CHAPLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-29 published
WRIGHT, W. J. Chaplin ''Bud''
Died of heart failure in Naples, Florida on March 25th, 2003, in his 81st year. He was the son of Alma CHAPLIN and Edward E. H. WRIGHT of St. Catharines. He was born and raised in St. Catharines, with summers spent at their cottage in Niagara-on-the-Lake. He attended Ridley College and graduated in Chemical Engineering from U. of T. Bud served with the submarine chasers, the corvette arm of the navy in World War 2.
As a chemical engineer, he worked for Stelco, Dupont and Galtex. Then he worked for over 25 years with Merrill Lynch as a financial advisor, a career that became his real love.
He was dearly loved and will be greatly missed by his wife of 53 years, Jane MURRAY, their four children: son Ken and wife Jill; three daughters, Marsha and Don SADOWAY, Ellen and Paul EDWARDS, and Leah Ann; by his sister Briar SMITH, wife of the late Larry SMITH, as well as three young grandchildren, Sam, Nathan and Caaryn. Bud is predeceased by his sister, Mary Elizabeth HUME.
Next to his family was his love for a good competitive game of squash, tennis and bridge. Many happy family holidays were spent at the cottage in Southampton, and that is where his final resting place will be.
Bud led his family by example with uncompromising integrity, loyalty, humour, a zest for life, and love.
Cremation took place in Naples. A Memorial Service will be announced at a later date, to be held at Saint Mark's Church, Niagara-on-the-lake. Donations to Historic Saint Mark's Anglican Church (est. 1792) Niagara-on-the-Lake or Arthritis Society.

