michael, Mark, Colin, Kristen, Brendan, Katie, Andrew, Joana and Matthew. Much loved sister of Geraldine, Sister Gertrude, Congregation of Notre Dame, Father Joseph, S.J., and Theresa, the late Ellen, Bernard, George, Gerald, John and Howard. Special sister-in-law of Margaret KINNA. Family and Friends may call on Thursday, August 21, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, August 22, 2003 at St. Gabriel's Roman Catholic Church, 650 Sheppard Avenue East, Toronto, followed by burial at Holy Cross Cemetery, Thornhill. Special thanks to Dr. Anne PYPER, Virginia CLARK- WEIR, R.N., and friend Andrea WARNICK, R.N., for their extraordinary care and kindness. In lieu of flowers, donations to North York General Hospital Foundation, Attn. Freeman Centre for Palliative Care (4001 Leslie Street, Toronto, Ontario M2K 1E1) would be most appreciated. Millie/mom/ grandma was an extraordinary woman who touched all who knew her. She will be deeply missed.
''Deo gratis''

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-20 published
Trudeau-era cabinet minister John MUNRO dies, aged 72
By Jeff GRAY/GREY With reports from Campbell CLARK and Canadian Press Wednesday, August 20, 2003 - Page A2
Former Trudeau cabinet minister John MUNRO, whose federal political career ended with a lengthy legal fight, died yesterday of a heart attack in his Hamilton home. He was 72.
Former colleagues remembered Mr. MUNRO, the member from Hamilton-East from 1962 to 1984, as a politician who fought hard for working people around the cabinet table, where he held several key portfolios.
"I think he was a feisty, progressive person of conviction, and was, I guess, part of a somewhat diminishing breed called a real Liberal," said Lloyd AXWORTHY, who served in cabinet with Mr. MUNRO in the early 1980s.
Mr. MUNRO, a Hamilton lawyer, was re-elected eight times and was a cabinet minister for most of the years between 1968 and 1984, handling health and welfare, labour and Indian affairs. As minister of welfare, he brought in the Guaranteed Income Supplement, which helped lift many senior citizens out of poverty.
But in 1989, after he left government, an Royal Canadian Mounted Police investigation accused him of corruption during his time as a minister. The charges were eventually thrown out, but Mr. MUNRO, hobbled by an estimated $1-million in legal bills, launched a civil suit to get the government to cover his costs. He eventually received about $1.4-million in a settlement.
Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN, who was elected to Parliament a year after Mr. MUNRO, remembered him as a hard-working minister.
"We were very good Friends, and I'm terribly sorry that he passed away, and I would like to offer my condolences to his family," Mr. CHRÉTIEN told reporters. "He was a very good member of Parliament, and he was a very good minister and a guy who worked very, very hard in all the files that was given to him."
Heritage Minister Sheila COPPS, the minister from Hamilton and daughter of the city's former mayor, said Mr. MUNRO gave her some political lessons when she served as a poll captain for his election in 1968.
"He was a great Canadian; he was a great parliamentarian, and also someone who will be sorely missed in Hamilton. He was well loved, and had politics in his blood."
Tom AXWORTHY, who was prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU's principal secretary, said Mr. MUNRO was a key figure in Mr. TRUDEAU's cabinet.
"He was a man who always had a great heart. He had tremendous empathy for the disadvantaged," he said.
Mr. TRUDEAU looked to Mr. MUNRO to fight for his social liberal positions at cabinet meetings, his former aide said. "When we had those kind of debates, he would kind of look over to MUNRO when he wanted to hear the liberal perspective on the issue."
The complex political scandal left Mr. MUNRO fighting for his reputation, instead of Liberal policies.
"That was a sad and distracting end to what had been a pretty good career," Tom AXWORTHY said.
"He'd spent his whole life fighting battles for the little guy, and then he ended fighting all kinds of battles against allegations and so on."
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police filed more 37 charges against Mr. MUNRO -- corruption, breach of trust, fraud, conspiracy and theft -- going back to his time as minister of Indian affairs. At the centre of the case was the allegation that part of a $1.5-million grant to the National Indian Brotherhood (now the Assembly of First Nations) actually went toward Mr. MUNRO's usuccessful 1984 Liberal leadership bid.
