BROWN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Rick FRANCIS
Funeral services for Mr. Rick FRANCIS, age 47 years, who died Saturday, May 17, 2003, were held on Tuesday evening in the Blake Funeral Chapel in Thunder Bay, ON, led by Reverend Larry KROKER of Saint Anne's Church. Eulogies were offered by Kevin MAIN, Jaymie PENNY, Paul FRANCIS, Jennifer O'NEIL and Tamara BROWN. Numerous co-workers from the city of Thunder Bay, fellow coaches from minor hockey, neighbors, Friends and family attended the service. Removal was then made to Little Current, for visitation and Funeral Mass in Saint Bernard's Church celebrated by Reverend Bert FOLIOT S.J. on Thursday, May 22, 2003. The readings were proclaimed by Celina McGREGOR, Jennifer KEYS, Raquel KOENIG and PollyAnna McNALLY. Eulogies were offered by Kerry FRANCIS, Raymond FRANCIS, Jenny McGRAW, Paul FRANCIS and Ruthanne FRANCIS. The offertory gifts were presented by Kerry and Brenda FRANCIS. The Soloist was Rosa PITAWANAKWAT- BURK/BURKE accompanied by the organist Thomas NESHIKWE. Services were largely attended by long time Friends, members of Saint Bernard Church, and family. Honourary Pallbearers were Jeff FRANCIS and David LARSON. The Active Pallbearers were Allan ESHKAWKOGAN, Paul FRANCIS Jr., Robert McGRAW Jr., Craig KOENIG, Mike McNALLY and Chris KEYS.

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BROWN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-27 published
Helena Viola {McGREGOR} TOOLEY
In loving memory of Helena Viola {McGREGOR} TOOLEY, May 7, 1920 to August 13, 2003.
Beloved wife of George Bruce TOOLEY of Steinbach Manitoba. Loving mother of Brucette WATERSON (Doug), Theodore (Betty), Juanita BROWN (Buster), Andre (Gail). Predeceased by sons Douglas and James. Loving grandmother of Crystal (Mark), Michael (Nancy), Jennifer (Paul), Jason, Sonny, Evelyn (Corey), Justin (Brandy), Jesse (Crystal), Lynette, Shawee, Teri, predeceased by Sean (Brucette), Bruce (Andre). Great Grandmother of Fern, Miah, Natashia, Alexandra, Brooklyn, Riley, Cameron, Tristen and Trinity. Sister of Rose (Harold) DOOLEY and Geraldine (Carl) ZIEGLER of Little Current, Oscar McGREGOR, Godfrey (Ann) and Jean-Mary Jane (Lawrence) ANDREWS of Birch Island. Predeceased by parents Dave and Louise McGREGOR, Theresa, Blanche, Theodore, Gordon (Rebecca), and Evelyn. Sister-in-law of Roy (Bernice), Jim (Betty), Fred (Dianne) and Velma (predeceased). Special Aunt to many nieces and nephews. Visitation was held on Sunday, August 17, 2003 at the Birch Island Community Centre. Funeral service was held on August 19, 2003 at St. Gabriel Lalement Roman Catholic Church. Interment in Birch Island Cemetery, Birch Island, Ontario. Reverend Michael STOGRE officiating.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-18 published
Clayton Lynn BROWN
By Elena PETRCICH Tuesday, February 18, 2003 - Page A18
Principal, teacher, inspiration, mentor, friend. Born May 7, 1912, in Fordwich, Ontario Died April 10, 2002, in Waterloo, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 89.
A remarkable and truly dedicated educator, Clayton BROWN had studied engineering at Queen's University before transferring to the Stratford Teacher's College. He began his career in northern Ontario as a teacher of Grades 7 and 8, became principal of the Hearst Public School, and retired at age 57. (He married only after retirement.) In 1972, the school was renamed the Clayton BROWN Public School.
Mr. BROWN taught all 11 children in my family. Master of motivation, he knew our talents and our shortcomings and he recognized the effectiveness of holding up the high achievements of older siblings as a challenge for the younger ones. Quick with praise and recognition when due, he was equally quick and fair to discipline when appropriate.
We always could tell from his look when he was less than pleased with anyone. He ran a tight ship, insisting on discipline from everyone. When he told the students to stand quietly in line while waiting to enter the classroom, we obliged. He kept us all straight and focused. When necessary, he lectured our classes on the "ability to accept responsibility, " made us look up the word "responsibility" in the dictionary, and then show him how to put it into practice.
Mr. BROWN was fiercely patriotic and a great supporter of the Commonwealth. He wanted us to be proud of our heritage. At the back of his classroom hung a print of Tom Thomson's painting Northern River. He told us about the Group of Seven and other Canadian artists and their valuable contributions to art.
Every Friday afternoon, in the last hour of the school day, Mr. BROWN (who had served with the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War in Quebec, Newfoundland and Labrador), passed out copies of the Patriotic Songbook. We sang songs such as: Rule Britannia, The Maple Leaf Forever, It's a Long Way to Tipperary and Waltzing Matilda. We usually finished the hour singing O Canada. If we were not standing at attention, eyes forward, singing proudly -- we started the anthem over again.
Mr. BROWN taught by example. When education dollars were tight, he declined his raise to keep the music teacher, purchase more library materials or buy much needed sports equipment. To encourage us to read, he set aside library time. We learned how to sit and focus and read quietly. One never knew when he might ask for a written or oral review of the story. Whenever there was a school dance, all the cool guys would stand in the corner each sipping coke from a bottle. Mr. BROWN would start to dance with the girls and soon the guys would follow his lead.
Mr. BROWN had an extensive stamp collection and saw the value in encouraging such a hobby. He helped us all collect stamps for our own albums. Since money was scarce in those days, his idea of a stamp trade was very generous: we brought him one stamp (and it may have been one he already had) and he let us choose 10 from his extras.
Mr. BROWN encouraged us all to pursue an education, to set goals for ourselves, to go on to higher learning, to choose a career path. He even provided financial assistance to one of our brothers in his first year at Queen's University. He always reminded us how proud our parents were of us, and encouraged us to make them even prouder. When we returned for family visits, we visited his school -- to say hello, share our accomplishments, watch for his smile of approval and receive his praise. Years later, he and his lovely wife Vera attended one of our family weddings where we had the opportunity to introduce our families and show Mr. BROWN that he had truly made a difference in our lives.
Elena was a student of Clayton BROWN.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-01 published
Ex-pilot aided foreigners who hid soldiers
By Kelly HAGGART Saturday, March 1, 2003 - Page F11
Robert ADAM/ADAMS, past president of a society set up to honour and assist individuals who risked their lives helping Allied airmen evade capture during the Second World War, died in Toronto this month of cancer. He was 82.
Mr. ADAM/ADAMS was a 22-year-old Canadian pilot on loan to Britain's Royal Air Force when his plane was shot down after bombing a German ship in southern Greece. Stout-hearted people on two small islands in the Aegean, risking torture or execution for their actions, sheltered the six-man crew for a month until they were rescued.
After the war, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS founded a chain of tool-rental stores in the Toronto area called ADAM/ADAMS Rent-All, which he sold when he retired in 1989.
In 1965, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS joined the newly formed Canadian branch of the Royal Air Forces Escaping Society. The group vowed to assist the citizens who had helped Allied airmen who fell into their midst escape or evade capture; thanks to their courage, almost 3,000 men had made it back to safety.
"The object of the society is to remember, " the group's literature says, "and to aid our helpers who may still be suffering the results of imprisonment and torture at the hands of the enemy, and to maintain the very strong Friendships that developed during those years."
(Ernest BEVIN, Britain's foreign secretary in 1945-51, told the first chairman of the group's British chapter: "Your society does a damned sight more good in Europe than all my ambassadors rolled together.")
