CARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-21 published
Norman Wesley CARD
By Julie PLANCKE Friday, March 21, 2003 - Page A24
Father, farmer. Born May 18, 1913, in Walsh, Ontario Died October 25, 2002, in Simcoe, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 89.
Norman Wesley CARD was born on the farm that was in his family for generations. My mom recalls her Sunday afternoon drives with her father, when it was just her and him riding in his truck, talking and taking note of how other farmers' crops were coming along. When she was young, she would often join Granny and Grandpa at the Walsh Hall for dances. Grandpa especially enjoyed square dancing as a younger man.
In his youth, my Uncle Don spent time with Grandpa in the tobacco fields. Some of Uncle Don's fondest memories of his time spent with his father were later in life: the days they shared splitting wood on the farm. It was the sharing of physical activity and the talks that followed that meant the most to Uncle Don.
I would ride with my grandfather on the tractors, be picked up by him from the tobacco kiln and sent down the conveyor to my Grandma at the bottom, or sit beside him in his truck when he'd take me to the Britt Club to play shuffleboard. This was in the day when women weren't allowed, but Grandpa knew that rule didn't apply to my sister Laurie and me. And, Grandpa taught us about arrowheads, which we found frequently in the fields, and pointed out beaver dams and wildflowers on the property. Farmers, like my grandfather, respect the land and live a clean and healthy life on it. It was hard work, but it was work he could be proud of, and we were proud of him.
We can't imagine Norman CARD's life without my grandmother, Hazel. That became crystal clear when she suffered a stroke that would forever change both their lives. They had to leave behind the farm and married life as they'd always known it. After my grandmother went into the hospital, separated for the first significant period of time from Grandpa since they'd wed, they didn't endure more than a few days without seeing each other. Before his own poor health precluded it, he was at Norfolk General Hospital every day, opening Granny's juice, playing cards with her and other hospital "inmates" (as my Granny calls them), visiting with Friends and family, or simply watching Wheel of Fortune while we chatted around him.
There have been many Friends made through Grandpa's community life. He was the longest-standing member of Walsh's Donnybrook Fair Board, a member of the Shrine Club and of the Britt Club. The association he most valued, and the one that took him from home most frequently, was the Masonic Lodge. I often asked Grandpa about secret handshakes and whoopee cushions, but he wouldn't betray his lodge secrets. That part of his life was important to him.
Our family has suffered significant challenges and losses and the most tragic and difficult was the accident that took Laurie from us in 1995. Grandpa silently supported my mom and she leaned on his strength and faith, just as she had when she and my father ended their marriage. Grandpa didn't say much, but he remained strong for her, even though he was dealing with his own pain. Losing Laurie really shook my grandfather's faith. For my grandparents, their church was always a major part of their lives and continued to be.
Norman CARD's life shines brightly in all of our hearts, our memories and in the faces and mannerisms of every member of his family. His body gave up, but I believe his spirit remains. There are many times throughout the rest of our lives that Grandpa's presence will be felt and his many contributions to our lives will be remembered and appreciated. He may have been the strong, silent type, but the life he lived shouted love.
Julie is Norman's granddaughter.

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CARDINAL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
HILLSON
-In loving memory of Maxwell Alexander "Bud" Hillson, who passed away at the age of 77 years. Husband of the late Katherine "Kay" (TURINECK,) July 4, 1999.
You had a smile for everyone
You had a heart of gold
You left the sweetest memories
This world could ever hold
No one knows how much we miss you
No one knows the bitter pain
We have suffered since we lost you
Life has never been the same
Those we love don't go away
They walk beside us every day
Unseen, unheard but always near
Still loved, still missed and very dear.
A father's legacy is not riches
possessions or worldly goods
It's the way he lived,
the lives he touched, the promises he kept
It's the man he was
Your life, Dad was a job well done
and now you have left us to be with Mom.
Loving father of Bernadine, husband Phillip HARRIS of Ottawa, Maxine, husband Ronald ALBERTS of London, Edward of Little Current, Roseanne of Calgary and Kevin of Little Current. Remembered by brothers Maxime, wife Shirley, Randolph wife Helen. By sisters Marie, husband Gene ARMOUR, Agnes CARDINAL, Rita DUNDON, Judith, husband Wifred GUAY, Georgina GAGNON and Dorothy MASSON.

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CARDINAL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
CROWE, Doris Mary (née SCANES)
Born in Winnipeg, July 12, 1921, daughter of Richard SCANES and Alice PAYNE, sister of Lenore and Jimmy, married Marshall CROWE, December 5, 1942. Graduate of United College, Winnipeg (B.A.: History and English) awarded highest standing in her class. Doris died on Friday, September 26, 2003, surrounded by family and Friends, after a long and spirited battle with cancer. Beloved wife, dear mother of Tom (Allison), Alison, Helen (David), Sheila (Brian), Abigail, Seumien (Nabo), Le (Ping) and Nick (Irene). Delighted and indefatigable grandmother of Jessica, Caleb, Innie, Susan, David, Adam, Cathy, Yuli, Jonathan, Ben, Rebecca and Ariana. Predeceased by her dear Friends Ann PHELPS and Starr SOLOMON. During World War 2, Doris worked as a reporter for the Vancouver Sun and taught high school. After the war, she accompanied Marshall on diplomatic postings, chiefly to New York and Moscow. During the 60's, she worked for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio and wrote and narrated a series of documentaries on life in the Soviet Union. She also worked tirelessly for the Toronto French School in its early years, helping to establish the first school library. Doris studied public relations in the early 70's, and did a variety of work in that field, including shepherding Harold CARDINAL through the Ottawa launching of ''The Unjust Society''. She also served as public relations director for the Canadian Nurses' Association. She was a member of the Committee for an Independent Canada and campaigned for the provincial and federal Liberal parties in many elections, beginning with Mitchell SHARP's campaign in the Toronto riding of Eglinton in 1963. In her 70's, Doris returned to university to study English history, Russian and Chinese. for the last 30 years of her life, Doris focused on the farm that she and Marshall ran near Portland. Among many enterprises, Doris was instrumental in introducing the Dexter cow into Canada. According to Doris' wishes, there will be no funeral. Arrangements by Scotland Funeral Home, Elgin. The family will receive Friends on Saturday, October 4, 12 to 8 p.m., at the farm, 4421 Old Kingston Road, Portland. In lieu of flowers, donations to the hospice, St. Vincent de Paul Hospital, Brockville (613) 342-4461, ext. 2271 would be most gratefully received. Their compassion, skill and generosity of spirit did much to ease Doris' last days when she could no longer be at her beloved farm. In memory of Doris: plant a garden, serve paella, learn a language, read a book to a child, be kind to an animal, support universal health care, live at peace with nature.

