BLACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
JOHNSTON, Thirza Elaine B.Sc. (Hons.,) B.Ed., M.Ed. (Teacher with the Toronto District School Board, Scarborough)
Unexpectedly, Thirza (née TOTTEN) passed away on Wednesday, February 26, 2003. Predeceased by her husband, Bruce, she is lovingly remembered by her children, Robert, Anne and her husband Greig BLACK, Mary and her husband Neil ABBOTT, and Julie and her husband Michael BERNIER. Thirza cherished her role as grandmother. A private family service was held. If desired, donations may be made in Thirza's memory to The Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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BLACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
Canada's Catholic leader, CARTER dies at 91
By Michael VALPY Religion And Ethics Reporter Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page A1
Three weeks ago, John TURNER met Gerald Emmett CARTER for their annual St. Patrick's Day drink. The former prime minister held the glass for his friend of 50 years while he sipped his Irish whisky through a straw.
When the retired cardinal archbishop of Toronto died yesterday morning at the age of 91, a reputation as richly coloured as the scarlet of his soutane died with him.
Canadian Roman Catholicism will probably never see his like again: a prince of the church who, while never unmindful of the meek and the poor, made no bones about being comfortable rubbing elbows with fellow princes of politics and business.
He was the close friend of prime ministers and premiers. He enjoyed socializing in the corridors of power with people like Conrad BLACK, Hilary and Galen WESTON and Fredrik EATON. He displayed an unabashed fondness for Progressive Conservative Party gatherings. ("I think at one Christmas party, I was the only Liberal there," Mr. TURNER said in an interview.)
Yet academics and religious and business leaders also spoke yesterday of a man with an acute understanding of Canada and its history.
They described an intense, intellectual democrat who believed he should speak out forcefully on the moral and political issues of the day and who welcomed debate with those who disagreed with him. And they talked of a cleric who profoundly understood the nature of the church and who welcomed ecumenism and Canada's emerging pluralism.
"He felt the institution of religion should have a public voice and he was not shy about exercising it," said Michael HIGGINS, principal of St. Jerome's University in Waterloo and co-author of My Father's Business, the 1990 biography of Cardinal CARTER.
"Whenever he spoke, his voice was strong, clear, public, undiluted and welcomed by political leaders even when they disagreed with him. It is an unfortunate circumstance that the marginalization of religious debate occurred at the same time as he was eclipsed by a stroke, retirement and age, at a time when his church needed him. He embodied a certain kind of churchman we probably won't see again."
Cardinal CARTER suffered a stroke in 1981 and retired in 1990.
Cardinal Aloysius AMBROZIC, his successor as archbishop of Toronto, said Cardinal CARTER "wanted to know what the movers and shakers were doing."
Cardinal AMBROZIC described him as a man totally engaged with his church and with his society -- an advocate for the poor, for immigrants and for the homeless.
"What I admired about him, what I found so instructive about him, was his sense of responsibility for the church and for society at large. He was very much a man of Vatican 2 [the church's 1962-65 ecumenical council] and he knew what the Catholic Church was about."
There was also, said Cardinal AMBROZIC, "his own personal style. He had panache."
The priest who rose from a working-class Montreal background to become the most powerful cleric in Canada met Mr. TURNER when the former prime minister was a young lawyer in Montreal doing legal work for the church. "He was a great human being who understood the balance between the religious and secular worlds," Mr. TURNER said.
"He loved tennis, and he had a wicked serve."
Former prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU consulted him on the Constitution in the early 1980s and became a close friend. At the celebration of Cardinal CARTER's 75th birthday in 1987, instructions were given that an entire pew was to be reserved for Mr. TRUDEAU in Toronto's St. Michael's Cathedral.
Mr. TRUDEAU delayed his arrival until just before the cardinal entered the church. "All eyes were trained on TRUDEAU until Cardinal CARTER arrived," said Dr. HIGGINS. "It was symbolic of the close relationship they had."
Toronto's Anglican Archbishop, Terence FINLAY, who first met Cardinal CARTER when they were both bishops in London, Ontario, in the 1970s, said the Roman Catholic Church in Canada had lost a great leader.