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CHAPMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-20 published
He helped build a media giant
Newly graduated accountant brought order to Thomson Corp. in early days
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, May 20, 2003 - Page R7
The astute accountant who provided the financial wizardry to pull the fledgling Thomson Corp. through its shaky early days and see it become one of the world's greatest media enterprises, has died. Sydney CHAPMAN was 93.
With Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and Jack Kent COOKE, Mr. CHAPMAN helped transform a Depression-era Northern Ontario radio station and The Timmins Press into Canada's largest newspaper group.
By the 1970s, with the aid of Mr. CHAPMAN's guiding hand, Thomson Corp. owned 180 newspapers, including The Times of London, 160 magazines, 27 television and radio stations and interests in North Sea oil.
"He certainly did great things for my father in the early days when my father desperately needed a right-hand man of his calibre and his integrity," said Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON's son, Kenneth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON.
"Of all the things he did, the thing I will be most grateful to Sid for is the fact that he was there when my dad needed him and he never, ever let him down."
Mr. CHAPMAN was a newly graduated accountant working at Silverwood Dairies in London, Ontario, when he answered a help-wanted ad Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON had placed for a financial man. Soon after being hired, Mr. CHAPMAN moved to the northern Ontario town of Timmins to sort out the finances of the growing media company.
"I didn't have any equity in Silverwood's; I was just an employee and my superiors were not old," he is quoted as saying in Susan GOLDENBERG's book The Thomson Empire. "I wanted to join something that was going somewhere and have equity in it."
At the time, Mr. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Mr. COOKE and a secretary shared one room in a Toronto building. Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON began buying radio stations and newspapers in Northern Ontario in the 1930s and bought his first newspaper in Canada, The Timmins Press, in 1934.
"Roy was so busy on the telephone, he could hardly talk to me. I had been making $40 a week at Silverwood's and Roy agreed to pay me $45," Mr. CHAPMAN said of the initial meeting.
Mr. CHAPMAN also insisted on buying $10,000 worth of stock in the company. Mr. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, not keen on the idea of anyone but himself owning stock in his company, said he would discuss this proposal with Mr. CHAPMAN at the end of his first month.
"At that time, he asked if I had the cash and said, 'That settles it,' when I said I didn't. But I was determined to have that stock," Mr. CHAPMAN said.
The young accountant went to the Bank of Nova Scotia manager in Timmins, where he was working at the time, and asked for a $10,000 loan. For collateral, he offered his group insurance. It took more than two decades for Mr. CHAPMAN's investment to become worthwhile. "I didn't get any dividends for 22 years but when the company went public, there was a 30 to one split," Mr. CHAPMAN said.
Sydney (Sid) CHAPMAN was born on January 22, 1910, in Bromley, England, on the border of London. One of five children born to Robert CHAPMAN, a house painter who had been wounded in the First World War, and his wife Sarah, the family scraped by with little money. When Mr. CHAPMAN was still a young boy, the family packed up and emigrated to Canada, making their way to Toronto.
Not long after arriving in the new country, Robert CHAPMAN decided he didn't like the place and wanted to return home to England. His wife decided not to join him. Left to raise the children alone, Mrs. CHAPMAN took a job cooking and cleaning for a wealthy family. Sid got a job as an office boy at what is now Deloitte & Touche. While working there, he completed his high-school equivalency through Queen's University and went on to earn his chartered accountant certificate.
After spending five years at Silverwood Dairies, Mr. CHAPMAN began his long relationship with the THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON family. Arriving in Timmins, Mr. CHAPMAN found the business affairs of the newspaper and radio station in less than immaculate order.
Mr. CHAPMAN complained to Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON about the cramped office space and CKGB's accounts and files being stacked in the bathroom and having to keep all his own books in a suitcase.
"Yes, well, that's why we got you up here -- to straighten things out," Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON replied.
Mr. CHAPMAN did just that. He was so reliable that Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON put him in charge of his northern business at the end of 1940, less than a year after he was hired. In the early days, the job was a balancing act. "I used to say about Roy's motto of 'Never a backward step, ' that he had better not step backwards or he would fall in a hole," Mr. CHAPMAN said in The Thomson Empire.
Mr. CHAPMAN got involved in the northern community through the Kinsmen service club, eventually becoming its president. It was in Timmins where he met his future wife Ruby, who was born and raised in Northern Ontario. The couple married in 1948 and had two sons. The couple later moved to Toronto with the growing Thomson company.
Mr. CHAPMAN told his young bride that he intended to work long hours. Even his honeymoon was a business trip to look into the purchase of a newspaper in Jamaica, said his son, Neil.
"He loved to work," said Neil CHAPMAN. " There was always a love of what he was doing. There was no way he was going back to being poor."
His most gratifying business moment was travelling back to England in the 1960s to be part of the acquisition of The Times of London, said Neil CHAPMAN. He was so proud to be with Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and to be staying at the grand Savoy Hotel after his poor beginnings in life, Neil CHAPMAN said.
Mr. CHAPMAN's financial skill extended beyond the balance sheets. He played a large role in the addition of trucking and insurance to the Thomson empire. The origin of Dominion-Consolidated Truck Lines is said to have been linked to Mr. CHAPMAN's habit of eating breakfast at Kresge's, a five-and-ten-cent chain, in Timmins in the 1940s.
"I used to sit at the counter beside a trucker named Barney QUINN who wanted my advice on buying the trucking business of Ford cars from a Windsor widow.
"Although the trucks were rusty, with bald tires, and business was slow because of the war, I expected a revival in business and decided to go in on the venture," Mr. CHAPMAN said in The Thomson Empire.
Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON tried to dissuade him, saying he didn't know that business or have the money. After some persuasion, Mr. CHAPMAN convinced him to invest. They went on to buy smaller firms and consolidated them under Dominion-Consolidated.
Mr. CHAPMAN was also a force behind the acquiring of Scottish and York Insurance, growing out of his belief in consolidation and lowering expenses.
"He was a good and tough negotiator," said Toronto lawyer John TORY, who began working for Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON in the 1950s. "He negotiated a lot of deals for the Thomson group.... He liked to win."
Kenneth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said that what he learned most from his early days working with Mr. CHAPMAN was his positive attitude toward life and people. "He was an extremely positive person. He loved people."
Described as a cheerful and decent man, Mr. CHAPMAN retired from the position of senior financial vice-president at Thomson Newspapers in 1975, but remained as senior vice-president of the Woodbridge Co. and as a director of Thomson Newspapers until 1982.
After retiring from Thomson, Mr. CHAPMAN had no intention of slowing down. He commuted daily into his 80s to a private Bay Street investment office he ran with his two sons. While he was extremely hard-working, serious and focused, he did allow himself to have some fun. He enjoyed golfing and ballroom dancing.
"He loved to dance with his wife Ruby," Mr. TORY said. "They danced well together."
Mr. CHAPMAN, who died on May 9, leaves Ruby, his wife of 55 years, and sons Neil and Glen.
"Dad was a good judge of character and he certainly judged Sid well indeed," Kenneth THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said. "He was so dedicated and so extraordinarily loyal."

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CHAPMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-10 published
STONEMAN, Douglas Wright, D.D.S., F.R.C.D. (C.) Professor Emeritus U. of T. Faculty of Dentistry, former Captain Royal Canadian Air Force Dental Corps ''The Rainbow Squadron''
Died suddenly on November 7, 2003 in his 82nd year at Sunnybrook Hospital surrounded by family. Survived and never to be forgotten by his beloved wife Lucy of 57 years, sons Bill, Rick, John, daughter-in-law Jane and grandchildren Pete, Katie and Courtney. Doug's long and remarkable life was made all the richer by family, Friends, patients and colleagues. Private family arrangements.
Special thanks to Doctors PANG and CHAPMAN and the nurses in The Schulich Cardiac Centre for their skill, expertise and most of all compassion. The family would also like to make special mention of Emergency Medical Services paramedics Ryan VAN POORTEN and Rod SHORTT who like Doug always knew the right thing to do and then did it. A life truly well lived.
Donations in Doug's memory can be made to The Schulich Heart Centre, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, Toronto, Ontario.