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CARIGNAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
Gordon Kenneth FLEMING/FLEMMING
By Jack FORTIN Thursday, February 13, 2003, Page A30
Musician, husband, father. Born August 3, 1931, in Winnipeg. Died August 31, 2002, in Scarborough, Ontario, following a stroke, aged 71.
Gordie FLEMING/FLEMMING was a remarkable music talent, known internationally as a master of the accordion, especially in the jazz idiom. He was a life member of Local 149 of the Toronto Musicians' Association.
In show-business vernacular, Gordie was "born in a trunk." He began playing accordion when his older brother gave him lessons. His musical ability was such that he began performing publicly at the age of five. His schoolteachers often saw him being whisked away in a taxi to perform at theatres and radio stations in Winnipeg. By the age of 10, he was a working member of various bands in that city.
In 1949, Gordie lost his accordion in a fire at a Winnipeg hotel. With the insurance money, he headed for the bright lights of Montreal where he soon became an important part of that city's musical life. His accordion ability was complemented by the fact that he was also a gifted arranger and composer.
He had a marvellous ability to improvise and could string out complex bebop lines, leaving his listeners in awe. He often slipped a jazz phrase into ballads or commercial tunes, confirming that jazz was indeed his first love.
One of Montreal's busiest musicians, he wrote for local orchestras, shows, radio and television. He had perfect pitch and often wrote without reference to a keyboard. He was at home in every type of music from classics to jazz. For several years, he worked at the National Film Board as a composer and musician.
In Montreal, Gordie performed with many show business headliners: there was a wealth of home-grown talent in Montreal, such as Oscar PETERSON and Maynard FERGUSON, as well as other jazz musicians who were beginning to be noticed.
Gordie had said that when when he first heard bebop it was like entering another world. As his career indicates, he had no trouble in that world. He worked with many personalities including: Charlie PARKER, Mel TORMÉ, Hank SNOW, Lena HORNE, Englebert HUMPERDINCK, Dennis DAY, Gordon MacRAE, Cab CALLOWAY, Nat King COLE, Cat STEVENS, Rich LITTLE, Billy ECKSTEIN, Pee Wee HUNT, Arthur GODFREY and Buddy DEFRANCO.
He also performed with Tommy AMBROSE, Allan MILLS, Wally KOSTER, Tommy HUNTER, Bert NIOSI, Wayne and Shuster, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation jazz shows with Al BACULIS, and many other Canadian jazz musicians.
On Montreal's French music scene, Gordie performed on radio and television with Emile GENEST, Ti-Jean CARIGNAN, André GAGNON and Ginette RENO. He was a featured soloist with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra on several occasions.
Internationally, Gordie toured France in 1952 and performed with Edith PIAF and Tino ROSSI. He had the honour to perform for former prime minister Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU at a Commonwealth Conference.
He participated with other top Canadian musicians in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation tour to entertain Canadian and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Europe in 1952 and 1968.
For me, a memorable experience was playing in a group with Gordie for several winters in Florida. A popular member of the Panama City Beach family of musicians, Gordie looked forward to his winter trek south. Many of the American musicians will miss him, as will the many snowbirds who looked forward to hearing him each year.
His extensive repertoire allowed Gordie to author a book called Music of the World, in which he wrote the music to 280 songs from more than 30 countries.
Gordie leaves his wife of 47 years, Joanne, and seven children.
Jack FORTIN is Gordie's friend.

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CARLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-08 published
Observers hail ASPER contribution
But views on Israel and direction of news coverage also provoked controversy
By Richard BLOOM and Paul WALDIE Wednesday, October 8, 2003 - Page B7
In its early days, CanWest Global Communications Corp. may have had the dubious moniker of The Love Boat network, but there is no doubt Izzy ASPER made "very significant" contributions to Canadian media, industry observers said yesterday.
At the same time, his actions as head of the media empire weren't without controversy.
Mr. ASPER died yesterday at 71. A tax lawyer by training, he is more commonly known as the founder of Winnipeg-based CanWest the parent of the Global network of television stations, and which, in 2000, engineered a multibillion-dollar purchase of Southam Newspaper Group, National Post and other assets from Conrad BLACK's Hollinger Inc.
Glenn O'FARRELL, president and chief executive officer of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters, said Mr. ASPER left a huge broadcasting legacy.
"The Canadian broadcasting system has been built over the last number of decades through the efforts of some fairly significant entrepreneurs, and Izzy ASPER was clearly one of those," Mr. O'FARRELL said. "He brought an incredibly astute vision of what could be done and what should be done in the name of strengthening Canada's place both domestically and internationally."
Mr. O'FARRELL worked at CanWest for 12 years and said working for Mr. ASPER was stimulating. "It was absolutely a privilege to work with somebody who possessed the depth and the breadth of his intellectual curiosity and interests."
Mr. ASPER also provoked controversy over the years with his views on Israel and his drive to converge news coverage at CanWest's newspapers.
In 2002, he fired Russell MILLS, publisher of the Ottawa Citizen, after an apparent conflict over editorial independence. At the time, CanWest forced papers across the chain to carry editorials written by officials in the company's head office. The policy sparked a barrage of complaints about a lack of editorial freedom at the papers. The removal of Mr. MILLS prompted a wave of protests against CanWest from Parliament to media organizations around the world. Mr. MILLS sued and reached a settlement with the company a few months later.
Mr. ASPER's staunch defence of Israel also left him open to charges that CanWest's papers do not fairly cover events in the Middle East. In a speech last year, he attacked media coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and accused several media outlets of having an anti-Israel bias. He singled out coverage by CNN, The New York Times, British Broadcasting Corp. and Canadian Broadcasting Corp. and said anti-Israel bias was a "cancer" destroying media credibility.
He has often criticized the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. in particular for what he has called the broadcaster's anti-Israel coverage. Yesterday, a Canadian Broadcasting Corp. official declined to comment on Mr. ASPER's views.
Still, amid the controversy, Christopher DORNAN, director of Carleton University's School of Journalism and Communication, praised Mr. ASPER's role in Canadian journalism.
"We're still, in the entertainment area, overshadowed by the exports of the juggernaut to the south. What's really ours is non-fiction, it's journalism... in as much as Israel ASPER built CanWest into a major, major player in that sector, his contribution is clearly significant."
Added Mr. DORNAN: " There are uncharitable souls that would argue that CanWest's contribution to the Canadian cultural landscape was negligible.
"Because when CanWest built itself as a network, in the early days, it was known as The Love Boat Network -- all they did was buy cheap, populist American programming, got ratings and contributed very little to Canadian cultural production. They made very little programming of their own and what they did make was in grudging compliance with Canadian content regulations," he said.
Mr. DORNAN argued that the Canadian media industry is not about keeping the Americans at bay, but instead about funnelling in highly desired American content in the most advantageous way possible.
Mr. ASPER built a television network that now employs "people from network executives to janitors. Those jobs would not have existed had he not done that. And now, of course, they do actually make some programming," Mr. DORNAN said.
Vince CARLIN, chairman of the School of Journalism at Ryerson University in Toronto, agreed, noting that history books won't likely describe him as a great endorser of Canadian culture.
"That's not what he was about. He was a businessman," said Mr. CARLIN, the former head of Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Newsworld, who had met with Mr. ASPER on numerous occasions.
"He learned how to use those [business] skills to create very dynamic business enterprises, but [CanWest] would never put cultural considerations ahead of business considerations," Mr. CARLIN said.
He explained how in his company's early days, Mr. ASPER insisted to government officials that his chain of television stations was not a "network" but instead a "system," because being dubbed a network was less advantageous from a business perspective. When regulations shifted, Mr. ASPER changed gears, calling the stations a network, Mr. CARLIN said.
Mr. ASPER was also involved in a bitter legal battle with Robert LANTOS, a prominent Toronto-based filmmaker. Mr. ASPER sued Mr. LANTOS for libel over comments he made during a speech in 1998. In the speech, Mr. LANTOS described Mr. ASPER as "the forces of darkness, whose greed is surpassed only by their hypocrisy." Mr. ASPER said the comments left the impression he was dishonest and disloyal.