John DIX, a fellow member of the Escaping Society's Canadian branch, said that, "in most cases, we only knew our helpers a week or less -- we were just passing through. But the nature of the relationship and the tension of the times were such that they became lifelong Friends. We never forgot them, we had them over to Canada every year, we kept in touch. We owed them a debt of honour."
Flight Lieutenant ADAM/ADAMS and his crew of four Britons and an Australian left their base in Benghazi, Libya, on the night of November 6, 1943, scouting for targets to bomb. They spotted a German ship anchored off Naxos, an island in the Cyclades group south of Athens.
After dropping 16 bombs, one of the plane's two engines was hit by German flak. "Luckily, it kept going for 10 minutes, which gave us time to make a getaway, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS told his daughter, Patricia ADAM/ADAMS. " Then it conked out and we had to slowly descend."
He ditched his disabled Wellington bomber flawlessly into the sea. The crew escaped through hatches, and a dinghy and a parachute popped out of the aircraft before it sank within 30 seconds of hitting the water. The men paddled ashore to the island of Sifnos, half a kilometre away.
"After complaining about our cigarettes being wet, we slept in the parachute under an olive tree, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS recalled. "In the morning, we were discovered by a girl riding by on a donkey. She went to fetch her father [George KARAVOS], and he went and got someone who could understand English and who decided we weren't German."
The initial suspicion was mutual. When Mr. KARAVOS took the men to his home and offered them water, they were afraid to drink it, until the farmer reassured them by taking a first sip.
The six men were hidden first in a mountaintop monastery on Sifnos, and then in a cave used as a goat pen on the neighbouring island of Serifos. Their presence was kept from local children, in case they unwittingly tipped off the German patrol that visited the islands several times a week from the nearby occupied island of Milos.
"During the war, 180 people on Sifnos died because they didn't have enough to eat, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS said. "But the locals made a big fuss over us, bringing food and cigarettes."
The men spent 10 days in the monastery, with a stream of hungry people climbing the steep path to bring them bread and cheese, oranges, figs, retsina and handfuls of precious, rationed cigarettes.
Then the Sifnos chief of police, Demetrius BAKEAS, who was determined the men should not be captured, arranged for them to go to Serifos, because "there are people there who can help you."
A fisherman took them under cover of darkness to Serifos. There, housed in the goat pen, they found five British commandos spying on German troop movements. Conditions were primitive in that cave for the next 20 days, but the spies had a wireless and were able to arrange the air crew's rescue. A Royal Navy gunboat disguised as a Greek fishing vessel picked them up and, moving by night, took them to safety in Cyprus.
All six men survived the war, and later learned they had succeeded in sinking that ship in Naxos harbour.
Mr. ADAM/ADAMS kept in touch with his helpers after the war, with his letters translated for him by a Greek neighbour in Toronto.
"I remember being taken to Greek community functions, " Patricia ADAM/ADAMS recalled. "And every Christmas Dad would send a parcel to the school on Sifnos, with paper and pencils, and little dime-store gifts for the children. Putting that package together every year was very emotional."
"Bob was a very great guy, with a great sense of humour, " said Roy BROWN, secretary of the Escaping Society. Mr. ADAM/ADAMS was treasurer of the society at his death, and served as president in 1995-96.
"We have about 100 members now across the country, who are in their 80s and beyond, Mr. BROWN said. "Most of our helpers are in the same or worse shape, so we're not bringing them over as we did up until five or six years ago. But we still help out when we see a helper in need."
Robert Watson ADAM/ADAMS was born on January 22, 1921, in Windsor, Ontario, where his father, Dr. Frederick ADAM/ADAMS, was the medical officer of health for more than 20 years. If he had returned to base that night after the raid on Naxos harbour, he would have received the cable informing him of his father's death back home.
After graduating from Windsor's Kennedy Collegiate in 1939, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS worked in a bank before enlisting in June, 1941. A few weeks later his older brother, Coulson, was killed during training in England, shot down by a German night fighter that had sneaked across the Channel. His other brother, John, was also a bomber pilot killed in action, shot down during a raid on Hanover, Germany, just a few months before the war in Europe ended.
Robert ADAM/ADAMS's story was featured in a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television documentary in 1966, when a Telescope camera crew followed him and his wife, Joan, back to Sifnos, where they received a hero's welcome.
"Those Greeks had nothing to gain and everything to lose, " Mr. ADAM/ADAMS told the show's associate producer, George Ronald. "They were starving, and yet they gave us everything. They were superb.... I don't think they know just how kind and generous and how brave they were."
Mr. BAKEAS, who had moved to Athens after retiring from the police force, returned to Sifnos for the emotional reunion held 23 years after he helped save Mr. ADAM/ADAMS's life. Earlier, he had written to "my dear friend" in Canada: "It is not possible for me to forget the danger which connected us in those terrible war days. We shall be always waiting you."
In addition to his wife, Mr. ADAM/ADAMS leaves his children John, Patricia and Mary, sons-in-law Lawrence SOLOMON and Steve DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS, and granddaughters Essie and Catharine.
Robert Watson ADAM/ADAMS, chain-store founder and past president of the Canadian branch of the Royal Air Force Escaping Society born in Windsor, Ontario, on January 22, 1921; died in Toronto on February 10, 2003.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
ALLAN, Gavina Y. (née BROWN)
Survived by her husband William, brother Donald Grant BROWN (Katherine,) sister Olga Marion COUSINS (William,) nephews and nieces Ian BROWN (Wendy), Kevin BROWN (Katherine), Randolph COUSINS (Anne), Anne GOODCHILD (Wayne,) grand nephews and nieces Graham, Colin, Andrew and Shawn BROWN, Russell and Kerry COUSINS and Monica and Justine GOODCHILD. Private family arrangements have been made. In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
CHANDRAN, Beverley Anne
On Friday, March 7, 2003, in her 50th year, Beverley was called to, once again, be one with the Creator of Creation. She went with a blazing smile of glory in her soul, while giving her unselfish, unstoppable gratitude in peace, tranquility, and a twinkle in her eye. At home in Erin, Ontario with her loved ones. In their 29th year of marriage, ever beloved part of Clarence; eternally loving mother of sons Justin (23) and his wife Jennifer; Liam (21) and Keddy (19.) Only daughter of Ambrose and Theresa CARROLL and sister of Gary (Marlene), D'Arcy (Pam) and Paul (Harriet). Only daughter-in-law of Geoff and Lena CHANDRAN and sister-in-law of Brinda McLAUGHLIN (John.) Permanent thanks to dearest and giving Friends, old and new. And special thanks to: Dr. Alan FRIEDMAN and staff, Dr. Henry FRIEDMAN of Duke University Medical Center; Dr. Stephen TREMONT and staff of Rex Hospital Cancer Clinic Dr. Julian ROSENMAN and staff of University of North Carolina Radiation Oncology Clinic; Dr. Lew STOCKS and staff, Dr. Mike DELISSIO and staff, Dr. Robert ALLEN and staff, Dr. Donald BROWN, all of Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina, U.S.A. Dr. Peter COLE of Orangeville, Ontario, and the nursing staff of Robertson and Brown of Kitchener, Ontario. Visitation and a Celebration of Beverley's life will take place at her home: #4998, 10th Sideroad of Erin, Ontario (north of Ballinafad Road, south of 5th Sideroad). Visitation for family and Friends will be held on Sunday, March 9, 2003, from 2 pm to 8 pm. On Monday, March 10, 2003, there will be a private family Funeral Mass, after which, Friends and family are invited to participate in a Celebration of Beverley's life from 3 pm. to 8 pm. In lieu of flowers, the family respectfully requests donations be made to the American Cancer Society (P.O. Box 102454, Atlanta, Georgia 303068-2454) or The Canadian Cancer Society (Wellington County Unit, 214 Speedvale Avenue, W. Unit 4A, Guelph, Ontario N1H 1C4) Arrangements entrusted to Butcher Family Funeral Home, 5399 Main Street, South, Erin, Ontario, Canada. For more information call 519-833-2231.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
BROWN, Ruth Elizabeth (née TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Tillsonburg
Suddenly on March 6, 2003. Beloved wife of Grant C. (Bud) BROWN, Q.C. for 61 years. Loving mother of Lyn SMITH (David,) Craig BROWN (Jane,) Kathy GIRVIN (David) and Timothy BROWN (Kathé.) Dear grandmother of Sara SMITH (Brian DYCK) and Cullen SMITH (Deceased); Will, Anna and Julian BROWN; Scott and Martha GIRVIN Lyn BROWN. Great-grandmother of Jacob and Liam DYCK. She will also be greatly missed by her sisters Kay WARREN and Jean HUNT and her brother, Campbell TAILOR/TAYLOR (Ruby) of Galt. The family will receive Friends and relatives at The Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg, on Sunday, from 2-4 pm and 7-9 pm. Funeral service will be conducted on Monday at 2 pm. at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 48 Brock Street, West, Tillsonburg. Interment to follow in the Tillsonburg Cemetery. If you wish, donations to St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church or Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital Foundation would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-10 published
Died This Day - James BROWN, 1862
Monday, March 10, 2003 - Page R7
Labourer born in Soham, near Cambridge, England, on February 23, 1830; in 1852, immigrated to the United States; in 1854, moved to Toronto to find work in shipyards of Canada West; fell in with group known as the Brook's Bush gang that prowled woods in Don Valley near Toronto; on December 1, 1859, accused of robbery-murder of John Sheridan HOGAN, newspaper-owner and member of legislative assembly; convicted and executed; 5,000 attended hanging; Toronto's last public hanging.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
The Globe was his church'
The editor-in-chief was mentor to journalists, defender of social policies, respected by those criticized in print, and described as a man with a 'warm human touch'
By Michael VALPY Thursday, April 10, 2003 - Page R11
In his two decades as editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, former senator Richard (Dic) James DOYLE wielded a journalistic influence in Canadian public life matched only by that of George BROWN, the newspaper's founder.
