CHAITON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-28 published
Hilda PERSAUD
By Carrol VERASAMY and Jennifer CHAITON Tuesday, January 28, 2003, Page A20
Mother, wife, businesswoman, survivor. Born July 3, 1931, in Guyana. Died May 4, 2002, of esophageal cancer, in Toronto, aged Hilda was the ultimate survivor. Born to hardworking parents, our mom was orphaned at 3 and drifted from one relative to another over the years, doing housework and working in rice fields for pennies a day. She watched with envy as other girls went off to school and enjoyed a normal childhood. For her, school was just a dream.
She grew up and married a handsome accountant, our dad Joe, and they had 10 children, the youngest a set of twins. She wanted to provide us with everything she lacked as a child, and our education was her top priority. There never seemed to be enough money to go around, yet mom always found the money for our textbooks and tuition fees. At night she would hand-wash our school uniforms, white socks, and sneakers, and hang them under light bulbs to dry, so we could have clean uniforms to wear every morning. Although these years were difficult, mom remembered them as the best years of her life.
After dad retired, they bought a struggling hotel-and-restaurant business, but it barely kept the family afloat.
In 1971, mom faced her biggest challenge when dad died suddenly, leaving no savings or life insurance. She was left on her own, with 10 children to raise. Well-meaning relatives offered to take some of the children, but mom adamantly refused to split up her family. Her survival instinct went into high gear and she found within herself incredible strength and wisdom that even she hadn't known she possessed. She built up a struggling hotel business, and despite her inexperience and lack of education, it became a thriving success within a short time. She became financially independent and was able to build a big house in the country; we lived there comfortably.
In 1974, one of mom's beloved twins, Donna, died tragically in a car accident. Mom survived this as she had the many previous adversities in her life: with extraordinary strength and spirit.
In 1982, the family emigrated to Canada to begin a new life. It was an enormous adjustment as mom was past 50, but she worked as a day-care provider, and finally got the chance to attend school, fulfilling her childhood dream. This wasn't easy for her but she refused to quit, and her perseverance paid off. What an accomplishment it was for mom to finally be able to read her beloved Bible! She was thrilled when she could write her own letters and cards to her grandkids. She began volunteer work at Warden Woods Community Centre, Bendale Nursing Home, and Agincourt Pentecostal Church. She was always willing to help anyone in need. Even when her health started to deteriorate, she refused to slow down.
Mom took great pride in watching her children grow into successful adults. She became a grandmother of 22 and great-grandmother of six. Her happiest times were with her family, and she eagerly looked forward to our large family gatherings. When she turned 70, in July, 2001, we held a big birthday party in her honour. That night, mom was the happiest we had ever seen her.
Just three months later came the devastating diagnosis of cancer. Although in great pain, mom remained optimistic to the very end, her faith in God never wavering. She believed that God was going to cure her as she had so much work left to do! But God had other plans. After a heroic battle, she died on a crisp spring morning, all her children at her bedside, a peaceful look on her face.
Mom will always be remembered for her fierce independence, determination, and courage: a phenomenal matriarch.
Carrol and Jennifer are Hilda's daughters.
Died This Day
Friday, January 31, 2003, Page R15
John Beverley ROBINSON, 1863
Lawyer, Family Compact leader, born on July 26, 1791, in Berthier, Quebec; Attorney-General of Upper Canada and later Chief Justice stalwart of the Family Compact that ruled the colony; favoured imperial unity against "pernicious American influences"; died in Toronto.

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CHALLET o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-10 published
Ben WISE
By Jeremy FERGUSON Thursday, July 10, 2003 - Page A20
Actor, director, lawyer, innkeeper, artist, husband, father. Born May 13, 1929, in Toronto. Died January 21, of cancer, aged Ben WISE spent the first six years of his life in a household of Polish Jewish immigrants. The language was Yiddish. Enrolled in public school at 6, Ben didn't speak a word of English. He was held back a year. He joked he was the guy who failed Grade Others knew him as the perfectionist, hands-on proprietor of the Inn at Manitou.
His daughter Jennifer, associate professor of theatre history at the University of Victoria, recalls that by the time he came to fatherhood at age 30, he was already accomplished. He'd been a floor director during the "golden age" of television drama at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. It was Ben's index finger that cued the first live-to-air transmission of the new national broadcast network in 1952.
He graduated as a lawyer, from Osgoode Hall in 1957, but the courtroom was not for him. It was more his nature to be the seasoned traveller, journeying to Israel in 1949, studying life from cafés on the Champs Élysées and, in a Hemingway turn, reeling in giant sail-fish off Jamaica.
Enter Sheila, his wife, partner, and best friend, always at his side, supporting and making possible everything he did, everything he was. Their greatest co-production was their children: Cindy, Jennifer, Jordanna and Jonathan -- and five grandchildren.
In 1959, Ben and Sheila launched Mani tou-wabing, a fine arts camp near Parry Sound, Ontario The Toronto press called him "The Sol Hurok of Camping." The fledgling impresario signed on prima ballerinas from Belgrade, musical-theatre directors from New York's 42nd Street, designers from Derbyshire, Shakespeareans from Stratford. He assembled a fine arts faculty unheard-of in the world of camping. He nurtured the talents of thousands of young painters, dancers, musicians and filmmakers.
This was mere rehearsal for Ben's baby, the Inn at Manitou, born in 1974. The Inn is a unique fusion of tennis club, five-star hotel, wilderness spa and French restaurant, and a long-standing member of Paris-based Relais and Chateau. The summer of 2003 marks its 30th season, its standards unflagging -- as Ben would have insisted.
He was a foodie before the word came along, bringing over several French chefs, including Jean-Pierre CHALLET of Toronto's Bouchon and Jean-Charles DUPOIRE of Epic in the Royal York Hotel.
"Ben understood the enormous difference between being good and very good," remembers Mr. CHALLET. "He guided chefs. He opened our minds. He and Sheila were always ahead of their time. Even today, there is nobody in Toronto with their standards of perfection."
Renaissance men don't sleep: Ben found time to be a developer, building spectacular country houses on the shores of Lake Manitou-wabing. He took up paint brushes and turned out hundreds of landscapes and portraits. His paintings sold. In his 70s, he was planning a return to acting. The man had many lives to live.
Fatherhood? "He wanted us to see, feel, experience, know everything all the beauty in the world, all the noble ideas, all the gorgeous music, all the best of every type of thing that is," says Jennifer WISE. " From blinis in Moscow to falafel in Jeru salem; from New Year's in Paris to the Old Vic in London; from Rumplemeyer's on the East Side to Beethoven on the West, he... treated us to a three-decades-long guided tour of his world."
The last words are Jennifer's: "Above all, Ben loved to feel the sun on his face -- he'd close his eyes, tilt his head back to catch all its rays, and command us to do the same. He never tired of the sight of the coloured leaves in autumn, or the blazing glow of a sunset at day's end."
Jeremy FERGUSON is Ben's friend.