"He enabled us to bring our churches closer together. I certainly counted on him as a friend and colleague. He had an impressive understanding of Canada's history and political situations. He knew who we were."

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BLACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-07 published
Cardinal felt at ease with politics, power
Corporate Friends, conservative image concealed complexities, contradictions
By Michael VALPY Monday, April 7, 2003 - Page A9
Gerald Emmett CARTER presided over the Roman Catholic Church in Toronto for 12 years with panache, deftness, wit and worldliness too much worldliness, some of his critics thought.
The retired cardinal archbishop, who died at 91 yesterday morning after a brief illness, chummed with the powerful of business and politics and became the most influential cleric in Canada.
He was a personal friend of Pope John Paul 2nd. His weight was felt in Vatican circles and his administrative expertise -- and connections with the elite world of corporate finance -- were valued by the church's governing Curia.
He raised millions of dollars for charity through his annual cardinal's dinner, pressed governments for social housing and worked energetically to improve race relations in a city being transformed from a WASPy bastion into a multicultural and multiracial metropolis. His was the largest and wealthiest English-speaking diocese in Canada.
In the North American church's tumultuous years after the 1961-65 Second Vatican Council, the most significant reassessment of the Catholic Church since the 16th century, Cardinal CARTER was branded a conservative by many Catholic liberals. It was a superficial label for a complex and astute pastoral theologian and a man whose intelligence was described as commanding.
The conservative label, for one thing, did not take into account Cardinal CARTER's publicly tepid response to Pope Paul 6th's reaffirmation of the church's opposition to birth control.
Or that he once said Catholics were "not required to agree with [the Pope's] every word or act." Said the cardinal: To think that a good Catholic is obliged to agree with the Pope on everything "would, at the very least, make for a very dull church."
But he strained ecumenical good fellowship in Ontario by relentlessly and, eventually, successfully -- prodding the provincial government to legislate full financing for the Roman Catholic separate school system. He intervened in the Newfoundland constitutional referendum on ending public financing of denominational schools.
He publicly defended his church's rules for an all-male, celibate priesthood. He wrote a pastoral letter calling Dr. Henry MORGENTALER's abortion clinic an "abomination" and calling on Christians to oppose its operations. But he also ordered his priests to stop distributing literature of militant anti-abortion groups.
When the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops swung to the left in its criticisms of the national government's fiscal policies, Cardinal CARTER bluntly took the opposite direction.
And he objected to the conference's decision in 1984 to study a plan to give women and girls a more prominent role in the church and attracted noise and notoriety three years later when he ordered a suburban Toronto church not to allow a teenaged girl to be an altar server at mass.
Cardinal CARTER, a Montreal typesetter's son who made his mark as an academic and teacher before climbing the church's ranks, looked stern in public, gave arid homilies and was known to intimidate his priests.
But he was mischievous and funny in private, played a superb game of tennis and was a sought-after dinner guest in the homes of Toronto's business and political elite.
He was, among other things, credited with converting Conrad BLACK to Catholicism, and his name often appeared in the press alongside those of political leaders such as former Ontario premier William DAVIS, prompting Globe and Mail columnist Orland FRENCH to write: "His presence at glittering Tory functions is overly noticeable and it would be fair to speculate that he discussed with the Premier the advantages of extending funding to separate schools."
Born in Montreal in 1912, Cardinal CARTER was a priest for nearly 66 years and a bishop for 40 years. His brother Alexander, who died last year at 93, had retired as bishop of the Ontario diocese of Sault Ste. Marie. Two sisters were nuns, one of them the head of her order.
Cardinal CARTER was educated at the Grand Seminary of Montreal and the University of Montreal. He spent the first 25 years of his priesthood working in various educational fields in the province of Quebec.
In 1939, he founded St. Joseph's Teaching College in Montreal and was its principal until 1961. For 15 years, he was English commissioner for the Montreal Catholic School Commission. He was a professor of catechetics -- the formation of faith -- for 25 years.