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CHAPUT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
KNOLL, Francis Aileen
Passed away peacefully at the Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto of cancer and heart complications on July 17, 2003, at age 69. Frances is survived by her brothers Alan (Catherine) and Gerald (Fay,) her sisters Madeleine ARNOLD and Catherine CHAPUT (Armand) and many loving nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her brothers Jack, Jim and George, and her sister Mary Louise. Frances made the most of her dynamic personality and keen intelligence, following many pursuits over her career. Born in Vermilion, Alberta, she graduated from the University of Alberta at age 19 with a degree in psychology, after which she became a caseworker with the Catholic Children's Aid Society. This work led her to pursue a Master of Social Work at the University of Ottawa, which she obtained in 1961. After working for another 10 years in the family service field, Frances accepted the position of Assistant Professor in the faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, a position she held for eight years. Frances then attended Osgoode Hall Law School, from which she graduated in 1982, and was called to the Bar in Ontario two years later. From that point on, Frances used her varied background to work extensively with not-for-profit organizations in a wide variety of ways, reviewing operations and complaints, frequently acting as Interim Director, and becoming a Family Court judge, until her retirement in 2001. Throughout her life, Frances made many, many Friends. She was always a much sought-after dinner companion, cherished the arts, travelled extensively, and truly loved life. Her Friends and family remember Frances as someone who would always tell it like it was, while somehow managing to put a light-hearted spin on even the most serious of matters. The family wishes to express their heartfelt thanks to the teams at Mount Sinai and Princess Margaret Hospitals. A memorial service for Frances, which will be announced, will take place in the coming weeks.

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CHARBONNEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-17 published
GOETTLER, George G.
Of Dublin, Ontario, died suddenly Tuesday, April 15, 2003 in his 82nd year. Predeceased by his beloved wife Ally LOOBY in 1995. Loving father of Jo-Ann WICKWARE of Burlington, Thomas GOETTLER of Guelph, Pauline HARTFIEL of Mitchell, and Stephen GOETTLER of Dublin. Cherished Papa to Kathryn, Suzanne and Alan WICKWARE, Stephen, Paul and Matthew HARTFIEL, and Kathleen, George and Donald GOETTLER. Survived by sisters Margaret RODGERS, London, Hélène DUCHARME, Canton, Michigan, and brother John (Jack) GOETTLER, London. Predeceased by parents Louis and Sarah (McCAFFREY,) sisters Evelyn DISLER, Dorothy WALSH and Mary, brothers Edgar and Fred and by infant granddaughter Ann HARTFIEL. George served with the Canadian Army overseas in the Second World War. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus, Father Stephen Eckert Council, for fifty years. In 1952, he came to Dublin and began a merchant career that spanned half a century and includes the present day G.G. Goettler group of companies, which he founded with his wife in 1978. Visitation will be at the Lockhart Funeral Home, 109 Montreal Street, Mitchell Thursday and Friday evenings, 6: 00 to 9: 00 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church, Dublin, Saturday, April 19 at 11 a.m. with Reverend Maurice CHARBONNEAU officiating. In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be made to L'Arche (Stratford) through the funeral home at (519) 348-8643.

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CHARIOT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-07 published
BERCOVITCH, Patricia (Pat) nee: COWAN
After a 2½ year unwavering, brave and courageous battle with colon cancer, Pat died peacefully with dignity at her home on July 05, 2003. Beloved wife of Morley, survived by mother-in-law Sadie CANHAM, dear sister of Mary CHARIOT (Larry,) brother Ted COWAN (Lucy,) brother Jim COWAN (Sheila,) predeceased by sister Barbara McGURK (Bob.) She will be missed by numerous loving nieces and nephews, along with their children, many aunts, uncles, cousins and caring Friends. Trained as a nurse and a teacher, she worked in many capacities in her field, then came to Wasaga Beach as the owner of the 'old' IGA, touching the hearts of many people along the way. Pat was most at home when boating on Georgian Bay. She will be remembered as a loyal friend, loving sister and a devoted wife. Thanks to Dr. James LANE for the compassionate care he gave Pat. Service at the Steeles Memorial Chapel, 390 Steeles Avenue West (between Bathurst and Yonge), Toronto, on Monday, July 07, 2003 at 11 a.m. Shiva at 65 Knox Road East, Wasaga Beach. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Pat Bercovitch Foundation at the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital would be greatly appreciated.

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CHARLES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-20 published
Pickering house fire claims lives of 2 sisters
Monday, January 20, 2003, Page A12
Two young sisters, aged 7 and 2, died in their Pickering townhouse early Saturday morning in a fire that completely gutted their home.
When emergency fire and police crews reached the Kingston Road townhouse on Saturday morning around 4 a.m., they found it engulfed in flames and residents wandering around in confusion.
Two females who lived in the house managed to get out of the building and were found behind the townhouse, and a male was found out front, according to Durham Regional Police.
Paramedics took them to Ajax-Pickering Hospital.
Briann MAILLET, 7, and Kiara CHARLES, 2, were still in the residence and were unable to escape the flames.
Firefighters found their bodies several hours later.
Their mother, Debra MAILLET, and another sister, Shiann MAILLET, 11, escaped by jumping from a third-storey window.
Those living in nearby units were moved to a community centre opened for the emergency.
The Ontario fire marshal's office and the fire prevention officer of Pickering's fire department are continuing the investigation into the cause of the fire.
Police are appealing to the public for information about the incident. Staff