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CHALLINOR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
John Ellsworth SEABROOK
In loving memory of John Ellsworth SEABROOK July 18, 1923 to November 30, 2003.
John Ellsworth SEABROOK, known as "Jack" passed away suddenly at 80 years, on November 30, 2003.
He was born in Chatsworth, July 18, 1923 and made his home in Mindemoya, Manitoulin Island, since 1931. He leaves to remember him, his beloved wife Marion. His cherished kids: Cathy, Deb, John, Diana, Mark and Vanda. Their spouses: David, Cheryl, Keith and Michelle. His treasured grandchildren: Brent, Brady, Logan, Meg, Kate, Sarah, Jenny, Ben, Philip, A.J., Josh, Lyric, Jasmine, Morgan and Jessie. His one beautiful great grandchild Teigan. His sisters: Ella (Peggy) HAHN and Lois CHALLINOR. Predeceased Maxine PRINGLE and Fern SEABROOK. His brother, Archie. Predeceased Bill. His sisters-in-law: Joanne
SMITH, Millie SEABROOK and Aletha SEABROOK. Predeceased Lorene STANLEY. His brothers-in-law: Jim HAHN, Jim SMITH and George STANLEY. Predeceased Hugh PRINGLE. His nieces and nephews: Clay, Susan, Bill, Beth, Robert, Paul, David, Charlie, John, Geoff, Mark, Kevin and Tara. Predeceased Lynn. All will miss him dearly. He was an original. He realized his own dreams of becoming a machinist, a master mechanic, a carpenter, the developer of the Brookwood Brae Golf Course, windmill designer, gentleman farmer (all animals at his farm died of old age) and curator and creator of Jack's Agriculture Museum. We all knew and loved him and he became our example to follow our dreams. His colourful, warm character shone at auctions, plays, card games, and church committees. He was the crank shaft and spark plug of our family. He loved Massey Harris tractors, Triumph motorcycles, Blue Jay games, yellow wooden shoes, novels by Louis L'Amour, movies with John Wayne, grape juice and certo (for arthritis), raisin pie and ice cream - and us!
"Everyday you're breathin' is a good day." This philosophy was reflected in his love for his wife, his kids, his grandkids, his Friends and his community. His love will shine in those he's left behind. Friends called the Mindemoya United Church on Wednesday, December 3, 2003. Funeral service was held on Thursday, December 4, 2003 with Reverend Mary Jo ECKERT TRACY officiating. Cremation to follow. Culgin Funeral Home

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CHALLONER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-12 published
KEARNS, Thomas Joseph
Tom died peacefully at North York General Hospital on February 9, 2003, following a brief illness, in his 96th year. Beloved husband of Edith KEARNS, and the late Anne KEARNS (1979.) Tom will be greatly missed by his son Dr. Terrence KEARNS (Linda) and his daughter Colleen DODDS, and Edith's children Bob McFARLAND (Pat,) and Jayne CHALLONER (Jim.) He leaves behind six grandchildren Glen KEARNS (Shelly), Chris KEARNS (Nancy), Tim KEARNS (Kim), Darlene KINGSTONE (Brian), Denise DODDS (Wayne), Catherine DODDS (Lee), and seven great-grandchildren. The family extends thanks to Dr. RUMBLE, Dr. SOMMERFIELD, and the excellent nursing staff at North York General Hospital. Friends may call at the Trull 'North Toronto' Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence), on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Blessed Sacrament Church (Yonge Street south of Lawrence), on Thursday morning February 13, 2003 at 10 o'clock. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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CHALLONER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-07 published
CAMPBELL, Ruth Eleanor (née BEATSON)
Died on June 5, 2003 at Glynwood Retirement Residence. Predeceased by her husband Dr. Hoyle CAMPBELL. Loving mother of Dr. Kathryn CHALLONER and her husband Dorian and their children Christine, Byron and David; Virginia TONG and her husband David and their children Kathryn and Janet. A private interment will take place in the family plot at Mount Pleasant Cemetery.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
CHALMERS, David Fairbairn
On February 28th, 2003, in Salem, South Carolina. Beloved husband of Betsey. Father of Mary, Sheila and Duncan. Brother of Helen Fiona and Iain. Predeceased by his first wife Rosamond. Cremation. If desired, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Parkinson Foundation would be appreciated.