The 1991 trial lasted several months, but the judge tossed out the charges before even hearing evidence from the defence.
Things did start to turn around. In mid-1998, Hamilton's airport, which he fought hard to expand, was named after him.
"In a time when Canada, I think, needs liberal voices, we've lost a great one," Tom AXWORTHY said.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-23 published
SCRIVENER, John Rodney
Died peacefully, August 21, 2003, at home in Carlsbad, California. Predeceased by his wife, Mildred, and by two of his brothers, Richard and Robert. Survived by his children, Jay SCRIVENER and Jane CARTMELL of California, Judy CLARK of Switzerland, Judy's mother, Hazel, of Beaverton, two grandchildren and one great-grandchild, and by his brother, Alan, of Toronto. An Engineering graduate of the University of Toronto ('40), he worked with Alcan, Kaiser Aluminum, Harvey Aluminum and Martin-Marietta. After retiring in 1975, Rodney travelled extensively, by van and bicycle, in Europe and Mexico, for 20 years. In 1995, he settled in Carlsbad, close to his son, Jay. At Rodney's request, there will be no memorial service. Condolences may be e- mailed care of jayscrivener@cox.net

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-01 published
CLARK, Gillian Margaret " Jill"
Died suddenly while working for The Christian Children's Fund in Baghdad, Iraq, at the age of 47, on Tuesday, August 19, 2003. Predeceased by her father Bill, Jill will be sorely missed and lovingly remembered by her mother Olive, sister Barb, nephew Bradshaw, brother-in-law Brian, cousin Mark, all of her other family members and large circle of Friends. Jill dedicated her life to advocating for the rights, lives and liberties of children around the world. Her devastating death is a real loss to those children and all who knew her. She will be remembered for her strength, humour, generosity, passion and dedication and is now ''an angel in the stars''. Love ya. Funeral services to be held at The Westway United Church, 8 Templar Drive, Etobicoke, on Wednesday, September 3rd, 2003 at 1 p.m. Reception to share memories to follow the service. Donations to The Christian Children's Fund or a charity of your choice in lieu of flowers would be appreciated by her family. Arrangements entrusted to the Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home, Toronto.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-23 published
CLARK, Samuel Delbert " Del"
Peacefully on September 18, 2003 at the age of 93. Loving husband of Rosemary Landry CLARK and loving father of the late Ellen TABISZ and her husband George, Samuel CLARK and his wife Claudia, and Edmund CLARK and his wife Fran. Beloved grandfather of Marie-Isabelle, Ted, Rob, Joey, Laura, Bert, Jeannie, Hugh, and Carrie, as well as five great grand-children. A warm and kind person with a remarkable sense of humour, he was a man who took immense pleasure in the simple things in life. Born in Lloydminster, Alberta, Del traveled to England to study at the London School of Economics, before returning to Canada to complete his Ph.D. at the University of Toronto. He began teaching in the Department of Political Economy at the University in 1938. Through his academic pursuits and contributions to the field, Sociology steadily gained respect from other scholars, culminating in the formation of the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto in 1963, where he served as the first Chair until 1969. A career dedicated to teaching and research resulted in many recognitions that made him Canada's most decorated sociologist including past-President of the Royal Society of Canada and an Officer of the Order of Canada. Friends may call at the Trull Funeral Home, 2704 Yonge Street, Monday September 22, from 6: 30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at Hart House, 7 Hart House Circle at the University of Toronto on Tuesday, September 23rd at 2: 30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the University of Toronto Scholarship Fund (University of Toronto Alumni and Development Office, 21 Kings College Circle, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3J3) would be appreciated.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-04 published
GAUDETTE, Barry Douglas
Born April 2, 1947 in Edmonton, Alberta, Barry died October 1, 2003 in the Ottawa Civic Hospital surrounded by family and Friends after a brief yet valiant struggle with multiple myeloma. Pre-deceased by his mother Orvie, father Douglas, and father-in-law Jim CLARK, he is survived by his beloved wife, Leslie Ann, and two children Darrell Lorne (University of Waterloo) and Lisa Marie (Acadia University). Loving brother to Allan (Gloria), Montreal; Neil (Merrilyn) and Dawn, Edmonton: Shelley (Glen), Nanaimo; and Douglas, Guelph. Also loved by his mother-in-law Mary CLARK, sister-in-law Mary-Jane GARNETT (Jim), Surrey, British Columbia; and brothers-in-law Jim (Shirley) and Norman (Gwen), Langley, British Columbia. Beloved nieces and nephews include Taryn, Jaden, Brynne, Ariel, Nathaniel, Sarah, Robin, Willow, Gaelan, Maxwell, Leanna, Tracey, Tara, Melissa, Sandra, Teresa, Angela, John and Shyan.