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CHARLTON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
Lillian Milinda VINEY
In loving memory of Lillian Milinda VINEY, who passed away peacefully at Manitoulin Health Centre on Friday, April 11, 2003 at the age of 82 years.
Beloved wife of Charles VINEY. Dear mother of Shirley VINEY of Little Current, George VINEY of Manitowaning, Sandra and husband Bruce POPE of Manitowaning, Lyla VINEY of Orillia. Loved grandmother of Stephanie and Mark MacDONALD (fiancée Holly,) Andrew and Katherine POPE, Kimberley, Laura and Marianne MENARD. Special great grandmother of Jonathan and Jessica ORR, Justin, Destanie (BAILEY) and Liliana MacDONALD. Remembered by brother and sisters Violet HUBBARD- McALLISTER (predeceased,) Harry JAGGARD (wife Gladys predeceased,) Bessie LOCKYER (husband James predeceased,) Florence LENSON (husband Walter predeceased,) Madeleine CHARLTON (husband John predeceased), predeceased by sisters Beulah and Iris and parents Guy and Evalena JAGGARD. Sister-in-law of Harry VINEY, Ruth McCULLIGH (predeceased,) Lauretta McGILLIS (predeceased,) Grace HUNTER (predeceased,) Joyce and husband Howard HOLMES, Glenn and wife Margaret VINEY, predeceased by Joe, Bob and Edith. Will be missed by numerous nephews and nieces. Visitation was held Sunday, April 13, 2003. Funeral service was held Monday, April 14, 2003. Both at Knox United Church, Manitowaning. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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CHARLTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-16 published
Annie M. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON
By Marcia DANIEL Thursday, January 16, 2003, Page A22
Wife, mother, health care worker, friend, grandmother, great-grandmother. Born January 11, 1910, in East Williams Township, Ontario. Died February 5, 2002, in Strathroy, Ontario, aged 92.
Annie Marie CHARLTON's mother died when Annie was 12. Annie quit school to help raise her six-year-old sister. I remember her telling me about one of the saddest days in her young life: the day their horse was sent off to battle during the First World War She watched as he was led down the lane-way, and she knew in her heart he'd never come back.
Married in 1930 to Simon THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, one-time reeve of East Williams, they had nine children. Their first years together were difficult. It was the Depression and they had a large family to raise. Annie made all their clothes, canned their own fruits and vegetables and helped Simon with the farm chores. They got by.
In 1953, a tornado levelled Annie and Simon's homestead, killing Simon and their five-year-old daughter, Dorothy. Annie shielded their youngest daughter Judy, 3, as the house fell down around them, severely injuring herself, but saving Judy's life. (Judy is my mother.)
Mourning the loss of her husband and daughter and hospitalized for months, Annie faced an uncertain future, raising her children on her own. Even in this state, she would say, "There is always someone worse off than me." There was no time to feel sorry for oneself, no sense in self-pity. She and her young family returned to the farm and rebuilt. When Judy, the youngest, was in school, Annie went to work at a local nursing home and later, at age 65, became certified as a health care aide worker.
Annie went on to create a life of her own, through her work, through the Emerald Rebekah Lodge, through her church, the Mary Hastings Homemakers' Club and the Women's Institute. She worked into her 70s and, after retirement, continued to volunteer. She always had a quilt or afghan on the go, and gave the hand-made treasures away to her loved ones.
My earliest memories of Grandma were visits after she had moved to the small town of Parkhill, just north of London, Ontario It didn't matter what time you arrived, or if you had just finished dinner, you had to eat. Her chair at the kitchen table was right beside the refrigerator, so she didn't have far to go to start pulling out leftovers, pies, cheese and pop; always pop, because she knew it was a treat for her grandchildren.
She played a mean game of cards. Cribbage, euchre, gin rummy. She wouldn't tolerate cheating and hated to win in her own home. The guests should win, not the host, she insisted.
Grandma always told you what was on her mind, no holds barred. Whether it was a politician's latest gaffe, a career decision you were about to make, or what to make for lunch, she had an opinion and was never afraid to share it -- just as she shared love, food and laughter. And while traditional in her values and religious beliefs, she believed a woman could, and should, do anything a man could. She was a feminist before her time.
On any given day, Grandma would see 10 to 20 visitors on her doorstep. With 24 grandchildren and 41 great-grandchildren, this comes as no surprise; she was a hit with the neighborhood children, as well. Her home, the kitchen table in particular, was the virtual centre of the THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON family. She was, in every sense of the word, the matriarch.
Her infectious laugh was almost as big as her heart. I can still see her, throwing her head back and laughing till tears came streaming down her face. She was happiest when surrounded by her family, and the love she gave was limitless.
Marcia DANIEL is the third-youngest grandchild of Annie THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON.