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CHALMERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
CHALMERS, Bruce Abernethy 1915-2003
Born Turriff, Scotland. Died Portland, Oregon. Lawyer, university registrar, Royal Air Force fighter and reconnaissance pilot (World War 2). As V.P. (Latin America) of Bristol Aeroplane in the 1950s, he extricated from Cuba company workers, who faced execution during Castro's revolution. He later worked on the first proposals for supersonic flight. He was Administrative Director of the Canadian Opera Company and of the Portland and Charlotte Operas. Retired at 75, he became a consultant to the U.S. National Endowment for the Arts, and won awards for his volunteer work in education and cultural programs. He loved books, planes, history, golf, skiing and Scottish Country Dancing. Beloved husband of Marilyn. Father, with first wife Saxon McLEOD, of Brian, Frances, Hilary and Deirdre. Grandfather to Kirsten, Lisa, Colin and Suzy. Great-grandfather of Jakob and Ethan. Soraidh leat.

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CHAMANDY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-15 published
CHAMANDY, Richard 'Dick' - b.1932 d.1973
Early Saturday morning on the 15th of September 1973, Richard 'Dick' CHAMANDY died suddenly while playing tennis in Bennington Heights. Dick was the only son of Adele ABRAHAM and Fred CHAMANDY, dear husband of Maree (née FINN) and father of Ian, David and Patrick. Dick attended Upper Canada College and the University of Toronto, eventually graduating with a law degree from Osgoode Hall. With law school friend Fred GRAY/GREY, he founded the law firm of Chamandy and Gray, where he worked until his death. Dick was second generation Lebanese and well connected to his community. He had many close Friends and relatives whom he charmed with his loyalty, a sharp intellect and a witty sense of humour. He would have adored the company of his four grandchildren, Aidan, Olivia, Eric and Leah and daughters-in-law Lori, Marie-Hélène and Cindy. One of Dick's passions was hockey, in which he participated as a player and as a tireless coach to his sons at North Toronto. This was in addition to his part-time job as head armchair coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs. Dick's flair for the unconventional, whether it be his Neil Young sideburns, giving motorcycle rides around Oriole Park to neighborhood kids, or playing the ukulele, endeared him to all. Has it really been 30 years? Some things haven't changed in that time, including our fond memories of him and the Leafs' inability to win without him. If you happened to have known Dick, please take a moment today to reflect with a smile on your own fond memories of him.

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CHAMBERLAIN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-23 published
Dorothy Jean SMITH
It is with great sadness that the family announces the death of Dorothy Jean SMITH (née McLAUGHIN) age 67 of Saskatoon, which occurred on July 6, 2003. A private graveside service was held at Woodlawn Cemetery in Saskatoon on July 11, conducted by the Rev. Henry COMERFORD with only family members in attendance in accordance with Dorothy's wishes. Arrangements were entrusted to Saskatoon Funeral Home.
Surviving are her loving husband Frederick, daughter Kim SMITH- CHAMBERLAIN (David) of Herefordshire, England, son of Terry of Martensville, Saskatchewan, sister Roberta McMULLEN (Doug) of Sudbury, brother Hugh McLAUGHLIN (Mollyanne) of Gore Bay, numerous nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles. Dorothy was predeceased by her father Wm. Burt McLAUGHLIN in 1956 and her mother Laura McLAUGHLIN in 1989. Dorothy was born in Manitowaning, on September 19th, 1935 where she grew up and completed her education at the Continuation School. She graduated from Ottawa Civic Hospital School of Nursing in 1957 and was a life member of the alumnae. She did private duty nursing in Ottawa and obstetrical nursing at the Sudbury General Hospital. She served in the Royal Canadian Air Force as a Nursing Sister with the rank of Flying Officer. She married Fred SMITH on September 9, 1961 at St. George's Anglican Church, Saskatoon. Dorothy enjoyed the arts and entertainment and was a huge "movie buff." She loved gardening, music and nature and was employed in the family business until the business was sold in 2001. She was also gifted with a remarkable decorating flare which was demonstrated during all the festive seasons. Dorothy was always active in her family's lives, a devoted wife, mother and friend and will be very sadly missed by all.