Barry earned a B.Sc (Honours) in Chemistry from the University of Calgary in 1969. He served 33 years as a Forensic Scientist with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, most recently as Manager of the Canadian Police Research Centre, a collaboration of the National Research Council, Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police. An internationally recognized expert in hair and fibre analysis, he published innovative research articles on forensic hair comparison, chaired international expert committees, and appeared as an expert witness in courts in both Canada and the United States. Envisioning the potential of DNA analysis in forensic science, he managed the implementation of DNA technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police labs across Canada, and contributed to the 1997 National DNA Databank legislation. A member of the Canadian, American and United Kingdom Forensic Science societies, he also served on the U.S. / Canada Bilateral Counter-Terrorism Research and Development Committee, 1999-2002. His contributions were recognized in 1996 with the Government of Canada Public Service Award of Excellence and in 2003 with the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Commemorative Medal for his work in hair comparison, implementation of the National DNA Databank, and international standardization forensic methodologies.
Barry loved God's world and his greatest joys were found while enjoying the many miles of recreational trails around Ottawa and in his garden. An active community leader, he volunteered his time as Cub leader, Soccer Coach and Chair of the Colonel By High School Parents Association.
Friends may visit at the St. Laurent Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 1200 Ogilvie Road at Aviation Parkway on Tuesday October 7, 2003 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 pm. A Celebration of Barry's life will be held at the Church of the Epiphany, 1290 Ogilvie Road, Ottawa on Wednesday, October 8th at 1 pm with a reception to follow. A private interment will be held at Beechwood Cemetary.
In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or to the Trans-Canada Trail Association.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-10 published
CLARK, Donald G. (1917-2003)
Died peacefully at home in Sarasota, Florida, surrounded by his family, on Monday, October 6th, 2003. Cherished and beloved husband of Thelma Jean CLARK (née LYNN.) Dear father of Donald Lynn and his wife Judy and Dean Goodwin and his partner Ken ROESKE. Loving grandfather of Donald Andrew and his partner Nadia ADAM/ADAMS, predeceased by grand_son Sean Patrick. 'Papa' to Christan BOSLEY. Survived by his brother Alfred Edward and his wife Elizabeth. Fondly remembered by his nieces and nephews.
After Glow
I'd like the memory of me
to be a happy one.
I'd like to leave an after glow of smiles
when life is done.
I'd like to leave an echo whispering softly
down the ways,
Of happy times and laughing times
and bright and sunny days.
I'd like the tears of those who grieve,
to dry before the sun
Of happy memories that I leave
when life is done.
Carol Mirkel
A private family service will be held at a later date. If desired, in lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the Hospice of Southwest Florida, 5955 Rand Blvd., Sarasota, Florida 34238. www.hospice-swf.org or charity of your choice.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-31 published
The dean of Canadian sociology
The first chair of a new University of Toronto department trained a generation of scholars
By Carol COOPER, Special to the Globe and Mail Friday, October 31, 2003 - Page R13
In 1938, with a doctorate in political science and anxious to achieve his dream of becoming a professor, Samuel Delbert CLARK reluctantly took the only position available to him at the University of Toronto, as its first full-time lecturer in sociology.
In doing so, S.D. CLARK became one of the country's early anglophone sociologists. During his career, his immense intellect, painstaking scholarship and prolific writing brought credibility and respect to the fledgling discipline. At a time when Canadian universities had few sociology departments, Prof. CLARK trained a generation of sociologists who spread out across the country, establishing sociology departments in other centres. And as an administrator at U of T, Prof. CLARK brought leading sociologists to the school.
The first sociologist born, raised and trained here, Prof. S. D. CLARK has died at the age of 93.
Incorporating the staples theory of his mentor, leading Canadian political economist Harold INNIS, the work of American historian F. J. TURNER, and sociologists Carl DAWSON and E. C. HUGHES of McGill University, among others, Prof. CLARK developed his own approach.