He died yesterday in Toronto, one month past his 80th birthday. His wife of 50 years, Florence, passed away on March 20.
Senator DOYLE -- editor from 1963 to 1983 -- gave the newspaper a boldly independent voice, loosening up its then lock-step support for the Progressive Conservative Party.
Under his direction, the newspaper would praise a government one day and lambaste it the next. He was a passionate defender of civil liberties, intensely engaged in the development of Canada's social policies throughout the 1960s and 1970s and as much concerned with the powerless in Canadian society as the powerful.
"In the time I've been editor," he once said, "we've not supported any party in office. I think we make whomever we support uncomfortable. We're the kind of friend you could do without."
He once said he felt more intellectually comfortable with Pierre TRUDEAU than all the prime ministers he knew, and one of his favourite editorial cartoons was one he suggested after overhearing his daughter Judith talking to a friend in her bedroom. It showed two teenage girls sitting on a bed under a poster of Mr. TRUDEAU. One girl says to the other: "He's not 50 like your father's 50."
His views, although stamped on the editorial page, were never imposed on his reporters. He was concerned with a story's news value -- not the fallout -- and he expected his staff to act with the same concern.
He wanted The Globe to be a writer's newspaper and gave his writers autonomy, even when their views went against his own philosophies. He had a special place in his heart for columnists who expressed contradictory opinions.
The young writers invited to attend the buffet lunches he gave regularly for prime ministers, premiers and cabinet ministers, bank presidents and giants of the arts were treated to superb tutorials in the life of their nation that left an indelible mark on their minds.
Warm, funny, theatrical and gregarious, he was a mentor and model for many of Canada's best-known journalists -- among them, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Michael ENRIGHT and Don NEWMAN, former Globe and Maclean's managing editor Geoffrey STEVENS, his successor as Globe editor Norman WEBSTER, and former foreign correspondent, dance critic and now master of the University of Toronto's Massey College, John FRASER.
"He was absolutely fearless," Mr. STEVENS said yesterday. "He did tough stuff. He did important stuff. And he refused to bow to pressure from business, from politicians and for that matter from journalists. I didn't always agree with him, but I always, always respected what he said."
Mr. FRASER said: "He was an editor who made young journalists' dreams come true. Like many who came under his spell at The Globe and Mail, I will go to my grave grateful for the horizons he opened up to me."
George BAIN, for years The Globe's Ottawa columnist, recalled the only time Senator DOYLE actually complained about something Mr. BAIN had written was when he filed an end-piece to a royal tour and suggested that the institution wasn't appropriate to the Canadian circumstances.
"Dic, as a devoted monarchist, was moved to say, 'Did you have to?' The fact is I felt I did -- and he, despite strong feelings, didn't say, 'You can't.' "
When Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY appointed him to the Senate in 1985, he decided to sit as a Conservative out of courtesy.
Mr. MULRONEY described him yesterday as "a marvellous man, rigorous, thoughtful, with a disciplined approach to life and a very warm human touch to everything he did.
"When he cut people up, including me, there was no malice to it, no ad hominem attack, he was never bitter or partisan in any way.'The full impact of Senator DOYLE's presence as editor was probably first felt by The Globe's readers on March 20, 1964, when a front-page editorial appeared under the heading, Bill of Wrongs.
It was prompted by legislation proposed by Ontario's Conservative attorney-general, Frederick CASS, which empowered the Ontario Police Commission to summon any person for questioning in secret deprive him of legal advice; and keep him in prison indefinitely if he refused to answer.
"For the public good," the editorial stated, the Ontario Government "proposes to trample upon the Magna Carta, Habeas Corpus, the Canadian Bill of Rights and the Rule of Law.
"Are we in... the Canada of 1964 -- or in the Germany of 1934?
"This legislation is supposed to be directed against organized crime. In fact, it is directed against every man and woman in the province."
Soon after, Mr. CASS resigned.
Senator DOYLE's skills as a writer were particularly evident on an election night when the paper would present an editorial on the results between editions. Alastair LAWRIE, now retired as an editorial writer, recalled that once the results were known, Senator DOYLE would stand in silent thought for maybe a minute and a half and then start to dictate. In a matter of a few minutes, he would complete a reasoned editorial that scarcely required the addition of a comma.
Senator DOYLE preferred to work in anonymity, only accepting honorary degrees and later the seat in the Senate near the end of his newspaper career.
He sat on no boards, belonged to no important clubs, almost never appeared on television or radio, didn't sign petitions and seldom gave speeches. When he met a politician, there were usually witnesses.
He didn't hold a driver's licence and for years arrived at the old Globe office on King Street by streetcar. When The Globe moved to its present office on Front Street, Senator DOYLE took a taxi.
Retired Ottawa Citizen publisher Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and a close friend of Senator DOYLE, suspected "he didn't trust his Irish temper [to drive] and that was probably to the common good."
Mr. DAVEY said Senator DOYLE's low public profile "was part of his own protection against conflicts on his own part. The Globe was his church. Journalism was his religion.
"I think that Dic, in the context of his time, probably had a greater influence on Canadian journalism than any other single individual," Mr. DAVEY said.
"It was Dic's execution that made the Report on Business what it became and is. He was the moving force from within The Globe often unseen -- in the whole question of conflicts of interest as they affected journalists.
"He was really the wellspring of that kind of thinking and, of course, what The Globe did affected very directly what a lot of other organizations did."
Born in Toronto on March 10, 1923, Dic DOYLE seemed destined to get ink on his hands. He said in 1985 that he had decided on a newspaper career at age 7 and joined the Chatham Daily News as a sports reporter after he graduated from Chatham Collegiate Institute. He was promoted to sports editor, city editor and then news editor.