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CHAMBERS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Mary CHAMBERS McQUAY
In loving memory of Mary Chambers McQUAY, April 9, 1916 to May 3, 2003.
Mary McQuay, a resident of Mindemoya, died at her residence on Saturday, May 3, 2003 at the age of 87 years. She was born in Peterborough, daughter of the late George and Mabel (FOLEY) TURNBULL.
Mary graduated as a Registered Nurse in 1942 and worked in hospitals in Kingston, where she met Jack McQUAY, who was an intern at the same hospital. They married in 1944, and lived in Kingston before moving to Mindemoya in 1947. Jack began his medical practice in Mindemoya and Mary assisted for many years running the office. Mary had a warm, friendly manner and enjoyed socializing with her many Friends. She will be remembered for her dedication to her family and to her community. Mary participated in and supported many community activities over the years. She was accomplished in sewing, knitting and baking, and often contributed her home-made items to bazaars and bake sales. She volunteered for the Red Cross, the Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary, Meals on Wheels, and the ambulance service. She enjoyed gardening, and participated in the Mindemoya Horticultural Society flower shows in years past. She was active in the local Women's Institute. An enthusiastic member of the Mindemoya Curling Club, she continued curling until she was well into her 80s, while in the summer she enjoyed golfing. She was an avid bridge player in the local bridge club. She was a member of St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church, where she sang in the choir for many years, and participated in the life of the parish through the Anglican Church Women's group. Always interested in crafts, she created many beautiful pieces in pottery and paper tole crafts.
Dearly loved and loving wife of Dr. Jack McQUAY. Loved mother of Marilyn (husband Martin CHILTON) of Kingston, Paul (fiancée Marion CARROLL) of Fort McMurray, Alta, Janice McQUAY of Toronto and Mindemoya and Betty McQUAY of Toronto. Also survived by Athena McQUAY of Edmonton. Proud grandmother of Peter McQUAY, Jane HOEKSTRA (husband Terry,) Stephen McQUAY and Jim CHILTON and great grandchildren Ethan, Sydney and Liam. Dear sister of Reta CONRAN, Gladys MITCHELL (husband Charlie,) Bruce TURNBULL (wife Alice,) Norma RAYCRAFT (husband Glen,) Billie McNEIL and brother-in-law Earl HARMAN. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sisters and brothers Marjorie McLEOD, Walter (Bud) TURNBULL, Ted TURNBULL, Gwen HARMAN and sister-in-law and brothers-in-law Marie TURNBULL, Alan McLEOD, Harold CONRAN and Gene McNEIL. Friends called the Saint Francis of Assisi Church in Mindemoya on Monday, May 5, 2003. The funeral service was held on Tuesday, May 6, 2003 with Reverend Canon Bain Peever officiating. Interment in Mindemoya Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home

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CHAMBERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-26 published
CHAMBERS, Dorothy Gail (née ALLEN) September 24, 2003
It is with great sadness that the family announces the death of Dorothy Gail CHAMBERS, in her 56th year. Beloved mother of Rebecca and Jesse; loyal, loving and supportive wife to Jim for over 32 years. Gail's loving presence will be missed by her brothers Glen and Gene and sister and brother-in-law Maureen and John and her extended family and Friends, too numerous to name. Gail lived fully engaged and with great humour, love and compassion with cancer for over 13 years. This was not a battle -- it was a co-existence with a disease that focused her energies on the things that were important to her, family, Friends, and a profound respect for the scared and the sacred and the spiritual, which she found in the natural world, particularly at her cottage in Muskoka. Gail will be sorely missed by the many Friends and relatives she touched in her life. Particular thanks must be given to the St. Elizabeth Visiting Nurses' Association home care who treated her with love and respect. Special thanks to Dr. Rob BUCKMAN who risked the very human trait of mixing health care with compassion and Friendship, also Dr. Molyn LESZCZ whose compassionate counselling helped her through the rough part of her difficult journey. Heartfelt thanks to Dr. Angela MAZZA- WHELAN who was present when Gail died in the loving embrace of her family. Thanks also to Doctors WARR and TOZER for their care. Also the unsung heroes of the health care system - the nurses. Cremation has taken place. A Celebration of Gail's life will take place on Saturday, September 27th at 2: 00 p.m. at Olivet United Church followed by a reception. Olivet United Church, 40 Empress Avenue at Prince George Street, Hamilton. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals would be appreciated by the family.