He studied social change on Canada's economic frontiers such as the fur trade, Western wheat farming, and the lumber and mining industries. He traced the development of those communities as the residents there, far from the cultural and financial institutions that controlled their lives and contending with distance and poverty, took their communities through a period of simultaneous disorganization and reorganization. From the struggle emerged new organizations and religious sects, such as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Social Credit Party.
Reflecting his university training in history, sociology and political science, Prof. CLARK brought a multifaceted approach to his research.
"He looked at things that were happening in Canada almost uniquely and tried to understand them and not to reduce it to some simplistic international generalization," said William MICHELSON, the S. D. Clark professor of sociology at the University of Toronto. "He really wanted to look into a multiplicity of factors."
Not everyone liked Prof. CLARK's approach to sociology, but nor did Prof. CLARK favour the Chicago School approach then taught at McGill University. Although he later altered his research methods, Prof. CLARK at first viewed the American approach dimly, seeing it as one of doorbell-ringing in order to ask stupid questions, one that scientifically quantified what happened in the present without exploring the past. Instead, he pored over archival material, studying the development of Canadian society from a historical perspective.
Books by Prof. CLARK, such as The Social Development of Canada, drew fire from historians, who challenged his theory and said sociology and history were incompatible. But the publications brought attention to the new discipline.
Born to a farming family on February 24, 1910, in Lloydminster, Alberta., Samuel Delbert CLARK was the second of five children. The family of Northern Irish descent had been established in Ontario since 1840 until it moved West in 1905.
Showing an early aptitude for school and a strong interest in history, Prof. CLARK graduated from the University of Saskatchewan with an honours B.A. in history and political science and an M.A. in history. Brushing aside suggestions that he become a high-school teacher and politician, Prof. CLARK aimed instead for a university position.
He entered University of Toronto in 1931 to do a doctorate in political science and economic history. While the studies proved dry and disappointing, it was there that he first met Harold INNIS, read the works of Marx, Engels and North American left-wingers, and attended meetings of the radical League for Social Reconstruction. Disillusioned with his studies and short of funds, Prof. CLARK accepted a Saskatchewan Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire scholarship and headed for the London School of Economics in 1932. At the school, he received his first exposure to sociology, including the works of Prof. DAWSON at McGill.
After leaving London in 1933, Prof. CLARK arrived in Montreal, again strapped for cash. Hoping to collect a debt from a friend, who was then studying at McGill, Prof. CLARK stopped by his house. With the friend not home, Prof. CLARK then visited Prof. DAWSON, who offered him a research fellowship. After working on a project studying Canadian-American relations for two years and receiving an M.A. in sociology, Prof. CLARK returned to Toronto to continue his doctorate in political science.
In 1937 he accepted an appointment to teach political science and sociology at the University of Manitoba and stayed a year before returning once again to University of Toronto to complete his thesis and begin his career there.
As a proponent of a more British style of sociology, Prof. CLARK was favoured for the job over another Chicago-trained candidate, setting the academic direction for the school. Sociology was then run as a section under the department of anthropology, to be transferred a year later to the department of political economy. Except for occasional leaves, Prof. CLARK remained a fixture on campus, impeccably dressed in a woollen suit and sporting a pipe, until his retirement in 1976.
Shy and quiet, Prof. CLARK constantly cleared his throat and jingled the change in his pocket while lecturing.
"He never cracked a joke.... It was serious scholarship. You had to ask serious questions," recalled retired York University sociology professor Edward MANN, an early undergraduate student and later a doctoral student of Prof. CLARK. " Their [ INNIS and CLARK] religion was scholarship."
In that vein, Prof. CLARK never talked to the press about daily issues, saying it cheapened the discipline. And he practised rigorous scholarship.
"He had a tremendous amount of integrity," said Lorne TEPPERMAN, a University of Toronto sociology professor and former student of Prof. CLARK. " This was a guy who knew what he stood for, what he believed in. He was uncompromising. He had very high standards for himself and other people."