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CARLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-14 published
CARLIN, Agnes Kathryn
Died quietly at home surrounded by her family on Sunday, October 12, 2003 at age 56. Agnes is survived by her husband Richard LATHWELL, her sister Eva CHIRSTY and her brother Steve GRISZBACHER. Resting at the Ogden Funeral Home, 646 St. Clair Avenue West (West of Bathurst) on Wednesday afternoon from 4-8 p.m. Funeral Mass on Thursday morning at 11 a.m. in St. Clare Catholic Church (St. Clair. East of Dufferin). Cremation to follow.

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CARLSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-11 published
JOHNSTON, Bruce F., B.Eng., F.I.C.A., Royal Canadian Air Force-Canada and Overseas, F/O Fighter Pilot-417 Squadron; Graduate McGill University, Mechanical Engineering; Lever Brothers Ltd., Canada and United Kingdom; McKim Advertising Ltd., Toronto, President and Chief Executive Officer, Chairman Executive Committee and Chief Executive Officer; The Spectrum Group Ltd., Toronto, Chairman of the Board and President; Sanlisco Ltd., Marketing and Management Consultants, President; HWB Inc., Director; Quarry Integrated Communications Inc., Director; Institute of Canadian Advertising, Toronto, Past President and Governor, F.I.C.A.-Fellow of the Institute; Long time member Mississaugua Golf and Country Country Club and The Meadows Golf and Country Club, Sarasota, Florida. - After a courageous struggle with cancer, Bruce died at the Credit Valley Hospital, Palliative Care Unit on Friday, October 10, 2003 at the age of 79. Much loved husband of Bunty (née MOFFAT) for 47 years. Loving father of Scott, Lisa, Sandi and Rick CARLSON, and grandfather of Meghan, Malcolm, Neil and Tyler. Dear brother of Helen and her husband Carl RAVNAAS and their family. Many thanks to Dr. Robert SAULS and the Palliative Care nurses for their special care. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter 'Peel' Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga, (Hwy. 10 north of Queen Elizabeth Way) on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Service of Remembrance will be held in the Chapel on Wednesday, October 15, 2003 at 3 p.m. Private cremation with entombment at Glen Oaks Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to the Carlo Fidani Peel Regional Cancer Centre, c/o Credit Valley Hospital or to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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CARLYLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-03 published
Archibald David CARLYLE
By Sue HABERGER, Monday, November 3, 2003 - Page A14
Farmer, father, mentor. Born September 1, 1912, in Chesterville, Ontario Died June 30, in Blackfalds, Alberta., of a heart attack, aged 90.
Archie CARLYLE was an ordinary man with an extraordinary philosophy that reached far beyond the Blindman River Valley in central Alberta, where he and his wife, Sarah, raised four children and farmed for 66 years.
Archie never completed university but those who knew him would say there were few men smarter or wiser. Everyone who met Archie went forth into the world with greater humanity, curiosity, and enthusiasm as a result of the contact. Archie's philosophy of life sorted itself into three great lessons. Lesson One: People are wonderful. Archie was intensely interested in people and he saw only the good in them. Even as a kid, his nickname was "Biz" -- short for busybody -- because he would question everyone he met for details of their lives. Archie understood that what people really want to talk about is themselves. Through his astute interrogations, he often discovered some way he could help people and this he would do without hesitation. We likely have no idea how many people Archie helped because he never tooted his own horn -- but when more than 350 people showed up at his 90th birthday party, it was obvious that Archie had touched a lot of people. And he was the only one at the party who knew everybody by name.
In the 1940's, each family in the Blindman Valley was actively involved in erecting poles and stringing wires in order to have telephone service -- a party line with as many as 25 other families. Archie used the party line to great advantage, "rubbering" in on other conversations so he always had a handle on what was going on in the valley and who might need help. It was not a love of gossip so much as an abiding interest in building community.
Lesson Two: The world is amazing. Archie possessed an intense curiosity about the world and he never stopped learning. He kept up on agricultural methods and experimented with cattle breeds and crops. In addition to welcoming the local Grade 4 class to his farm every year, he would organize visits for kids and seniors alike to local fairs, nature sanctuaries, and heritage sites. All of these outings served to inject others with Archie's sense of wonder about the world. He loved the ecology of his own land, even fencing off the corner of a pasture to prevent the cattle from destroying the lady's slipper orchids that grew there.
Archie was also fascinated by medicine. We will never know which of his many personal health experiments gave him 90 years. Was it porridge, alfalfa, gin and raisins, cider vinegar -- or simply his grand sense of humour?
Lesson Three: Work is fun. This is perhaps the greatest lesson of all. Archie loved what he did and he had an extraordinary ability to turn work into play and to make his helpers feel very important. Whenever things got a bit dull, some crisis would arise that needed immediate attention and at times he was even suspected of letting the cattle out just for the fun of rounding them up.
Archie worked with incredible strength and determination. He absolutely never gave up on a problem -- whether it was curing a sick calf or mending a leaky toilet. Although not a big man, he had super strength and could lift lumber, stretch wire, and loosen rusted joints with ease. He never seemed to mind personal discomfort or getting his hands dirty.
Archie's family, Friends and neighbours made it possible for him to stay on his farm. Archie helped build community and community helped sustain him.
Archie's death is a great loss, but he lived life right up to his graceful exit, which occurred, appropriately enough, while he was feeding his dog and cat. He's now gone but his lessons were well taught.
Sue HABERGER is a friend of Archie.