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CHAMBERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
Marion CHAMBERS
By Rosemary, Colin and Maralee CHAMBERS, Wednesday, November 19, 2003 - Page A22
Mother, grandmother, wife and partner, teacher, friend, community activist. Born July 23, 1928, in Massey, Ontario Died June 22 in Guelph, Ontario, aged 74.
It seemed fitting that Marion CHAMBERS won the 1994 Ontario New Democratic Party's Agnes MacPhail award for pioneering women. Like MacPHAIL, Marion's roots were in Ontario's Grey County. And like MacPHAIL, she lived life with a strong commitment to social justice, equality and activism.
Born in Massey, Ontario, in 1928, Marion McKESSOCK grew up on a farm in the Depression era. As a child she was a strong student with a flair for reading, creative writing and drama. Marion aspired to be a journalist but as there were few women in the profession at that time, her guidance counsellor (later known to Canadians as Olive DIEFENBAKER) steered her toward teaching. It was a good match. As a teacher, parent and friend, Marion had never-ending patience, an enthusiasm for knowledge, a keen analytical mind and an ability to bring out the best in people.
Marion taught in Inglewood, Guelph and Forest Hill while completing her B.A. at Queen's University during the summers. Her first love as a teacher was English literature and drama and she won awards for her student productions. Even after her formal teaching career ended, Marion continued to pursue English and drama on a volunteer basis. She taught English as a second language to two Vietnamese families who settled in the Erin area and wrote and directed an annual Christmas pageant for the children of Friends and neighbours.
Marion met Cecil, her husband of 46 years, when she taught his younger sister.
Along with their children, Rosemary, Colin and Maralee, they settled in Erin Township. Their busy lives were balanced by gorgeous fall colour, serene winter walks, spring carpets of trilliums and summers of gardening.
While at home caring for her young family, Marion became very involved in her community. She served on the boards of her local arts council, library, home and school association, parks and recreation association, United Church and on the Wellington Dufferin Health Council. Marion was elected to Erin Village Council in 1975 and her many contributions to the community were officially recognized when she was awarded Erin's Citizen of the Year Award.
A long-time member and supporter of the New Democratic Party, Marion became increasingly involved in the party in the late 1970s and early 1980s. She managed campaigns, twice sought election to the Ontario Legislature, served on the Ontario New Democratic Party Executive and was party president from 1982-1984.
Marion loved ideas and debate and was well known for putting her beliefs into action. She was often ahead of her time: recycling long before it was common, offering her own home as a "safe house" before such alternatives were available locally, expressing written dissent in 1988 when her United Church Board voted to deny the ordination of gays and lesbians. She encouraged her children in their studies and careers and enjoyed the lively discussions that ensued when five opinionated family members and frequent guests met around the dinner table.
Marion greeted everyone she met with a warm and engaging smile. Family and Friends looked to her for support.
Marion would have been humbled by the dedicated group of caregivers who were by her side as Alzheimer's disease took its toll. Her husband Cecil, her children and grandchildren, extended family and Friends provided exemplary care and support. As one friend noted in a letter to the family, "great love begets great love."
Rosemary, Colin and Maralee are Marion's children.

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CHAMPAGNE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
Robert Marven SYER
Born February 19, 1912 at Thamesville, Ontario, died May 15, 2003 at Oakville, Ontario, late of Oakville (Bronte) and lastly of Burlington Ontario; predeceased by parents Frank Morgan SYER (1923) and Maud Lillian SYER (née) (1969,) and by brother Ralph Evans SYER (1932;) survived by his wife of 63 years, Frances Teresa SYER (née,) and seven children: Robert Marven (Marg HEEMSKERK) of Toronto, David Dirk (Mimi CHAMPAGNE) of Shelburne Nova Scotia, Susan Frances (Brian RIKLEY) of Hudson Québec, Michael Stanley of Oakville, Timothy William (Marilyn MacGREGOR) of Milton Ontario, Deborah Anne (Barry BALL) of Brampton Ontario and Dani Elizabeth (Brian FINNEY) of Orlando Florida; and by fifteen grandchildren: Sheri Lynne SYER (Michael PINNOCK) of San Jose California, Wendy Frances SYER (Kevin OUGH) of Peterborough Ontario and Julia Helen SYER (Pat PELLEGRINI) of Ajax Ontario; David Dirk SYER (Doris HOO) of Whitby Ontario and Judith Gail SUSLA (Joe SUSLA) of Oakville Brian Joseph Rikley (Eva GJERSTAD) and Toni Lauren RIKLEY (Dave KRINDLE) of Hudson; Cassidy Anne SYER (Danny PIETRONIRO) of Montréal, Michael Timothy SYER of Victoria, British Columbia and Robert Christopher SYER of London Ontario; Thomas William SYER and Douglas Donald SYER of Milton; and Hayley Elizabeth FINNEY, Brian James FINNEY and Kyle James FINNEY of Orlando; and by nine great-grandchildren: Skylar Syer OUGH of Peterborough and Julian Robert Domenico PELLEGRINI of Ajax; Robert Marven SYER, James Michael SYER and David Dirk SYER of Whitby and Erin Nicole SUSLA of Oakville; and Austin Tyler RIKLEY- KRINDLE, David Shane RIKLEY- KRINDLE and Joseph Cody RIKLEY- KRINDLE of Hudson; also, by nephew Richard Frank SYER of Lake Placid Florida, grand-nephew Michael Charles SYER of Ann Arbor Michigan and by brother-in-law Dr. Patrick Gaynor LYNES of Brampton and his family. An Anglican graveside service was held at St. Jude's Cemetery in Oakville on May 22, 2003. Expressions of respect may be sent to the family at 2455 Milltower Court Mississauga, Ontario L5N 5Z6 or by eMail to RMS@The RMSGroup.net gifts may be made to a charity of choice. A child is sleeping: An old man gone. ­ James Joyce

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CHAMPAGNE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
COLQUHOUN, Stephen Murray
It is with great sadness that we announce that Stephen Murray COLQUHOUN died suddenly on Wednesday, June 18th, 2003 in Thunder Bay, Ontario. Steve will be sorely missed and always cherished by his wife Maria (née SALATINO,) sons Stevie and Jamie, his sisters Liz (Mike EVANS), Marg (Brian WEBSTER), Mary Louise (Paul RADDEN,) and brother Bob (Judy COLQUHOUN.) He died too young. First and foremost in Stevie's life was always Maria and his boys. He will also be missed by his in-laws Maria and Giacomo SALATINO, his wife's sisters Rosa (Cheslan CHOMYCZ,) Anna (Chris KELOS), Gina (Dan CHAMPAGNE), Aunt and Uncle Jim and Cappy COLQUHOUN. A funeral was held at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church on Monday, June 23, 2003. In lieu of flowers, a donation to a trust fund for his children, c/o any branch of the Bank of Nova Scotia, account #006870000485 would be greatly appreciated.