During the fifties, Prof. CLARK, an admirer of Lester PEARSON, exchanged his membership in the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation for that of the Liberal Party, the one endorsed by his wife, Rosemary. A graduate in economics from Columbia University, she edited all his works. By the sixties, Prof. CLARK had begun to study social change and urbanization, writing The Suburban Society and later, The New Urban Poor. Despite altering his research methods, dropping his historical research and adopting the American style of conducting questionnaires to collect data, he stopped short of tabulating them, arguing in The Suburban Society that "to lay claim to scientific precision... would be to falsify the competence of sociology."
And the man who studied social change became buffeted by it. While the sociology section had remained small during the forties and fifties, it ballooned during the sixties, becoming an independent department in 1963 with Prof. CLARK as its appointed head.
A capable administrator, Prof. CLARK brought feistiness to the job. "He was a very honest man," said Prof. TEPPERMAN. "He wasn't afraid on an argument, he wasn't afraid of a fight. If he liked you, he really liked you and if he didn't like you, he really didn't like you."
With the huge increase in sociology-department enrolment but small number of sociology graduates, Prof. CLARK looked outside the country to fill teaching positions. Most either came from the United States, or had been trained there.
While some scholars hailed Prof. CLARK for having eschewed American-style sociology and maintaining a Canadian approach, the young and sometimes radical newcomers with a markedly different approach regarded him as an oddball and an anachronism. And as an older, white, staunch Liberal Party-supporting male at the centre of an old-boy network, he represented everything they were fighting against. Accustomed to a more democratic academic culture at other schools, the new staff agitated for a greater say in the running of the department. When Prof. CLARK resisted, he was pushed out, and the chair became an elected position. He remained at the university until his retirement in 1976.
Outside of the university, throughout his career, Prof. CLARK served as an editor of The Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science, and as president of the Royal Society of Canada. In addition, he was appointed an Officer in the Order of Canada.
Despite the recognition he received, Prof. CLARK always felt that his older brother who took over the farm was the family success, according to his son, Edmund. And he enjoyed such simple pleasures as hockey. Once, while attending a dinner party at Claude BISSELL's house, then the president of U of T, Prof. CLARK asked where the television was and sat down to watch the hockey game. When questioned later, Prof. CLARK replied, "Anyone stupid enough to hold a party on a hockey night deserved to have the guests watch television in the den."
S.D. CLARK died on September 18. He leaves his wife, Rosemary, sons Edmund and Samuel, nine grandchildren and a sister, Grace. His daughter Ellen predeceased him.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-25 published
A world-class forensic scientist
Expert in hair and fibre analysis and DNA techniques helped revolutionized police investigations worldwide
By Randy RAY, Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, November 25, 2003 - Page R7
Ottawa -- A simple demonstration using a red pullover and an ultraviolet light during one of the United State's most infamous murder cases helped cement Barry GAUDETTE's reputation as an internationally renowned forensic scientist.
While testifying as an expert witness during the 1981 trial of Wayne WILLIAMS for the murder of several black children in Atlanta, Mr. GAUDETTE asked members of the jury to pass the sweater back and forth. Then he switched off the lights in the courtroom and shone an ultraviolet light on the jury members, revealing fibres from the pullover all over them..
His testimony made a strong connection between carpet fibres from Mr. WILLIAMS's residences and vehicles, and fibres found on several of the young victims, including some whose bodies were found submerged in water. Soon after, Mr. WILLIAMS was convicted as the first black serial killer in the U.S.
"It was a graphic, innovative and very compelling demonstration that showed how fibre transfer worked, and it led to a conviction," said Skip PALENIK, a forensic scientist and president of Microtrace in Chicago, who was involved in the WILLIAMS trial.
"Barry's demonstration helped the jury buy into the theory of fibre transfer... they were hostile to the idea that a black man could kill other blacks, but it tied WILLIAMS to the victims. It was the kind of demonstration that brought science home to a jury.'' Mr. GAUDETTE, a native of Edmonton, died in Ottawa on October 1 after a brief battle with multiple myeloma. He was At the time of the Atlanta child-murders case, Mr. GAUDETTE, a forensic scientist by training, was an expert in hair and fibre analysis. Later, he would help implement the use of DNA technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police laboratories across Canada. His findings in hair and fibre analysis and his legwork in DNA helped revolutionize police investigative tools in Canada and around the world, so much so that his work became instrumental in tracking down society's most feared criminals.