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CHARLTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
YOCOM, John H. (Jack) Hons. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., M.B.A.
At North York on February 22, 2003 after a lengthy career in education, journalism, corporate communications and community service. Survived by his beloved wife Catherine CHARLTON, (pre-deceased by his loving wife Helen DOLAN 1989.) Survived by his sister Helen RIGG, Dunnville; also by sons John J. (Suzy) of Mississauga, Paul A. of Calgary, Mary Anne MAHONEY (Dr. James) of Toronto, and nine grandchildren: Jay, Robert and Christopher YOCOM, Michael, Mark, Mary Helen and Matthew MAHONEY, and Wesley and Natalie YOCOM of Calgary. Born in Dunnville, Ontario, 1911; educated at Toronto, Ottawa and York Universities; after U.C. graduation taught high school in Ottawa for a short time before joining the Royal Canadian Air Force as a Flt. Lt. for World War 2 overseas service. Upon return joined Saturday Night Magazine, becoming managing editor; left Saturday Night Magazine to work for British American Oil Company (later Gulf Oil Canada). Upon retirement worked for a short while at Vickers and Benson Advertising. Involved in professional and community service; President, Toronto Canadian Club, Chairman, Institute of Canadian American Studies, President, Life Member and Fellow of Canadian Public Relations Society, President and Life Member Arts and Letters Club of Toronto. Board Member: Canadian Paraplegic Association, Toronto Symphony National Youth Orchestra and other institutions. Member: Royal Canadian Military Institute, and Royal Canadian Legion, Ft. York Br. Consultant to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. Recipient of: the Queen's Silver Coronation Medal; University of Toronto 70 year medal; York University's Schulich School of Business Distinguished Alumni Award. Business awards include; four Silver Anvils by Public Relations Society of America for premier corporate communications. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday. Funeral Service in the chapel on Wednesday at 1: 00 o'clock. Officiating clergy: the Rev. Dr. Malcolm SINCLAIR, Metropolitan United Church and Father Paul CUSACK, St. Gabriel's Roman Catholic Church.

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CHARLTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-21 published
HOUSTON, Neil Ritchie
78, of North Vancouver, British Columbia, amiable entrepreneur, avid golfer and bridge partner, long-time horse-racing fan, armed forces veteran, one-time owner of a thoroughbred racehorse in Toronto, a hotel in Leamington, Ontario, a fishing lodge on the French River, a clothing store in Burlington, Ontario, an antique/collectibles store in Waterdown, Ontario. Born in Toronto on October 11, 1924, husband of the late Helen HOUSTON (née CHARLTON) and the late Dorothy HOUSTON (née LAKE,) brother of Archie of West Vancouver, Bob of Toronto and the late Colin HOUSTON, father of Gail TERRON of Windsor, Ontario, and John HOUSTON of Toronto, stepfather of Ron JOINER of Victoria, British Columbia, Lynda JOINER of Burlington, Ontario, Elizabeth HADDOCK of Chatham, Ontario, grandfather of six, uncle to many nieces and nephews. Died peacefully Monday, August 18, 2003 in Lion's Gate Hospital, North Vancouver, following a lengthy illness. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of British Columbia or a charity of your choice. Special thanks to the doctors, nurses and staff at Lion's Gate and St. Paul's Hospital. Arrangements will be made for burial service in Aylmer, Ontario.