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CHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-12 published
Cecilia Pik-Ling TAM
Just over a week after being diagnosed with cancer, died peacefully at Scarborough General Hospital with her loving family at her side on February 9, 2003. She was 54. She will be sadly missed by her husband Paul and children Janice and Anthony. Dear sister to Paulson LEE and his wife Winifred WONG, Anita LEE and her husband Choy Ping YIN, Leslie LEE and her husband Gilbert HUNG, Antonia LEE and her husband Norman TU, Josephine LEE and her husband William CHAN, Bernard LEE and his wife Happy SHEE. Predeceased by her parents LEE Chun Kwok and LO Kwei Yuen as well as her siblings LEE Pik Kwan, Betty LEE, Elsie LEE and her husband Chau Kai Hang, and LEE Pik Shan. Francis LEE, Betty LEE's husband, will also miss Ceci. Loving sister-in-law to Peter TAM and his wife Julianna CHEUNG, Alice TAM and her husband Charles YAM, Henry TAM and his wife Teresa TSANG. Her many relatives and Friends will miss her kindness and beauty. She passed away with extraordinary grace, courage, and faith. Surely God was on her side. Her selfless devotion will be remembered by all the people she has touched during her shortened lifetime. Family and Friends may visit at the Jerrett Funeral Home ­ North York Chapel, 6191 Yonge Street, North York (2 lights South of Steeles Ave.) on Wednesday from 6 ­ 9 p.m. and Thursday from 2 ­ 4 and 6 ­ 9 p.m. There will be no visitation on Friday. The Funeral Mass will be on Saturday February 15, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. at St. Bonaventure Roman Catholic Church, 1300 Leslie St. (at Lawrence Ave. East.). Private burial for family members only. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Cecilia TAM Memorial Fund at 42 Fulham Street, Scarborough, Ontario, M1S 2A5.

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CHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-22 published
CURRIE, Alda Christina (née MAIR)
(1932-2003) We regret to announce the death of our mother and friend, she died peacefully at home surrounded by family and Friends. She was predeceased by her husband James CURRIE (1991.) Alda was a loving, caring, compassionate person and will be missed by many her children Bob (Charlotte YATES,) Andy (Rose CHAN,) Mary (John WOOD), Stewart, John (Elizabeth MASTROUTUCCI), and her seven much loved grand children, and her siblings, Arlington MAIR and Kathleen BURSEY, and much loved by her in-laws. During her illness Alda was cared for by her cousin Mary Ann DEACON and her sister Kathleen, and supported by her family and Friends. A Service to celebrate Alda's life will be held at the Beaconsfield United Church, 202 Woodside Road, Beaconsfield, Quebec at 1 p.m. on Monday, February 24, 2003. Donations in her name may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, and the Victoria Order of Nurses, and Child Haven.