Born in Edmonton on April 2, 1947, the oldest of six children, Mr. GAUDETTE received an honours bachelor of science degree in chemistry from the University of Calgary in 1969 and that year was hired by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to work as a forensic scientist in its hair and fibre section in Edmonton. In 1971 he married Leslie Ann CLARK, whom he'd met while the pair worked at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., in Pinawa, Manitoba
He worked for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Edmonton until 1980, during which time he wrote a groundbreaking paper and published various research articles on the high probability that human scalp hair comparisons could be used to link persons to crimes. "His work proved hair comparisons were even more conclusive than blood," said Ms. GAUDETTE, an epidemiologist for Health Canada in Ottawa.
"Barry showed for the first time scientifically that human hair comparisons were a legitimate type of examination to pursue. His work put what had been conventional wisdom onto a scientific footing," adds Mr. PALENIK, whose company provides expert scientific analysis and consultation in the area of small-particle analysis.
After undergoing a year's training with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in hair and fibre analysis, Mr. GAUDETTE was accredited in 1970 as an expert witness and often testified in court cases in Edmonton and later across Canada and in the United States. In 1980, he was transferred to Ottawa to be the chief scientist for hair and fibre analysis at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's central forensic laboratory.
"Barry developed the hair and fibre field and brought it to prominence in the world arena," said John BOWEN, chief scientific officer for Royal Canadian Mounted Police Forensic Laboratory Services in Ottawa, who was trained in hair and fibre analysis by Mr. GAUDETTE in the mid-1980s.
"He was an individual with a lot of vision, a world-class expert in his field.'' In the late 1980s, Mr. GAUDETTE envisioned the potential of DNA analysis in forensic science. He helped implement the technology in Royal Canadian Mounted Police labs across Canada and worked to promote the national DNA databank legislation that came into force in 1997.
"Barry did not invent DNA testing," said Mr. PALENIK, "but he saw that it was a powerful tool that could give investigators an ultimate kind of identification. Blood, semen and hair were good, but he recognized that DNA was as good as a fingerprint. He was the one who said the Royal Canadian Mounted Police should put all of its resources into developing DNA as a forensic tool. He said 'let's not waste time on our old ways.' "
It's no stretch, said Mr. PALENIK, to link Mr. GAUDETTE's work in DNA to the conviction of many criminals linked to crimes by their DNA and exoneration of others whose DNA did not match DNA samples taken from crime scenes.
"Barry GAUDETTE made a large contribution to the DNA business because it has significantly changed the investigation procedures in policing," said John ARNOLD, chief scientist for the Ottawa-based Canadian Police Research Centre, a collaboration of the National Research Council, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, which was set up to develop tools for use by police.
"Today, they are solving cases that could never have been solved before without this kind of technology."
In 1999, Mr. GAUDETTE became manager of the Canadian Police Research Centre, where his innovative ways continued. Before retiring in 2002, he helped develop a website, scheduled to be up and running next year, to provide Web-based training for police. He was also involved in developing a cross-Canada standard for protective equipment worn by police. The standard is expected to be in place by the end of 2004, Mr. ARNOLD said.
Even when he was in the twilight years of his career, Mr. GAUDETTE had an appetite for fieldwork and was never content to sit in a cushy office chair and watch his subordinates do all of the work.
"When some people get into management they don't want to work. They want to be the one who directs it. That wasn't Barry," Mr. ARNOLD said.
His stellar reputation led to a position on the U.S./Canada bilateral counterterrorism research and development committee from 1999 to 2002. He received numerous accolades for his pioneering forensic work. In 1996, he was awarded the government of Canada Public Service Award of Excellence, and in 2003 a Golden Jubilee Medal.
Friends and colleagues said that away from the job, Mr. GAUDETTE enjoyed time with his family and took part in community affairs.
Mr. GAUDETTE leaves his wife Leslie and children Lisa, 18, and Darrell, 22.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-18 published
Party leaders pay tribute
Tories fondly remember Stanfield as best prime minister Canada never had
By Kim LUNMAN and Drew FAGAN, Thursday, December 18, 2003 - Page A10
Ottawa -- Robert Lorne STANFIELD, the former leader of the federal Progressive Conservatives, was remembered yesterday as a Canadian icon.
Political tributes were made across the country for Mr. STANFIELD, who died Tuesday at the Montfort Hospital in Ottawa. He was 89.