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CHARNEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-11 published
GELBER, Sylva Malka, OC, LL.D.
93 years old, Sylva Malka GELBER, whose years of activism in pre-Israel Palestine eventually propelled her to be the first director of the Canadian Department of Labour's Women's Bureau, died on December 9th, 2003, of complications from a stroke. She was 93 and lived in Ottawa.
During the heady years of pioneering in gains for women's rights and Medicare in Canada during the 1960s and 70s, she travelled the country, never shrill and always reasoned in her campaign for equality for women in the country's labour force. She took this pragmatic approach to the United Nations where she represented Canada on the United Nations Commission for the Status of Women between 1970 - 74.
A social and industrial activist at heart, she never lost her zest for a good argument on those issues which had been part of her adult life since she left her comfortable Toronto home in the early 1930s for the turmoil of Jerusalem and Palestine. There she became the first graduate of the Va'ad Leumi School of Social Work - now the Faculty of Social Work of the Hebrew University - and took on jobs incongruous with her upbringing which had included schooling at Havergal College, a private girl's school.
She worked in Palestine during the Mandate as a family counsellor, a probation officer and medical social worker at Hadassah Hospital, and then with the Palestine Department of Labour from 1942 - 48 when she returned to Canada. The adventuresome 15 years Sylva GELBER lived in the turmoil of Palestine are chronicled with affection, awe and frankness in ''No Balm in Gilead: A Personal Retrospective of Mandate Days in Palestine'' published in 1989. By the time she moved back to Canada, she could switch effortlessly among Hebrew and Arabic and English which impressed no one in bureaucratic Ottawa, but did startle the Capital's stuffy side, she often noted mischievously.
Her deep red lipstick and nail polish when paired with her fast sports cars belied the image of the traditional Ottawa civil servant she could never be, despite distinguished and proud accomplishments in promoting federal health insurance and Medicare until they became the law of the land.
Along the way, she accepted many appointments to serve Canada at International Labour Organization conferences, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the United Nations General Assembly. She was a member of the Order of Canada and was awarded honorary degrees from several universities including Queen's, Memorial, Trent, Guelph and Mount St. Vincent.
Sylva Malka GELBER was born in 1910 in Toronto to Sara (MORRIS) and Louis GELBER. Her father, a survivor of pogroms in Eastern Europe, was determined that her four brothers, all of whom attended Upper Canada College, and she, all receive worldly educations beyond their specific Jewish community. She always admired her father for this farsightedness in encouraging his children to become part of a broader society.
At the University of Toronto, she produced plays. She sang spirituals on a Toronto radio station, but her parents would have none of a show business career. She was packed off to Columbia University in New York; but even that did not satisfy her rambunctious spirit and soon she was on her way to distant Palestine.
Never domesticated as women of her day usually were, she paid little attention to her kitchen pantry when she finally settled in Ottawa; but always gregarious, she loved to entertain around the piano which she played by ear and with great gusto. Her library of records and Compact Disks, was always in use as music filled her life; and she has endowed an important annual prize through The Sylva Gelber Music Foundation, which is granted to an outstanding young Canadian musician at the early stage of his or her career.
In retirement, she energetically participated in the Canadian Institute of International Affairs and the Wednesday Luncheon Club of former cabinet ministers and civil servants, such as her neighbour, Jack PICKERSGILL, who thrashed over current political issues.
Sylva GELBER was predeceased by her four brothers, Lionel, Marvin, Arthur and Shalome Michael. She is survived by her four nieces and their husbands, Nance GELBER and Dan BJARNASON, Patty and David RUBIN, Judith GELBER and Dan PRESLEY, and Sara and Richard CHARNEY, all of Toronto; her sister-in-law, Marianne GELBER of New York; four great nephews and a great niece, Gerald and Noah RUBIN, and Adam, Andrew and Laura CHARNEY; as well as cousins Ruth JEWEL and David EISEN; David ALEXANDOR, and Ruth GELBER all of Toronto; and Ivan CHORNEY and Betsy RIGAL, both of Ottawa. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (1 light west of Dufferin) for service on Thursday, December 11, 2003 at 12: 00 noon. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park.

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CHARTERIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-25 published
CHARTERIS, Richard Walter
Died suddenly of a heart attack, at home in Toronto, on Saturday, February 22, 2003. Born in Toledo, Ohio on October 20, 1955, he was the son of Dr. Richard Webster CHARTERIS of Chatham and the late Mary Campbell CHARTERIS, and stepson of the late Joan Fleming CHARTERIS. He leaves his father, daughters Mary and Anna of Toronto, and his friend Jill STEWARD/STEWART/STUART of Etobicoke. He was a graduate of Upper Canada College and Victoria University of the University of Toronto. Richard was a devoted son and father, and a keen sailor at the Queen City Yacht Club. Cremation has taken place. Interment in Maple City Cemetery, Chatham at a later date. A reception will be held at the Royal Canadian Military Institute, 426 University Avenue, from 3-7 p.m. on Friday, February 28th. If desired, memorial donations in his name may be made to the Chatham-Kent Public Library, 120 Queen Street, Chatham N7M 2G6, or Missions to Seamen, 8 Unwin Avenue, Pier 51, Toronto M5A 1A1.

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CHARTERIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-02 published
CHARTERIS, Richard
A family interment service was held at Old Maple Leaf Cemetery, Chatham, on Friday morning May 30th for Richard Walter CHARTERIS of Toronto who died on Saturday, February 22 last. Officiating were the Reverend Canon James STEVENSON of St. George's Anglican Church, Goderich and Reverend John HODGINS of Holy Trinity Anglican Church, Chatham.