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CHANDA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-02 published
An active life of kindness and empathy
The wife of former Globe and Mail editor and senator always reached out to others
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, April 2, 2003 - Page R7
In Florence DOYLE, Friends and family saw someone who throughout her life actively lived her Catholic faith and embodied the qualities of kindness and compassion.
"My mom was always very concerned about the people in her immediate reach," said her daughter Judith DOYLE. " Her sense of empathy and concern for others guided her. People felt safe near her."
Whether it was chauffeuring her family around or taking an elderly neighbour on an outing to the horse races, Mrs. DOYLE, wife of former Globe and Mail editor and senator Richard (Dic) DOYLE, was always conscious of others. Mrs. DOYLE died on March 20 in a Toronto hospital after suffering a stroke. She was 78.
Known as Flo to family and Friends, Mrs. DOYLE also earned the affectionate nickname of "Sarge" from her family for her knack of keeping watch over their schedules and well-being. At one point, she was the only family member with a driver's licence and would faithfully drive her husband to work and their children to various places. She also kept track of the family's money matters and would ensure at tax season that everyone filed on time. Later, she nursed her husband through a bout with throat cancer and with diabetes.
"Her family was the centrepiece of her life," said Colin McCULLOUGH, a former Globe reporter and newspaper publisher.
Sharing in her husband's professional life, Mrs. DOYLE travelled with him, attended functions and opened their home to Friends and colleagues. "I didn't enjoy myself without her," Mr. DOYLE said.
Aside from her responsibilities at home and at church, where she helped with various charitable works, Mrs. DOYLE enjoyed a good game of cards. Her bridge club met regularly for 40 years. One favourite memory was from a trip she and Mr. DOYLE took to China in the early 1980s, when she travelled down the Yangtze River playing cards with their guides.
Florence Barbara CHANDA was born on November 30, 1924 in Lynedoch, Ontario, the youngest of six children to farmers Frank and Franis CHANDA. Her early ancestors had cleared the land in this southwestern part of the province using workhorses. They grew turnips and later tobacco. Mrs. DOYLE was very close to her mother, who considered her last child "a gift" because she had her later in life, Judith DOYLE said.
After her father was killed in a car accident when she was about eight years old, Florence was put to work in the tobacco fields and remained on the farm until her older brother took over and she and her mother moved to nearby Chatham. In town, she attended a Catholic high school but soon suffered another tragedy when her mother died. Left without parents, she moved into a local boarding house run by a generous woman remembered as Mrs. Con SHAY/SHEA.
After high school, she found work at Libby's Foods and rose to the rank of office manager. Around that time, she met Dic DOYLE, a young reporter at The Chatham Daily News. The couple married in Chatham in January, 1953.
Not long after they were married, Mrs. DOYLE moved to Toronto, where her husband was by that time at The Globe and Mail. Hired as a copy reader on the news desk in 1951, Mr. DOYLE became editor and then the paper's editor-in-chief from 1963 to 1983.
Judith DOYLE remembers her parent's house as an open and welcoming place. Late at night after Mr. DOYLE and his colleagues left The Globe's office, they would often venture over to the house to talk and unwind from a busy day.
Cameron SMITH, a former editor at The Globe, said of Mrs. DOYLE: "She was one of the most welcoming people that I've known. She made me feel good about whatever I was doing."
Judith will never forget the only Christmas she experienced away from her mother. It was the early 1980s and Judith was in Nicaragua to make a documentary. Mrs. DOYLE managed to track her down and sent a Christmas cake. When the cake arrived, Judith remembers the joy of slicing it into slivers for a group of foreign journalists.
Years later when Judith made another documentary about an Ojibway reserve in Northern Ontario, Mrs. DOYLE befriended some of the people from the reserve when they visited Toronto.
Mrs. DOYLE extended her kindness to animals. Working in the garden of her Toronto home, Mrs. DOYLE could be heard chattering away to the birds and animals, Judith said. The family has photographs of her feeding foxes in the backyard.
"She was the kind of person who had raccoons following her around, " Judith said.
After Mr. DOYLE was appointed to the Senate in 1985, the couple moved to Ottawa. Their years in the capital were among their happiest. They made close Friends and Mrs. DOYLE enjoyed heading across the river to Hull with a friend and a few rolls of quarters to do some gambling. "She had the capacity for developing Friendships that went on throughout her life," Mr. DOYLE said. "She was interested in people."
Florence DOYLE leaves her husband Richard, sister Clara HILLIARD, son Sean and daughter Judith.

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CHANDA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
DOYLE, The Honourable Richard James, O.C. Died peacefully on April 8, 2003 in the Toronto Hospital in his 80th year. Dic DOYLE was born on March 10th, 1923 in Toronto and moved with his parents, Lillian and James DOYLE, to Chatham, Ontario where he attended McKeough Public School and the Chatham Collegiate Institute with his brothers William and Francis and his sister, Ruby Louise KEIL, all of whom predeceased him. He would want us to mention that he was the grand_son of Fan Gibson HILTS who taught him when he was ten to draw parallel columns on brown wrapping paper and to write stories to fill them. In January 1940, he joined the reporting staff of the Chatham Daily News where he remained until 1942 when he joined the Royal Canadian Air Force. After training in Vancouver and Nova Scotia, he joined 115 Squadron Royal Air Force Bomber Command. He was engaged in operations in the European Theatre until the war's end when his crew was assigned to the movement of Canadian Prisoners of War from liberated camps to the United Kingdom. He retired from the Royal Canadian Air Force with the rank of flying officer. In the summer of 1945, DOYLE returned to the Chatham Daily News as city editor. Apart from a one-year stint at a public relations job at the Canada and Dominion Sugar Company, he remained at the Chatham News until 1951 when he was hired as a copy reader at The Globe and Mail in Toronto. He married the lovely Florence CHANDA in Chatham in 1953, and they moved together to Toronto, taking a small apartment on Harbord Street where the University of Toronto Robarts Library now stands. They moved to the Beaches before their children Judith and Sean arrived in the late 1950's. Subsequent jobs at The Globe and Mail included Night City Editor, Editor of the newly-launched Weekly Globe and Mail. When he was called to the Senate of Canada in 1985, he had been editor of the paper for 20 years - a longer period than that served by any editor other than the paper's founder. In the course of that service he received honourary doctorates from St. Francis Xavier and King's College Universities, and was named an Officer of the Order of Canada. In his years in the Senate, DOYLE was active in a number of committees, in particular the Internal Economy and Legal and Constitutional Committees. When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY asked DOYLE to come to Ottawa, he was aware of his record in print as a Senate critic. He invited the editor to share with others in an on-going campaign to enhance the effectiveness of the Upper Chamber in the Parliamentary process. When DOYLE left the Senate, he recalled the challenge and insisted the goal was within sight. Richard DOYLE was the author of two books, The Royal Story and Hurly Burly: A Time at the Globe. He was named to the Canadian Newspaper Hall of Fame. Richard DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean, and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. After celebrating their 50th anniversary in January of this year, Dic's beloved wife Flo passed away suddenly and peacefully on March 20. They were parted for less than three weeks. Funeral service will be held at Trinity College Chapel, 6 Hoskin Avenue, on Wednesday, April 16 at 2: 30 p.m. A reception will follow. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, 20 Holly Street, Suite 101, Toronto M4S 3B1.