During the Second World War, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and served with the 115 (Bomber) Squadron (Royal Air Force) at Ely, near Cambridge in England. He was discharged at the end of the war with the rank of flying officer.
He was 23 and felt that life was passing him by, so rather than attending university, as other returning air-force officers were doing, he returned to the Chatham paper. It was a decision he said he later regretted.
He came to The Globe in 1951, initially as a copy editor, the only job available. His first byline appeared in The Globe in December of 1952 over a story about milk bottles.
In the same year, he also wrote a book called The Royal Story, a labour of love that proved to be a standard treatment of the monarchy, and which he was the first to acknowledge, replowed already well-tilled soil.
(The Royal family had a special status at The Globe under Senator DOYLE. One former senior editor, the legendary Martin LYNCH, told of being taken off the front-page layout after he replaced a picture of Princess Margaret, which appeared in early editions, with a photograph of a prize-winning pig.
When The Globe decided to publish a weekly supplement in 1957, Senator DOYLE became its first editor, with a staff that had no experience in the weekly field. The paper was laid out on the carpet of the managing editor's office after he had gone home.
It shrunk over the years because, Mr. DOYLE said, it was ahead of its time. It died in 1971.
From there, in 1959, he became managing editor of the newspaper and then editor in 1963. He stepped aside in 1983 to take on the role of editor emeritus and to write a column -- an experience, he said two years later, that left him chastened. "The guy [columnist] out there has his problems."
Former Globe publisher A. Roy MEGARRY, said, "In my opinion, no one -- including the seven publishers that Dic has served with during his time at the paper -- had made a more positive and lasting impression on The Globe than he has."
Likely among the greatest tributes paid to him as an editor came from the Kent Commission established by the federal government in 1980 to investigate the ownership of Canada's daily newspapers after the Ottawa Journal and the Winnipeg Tribune folded in virtually simultaneous moves by the Thomson and Southam chains.
In its report, the commission credited Senator DOYLE with "adhering to an ideal of press freedom that often tends to get lost in the management of newspapers....
"To a great extent, the editor-in-chief of The Globe belongs to a breed which unfortunately is on its way to extinction.
"The Globe and Mail testifies to the influence that continues to be exerted by a newspaper with a clearly defined idea of its role and substantial editorial resources. It is read by almost three-quarters of the country's most important decision-makers in all parts of Canada and at all levels of government. More than 90 per cent of media executives read it regularly and it tends to set the pace for other news organizations."
The Globe and Mail was bought by Thomson Newspapers in 1980. Senator DOYLE made no secret of the fact that he would have preferred having the newspaper bought by R. Howard Webster, who owned it before it became part of the Financial Post chain. However, in 1985 he said that Thomson was the best alternative among the others in the field.
When Prime Minister MULRONEY named him to the Senate, he became the first active Globe journalist to receive such an appointment since George BROWN in 1873. As an editor and a columnist, Senator DOYLE had often preached Senate reform and had opposed patronage appointments.
His acceptance prompted a flow of letters to the editor that favoured and disapproved of the appointment in about equal measure.Senator DOYLE is survived by his children Judith and Sean and his granddaughter Kaelan MYERSCOUGH. Funeral arrangements have not been announced.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-30 published
BROWN, Rosemary
It is with profound sadness that we announce the sudden passing of the Honourable Dr. Rosemary BROWN, P.C., O.C., O.B.C. She died peacefully at home on April 26, 2003. She is survived by her loving husband, Dr. William T. BROWN; three children, Cleta, Gary and Jonathan; seven grandchildren, Katherine, Ashton, William, Giselle, Jonathan, Jackson and Louis and many other cherished relatives and Friends. Born in Kingston, Jamaica on June 17, 1930, she graduated from Wolmer's School and then came to Canada in 1951 to study at McGill University in Montreal where she completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1955. After moving to Vancouver, Rosemary completed Bachelor and Masters degrees in Social Work at the University of British Columbia. Rosemary BROWN was a member of the Privy Council, Officer of the Order of Canada, Commander of the Order of Distinction of Jamaica, Member of the Order of British Columbia, the recipient of 15 honourary doctorates, and was a Member of the Legislative Assembly in British Columbia from 1972 to 1986. She was also President of her favourite charity MATCH International, an organization dedicated to the empowerment of woman in developing nations. Rosemary was a founder of a number of socially progressive organizations including the National Black Coalition, the British Columbia Association for the Advancement of Coloured People, the Vancouver Status of Women, Multilingual Orientation Service Association for Immigrant Communities, the Canadian Women's Foundation, The Vancouver Crisis Centre and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. Donations may be made to MATCH International. Funeral Service will be held at St. Andrew's Wesley United Church, Burrard and Nelson, Vancouver on Monday, May 5th at 1: 30 p.m., Bishop Michael INGHAM, Dean Peter ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, and the Reverend William ROBERTS officiating. Kearney Funeral Services 604-736-0268.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-09 published
Died This Day -- George BROWN, 1880
Friday, May 9, 2003 - Page R11
Editor and politician born at Alloa, Scotland, on November 29, 1818; raised in Edinburgh; in 1837, immigrated with father to New York; in 1843, moved to Toronto to begin newspaper for Upper Canadian Presbyterians; in 1844, launched Toronto Globe to back Reform efforts for responsible government; in 1851, elected Member of Legislative Assembly; in 1858, formed government with Lower Canada Liberals; in 1864, joined others of influence to form Great Coalition that led to carry Confederation; in 1874, named senator; died of infection from a minor leg wound after shot by disgruntled former Globe employee.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-28 published
SHIRRIFF, Barbara Jean (née SLOAN)
Died peacefully at home in Toronto, on Tuesday, May 27, 2003, having recently turned 81. Predeceased by her beloved husband Francis Colin SHIRRIFF. Dear mother of Susan, Cathie Shirriff FORSTMANN, Janet, Joan VAUGHAN (the late Steven VAUGHAN) and Barbara. Loving grandmother of Diana CABLE (Warren), Allyson WOODROOFFE (Roger PEPLER) and Kelly FORSTMANN. Great-grandmother of Kate and Julia PEPLER and Hayley, Stephanie and Scott CABLE. Survived by brothers Manson and Frank, and sisters Neva PAUL and Mary PARKER. Barbara's love, encouragement, strength and ''joie de vivre'' will be cherished always. Our very special thanks to Dr. Wendy BROWN, Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and The Temmy Latner Palliative Care Team, Ella CASE and the Victorian Order of Nurses, and caregivers Ramona and Helen. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 3-6 p.m. on Thursday, May 29. A celebration of Barbara's life will be held at Saint John's Anglican Church York Mills, 19 Don Ridge Drive at 2 p.m. on Friday, May 30. If desired, donations to The Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care, 700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Suite 3000 Toronto M5G 1Z5 will be much appreciated by the family.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-05 published
Kenneth Peter BARR