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CHARTERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-21 published
CHRISTIE, Mary Louise (née HUMPHREY)
Died peacefully of natural causes on February 19, 2003, at the age of 84. She was predeceased by her husband John Donald CHRISTIE (1967,) and her mother Stella HUMPHREY (CHARTERS) (1977.) She was born in Toronto but after her marriage to Jack, considered herself to be a Westerner. She will be greatly missed by a small Corp of dear Friends in Winnipeg and her cousins in Ontario. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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CHASE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
Don (Donald Gerald) McGILLIVRAY, 1927 - 2003
Canadian journalist Don McGILLIVRAY died at Mount Saint Mary Hospital in Victoria, British Columbia, on 24 June 2003.
Don was born 21 June 1927 in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan and grew up on a farm in nearby Archive.
He completed a B.A. in Economics at the University of Saskatchewan before embarking on a journalistic career in 1951.
Don was a reporter and city-desk editor at the Regina Leader-Post until 1955, and a reporter and columnist for the Winnipeg Tribune from 1955 to 1962. He was Parliamentary Correspondent for Southam News Service in Ottawa from 1962 to 1966, Southam National Correspondent in Washington in 1966, Southam Bureau Chief in London, England (1967 - 1970), and Associate Editor of the Edmonton Journal from 1970 to 1972. Editor of the Financial Times of Canada (1972 - 1975), Don returned to Southam News in Ottawa as National Economics Editor (1975 - 1984) and as National Political and Economic Columnist (1985 - 1995). Don won three National Business Writing awards.
Don was a founding member, a Treasurer, and President (1986 - 87) of the Centre for Investigative Journalism, now the Canadian Association of Journalists. He taught journalism at Concordia University and was Adjunct Research Professor in journalism at Carleton University for 15 years beginning in 1978.
Don McGILLIVRAY is survived and will be sadly missed by his sister Marion in Moose Jaw, his brother Allan in Edmonton, his son Murray and daughter-in-law Georgina (Grant) in Calgary, daughter Peigi Ann and Mark BAWDEN in Victoria, son Neil and daughter-in-law Wendy (HARRIS) in Toronto, and daughter Fionna and son-in-law Howard (CHASE) in Tampa, and his eight grandchildren, Patrick and Madeleine McGILLIVRAY, Rebecca and Samuel Willcocks, Noah and Kate McGILLIVRAY, and Zoö and Eli CHASE. He was predeceased by his wife Julietta (née KEPNER) and his brother Archie.
Donations are gratefully accepted to the Don McGillivray Scholarship Fund c/o Development and Alumni Office, Room 510, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1S 5B6, or on-line at Carleton.ca/alumni (click on Express Counter and type in fund name).
A memorial service will be held at the First Unitarian Congregation of Ottawa, 30 Cleary Avenue, at 2: 00 p.m. on Saturday, July 12. An event to celebrate Don's life for family, Friends, former colleagues and students is being planned for Sunday, October 19, 2003 in Ottawa. For information about the October event e-mail donsparty@sympatico.ca

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CHATHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-06 published
McALPINE, Barnelle 'Bonnie' Alice (née CHATHAM)
For 57 years the beloved wife of Lieut. Gen. (ret'd) Duncan Alastair McALPINE of Kingston, mother of Lynn (Montreal,) Bruce (Toronto,) Keith (Chicago) and Craig (Montreal), grandmother of six, and great grandmother of two, passed away peacefully at home on October 2, 2003 after a heroic struggle with cancer. Surrounded by her loving family, she died as she lived her life ­ with elegance, poise, grace and dignity. Throughout her life, Bonnie used her love, her respect for all and her boundless energy to reach out to those who crossed her path. She had a unique ability to bring out the best in others, and to make everyone she touched feel special. A constant source of help and encouragement in her community, church and volunteer organizations, across Canada, the U.S. and Europe ­ she made us better people. It is impossible to imagine family life without her presence. A ceremony to celebrate Bonnie's life will be held on October 11th, at 2: 30 p.m. at Chalmers United Church, 212 Barrie Street, Kingston, Ontario. While flowers are appreciated, a donation to the charity of your choice in Bonnie's name would be preferred.

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CHATWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-11 published
AFFLECK, Betty Ann (née HENLEY) 1927-2003
Died on Monday evening, June 9th, 2003, in Montreal, at home with her family. Beloved wife of the late Raymond AFFLECK and dear companion of Harry MAYEROVITCH. Mother of Neil (Marnie STUBLEY,) Jane (John KIMBER), Gavin (Sylvie CORMIER), Ewan (Susan CHATWOOD) and the late Graham. She will be lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Alexander, Gabriel, Lucas, Shonah and Anika. Visitation will be held at Collins Clarke Funeral Home, 5610 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, on Wednesday, June 11th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held at the Unitarian Church of Montreal (5035 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West, on Saturday, June 14th at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, a donation to Autism Society, Canada, P.O. Box 65, Orangeville, Ontario L9W 2Z5, would be appreciated.