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CHANDELIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
DICKIE, William Hamilton Caldow
Born in Renfrew, Scotland September 29th, 1905 - died in Huntsville, Ontario on June 10th, 2003, after a long, happy and productive life. Predeceased by his devoted wife Anna Elizabeth (WHITE/WHYTE.) Survived by his children, Carol, (Michael MOFFAT,) Billy (Janet LAW) and Susan CHANDELIER, grandchildren, Blake and Gregory O'BRIEN (Sandy FORSYTH,) Jonathan and Kirk\Marshall, Christine and Bobby DICKIE, great-grandchildren, Duncan, Charlotte and Eric O'BRIEN. He will be remembered for his distinguished career in industrial and labour relations, his dry (just add scotch) humour, quick wit and great sense of fairness. A celebration of his life will be held August 9th at his home on Lake of Bays where tales will be told and favourite noontime refreshments served. If desired, donations may be made to the Huntsville Hospital Foundation, 354 Muskoka Road 3 North, Huntsville, P1H 1H7.

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CHANDLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-24 published
Died This Day -- Dorothy COLLINS, 1994
Thursday, July 24, 2003 - Page R7
Singer and actor born Marjorie CHANDLER in Windsor, Ontario, on November 18, 1926; in 1950s, performed on television's Your Hit Parade; sang trademark Be Happy, Go Lucky for sponsor Lucky Strike cigarettes; later performed weekly top hits; in the 1960s, demonstrated flair for comedy in helping set up gags on unwitting victims for Allen Funt's Candid Camera; married to bandleader/composer Raymond SCOTT, with whom she ran a record label; starred in original Broadway cast of Stephen Sondheim's Follies; regarded as one of finest vocalists of her era; died of heart attack in New York.

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CHANDRAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
CHANDRAN, Beverley Anne
On Friday, March 7, 2003, in her 50th year, Beverley was called to, once again, be one with the Creator of Creation. She went with a blazing smile of glory in her soul, while giving her unselfish, unstoppable gratitude in peace, tranquility, and a twinkle in her eye. At home in Erin, Ontario with her loved ones. In their 29th year of marriage, ever beloved part of Clarence; eternally loving mother of sons Justin (23) and his wife Jennifer; Liam (21) and Keddy (19.) Only daughter of Ambrose and Theresa CARROLL and sister of Gary (Marlene), D'Arcy (Pam) and Paul (Harriet). Only daughter-in-law of Geoff and Lena CHANDRAN and sister-in-law of Brinda McLAUGHLIN (John.) Permanent thanks to dearest and giving Friends, old and new. And special thanks to: Dr. Alan FRIEDMAN and staff, Dr. Henry FRIEDMAN of Duke University Medical Center; Dr. Stephen TREMONT and staff of Rex Hospital Cancer Clinic Dr. Julian ROSENMAN and staff of University of North Carolina Radiation Oncology Clinic; Dr. Lew STOCKS and staff, Dr. Mike DELISSIO and staff, Dr. Robert ALLEN and staff, Dr. Donald BROWN, all of Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina, U.S.A. Dr. Peter COLE of Orangeville, Ontario, and the nursing staff of Robertson and Brown of Kitchener, Ontario. Visitation and a Celebration of Beverley's life will take place at her home: #4998, 10th Sideroad of Erin, Ontario (north of Ballinafad Road, south of 5th Sideroad). Visitation for family and Friends will be held on Sunday, March 9, 2003, from 2 pm to 8 pm. On Monday, March 10, 2003, there will be a private family Funeral Mass, after which, Friends and family are invited to participate in a Celebration of Beverley's life from 3 pm. to 8 pm. In lieu of flowers, the family respectfully requests donations be made to the American Cancer Society (P.O. Box 102454, Atlanta, Georgia 303068-2454) or The Canadian Cancer Society (Wellington County Unit, 214 Speedvale Avenue, W. Unit 4A, Guelph, Ontario N1H 1C4) Arrangements entrusted to Butcher Family Funeral Home, 5399 Main Street, South, Erin, Ontario, Canada. For more information call 519-833-2231.

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CHANG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-19 published
LEWIS, Paul
Paul Lewis, age 90, died suddenly on Saturday, August 16, 2003 in Pembroke, Ontario. Beloved husband of Sarah Boone LEWIS (nee SMITH) and devoted father to Christine LEWIS (Gary CHANG;) Marion LEWIS (Billie BROCK;) Alan LEWIS (Kerry CALVERT.) Grandfather to Georgia BARKER, Robert CHANG and Ray LEWIS. Predeceased by sister Mary THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Brother-in-law to Davis (Catherine) SMITH of Sarnia Ontario; uncle to Ian THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, the late Scott SMITH, and Grant, Sally Ross SMITH and Price SMITH. Paul was born in Toronto to Marion and Thomas LEWIS. He lived a full and varied life working as a chemical engineer on three continents. Raising his family in Deep River, Ontario, he retired from the Atomic Energy of Canada to Beachburg, Ontario where he continued his interest in gardening and his love of nature. A reception to celebrate his life for family and Friends will be held at Supples Landing Retirement Home in Pembroke on Friday August 22 at 2: 00. In lieu of flowers, a donation to your favourite charity would be appreciated.

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CHANNING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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