He had been in poor health for several years after a stroke. A private funeral will be held in Ottawa tomorrow and a family burial in Halifax.
Mr. STANFIELD led the federal Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 against Pierre TRUDEAU and was known within the party as the greatest prime minister Canada never had. In later years, he was regarded as the conscience of the Conservatives, representing their progressive side on social issues.
"Today we mourn the passing of one of the most distinguished and committed Canadians of the past half-century," said Prime Minister Paul MARTIN. "I, like other Canadians, fondly remember Mr. STANFIELD's great warmth, humility and compassionate nature, but also his intellect and humour."
Progressive Conservative Leader Peter MacKAY said Mr. STANFIELD will be remembered as an icon.
"It's a very sad and poignant day. He had a larger-than-life persona and I think he can be accurately described as an icon in Conservative politics and Canadian politics," Mr. MacKAY said.
"Conservatives across the country, and indeed all Canadians, have lost a great leader and a great Canadian," Canadian Alliance Leader Stephen HARPER said.
In an interview yesterday, former prime minister Brian MULRONEY described Mr. STANFIELD as having brought the Progressive Conservative Party into the mainstream of modern Canadian life through his support for the Official Languages Act and his openness to ethnic minorities and diversity. Mr. MULRONEY said it was appropriate that Mr. STANFIELD had been receiving treatment at Montfort Hospital, the French-language facility in Ottawa, considering how hard he had worked as leader to make the Tories comfortable with bilingualism and how much effort he himself had made to learn French. "He was a strikingly impressive, quiet, thoughtful man, but who was very resolved and determined -- and with a generous view of Canada," Mr. MULRONEY said.
When Mr. MULRONEY was prime minister from 1984 to 1993, he would occasionally invite Mr. STANFIELD to 24 Sussex Dr. for lunch. Mr. MULRONEY revealed yesterday that, in the late 1980s, when Mr. STANFIELD was almost 75, he offered him the post of Canadian ambassador to the United Nations.
"He thought it was a great honour. He wrestled with it for a little while, but decided that, though he would love to do it, he thought it would be a bit much at that stage of his life," Mr. MULRONEY said.
"He brought compassion to politics," Nova Scotia's Premier John HAMM said yesterday.
"He brought a love of his country to his politics."
Flora MacDONALD, a former federal Tory cabinet minister, first worked with Mr. STANFIELD during the 1956 provincial campaign that made him Nova Scotia premier. "He set a very high standard for himself as a politician and expected others to do the same," she said yesterday. Mr. STANFIELD supported official bilingualism and abolition of the death penalty when his other caucus colleagues were strongly opposed, she said. "He didn't do things just because they were popular. He did things because he thought they were intrinsically right."
Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON said Mr. STANFIELD "will be remembered for his integrity, his devotion to his country, his social conscience and especially for his wit and sense of humour."
Mr. STANFIELD was premier of Nova Scotia from 1956 to 1967. He was born in Truro into a family famous for its underwear business and became a lawyer before turning to politics, first provincially and later on the federal stage. But his awkward image contrasted sharply to that of the hip, telegenic Mr. TRUDEAU, costing the party every election it fought under his leadership. The 1972 election was Mr. STANFIELD's closest brush with federal power, when the Liberals narrowly defeated the Conservatives by 109 to 107 seats. Two years later, the Liberals regained their majority and Mr. STANFIELD announced his decision to step down. He remained as leader until Joe CLARK succeeded him in 1976.
After relinquishing his seat in the Commons in 1979, Mr. STANFIELD became Canada's special envoy to the Middle East and North Africa until 1980, and was chairman of the Commonwealth Foundation from 1987 to 1991.
He married three times. His first wife died in a car crash in 1954 and his second wife died of cancer in 1976. He married his third wife, Anne Henderson AUSTIN, in 1978. He had four children.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-20 published
Ottawa bids STANFIELD goodbye
'He was a sage.... He was quite extraordinary,' Charest says at funeral
By Kim LUNMAN, Saturday, December 20, 2003 - Page A9
Ottawa -- Robert STANFIELD was fondly remembered yesterday as a sage statesman.
The former Nova Scotia premier and federal Progressive Conservative leader remained one of the country's most respected politicians even years after leaving the national arena, Tory Senator Lowell MURRAY told more than 100 mourners yesterday at Mr. STANFIELD's funeral in Ottawa.