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CHAVEZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-19 published
'His heart was always in the labour movement'
United Auto Workers director and Canadian Labour Congress president, he was one of labour's most influential leaders
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - Page R7
He went from the assembly line to the lofty heights of union leadership. Dennis McDERMOTT, who died last month at age 80, was one of Canada's most influential labour leaders throughout the 1970s and 1980s as Canadian director of the United Auto Workers and later president of the Canadian Labour Congress.
Mr. McDERMOTT's life in the labour movement began in 1948 when he started work as an assembler and welder at the Massey Harris (later Massey Ferguson) plant in Toronto. He joined United Auto Workers Local 439 and quickly rose through the ranks.
"He had a lot of pizzazz, said Bob WHITE/WHYTE, former president of the Canadian Auto Workers and the Canadian Labour Congress. "He had a good sense of what was good for working people."
After a 38-year career in the Canadian labour movement, Mr. McDERMOTT was made Canadian ambassador to Ireland in 1986 by Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY. Mr. McDERMOTT received some criticism within the labour movement for the appointment, but he made no apologies.
"I didn't cross the floor and become a Conservative. I am a social democrat and will continue to be a social democrat, " he said at the time. "I will continue to act and speak as a trade unionist, Mr. McDERMOTT said in 1986 after accepting his appointment.
Mr. McDERMOTT was known for his sharp tongue and had a particularly abrasive relationship with former prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU. He fought against the anti-inflation policies of the Trudeau government, in particular wage and price controls.
On November 21, 1981, Mr. McDERMOTT led a massive rally on Parliament Hill, said to be the largest such demonstration in Canadian history. About 100,000 people protested against the oppressive burden of high interest rates that created high unemployment and economic instability.
Behind his combative style, Mr. McDERMOTT had a strong intellect and a talent for building consensus. As Canadian Labour Congress president, he was able to reach out to other groups and build a coalition among various social interests in Canada in pursuit of common goals.
"I am confrontational. When I have to play hardball, I play hardball. But I can be just as conciliatory as anyone else. I can walk with the bat or I can walk with the olive branch. It depends on what's happening, Mr. McDERMOTT once told a reporter.
Dennis McDERMOTT was born on November 3, 1922, in Portsmouth, England. He was the eldest of three children to his Irish parents John and Beatrice McDERMOTT. Growing up poor, Mr. McDERMOTT learned firsthand about some of life's injustices. As a young boy in the church choir, Mr. McDERMOTT remembered being left behind on the bus while the rest of the choir performed at a concert because his family was too poor to buy him a uniform, said his wife, Claire McDERMOTT.
Mr. McDERMOTT left school at age 14 to become a butcher's helper. Two years later, he joined the Royal Navy. During the Second World War, he served on a destroyer escort travelling on convoy duty to different parts of Europe and sometimes to the Russian port of Murmansk. In 1947, he left the navy to work in a Scottish coal mine before coming the Canada.
After landing a job at Massey Harris in Toronto, Mr. McDERMOTT quickly became involved in the United Auto Workers. Small in stature, but with a quick mind and wit, he became a budding leader.
"He was very impressive, said Bromley ARMSTRONG, a civil and human-rights activist who worked with Mr. McDERMOTT at Massey Harris. "He held rapt attention."
During his first year in the union, Mr. McDERMOTT worked on the Joint Labour Committee to Combat Racial Intolerance, which successfully lobbied to help bring about Ontario's first piece of human-rights legislation, the Fair Employment Practices Act of 1948.
His work in human rights continued throughout his career. He later served on the executive of the Toronto Committee for Human Rights and as a member of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association. He was awarded the Order of Ontario for his work in the trade-union and human-rights movements. After serving in several positions in the United Auto Workers Local 439, Mr. McDERMOTT became a full-time organizer for the union in 1954. He was made subregional director of the Toronto area in 1960, a position he held until being elected Canadian director of the United Auto Workers in 1968. During his first year as Canadian director, he moved the union headquarters from Windsor, Ontario, to Toronto.
"He started down the road towards more autonomy for the Canadian union, and he reached out to all points of view inside the union, Mr. WHITE/WHYTE said. (In 1985, the Canadian arm of the United Auto Workers broke away to form its own union -- the Canadian Auto Workers,)
"Dennis McDERMOTT raised the profile of the Canadian labour movement to new heights, said Canadian Auto Workers president Buzz HARGROVE. "He was a tough and effective negotiator at the bargaining table, but he also took on the key social and political issues of the day."
Mr. HARGROVE added that his friend and colleague "always had a vision for the movement."
Mr. McDERMOTT was a strong supporter of American Cesar CHAVEZ and the United Farm Workers. He led a contingent of Canadians to California and also organized a march in Toronto to raise money for Mr. CHAVEZ.
Elected Canadian Labour Congress president in 1978, Mr. McDERMOTT served in that position until his retirement in 1986. When asked by a reporter what he considered his prime accomplishment, he pointed to the labour congress. "I think putting the Canadian Labour Congress on the map. Before I came there, it was pretty low profile. You never heard of it. I was kind of proud of that, Mr. McDERMOTT said in a 1989 interview with The Toronto Star.
McDERMOTT also broadened the Canadian Labour Congress's role in international affairs. He was a member of the executive board of the Inter-American Regional Organization of Workers and served as vice-president of the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions.
"His heart was always in the labour movement, Ms. McDERMOTT said. During his three years as ambassador to Ireland in the late 1980s, Mr. McDERMOTT made headlines when he lashed out at Irish government officials for giving better treatment to singer Michael Jackson's pet chimpanzee than the McDERMOTT's Great Dane, Murphy. Mr. Jackson's chimp was whisked into the country while Murphy had to endure six months of quarantine. The dog died shortly after being freed.
Mr. McDERMOTT enjoyed both writing and painting. While in Ireland, he sold a few of his paintings. One of his short stories, about his war experiences, was published in The Toronto Star as part of the newspaper's short-story contest.
Returning from Ireland, Mr. McDERMOTT retired and spent his time between a home near Peterborough, Ontario, and a place in Florida. He continued to paint and write. His letters to the editor frequently appeared in newspapers.
"He lived an incredible life if you think of where he came from, Mr. WHITE/WHYTE said. "He would be the first to say that he was fortunate."
Mr. McDERMOTT died on February 13 in a Peterborough hospital. He had been suffering from a lung disease. He leaves his wife Claire and five children.
A memorial service will be held on March 24 at 1 p.m. at the Toronto Centre for the Arts, 5040 Yonge Street, Toronto.

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