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CARMICHAEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-01 published
CRASHLEY, Lt. Col. J. Douglas, C.M., C.D.
Died Thursday, March 27th, 2003 at the Doctor's Hospital in Nassau, Bahamas. Born in Toronto May 5, 1921. son of the late John Willard and Doris Sanderson CRASHLEY. Predeceased by his beloved wife Elizabeth INGLIS. Dear brother of Doris Crashley PHILLIPS (Brian) of Kennebunk, Maine. He will also be sadly missed by his nieces and nephews. He was a dear friend of Colleen CARMICHAEL and family.
He served with the Governor General's Horse Guards from 1940 was on active service with them from 1941-1945 in England and Italy. He commanded the regiment from 1952-1954. The motto of the regiment, Nulli Secondus (second to none), aptly describes him. He was Past Chairman of the Governor General's Horse Guards Board of Trustees.
He served as Division Chairman for the United Appeal for four years, Past Chairman of the City of Toronto Planning Board, Metropolitan Toronto Planning Board and the City of Toronto Redevelopment Advisory Council. Past President of the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Toronto 1974-1975 and headed a delegation of 100 members on a tour of Eastern Europe and the Baltic countries. Past President of the Art Gallery of Ontario 1972-1974 and Chairman of the King Tutankhamen Exhibition Committee in 1979.
He was the owner of Elgin Motors, Walker House Hotel, Ascot Hotel and Central Precision, and a major shareholder of many other corporations.
In 1978, he was made a Member of the Order of Canada. He was most proud of this honour.
He was a member of the Toronto Club, The York Club, Lyford Cay Club, Royal Canadian Military Institute and The Badminton and Racquet Club.
He will be remembered for his foresight, meticulous attention to detail and business acumen. He had the capacity for making strong personal relationships with many people.
The funeral service will be held at The Cathedral Church of St. James, 65 Church Street, Toronto, at 11: 00 a.m. on Monday, April In lieu of flowers, a memorial donation to the Governor General's Horse Guards Foundation, 137 Hall Street, Richmond Hill, Ontario L4C 4N9 or to a charity of your choice would be most appreciated.

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CARON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
CARON, Joseph Ross
Ross passed away peacefully at The Westmount, Kitchener, on Monday, September 29, 2003, at the age of 72 years. Ross was predeceased by his loving wife, Pegi, who died of cancer in 1998. Cherished father of Denise and her husband Steve BRAUN, Heather, and Yvonne and her husband Jim SCHMIEDENDORF. Proud grandfather of Michelle and her husband Shawn THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Bryan ANDREWS, Megan and Lucas SCHMIEDENDORF, and great-grand_son Jacob THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Survived by his sister, Virginia WRIGHT of Kemptville. Predeceased by his parents, Armand and Phyllis CARON.
Ross was born in Toronto, Ontario, on August 5, 1931, and married Pegi in 1953. In 1954 Ross became a Chartered Accountant, and achieved a lifetime membership in that esteemed organization. Ross was an accomplished swimmer who swam competitively as a youth, at a Masters level with the R.O.W. swim club, and he coached young swimmers in New Hamburg with the Aquatic Aces and the New Hamburg Special Olympics.
He was a kind and gentle man who will be sorely missed by his family and Friends. A special thank you to the staff at the Westmount for their kindness and caring.
Friends are invited to share their memories of Ross with his family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo, Ontario on Wednesday, October 1, 2003 from 2-3 p.m.
A memorial service to celebrate Ross's life will take place on Wednesday at 3 p.m. in the funeral home chapel.
In memory of Ross, donations to the Ontario Special Olympics would be appreciated which may be arranged through the funeral home at 519-745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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CARPENTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-13 published
CARPENTER, Donald B.
Former Toronto resident, died suddenly at his home in Washington, D.C. on August 23, 2003. Mr. CARPENTER lived and worked in Toronto from 1980-1986 as Vice President of Ogilvy and Mather and later, Product Initiatives. At the time of his death Mr. CARPENTER was the Director of Strategic Planning for the U.S. Air Force.
Mr. CARPENTER was the beloved husband of 35 years to Jeanne D. CARPENTER; father of Andrew CARPENTER and his wife Andrea French of Washington, D.C. and Jennifer CARPENTER of Toronto, Ontario brother of Kim CARPENTER and his wife Sue of Nashua, New Hampshire. Memorial service will be held at the Old Post Chapel at Fort Myer on Thursday, October 16, 2003 at 11 a.m. Interment with full honours, Arlington National Cemetery Columbarium. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in his name to the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 3008, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-3008.

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CARR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-21 published
Irene {TAIT/TAITE/TATE} NOE
At Alezandra Hospital, Ingersoll on Monday, May 12, 2003, Irene (TAIT/TAITE/TATE) NOE, of Ingersoll. Wife of the late Earl NOE (1968.) Dear mother of Myra and her husband Larry SHIER of Ongersoll, Judy and her husband Bob JOHNSON of Woodstock, Paul NOE and his wife Connie of Vancouver BC, David NOE and his wife Lynda of Gore Bay, Deborah and her husband Dennis O'BRIEN of Red Deer, Alberta and Chris NOE and his wife Christina of Ingersoll. Also survived by 18 grandchildren and 21 great grandchildren. Friends were received at the McBeth-Dynes Funeral Home, 246 Thames Saint S. Ingersoll on Wednesday, May 14. The Funeral service was held at Saint James Anglican Church, Ingersoll on Thursday, May 15 with Reverend Jim CARR officiating. Interment in Harris Street Cemetery. Memorial donations to Dr. Michael J. Strong A.L.S. Research or Saint James Anglican Church would be appreciated.