Died peacefully at home on Monday, June 2, 2003 with dignity and courage, after a brief battle with cancer, his wife Trish by his side. Ken was born November 25, 1949 and raised in St. Catharines, Ontario. Predeceased by his mother Isabel. Ken is survived by his father David BARR, wife Patricia, sons Paul and Craig HANSON and grand_son T.J. Also survived by his sister Judy and family, father-in-law John STOTT, and extended family members Normande GAUDETTE and Margaret HANSON- BROWN. Ken spent 35 years in the telecommunications industry in Canada and is well respected by colleagues, customers and business partners. Ken's caring, Friendship and respect for all individuals are hallmarks of his personality and his leadership style. Ken's extensive career included President of CTI, President of Lucent Canada's, Business Communications Systems, and a variety of sales, marketing, regulatory and management roles at American Telephone and Telegraph, TTS, Nortel, BCSI and Bell Canada. Most recently Ken was President and Chief Executive Officer of Vancouver based Security Biometrics. Ken's involvement with the community included the United Way, Junior Achievement, the Bay Street Rat Race and Ronald McDonald House. Ken balanced his business life with his love for his family. His special place for himself, family and Friends was Oak Lake, where he loved to relax and appreciate the wonders of nature. Ken's love of life is exemplified by his genuine concern for family and Friends and his many hobbies and interests including flying, boating, snowmobiling. His spirit will live on in all of us. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West on Monday, June 9th at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Ken's memory to the Canadian Cancer Society, 20 Holly Street, Suite #101, Toronto M4S 3B1 or the Ronald McDonald Children's Charities of Canada, McDonald's Place, Toronto, Ontario M3C 3L4.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-07 published
Henry (Hank) Edward BROWN (May 1930-June 2003)
On Thursday, June 5, 2003, Royal Canadian Air Force Colonel (retired) Henry Edward BROWN, Canadian Forces Decoration, 'Hank' to all who knew him, died suddenly at home of a heart attack. Beloved husband of 47 years to Muriel, and loving father of twin girls, Kelly (Mark) and Kim; grandfather to David, Jeffery and Genevieve. Born in Prince Edward Island in 1930, Hank attended school in Summerside, Alberton, and Prince of Wales Junior College, Charlottetown. Through the Air Cadets, he pursued his love of flying, becoming a Sergeant Pilot at age 16; subsequently joining the Royal Canadian Air Force at age 19. After several postings on all types of aircraft, Hank attended the Royal Canadian Air Force Staff College from 1965-66. His successful career was varied with postings as far afield as France, East Africa, England (Royal Air Force Air Warfare Course), and Poland (Canadian Military Attaché). While on his posting in East Africa, Hank successfully completed a climb of Mount Kilimanjaro's Gilman's Point (18,635 feet) in 1969. He returned to Canada from East Africa to command 436 Hercules Squadron. He received a Flight Safety Award having displayed an exceptional degree of flying skill and professionalism by completing 1,000 hours of flying instruction with no pilot-error accident. His last posting was as Base Commander of C.F.B. Cornwallis, Nova Scotia, from 1980-1982. Upon retirement from the military, Hank maintained his aviation interest whilst managing the Ontario Ministry of Health's Emergency Air Ambulance Service. After retiring from the Ministry, Hank was able to spend more time on his second love, sailing out of the Whitby Yacht Club. There will be a celebration of his life at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), at 3 o'clock on Thursday, June 12. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, 1920 Yonge Street, 4th Floor, Toronto M4S 3E2, would be appreciated.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-21 published
WALLACE, Matthew Maurice ''Mo'' (Long term Confederation Life Employee, World War 2 Veteran, avid bridge player)
Died peacefully, on June 19, 2003, in his 81st year, at the Toronto East General Hospital. Loving husband of 55 years to Hazel and much loved father of Sean, Tony and his fiancée Barb SECKER, Erin WALLACE and her husband Steve BROWN, and Laura WALLACE. Cherished Grand-Dad and ''Zaide'' of Naomi and Colin BROWN, and Sarah and Rachel BECKERMAN. Sadly missed brother of Virginia WALLACE and predeceased by his dear sister Barbara. Fondly remembered Godfather of Jeanne SHEMILT and her family. ''Mo'' will always be remembered by his many Friends and relatives. As he wished, his body has been donated to the Division of Anatomy at the University of Toronto. Mo's family will receive Friends at the Sherrin Funeral Home, 873 Kingston Road (west of Victoria Park Avenue), Toronto (416) 698-2861, on Sunday, June 22, 2003 from 4 - 6 p.m. We will celebrate a life lived well in the funeral home chapel on Monday at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Anne Frank House, would be appreciated by the family.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-09 published
BROWN, Rand Holden
Died at his home in Toronto, on Monday, July 28, 2003 at the age of 39. Beloved son of Rosalie and Harlan BROWN. Older brother of Jay and Lee BROWN. His bright and generous spirit will be missed by all who knew him. Friends and associates are welcome to attend a Memorial Service Monday, August 11th from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home, 6150 Yonge Street (at Goulding south of Steeles).

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-21 published
Died This Day -- Harry BROWN, 1917
Thursday, August 21, 2003 - Page R7
Soldier born in Gananoque, Ontario, on May 11, 1898; August, 1916, enlisted in army in London, Ontario; assigned to 10th Battalion, Quebec Regiment, and sent to France; at Hill 70, near Loos, company surrounded in fierce fighting and signal and telegraph lines cut; ordered to take message to headquarters at all costs; crossed no-man's land and reached lines even though severely wounded died at dressing station; message saved loss of battalion's position and prevented many casualties; October 17, 1917, awarded posthumous Victoria Cross.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-25 published
Donald K. BROWN
By Donna-Lynn TYMOCHENKO Monday, August 25, 2003 - Page A14
Donald K. BROWN
Husband, father, grandfather, salesman, friend. Born on January 30, 1931, in Toronto. Died June 11 in Sudbury, Ontario, of cancer, aged 72.
Don BROWN was born over a butcher shop on Bloor Street in Toronto as the only child to young immigrants from the British Isles. Like many of their generation, his parents toiled long hours in the shop to build a better life, yet the year after Don entered Vaughan Road Collegiate, they purchased a fishing lodge and moved the family north to the French River.
Never one to focus too strongly on his academics, Don commented that "the Rhodes Scholarship people don't bother me much..." and was happy to begin a new life in Northern Ontario.
He helped his parents run the Bon Air Lodge on the French River for years and became an expert fisherman. But as a young adult he eventually moved back to Toronto in the early 1950s. He always said that it was here that a chance meeting of a young Mothercraft nurse, named Gwen DIZZELL, changed his life. They dated for a year and married in November, 1954, in my mother's hometown of Smiths Falls, Ontario I was born in 1957 in Sudbury where my Dad was establishing himself in the sales industry. My sister, Lu-Anne, was born three years later.
In 1963, Dad began a career in Sudbury in sales with The Mutual Life of Canada, later Clarica Life, where he remained for almost 40 years. Initially working six and seven days a week to establish himself, he built a reputable business in a profession he loved. Eventually he earned such industry honours as Mutual Life's "Agent of the Year," was a Clarica Hall of Fame inductee and was a Million Dollar Round Table member for more than 25 years.
He also enjoyed years of public speaking within the insurance field where he spoke passionately about his industry and the need for a positive attitude in all aspects of life.
My parents travelled extensively and always enjoyed the company conventions that allowed them to keep in touch with many Friends they had made over the years. While my Dad thrived in the insurance industry, he thrived even more so in his community.
He was a member and past president of Idylwylde Golf Club in Sudbury for 40 years, and enjoyed helping the Sudbury Boys' Home Charities. He was a proud Sudburian and fiercely defended his choice to live in Northern Ontario. He loved his cottage on the French River and remained an active fisherman.
He was very proud of both his daughters and what they had accomplished, and never missed one of our recitals, Christmas concerts, ski races or awards ceremonies when we were young. He always instilled the value of hard work and an education in his four grandchildren, whom he adored. He was the best "Bumpa" in the world.
In 1996, he and Gwen became winter residents in Sarasota, Florida, buying a home and establishing wonderful new Friends, yet always looking forward to their return to Sudbury each spring.
The end came quickly for him, with very little warning from an unforgiving disease. He returned home from Florida this past April and it was shortly after that he received the diagnosis of his illness. His last days were spent with family and Friends, with my mother rarely leaving his side. His sudden passing has left us all grieving and missing his ever-present sense of humour.