"There has survived perhaps only the kernel of something, but its essence in the Canadian consciousness -- that once, uniquely, there was STANFIELD, leader of a major party, a man of such civility, such humanity, such integrity, who adorned our national life," Mr. MURRAY said
Mr. STANFIELD, who suffered a stroke several years ago, died Tuesday in Ottawa. He was 89.
At the private ceremony at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, he was remembered as a respected politician with a dry wit. He will be buried today in Halifax's Camp Hill cemetery.
Politicians of all stripes attended the service to pay tribute. Outside the church, Prime Minister Paul MARTIN told reporters his father and Mr. STANFIELD were "great Friends. My father had huge admiration for Mr. STANFIELD. And I actually shudder to think what the two of them are doing up there right now, the amount of discussions that are going on."
Mr. MARTIN said he remembered Mr. STANFIELD for his "great sense of decency, integrity, and his deep, deep love of country." Progressive Conservative Leader Peter MacKAY said Canada has lost "one of its greatest statesmen, a person who raised the standard of politics and public service.... He was very much substance over style."
"He was a sage," Quebec Liberal Premier Jean Charest, the former federal Tory leader, said. Mr. STANFIELD "looked at life with a bit of a smile, I think. He was quite extraordinary."
Governor-General Adrienne CLARKSON called Mr. STANFIELD remarkable, "a man of deep conviction, a man who was decent and fair and honest and very funny." Other political colleagues at the funeral included former Tory prime ministers Kim CAMPBELL and Joe CLARK and former Tory cabinet minister Flora MacDONALD.
Mr. STANFIELD married three times. His first wife died in a crash in 1954 and his second wife died of cancer in 1976. He married his third wife, Anne Henderson AUSTIN, in 1978. He had four children.
Even as the service was going on in Ottawa, hundreds of people filed into the Nova Scotia legislature in Halifax to sign a book of condolence next to a portrait of the former premier, who led the province for 11 years, from 1956 to 1967.
Mr. STANFIELD led the federal Progressive Conservatives from 1967 to 1976 against Pierre TRUDEAU and was known within the party as the greatest prime minister Canada never had.
In his later years, he was regarded as the Conservatives' conscience, representing the party's progressive side on social issues. He supported Mr. TRUDEAU's Official Languages Act despite a revolt by his fellow Tory members of parliament and also backed abolishing the death penalty.
He was born in Truro into a family famous for its underwear business and became a lawyer before turning to politics.
Bespectacled and known for his slow-speaking style, Mr. STANFIELD conveyed an awkward image that contrasted sharply with the youthful, charismatic Mr. Trudeau, costing the party every election it fought under his leadership.
But he came within two seats of office in the 1972 election when the Liberals defeated the Conservatives by 109 to 107 seats.
Two years later, the Liberals regained their majority and Mr. STANFIELD announced his decision to step down. He was succeeded by Mr. CLARK in 1976.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-23 published
CLARK, George T. B.
Died peacefully with his family by his side at the Cambridge Memorial Hospital on Saturday, December 20, 2003 in his 81st year. George CLARK of Cambridge is the beloved husband of Susanne CLARK; dear father of Graham and his wife Leslie of Oakville loved grandfather of Colin and Kendal. He was predeceased by one brother William and one sister Elsie WHITE/WHYTE. Mr. CLARK was an Engineer at Diamond Canapower where he retired as Vice President. The family will receive Friends at T. Little Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 223 Main St. E., Cambridge (www.funeralscanada.com) on Saturday, December 27, 2003 from 2-4 p.m. The family wish to thank the Doctors and staff of Cambridge Memorial Hospital for their care and compassion. As expression of sympathy, donations may be made to the Cambridge Memorial Hospital Foundation.

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CLARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
BEALE, Katherine Louise (née CLARK)
Died in London on December 24, 2003 after a long illness, bravely borne. Kay is survived by her dear husband Gerald M. BEALE, her daughter Diane BEALE and her granddaughter Lucy. She is also survived by her sister Margery HARPER, and her nieces Celia, Cynthia and Karoline.
''Remember me when I am gone away,
Gone far away into the silent land.''
C.G. Rossetti

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