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CARR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
SONE, Maurice
Peacefully, on Thursday, March 6, 2003, in his 95th year. Beloved husband of the late Sonya SONE. Loving father of Luby CARR and Ian and Laurie SONE. He will be deeply missed by his treasured grandchildren Matthew and Paul CARR and Judith, Eli, Abigail, David, and Jacob SONE. Survived by his loving sister Min SHANKMAN, sisters and brothers-in-law Dora SENELNICK, Eva SCHOLNICK, Frida JOLSON, David ZIMMERMAN and Willie ZIMMERMAN, and his nieces and nephews and their families. Funeral will be held at Steeles Memorial Chapel, 350 Steeles Ave. W. (between Yonge and Bathurst) on Friday, March 7, 2003 at 1 p.m. Interment at Mount Sinai Cemetery, Beth Shalom Section. Memorial donations to the Baycrest Centre, (416) 785-2875, would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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CARR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
JAMIESON, Joseph Thoburn
Died suddenly, February 25, 2003, in hospital, at Cranbrook, British Columbia. Beloved and loving husband of Ellen Cameron (McFARLANE,) his wife of 45 years. Sadly missed by his two sons, Joseph Alexander (Alec); and Michael Douglas (Laura SALEM), cherished ''Papa'' of Kathleen all of Calgary. Lovingly remembered by his sister Norah (wife of the late Don CARR,) Manotick, Ontario brother, William R. (Pamela MacDOWELL,) Rideau Ferry, Ontario. Predeceased by his sister Catherine E. DAVIDSON, Aberdeen, Scotland. ''Uncle Joe'' will be forever loved and never forgotten by his nieces and nephews Susan WINTER (Bill;) Mary McLAUGHLIN (Peter) and Shannon; Scott (Joanne), Jacqueline and William; Jane Jamieson and other nieces and nephews. Predeceased by very special grandniece Lindsey WINTER. Born at Almonte, Ontario, January 24, 1927, son of the late William Algernon and Catherine Isobel (COCHRAN) JAMIESON. Primary and secondary education at Almonte. Graduated, as a Textile Engineer, from Philadelphia Institute of Technology, 1949. Moved west to British Columbia upon his retirement, in 1991. Following a productive 26 year career, with Canadian General Tower Ltd. of Cambridge Ontario, Joe and Ellen spent many happy years at Nelson, Marysville and Cranbrook, British Columbia. Traveling with Ellen he enjoyed frequent trips back to visit their special Friends in Ontario. Joe seemed to particularly look forward to his fall hunting excursions to visit the Happy Hopeful Hunt Club on Pakenham Mountain. Family members and close Friends have been recipient of the product of his sculpted wood bird carving endeavors of his retirement years. Joe will live forever within the hearts of those of us who loved him. Missed by many.

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CARR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-30 published
A man of uncommon passion and drive
Despite hints of scandal, the scrappy former Liberal member of parliament, who spent a lifetime fighting for social safety nets, earned a reputation as a tireless crusader for the working people
By Ron CSILLAG Special to the Globe and Mail; With a report from staff Saturday, August 30, 2003 - Page F8
He died with his boots on.
John MUNRO, a Trudeau era Liberal warhorse once described as a rumpled fighter who had gone too many rounds, had just put the finishing touches to a barn-burning speech, to be delivered to a Rotary Club, on the evils of concentration of media ownership when he suffered at heart attack at his desk in his Hamilton home on August 19. He was 72.
It was almost just as well that he went suddenly, his daughter, Anne, said in a eulogy, for her father could not stand suffering. Rather, he would not abide it. Suffering had no place in Canada, he reasoned, which is why his name is so closely associated with such social safety nets as medicare, the Canada Pension Plan and improvements to Old Age Security.
More than 500 well-wishers, including old political pals, steel-workers, artists, business people and labourers, packed the James Street Baptist Church last Saturday to laud Hamilton's favourite son, a scrappy lawyer who earned a reputation as a tireless crusader for working people, despite the recurring taint of scandal.
As the Member of Parliament for Hamilton East from 1962 to 1984 and through five cabinet posts, he was proudly on the left of the Liberal Party, alongside people such as Allan MacEACHEN, Judy LAMARSH, Lloyd AXWORTHY, Eugene WHELAN -- and probably Pierre TRUDEAU himself -- fighting for medicare, against capital punishment and in favour of a guaranteed annual income. As minister of national health and welfare, he didn't win the battle for a guaranteed annual income, but he did get the Guaranteed Income Supplement that has made life easier for many seniors. He was also known and often ridiculed -- for being a chain-smoking health minister.
Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN, who entered Parliament a year after Mr. MUNRO, mourned the death of his former cabinet colleague. "We were very good Friends, and I'm terribly sorry that he passed away. He was a very good member of Parliament, and he was a very good minister and a guy who worked very, very hard in all the files that were given to him."
The political bug bit early. At 18, Mr. MUNRO ran for president of the Tribune Society at Westdale Secondary School in Hamilton. Mark NEMIGAN, a lifelong friend, remembers his resourcefulness: "He went to a local bus stop and festooned all the park benches with banners reading, 'Vote for John.' It worked too. He had uncommon drive and passion, even then."
Born in Hamilton on March 26, 1931, to lawyer John Anderson MUNRO and Katherine CARR, a housewife, John Carr MUNRO became a municipal alderman at the age of 23 while attending law school at Osgoode Hall in Toronto.
"I have no idea how he did that," Mr. NEMIGAN says. "The guy didn't sleep."