Donna-Lynn is Don's eldest daughter.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-11 published
SEGAL, Murray
Eckler Partners Ltd. mourns the passing of its esteemed partner, Murray SEGAL, who died on September 1, 2003 after a brief battle with cancer. A prominent actuary, Murray joined Eckler Partners 44 years ago. In addition to his professional consulting activity Murray served on the Board of Directors and as the firm's Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Secretary for the past many years. The loss of our treasured colleague and friend is immeasurable.
Murray headed up Eckler Partners' Actuarial Evidence practice and was considered by many to be Canada's leading practitioner in the field. He played a key role in numerous landmark cases and was greatly respected by his peers, including fellow actuaries, economists, lawyers and judges.
Murray was known for his love of his family, his community and his profession. Murray's commitment and dedication to the betterment of the actuarial profession was unfailing. Throughout his career he served tirelessly on advisory committees and professional organizations.
Murray's integrity and intelligence were matched only by his humility, good humour and generosity. He was a great (and usually anonymous) contributor to community charities, and passionately lobbied for causes near to his and his family's heart. He will be remembered always by his colleagues for his frequent and spontaneous acts of kindness and for the respect he extended to one and all.
Murray will be missed immensely, both personally and professionally, by so many. We extend heartfelt condolences to his wife Marlene and his three sons, Gerald, Ernest and Moshe, and their families.
In honour and memory of Murray SEGAL, Eckler Partners Ltd. is establishing a Murray Segal Memorial Award in Actuarial Science at the University of Manitoba, Murray's alma mater. Donations are welcome, and may be made through David BROWN at Eckler Partners (telephone: (416) 696-3016 or email: dbrown@eckler.ca), or through Diana KASPERSION, at the Department of Private Funding, 179 Continuing Education Complex, 406 University Crescent, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2. Donations should be made payable to the University of Manitoba.
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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-20 published
GLADDY, Dr. Percy Vaughan, B.Sc., M.D., (F.R.C.SC)
On September 16, 2003, in his home on the shores of Lake Huron with his family, Percy died, at the age of 76, after a life filled with integrity, hard work, dedication and achievement. He leaves his dear wife, Alexia, and beloved children, Geoffrey, Sarah (Jonathan), Jennifer and Rebecca, and cherished grand_sons Alexander and Daniel. He was predeceased by his parents, Arthur and Nellie, and brother, Leo. Born and raised in Sarnia, Ontario, Percy was a graduate of Queen's University (Meds '50), with postgraduate training in Canada and the U.S. in Obstetrics and Gynecology. A lifelong student of medicine, Percy practiced medicine for over 45 years in Sarnia where he served his community and positively touched the lives of many mothers and their families. He was instrumental in setting up the first Emergency Physicians' Service at St. Joseph's Hospital which provided 24-hour emergency care for the residents of Sarnia-Lambton. He also set up the first mother-baby wellness clinic in Walpole Island to provide pre- and post-natal care. For service to the First Nation community, he was given the honorary name Mshkikiiwnini (Indian Doctor). A skilled physician, he will be remembered for his strong moral code, humour, warmth, availability and concern for others. In his career and personal life, Percy was guided by his Christian faith, especially during the last difficult days of his illness and he remained true to himself determined, strong and willing to do the work to survive. He had great love for his family and was the proud father of four Queen's graduates. His example and principles will remain to inspire his children and all who knew him. He received excellent medical care and his family wishes to express their appreciation to Dr. D. PAYNE, Dr. F. SHEPHERD, Dr. G. DARLING, Dr. D. BROWN and Jennifer HORNBY, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, and Dr. V. BALACHANDRA and Dr. R. GARRETT, Sarnia. Percy's family is grateful for the support and care extended to them by their many relatives, Friends, and especially Helen PARADIS. Cremation has taken place with arrangements entrusted to McKenzie and Blundy Funeral Home and Cremation Centre (519-344-3131). A memorial service to celebrate Percy's life will be held at 11: 00 a.m. on Saturday, September 27, 2003, at Grace United Church, 990 Cathcart Blvd., Sarnia. In lieu of flowers, Percy's family kindly requests that expressions of sympathy be directed to the Lambton Education Foundation (Dr. P.V. Gladdy Scholarship), 200 Wellington Street, P.O. Box 2019, Sarnia, Ontario N7T 7L2 or to the Lambton Hospitals Foundation (Building Fund
Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology), 89 Norman Street, Sarnia, Ontario N7T 6S3. Messages of condolence and memories may be left at www.mckenzieblundy.com
A tree will be planted in memory of Percy GLADDY in the McKenzie & Blundy Memorial Forest. Dedication service Sunday, September 19th, 2004 at 2: 00 p.m. at the Wawanosh Wetlands Conservation Area.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-16 published
MOYER, David S.
Born March 5, 1922 in Clinton Township, and died Tuesday, October 14, 2003, at his home in Beamsville. son of the late Ira C. MOYER and the late Georgina Isabella MacLEOD of Beamsville and brother of the late Margaret Irene BROWN, Etta Jean BLUMGOLD of New Jersey, Ronald Claus MOYER of Grimsby and Ralph Levi MOYER of Carruna. In 1930 Ira Claus married Agnes Rohde HANSEN of Denmark and had additional children, Elizabeth FRACCHIONI of Troy, New York, Inge VIAU of Kingston, Peter MOYER and the late Samuel MOYER of Beamsville. Mr. MOYER was uncle of Paul MOYER of Vineland, Thomas MOYER of Beamsville. He is also survived by his daughter Julia Grace DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS and her husband Steven and four grandchildren, Richard, Sarah, Cordelia and William, all of Whitby.
Mr. MOYER attended Queen's University in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and graduated in 1951 with a B.Sc. in Physics. He worked in Toronto as a project engineer and later as a production engineer for most of his professional life. He attended the Vineland Mennonite Church as a child and later the Beamsville Baptist Church. After his marriage he converted to the Anglican Communion and lived mainly in Toronto. In later life he returned to Beamsville and attended services in both the Baptist Church and the Anglican Church.
Mr. MOYER is at the Tallman Funeral Home, 4998 King Street, Beamsville, where the family will received Friends on Thursday 2-3: 30 and 7-8: 30 p.m. The funeral service will be held at St. Alban's Church, 4341 Ontario Street, Beamsville, on Friday, October 17 at 7 p.m. Cremation to follow. If desired, donations to the West Lincoln Memorial Hospital Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-05 published
BLOCK, Matthew Alexander
Tragically died of injuries sustained when struck by a car on Hallowe'en evening. Matthew passed away peacefully with his family by his side at the McMaster Medical Centre on Saturday, November 1, 2003. He was 12 years old.
Matthew BLOCK (Cambridge, Ontario) is the cherished son of Kelly (née FLOOD) and Robert BROOK, dear brother of Stephen, Kevin, Andrew, Caitlin and Jenny, friend of Brent, and precious grand_son of Ellen and Denis CASE, Dennis and Patricia FLOOD, Stanley and Evelyn BROOK. He will also be sadly missed by his great aunts and uncles.
Loved nephew of Sheryl FLOOD and Douglas RITCHIE, Christopher CASE, Leslie (née CASE) and Rodney GIEBLER, Debbie and Jerry and Dave and Denise; and cousins Nicole and Alexander. Special friend of Keith, Lena, Zeo and Matthew BENNETT; Ted and Joe GIBBONS Doreen BROWN and Lloyd STEWARD/STEWART/STUART; and all of his many Friends and their families.
Matthew was a student at St. Joseph's School in Cambridge, and he enjoyed playing left wing with Hespler Minor Hockey. Matthew was also an aspiring chef who shared his passion for cooking with all who knew him.
We wish to thank all those who have given us their love and support, and we offer our heartfelt gratitude to the staff at Cambridge Memorial Hospital, McMaster Medical Centre, and specifically Dr. Holly SMITH, Nancy FRAM, and Chaplin Steve. We were comforted to know that Matthew gave the gift of life to seven families through organ donation.