Mr. MUNRO took his first run at federal politics in the seat of Hamilton West in 1957, but was beaten by Ellen FAIRCLOUGH, who went on to become Canada's first female cabinet minister. In 1962, he switched ridings, and won the seat he would hold for the next 22 years.
With the election of Mr. TRUDEAU in 1968, a string of cabinet positions followed for Mr. MUNRO: minister without portfolio, amateur sport, health and welfare, labour and Indian affairs and northern development, the last earning him the hard-won respect of aboriginal groups.
In the 1968 general election, an aggressive young poll captain named Sheila COPPS worked on Mr. MUNRO's re-election bid. She would go on to replace him in the seat in 1984.
Tom AXWORTHY, who was Mr. TRUDEAU's principal secretary, recalled that the prime minister often turned to Mr. MUNRO for support on progressive positions at the cabinet table: "When we had those kind of debates, he would kind of look over to MUNRO when he wanted to hear the liberal perspective on the issue."
Mr. MUNRO's support for the decriminalization of marijuana led to a perk in December, 1969: A 90-minute chat about drugs with John LENNON and Yoko ONO, fresh from the duo's "bed-in" at Montreal's Queen Elizabeth Hotel. Documents unearthed this spring by a researcher for an Ottawa Beatles Web site revealed that Mr. LENNON joked that while Mr. TRUDEAU and Mr. MUNRO, then health minister, were members of the "establishment," they were both "hip."
"Mr. MUNRO's speech [on the decriminalization of marijuana] was the only political speech I ever heard about that had anything to do with reality that came through to me," Mr. LENNON is quoted as saying in the 12,000-word document.
Contacted by a reporter in May, Mr. MUNRO recalled that the incident, and his stand on cannabis, didn't go over well. "Yeah, I was in a little hot water at the time," he laughed. "Everybody thought I wanted to give the country to the junkies."
Mr. LENNON and Ms. ONO made a distinct impression, he said. "The more I think about it, the more I remember he and his wife were very polite and committed people."
In 1974, the water became considerably hotter when the Royal Canadian Mounted Police raided Mr. MUNRO's campaign headquarters during a probe into kickbacks and bid rigging on Hamilton Harbour dredging contracts.
Around the same time, Mr. MUNRO was criticized for accepting a $500 campaign donation from a union whose leaders were under investigation.
In 1978, he was forced to resign from the cabinet when it was revealed that he had talked to a judge by telephone to give a character reference for a constituent on the day of the person's sentencing for assault. But he bounced back with a tenacity that Mr. TRUDEAU was said to have admired and in 1980 won reappointment to the cabinet.
Mr. MUNRO's stamp on Hamilton was legendary, from the reclamation of land that gave the city Confederation Park, to the Canada Centre for Inland Waters, to the fundraising of more than $50-million for the local airport, renamed in his honour in 1998. "Without a doubt, he was the feistiest, most stubborn person I knew in public life," former mayor Bob MORROW remarked. "I don't think we will ever meet his equal of scaring up funds for Hamilton."
When Mr. TRUDEAU retired in 1984, Mr. MUNRO ran for the Liberal leadership and prime minister. He finished a poor fifth in a field of six. There began what his daughter called the "decade from hell," starting with a four-year Royal Canadian Mounted Police investigation so vigorous, the Mounties even considered using a helicopter to track Mr. MUNRO because the officers assigned to tail him couldn't keep up with his car.
That investigation killed a re-election bid in 1988 and scuttled his marriage to Lilly Oddie MUNRO, a minister in the former Ontario Liberal government. It eventually produced 37 flimsy charges of breach of trust, conspiracy, corruption, fraud and theft stemming from his years as Indian affairs minister. After a trial that dragged on for most of 1991, the judge threw out nearly all the charges without even calling for defence evidence. The Crown later withdrew the rest.
Mr. MUNRO welcomed the verdict as "complete exoneration" but was left with legal bills estimated at nearly $1-million and a reputation in ruins. Swimming in debt (he had to rely on Ontario Legal Aid), he filed a civil suit in 1992, claiming malicious prosecution and maintaining he had been targeted by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to embarrass him. He attempted a political comeback in 1993, only to have Mr. CHRÉTIEN refuse to sign his nomination papers. Mr. MUNRO responded by filing an unsuccessful court challenge seeking to strip Mr. CHRÉTIEN of his power to appoint candidates.
Mr. MUNRO, who had returned to an immigration law practice in Hamilton, felt betrayed by the government's refusal to pay his legal bills, and it took an emotional toll.
"I'm not mad at the world," he said in 1996. "I realized this could totally destroy me if I didn't live a day at a time. You have to impose discipline, or you're finished. The motivation to carry on is voided. There's nothing to look forward to except endless grief."
He finally won nearly $1.4-million in compensation from Ottawa in 1999, but most of the money went to pay taxes, legal bills and other expenses. He could have avoided problems by declaring bankruptcy, but insisted on clearing his debts.
"He was no saint, but he was dedicated and hardworking," said his daughter Susan. "He was deeply hurt."
Mr. MUNRO had no interest in the personal trappings of wealth, she said, adding that he had a weakness only for Chevy Chevettes and homemade muffins. Good thing too, for a proposal for bankruptcy he filed in 1995 showed a monthly living balance of $476.
His last political gasp came in 2000 when he ran unsuccessfully for mayor of Hamilton. Asked in 1996 about writing his memoirs, he said: "I'm not ready. There's no last chapter yet."
Mr. MUNRO leaves his third wife, Barbara, and four children.