Our dear Matthew will be greatly missed by all who knew him. It was a great joy and honour to have shared 12 years with him.
Friends will be received on Tuesday and Wednesday from 6: 00-9:00 p.m. at Littles Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 223 Main Street East, Cambridge www.funeralscanada.com Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Clements R.C. Church, 745 Duke Street, Cambridge on Thursday, November 6th at 10: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. In memory of Matthew, donations would be appreciated to ''Kids Can Play'' and to the school that he loved, St. Joseph's in Preston, for any educational needs.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-12 published
MacNEIL, Lt.-Col. Robert Robertson, C.D., B.Sc. (Queen's,) B.Sc. (Mil.)
Died in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, on Monday, November 10, 2003. He was born in Little Harbour, Pictou County, Nova Scotia in 1919, the eldest son of the late Frank H. and Margaret ROBERTSON) MacNEIL. He was a graduate of New Glasgow High School, Royal Military College No. 2540 and Queen's University; an elder in Little Harbour Presbyterian Church; a director of the Pictou County Historical Society; former chairman of Pictou County Business Opportunities Limited; and past president of St. Andrew's Society of New Glasgow. He is survived by his wife, the former Isabelle MacLEOD; daughters Susan and Meg; son-in-law Jim BROWN; grand_sons MacNeil and Woody; brother Donald (Mardy) of Little Harbour nephews David, Graham, Bruce, Stanley and Murdo; niece Peggy. He was predeceased by his brother Frank. Jr.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
BROWN, Kenneth, M.D., C.M., (F.R.C.S.C)
Born 1924 in Montreal, Québec, died November 18, 2003, North Bay, Ontario. Lovingly remembered by his wife, Toni and his children, Susan (Don) PRIEBE of North Bay, Pam (Tom) DAWES of Thunder Bay, Ken (Rose) BROWN of Port Perry, Heather ROBERTSON of Calgary, Alison (Bruce) MILLAR of Canmore, Toni BROWN (Dick AVERNS) of Vancouver, and Meredith BROWN (Ronnie DREVER) of Montreal. Especially loved by his grandchildren, Sarah, Nik, Heidi, Kim, Lisa, Eric, Graeme, Laura, Evan, Geoff, Cam, Aidan, Riley, Nelson, Brooke, and Lily. Also survived by his brother, James (Jean) BROWN of South Carolina. Friends may call at the Martyn Funeral Home, 464 Wyld Street, North Bay, on Thursday, November 20, 2003 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday November 21, 2003, at Christ Church Anglican, Vimy Street, North Bay. If desired, donations to the Parkinson Society Canada would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.
Husband * Father * Grandpa * Friend * Surgeon
We'll miss you

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
TENNANT, John Holmsted, Q.C.
Died peacefully on Wednesday, December 24, 2003, in Burlington, Ontario. A devoted father and grandfather he leaves behind daughters Peggy (WENGLE) and Barbara (and Malcolm MacKAY;) grandchildren Christopher, Sandy and Robert McLAREN, Heather (OUELLETTE;) Lisa and Malcolm MacKAY, and great-grandchildren Amelia, Skye and Natalie. He was predeceased by his wife Airdrie (BROWN) in 1977. Born September 10, 1915 in Yorkton, Saskatchewan, he moved to Montreal, Quebec at age 14 and graduated from Université de Montréal with a law degree in 1940, winning the Bar of Montreal prize for commercial law. During the war, he served on corvettes with the R.C.N.V.R. 1941-1945. He worked for the legal department of the Industrial Development Bank and then for the law firm Howard, Cate, Ogilvy, Bishop, Cope, Porteous and Hansard. He retired in 1979 to Oakville, Ontario to be closer to his grandchildren. His family was the joy of his life and he will be sorely missed by them. A private service will be held. Calls and visits will be welcomed at the homes of his daughters. Donations in lieu of flowers can be made to his favourite charities: The Salvation Army and Covenant House.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
witnesses: are silent as the slain weep
By Christie BLATCHFORD, Tuesday, December 30, 2003 - Page A1
Even on its face, what unfolded in two parts of the Beechwood Cemetery at noon yesterday is a gripping story.
There, in Section 7, the family of Godfrey "Junior" DUNBAR -- including his three astonishingly beautiful children, aged 12, 8 and 7 -- were holding a vigil for their lost son, brother and father at his grave. Mr. DUNBAR and Richard BROWN, respectively 27 and 29 years old, were gunned down precisely four years earlier at a North York nightclub jammed with upward of 800 people.
The case went cold and has stayed that way -- Toronto police offered a $50,000 reward yesterday as a last resort -- not because it isn't solvable, not for a lack of potential witnesses, but rather because none of those witnesses, including many Friends of the two men, is talking.
Among those who were at the Connections II club that night and who would not tell detectives what they saw was one Kirk SWEENEY.
And who was being buried yesterday in Section 17 of the cemetery, about 400 metres away from the vigil? None other than young Mr. SWEENEY, himself the victim of an execution-style killing just before Christmas at a downtown club called the G Spot.
There was a big crowd of mourners at the mound of fresh earth by his grave. Funerals for the young black men who form the city's largest single group of homicide victims are always well attended, as Mr. DUNBAR's terrific older sister, Trisha, noted yesterday. At her brother's, for instance, she remembered, people did what they could to console the family. "But money is not what we wanted," she said. "We wanted for one of them to come forward." It is the cruellest irony, she said, that her brother, who so "valued Friendship," should have been betrayed by those who were with him the night he died.
At the vigil, the crowd was tiny, composed only of relatives, media (invited because the DUNBARs are hoping renewed publicity will see someone belatedly speak up) and other black mothers who have lost sons to gun violence.
One of them was Yvonne BEASLEY. I'd been told her son had been killed, and after introducing myself, asked if the case had been solved. She looked at me as though I was mad. "Oh," she said, "they're all unsolved."
"What was your son's name?" I asked, apologizing for not remembering. "I don't blame you," she said. "There have been so many."
Her boy was Sydney HEMMANS. One day shy of his 19th birthday, in July, 2001, he was shot and killed in his old downtown neighbourhood. "Were there witnesses?" I asked Ms. BEASLEY. " There are always witnesses," she said. "That's why all us moms are here."
Another was Julia FARQUHARSON, whose 24-year-old son, Segun, was shot and killed on May 17, 2001, the victim of what began as an attempted robbery and ended in an utterly senseless murder.
Mr. FARQUHARSON was carrying his basketball at the time of his death, and, realizing the gravity of the situation he was in, had called his own cellphone's voicemail to secretly record the voices of the two men wanting to rob him. That two-minute call, played publicly by homicide detectives not long after Mr. FARQUHARSON's murder, is a terrifying mélange of Mr. FARQUHARSON clutching his basketball and pleading for his life, and one of his attackers shrieking, "Yo, let me fucking kill you, dude."
Police were hoping someone would recognize the voices on the tape, and call them. That was more than two years ago. They continue to wait, and despite a recent $50,000 reward, Mr. FARQUHARSON's slaying remains unsolved.
That is one of the other stories here -- that police, despite dogged work and the fact that so many of these killings take place in public places, cannot successfully close these cases without witnesses: willing to testify and that, on the rare occasion they are able to get a case to court, the witnesses: are by then demonstrably unreliable, having given several versions of what they saw before belatedly telling the truth.
All of this goes to undermine the administration of justice.
But the other, broader story is that because of the intimate connections that often exist among the slain and their killers and the mute witnesses: to their deaths -- and the fact that so much of the gun violence in Toronto is committed by young black men upon other young black men -- there is a growing cynicism, captured in an e-mail I got yesterday.
In Monday's paper, I'd written about the case of Adrian Roy BAPTISTE, a handsome 21-year-old who was shot five times, in broad daylight, last Saturday, just eight days after he was found not guilty by a properly constituted jury, and freed, in another shooting in Hamilton almost two years previous.