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CARRADONNA o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Betty Jane VANHORN (née HOWARD)
In loving memory of Betty Jane VANHORN (née Howard,) October 28, 1935 to October 26, 2003. Suddenly at Mindemoya Hospital on Sunday, October 26, 2003 at the age of 67 years.
Dear wife of John VANHORN of Tehkummah. Loving mother of Hector (Marilyn) of Ice Lake, Jacqueline (Ted) of Cambridge, Becky (Marvin) of Manitowaning, predeceased by Barry (1981), Gilbert (1979). Special grandmother of Tammy, D.J., Tobi (Andy), B.J., Ariana, Tyler, Benjamin, Mikala and two great grandchildren Angelica and Logan John. Will be remembered by siblings, Eleanor (Len) BOND, Tina (Roy) MANDIGO, Dorothy ALLARD, Reta (Charlie) PARKINSON, Lawrence HOWARD, Marie (John) CARRADONNA, Len (Ilene) HOWARD, Tom (Florence) HOWARD. Visitation was held on Tuesday, October 28, 2003.
Funeral Service at 2: 00 pm Wednesday, October 29, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Burial in Elmview Cemetery.

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CARRIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
Visionary performer waged war on trivial art
Her trademark was a experimental process that embraced dance, music, text, mime, clown, ritual and mask
By Paula CITRON Friday, April 11, 2003 - Page R13
Canada has lost a powerful force in experimental theatre and dance. Director, dancer, actor, writer and choreographer Elizabeth SZATHMARY died last month in Toronto.
While she will be remembered as a dynamic figure, her artistic life will remain a contradiction. At the beginning of her career, Ms. SZATHMARY was one of the gilded darlings of Toronto's burgeoning experimental theatre. At the end, she was seen by some as a marginalized, religious eccentric who put on plays in church basements.
To her long-time Friends and loyalists, however, Ms. SZATHMARY's life was a spiritual journey in which art, religion and morality were inextricably intertwined in a nobility of purpose.
Ms. SZATHMARY was born in New York on October 12, 1937, to Jewish-Hungarian parents. Her mother was an unhappy former opera singer and vaudeville performer and her father was a composer and arranger who wrote the theme for the popular television show Get Smart and who abandoned his family. Ms. SZATHMARY attended New York's High School of Performing Arts and later performed with the Metropolitan Opera Ballet under choreographer Antony TUDOR.
A ravishing beauty with masses of long, jet-black curls and compelling light-coloured eyes, Ms. SZATHMARY attracted followers throughout her career. She was, says Toronto choreographer David EARLE, a powerful, mysterious presence and a charismatic performer.
Another admirer was Canadian Robert SWERDLOW. Mr. TUDOR's piano accompanist, he fell in love with the beautiful young dancer and followed her to France where Ms. SZATHMARY danced with such companies as Les Ballets Classique de Monte Carlo and Les Ballets Contemporains de Paris. He was the first of many artists to be inspired by Ms. SZATHMARY.
"Elizabeth was a theatre philosopher who wanted to save the world through the beauty and truth of her art," Mr. SWERDLOW said.
The couple relocated to Montreal in the mid-sixties where Mr. SWERDLOW got a job with the National Film Board. One assignment brought him to Toronto, and it was Ms. SZATHMARY who persuaded him to settle there because of the city's "happening" dance scene. Performing under the name Elizabeth SWERDLOW, she first worked with Mr. EARLE and the future co-founders of Toronto Dance Theatre.
In 1969, Mr. SWERDLOW took an unexpected windfall of $30,000 and built his wife a performing venue of her own. In this way, Global Village Theatre emerged from a former Royal Canadian Mounted Police stable and the couple went on to became synonymous with a new wave of provocative, political, issue-oriented theatre.
Mr. SWERDLOW provided the words and music, and co-wrote the shows Elizabeth co-wrote, choreographed, directed and was the featured performer. Importantly, she was the visionary who came up with original concepts and her trademark, multidisciplinary theatrical process embraced dance, music, text, mime, clown, ritual and mask.
Among their better-known collaborations was Blue.S.A., an indictment of the "American empire," and Justine, the story of a young girl who gains wisdom through the vicissitudes of life. A huge hit, Justine went to New York where it won off-Broadway awards and enjoyed a long run.
Its success meant Global Village became a stopping place for others. Gilda RADNER, John CANDY and Salome BEY represented just some of the talent that passed through. Later, when Ms. SZATHMARY founded Inner Stage Theatre, she helped propel the early careers of Antoni CIMOLINO and Donald CARRIER of the Stratford Festival, Jeannette ZINGG and Marshall PYNKOSKI of Opera Atelier and Native American performer Raoul TRUJILLO.
In the mid-seventies, Ms. SZATHMARY experienced a religious conversion and became a devout Christian.
For Mr. SWERDLOW, it was the last straw in an already turbulent relationship. After the couple split up, Ms. SZATHMARY founded Inner Stage, a name that expressed her desire to produce art that would transform and heal through spirituality. To better strike out on her own, she also shed the SWERDLOW name. Until the 1990s, the main work of Inner Stage was a series of acclaimed morality tales -- or modern fables as Ms. SZATHMARY called them which toured schools from coast to coast. She also explored the storytelling power of Native American myths and turned to such themes as the plight of street youth or to the Holocaust from a teenager's point of view. Her final project, No Fixed Address, attempted to air the true voice of the homeless by both telling their stories and casting them as actors.
By all accounts, Ms. SZATHMARY was a true eccentric who personalized everything. Her computer, for example, was called Daisy. Her home was a living museum dominated by a family of cats who occupied their own stools at the dining table, held conversations and sent out Christmas cards to the pets of Friends. Spiritual sayings, religious art and theatre memorabilia covered every scrap of wall and floor space. On an even more personal level, Ms. SZATHMARY kept a journal of religious visions and dreams written in ornate calligraphy and illustrated in Hungarian folk-style art. What is more, she described ecstatic events and augurisms, including a personal affinity with bison, as if such occurrences were as routine as the weather.
In her work, Ms. SZATHMARY demanded perfection, which meant she often proved impossible to work alongside. Friends and colleagues Robert MASON, Julia AMES and Peter GUGELER all talk about Ms. SZATHMARY's middle-of-the-night phone calls -- and the fact that she brooked no criticism or contrary opinions. All the same, their devotion never lessened.
"She was a queen and we were her subjects," said Mr. GUGELER. "Elizabeth never left you once she got ahold of you."
Guerrilla theatre, grass-roots theatre, shoe-string theatre, theatre against all odds, a "let's-make-a-show" mentality -- that was the brave, artistic world in which Ms. SZATHMARY waged her war against what she saw as frivolous or commercial art. In 1989, Inner Stage lost its operating grant and from that time on she financed her own productions. During the last year that she was able to work, she earned a pitiful $5,000.
Ms. SZATHMARY continued to perform in all her productions, turning more to straight acting as her dancing powers declined. Even so, she never gave up the stage to anyone.
Elizabeth SZATHMARY died of rectal cancer in Toronto on March 28. A memorial service will be held at the Church of the Redeemer, 162 Bloor St. W., Toronto, at 3 p.m. on April 27.

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CARROLL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Mary CHAMBERS McQUAY
In loving memory of Mary Chambers McQUAY, April 9, 1916 to May 3, 2003.
Mary McQuay, a resident of Mindemoya, died at her residence on Saturday, May 3, 2003 at the age of 87 years. She was born in Peterborough, daughter of the late George and Mabel (FOLEY) TURNBULL.
Mary graduated as a Registered Nurse in 1942 and worked in hospitals in Kingston, where she met Jack McQUAY, who was an intern at the same hospital. They married in 1944, and lived in Kingston before moving to Mindemoya in 1947. Jack began his medical practice in Mindemoya and Mary assisted for many years running the office. Mary had a warm, friendly manner and enjoyed socializing with her many Friends. She will be remembered for her dedication to her family and to her community. Mary participated in and supported many community activities over the years. She was accomplished in sewing, knitting and baking, and often contributed her home-made items to bazaars and bake sales. She volunteered for the Red Cross, the Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary, Meals on Wheels, and the ambulance service. She enjoyed gardening, and participated in the Mindemoya Horticultural Society flower shows in years past. She was active in the local Women's Institute. An enthusiastic member of the Mindemoya Curling Club, she continued curling until she was well into her 80s, while in the summer she enjoyed golfing. She was an avid bridge player in the local bridge club. She was a member of St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church, where she sang in the choir for many years, and participated in the life of the parish through the Anglican Church Women's group. Always interested in crafts, she created many beautiful pieces in pottery and paper tole crafts.
Dearly loved and loving wife of Dr. Jack McQUAY. Loved mother of Marilyn (husband Martin CHILTON) of Kingston, Paul (fiancée Marion CARROLL) of Fort McMurray, Alta, Janice McQUAY of Toronto and Mindemoya and Betty McQUAY of Toronto. Also survived by Athena McQUAY of Edmonton. Proud grandmother of Peter McQUAY, Jane HOEKSTRA (husband Terry,) Stephen McQUAY and Jim CHILTON and great grandchildren Ethan, Sydney and Liam. Dear sister of Reta CONRAN, Gladys MITCHELL (husband Charlie,) Bruce TURNBULL (wife Alice,) Norma RAYCRAFT (husband Glen,) Billie McNEIL and brother-in-law Earl HARMAN. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sisters and brothers Marjorie McLEOD, Walter (Bud) TURNBULL, Ted TURNBULL, Gwen HARMAN and sister-in-law and brothers-in-law Marie TURNBULL, Alan McLEOD, Harold CONRAN and Gene McNEIL. Friends called the Saint Francis of Assisi Church in Mindemoya on Monday, May 5, 2003. The funeral service was held on Tuesday, May 6, 2003 with Reverend Canon Bain Peever officiating. Interment in Mindemoya Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home