This is what the note said: "Let them all shoot each other. Leave the rest of us in peace. And let God sort it all out. Enough said."
I understand the weariness there, but strongly disagree.
The killing spree now going on in the city -- not the first one, merely the latest -- is not a problem confined to the lawless, and it ought not to be left to the black community to solve.
There are often perfectly innocent victims, and even those with lengthy criminal records die so young that they never get the proverbial second chance that ought to be a given in a civilized society.
Junior DUNBAR's mother, Jamela, bent low in the rain yesterday and whispered to her son's tombstone, "You had so many Friends. None of them came forward to speak on your behalf; no one has the decency. Where are your Friends now?" His older son, Marquel, left a little drawing of him and his dad holding hands.
The baby son, D'angelo, stood with his small face utterly stricken, his big sister, Deondra, keeping an arm around him.
Aside from a few reporters, the only white face at the vigil belonged to Gary BRENNAN, the detective who was one of the original investigators of Mr. DUNBAR's killing; he has moved to another squad now, but still was good enough to show up.
It's rarely the cops who have to be motivated to give a damn. It's the rest of us.

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BROWN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-31 published
Slain man was central to case that altered confession rule
By Christie BLATCHFORD, Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - Page A7
The late Kirk Alexander SWEENEY, who was buried just this week, may be best remembered by the general public as one of a number of young black men gunned down over the Christmas holidays.
Toronto homicide detectives may think instead of how crude street justice got Mr. SWEENEY in the end: He was, they say, essentially executed at the G-Spot nightclub in the early-morning hours of December 22.
The handsome 26-year-old allegedly had been a witness, four years ago, to a double murder that took place at another crowded club.
But Mr. SWEENEY, like dozens and dozens of others who were within an arm's length of the victims, refused to tell police what he knew of the shooting of Godfrey (Junior) DUNBAR and Richard BROWN.
The result of their collective silence has been that those two slayings remain unsolved, the killer or killers still at large.
And now, of course, the same hear-, see-, and speak-no-evil rule appears to be applying to the investigation of Mr. SWEENEY's slaying. Detectives find few people who were within eyeshot, among the crowd of 150, willing to co-operate.
But Mr. SWEENEY made a rather more lasting contribution to Canadian criminal law -- aside, that is, from compiling a not unimpressive record of his own on various weapons-related offences.
In the fall of 2000, he was the person at the centre of an important legal case, the outcome of which made it far more difficult for police to get suspects to talk and virtually impossible for prosecutors to take any resulting confessions to court if even a hint of a whiff of a threat had been used to obtain them.
The background goes like this.
On December 31, 1996, a taxi driver -- a hard-working new immigrant picked up two men and drove them to a townhouse complex in Toronto.
One man, allegedly Mr. SWEENEY, was in the front passenger seat, the other in the rear. Once they reached their destination, the man in the front switched off the ignition, while the rear passenger purportedly put his arm around the driver's neck.
The man in the front then allegedly pointed a gun at the driver, threatened to kill him, and demanded his money.
As the driver was reaching to get it, he told police later, the man in the front pistol-whipped him about the head.
The two men fled with the money; the police were called, and within an hour, a police dog was tracking a scent from the cab to the rear entrance of the townhouse of Mr. SWEENEY's family.
As Mr. SWEENEY left the home, he was arrested, along with another suspect.
Mr. SWEENEY subsequently made two statements to police.
One officer said if Mr. SWEENEY could tell them where the gun was, they would not have to execute a search warrant on his mother's home.
Mr. SWEENEY told the detective he had thrown the weapon out a window, but police still couldn't find it.
At Mr. SWEENEY's original trial, Judge David HUMPHREY disallowed the statement on the grounds that it was the product of "an inducement" by the detective.
But Mr. SWEENEY gave another statement.
A second officer said police had prepared a search warrant for the house -- this was true -- and told Mr. SWEENEY that officers would "trash" the house, looking for the gun, if he didn't tell them where it was. Mr. SWEENEY apparently hesitated, and the officer added, "Your mom is already upset. Just be a man and make this easier for her." Mr. SWEENEY told the officer the gun was in a box in his mother's closet, and even drew a little diagram for him.
The police executed the warrant and, as sure as cats like litter, found the gun, right where Mr. SWEENEY said it was.
At trial, Judge HUMPHREY concluded -- sensibly, I'd argue, to the average Joe -- that this statement was also the result of an inducement, and thus involuntary, but found it admissible under what's called the St. Lawrence rule. That rule, taken from an old case of the same name, held that even involuntary statements are admissible if they are reliable -- if, in other words, the suspect is proved to have been telling the truth. In this way, those who make false confessions are still protected.
As Judge HUMPHREY wrote with considerable understatement of the purported inducement, "There was no aura of oppression, no torture it was almost a gentlemen's agreement, if you will."
Mr. SWEENEY was duly convicted by a judge and jury of robbery, assault while using a weapon and two other weapons offences, and sentenced to six years in prison.
Fast forward to the Ontario Court of Appeal, where Mr. SWEENEY's new lawyer, Howard BORENSTEIN, successfully argued that his client's Charter right to remain silent had been violated by the police having held over his head the "threat" of the raucous search.
In a September 25, 2000, decision, Mr. Justice Marc ROSENBERG, writing for the unanimous court, threw out the involuntary confession, thundered that "a threat to destroy the property of a family member by abusing the authority given to the police by the search warrant is not properly characterized as a technical threat" and said that if the confession were allowed, "it would be condoning the use of threats to abuse judicial process" and would "raise serious concerns for the administration of justice."
More broadly, Judge ROSENBERG said that the old St. Lawrence rule was now so undermined by the Charter that it "would only be in highly exceptional circumstances" that a trial judge would be entitled to admit a confession like Mr. SWEENEY's.
And because the poor cab driver -- remember him? -- had had only a glimpse of his attacker, and there was virtually no other evidence against Mr. SWEENEY, the Court of Appeal set aside the conviction and entered an acquittal.
Mr. SWEENEY went on to compile his lengthy criminal record, allegedly witness a double murder about which he remained mute, and die on the floor of the G-Spot. I wonder what all that does for the glory of the administration of justice.
Clarification Due to my inability to read my own notes, I wrote the other day that Adrian BAPTISTE, gunned down last Saturday in a North York parking lot and only eight days out of jail after being acquitted of second-degree murder, had been talking of straightening out his life, and thinking of going into law enforcement. In fact, as his lawyer David BAYLISS told me, Mr. BAPTISTE had dreamed of becoming a lawyer.

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MORGAN- JONES, John Frederick (April 9, 1918 - March 1, 2003)
Suddenly, at Mount Sinai Hospital, on March 1, 2003. Born in Winnipeg in 1918, Dr. MORGAN- JONES was the younger son of John Samuel MORGAN- JONES and Elizabeth Madeline (BROWNRIGG) MORGAN- JONES. Dr. MORGAN- JONES obtained his doctoral degree in microbiology from Uppsala University in Sweden in 1960. He served as a professor in the Botany Department at the University of Toronto from 1953 to 1983 where he specialized in microbiology and created new courses in industrial and medical mycology. His film ''Penicillin: First of the Miracle Drugs'' won the top award in the medical and health category at the 1989 Houston International Film Festival. He will be missed by his niece Lynda JONES, his niece Sybil JONES, and her husband Stephen Cox THOMAS. Memorial Service to be held on Saturday, March 8, 2003 at 2 o'clock in the Chapel of the Missionary Church of St. Francis of Assisi, 817 O'Connor Drive. In lieu of flowers, please send a donation to the Animal Rescue Mission of Canada, 821 O'Connor Drive, Toronto, Ontario M4B 2S7. Arrangements by Aftercare Cremation and Burial Service 416-440-8878.

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