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CARROLL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
John BATEMAN McQUAY
In loving memory of John BATEMAN McQUAY, October 11, 1921 to December 12, 2003.
John Bateman McQUAY, a resident of Mindemoya, died peacefully on Friday, December 12, 2003, in Mindemoya Hospital, at the age of 82 years.
He was born in Portage La Prairie, Manitoba, son of the late Doctor Russell and Gladys (SAUNDERS) McQUAY. The family moved to Mindemoya in 1934, where Russell set up a medical practice. Following his father's footsteps, John graduated as a medical doctor from the Faculty of Medicine at Queen's University in 1944. He married Mary TURNBULL in the same year, and interned in Kingston. In 1947 they moved to Mindemoya, where he joined his father's medical practice. He quickly became known and loved as "Doctor Jack". After his father became disabled in 1949, Doctor Jack served as the only doctor in the area until 1970, when other doctors began to arrive. He continued faithfully serving the community in full-time practice until 1991, easing into retirement over the next decade. Doctor Jack loved his vocation as family practitioner, and was dedicated to his patients. He worked long hours, making hospital rounds in the morning, seeing patients in the afternoon and sometimes in the evening, and calmly handling emergencies at any hour of the day or night. For many years he held a weekly clinic in West Bay. He often visited patients in their homes, and in the days before ambulance service, even brought patients to the hospital himself. He was a skilled physician who performed many kinds of surgery, but his greatest enjoyment was delivering babies, and he estimated he delivered over 2000 babies in his career. He also served as coroner for Manitoulin and the North Shore for 20 years. In 1991 the College of Family Physicians of Canada presented him with a Special Recognition Award for his outstanding service.
Doctor Jack will also be remembered for his dedication to his community. As Chair of the Board of Central Manitoulin High School, he worked to establish the Manitoulin Secondary School, serving all of the Island. As founding member of the Manitoulin Centennial Board, he helped set up the Manor in Little Current. He served as President of the Mindemoya Area Chamber of Commerce in the 1960s. He was a founding member of the Central Manitoulin Lions Club, and later received the Lions' Melvin Jones Fellow award for dedicated humanitarian services. He was a modest person, but he greatly appreciated this recognition. He was also a founding member of the Mindemoya Curling Club. In 1994, the Carnarvon Township named him as Citizen of the Year, and in September 2003, in ill health, he was particularly pleased when Central Manitoulin Township presented him with its Senior of the Year award. He and his wife Mary were members of St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church. For relaxation, Jack and Mary very much enjoyed curling, playing bridge, and golfing. He loved playing the piano, and his other hobbies included photography, stamp collecting, gardening, swimming and sailing on Lake Mindemoya, and rug hooking. Doctor Jack was devoted to his family, who will remember his encouragement and loving support. Dearly loved and loving husband of Mary McQUAY (predeceased.) Loved father of Marilyn (husband Martin CHILTON) of Kingston, Paul (wife Marion CARROLL) of Fort McMurray, Alta, Janice McQUAY of Mindemoya and Betty McQUAY of Toronto. Also survived by Athena McQUAY of Edmonton. Proud grandfather of Peter McQUAY, Jane HOEKSTRA (husband Terry), Stephen McQUAY and Jim CHILTON and great grandchildren Ethan, Sydney and Liam. Dear brother of Mary Alice THACKER of Ottawa, Ann GAGE (husband James) of Hartford, Conn., Thomas McQUAY, wife Barbara of Mindemoya. Predeceased by sister Margaret KYDD and her husband Gordon, and brother-in-law Doug THACKER. Also survived by many nieces and nephews.
Friends called the St. Francis of Assisi Church, Mindemoya on Tuesday, December 16. The funeral service will be conducted at the church on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 at 2 p.m. with Reverend Canon Bain Peever officiating. Culgin Funeral Home

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CARROLL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
CHANDRAN, Beverley Anne
On Friday, March 7, 2003, in her 50th year, Beverley was called to, once again, be one with the Creator of Creation. She went with a blazing smile of glory in her soul, while giving her unselfish, unstoppable gratitude in peace, tranquility, and a twinkle in her eye. At home in Erin, Ontario with her loved ones. In their 29th year of marriage, ever beloved part of Clarence; eternally loving mother of sons Justin (23) and his wife Jennifer; Liam (21) and Keddy (19.) Only daughter of Ambrose and Theresa CARROLL and sister of Gary (Marlene), D'Arcy (Pam) and Paul (Harriet). Only daughter-in-law of Geoff and Lena CHANDRAN and sister-in-law of Brinda McLAUGHLIN (John.) Permanent thanks to dearest and giving Friends, old and new. And special thanks to: Dr. Alan FRIEDMAN and staff, Dr. Henry FRIEDMAN of Duke University Medical Center; Dr. Stephen TREMONT and staff of Rex Hospital Cancer Clinic Dr. Julian ROSENMAN and staff of University of North Carolina Radiation Oncology Clinic; Dr. Lew STOCKS and staff, Dr. Mike DELISSIO and staff, Dr. Robert ALLEN and staff, Dr. Donald BROWN, all of Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina, U.S.A. Dr. Peter COLE of Orangeville, Ontario, and the nursing staff of Robertson and Brown of Kitchener, Ontario. Visitation and a Celebration of Beverley's life will take place at her home: #4998, 10th Sideroad of Erin, Ontario (north of Ballinafad Road, south of 5th Sideroad). Visitation for family and Friends will be held on Sunday, March 9, 2003, from 2 pm to 8 pm. On Monday, March 10, 2003, there will be a private family Funeral Mass, after which, Friends and family are invited to participate in a Celebration of Beverley's life from 3 pm. to 8 pm. In lieu of flowers, the family respectfully requests donations be made to the American Cancer Society (P.O. Box 102454, Atlanta, Georgia 303068-2454) or The Canadian Cancer Society (Wellington County Unit, 214 Speedvale Avenue, W. Unit 4A, Guelph, Ontario N1H 1C4) Arrangements entrusted to Butcher Family Funeral Home, 5399 Main Street, South, Erin, Ontario, Canada. For more information call 519-833-2231.

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