He was installed as the first auxiliary bishop in the diocese of London, Ontario, in 1961 and became the eighth bishop of London in 1964.
In 1971, he headed the International Committee for English in the Liturgy, which was responsible for translating Latin texts for the mass and the sacraments.
In 1977, he was elected a member of the Permanent Council of the Synod of Bishops in Rome, which sets the topics for the International Synod of Bishops in Rome every two or three years.
Pope John Paul named him a cardinal, one of only four in Canada, in May of 1979, a year after he became archbishop of Toronto.
From the moment he was installed as archbishop, promising to serve all who "would like to see Toronto as something more than an asphalt jungle," Cardinal CARTER put his job in the spotlight and, very often, himself in the hot seat. He tackled controversial issues with a candour that won him arrows and acclaim from politicians, minority groups, the church laity and sometimes fellow clergy.
At the same time, he was loyal to the Pope and to the official teachings of the church, declaring in 1979 that the time had come to end the dissent within the church that had followed Vatican 2 and turn the 1980s into a time of reaffirmation of faith.
"We have had enough of confusion, enough of confrontation, enough of dissent. We are the believers. Those who go looking for dissent are not Catholic."
His ties with the Pope were personal. John Paul, as archbishop of Krakow, had visited Cardinal CARTER in London, Ontario, and had him stay as a houseguest in Poland. Cardinal CARTER, in turn, was host to the Pope at his Rosedale home when the pontiff visited Toronto in 1984.
His funeral will be held at 10: 30 a.m. Thursday in St. Michael's Cathedral, Toronto.

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BLACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-30 published
Laurie BENNETT (née McDERMOTT)
It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Laurie BENNETT (née McDERMOTT) on Monday, April 28, 2003. Laurie, who was a loving and dedicated mother and grandmother, died at home with her family. As a professional, she was the Founder and a former Executive Director of Hospice of Peel. Laurie spent the last twenty-five years of her career dedicating her life to helping those around her and to developing and promoting the invaluable hospice services in Mississauga as well as in Ontario and across Canada. Starting in 1977, she was instrumental in starting the palliative care service at Mississauga Hospital (now Trillium Health Care Centre). In 1985, when the government and hospitals began to limit services to the terminally ill, Laurie and a few colleagues started an organization that could serve all terminally ill patients in the community - the Hospice of Peel. Laurie was loving mother to Lynne, Bruce and his wife Susan BLACK, Brenda and her husband Bob LEARMONTH; proud grandmother of Shannon, Cody, Tyler, Myles, Carolann, Christine and Jamie; dear sister to Ted and Gary McDERMOTT; and loving aunt to Sean, Michele, Kevin and his wife Jessica (both who went out of their way to help the family during Laurie's last few months), Steve, Jackie and Scott and dear friend to too many to mention. Laurie is predeceased by her brother Jack (affectionately known as the 'Great J.B.'). She was loved by all who were close to her and will be tremendously missed. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter 'Peel' Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10North of Queen Elizabeth Way) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Thursday. Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Friday, May 2, 2003 at 11 o'clock. Private family interment Saint John's Dixie Cemetery. For those who wish, it is Laurie's and the family's request that any donations be made to Hospice of Peel, 855 Matheson Blvd. East, Unit #1, Mississauga, Ontario L4W 4L6

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BLACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-12 published
Died This Day -- 13 school canoeists, 1978
Thursday, June 12, 2003 - Page R9
Adventure outing by Saint John's School, Claremont, Ontario, struck by high winds on Lake Temiskaming, single capsize caused panic and the upset of other canoes, led to deaths of teacher Mark DEANNY and boys
Todd MICHELL,
Barry NELSON,
Jody O'GORMAN,
Timothy PRYCE,
David GREANEY,
Andy HERMAN,
Simon CROFT,
Tim HOPKINS,
Tom KENNY,
Scott BINDON,
Kevin BLACK,
Fraser BOURCHIER
Autopsies showed all drowned but that some had been in water 12 hours before death occurred.

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BLACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-11 published
BLACK, George Alexander, Associate, Royal Conservatory of Music of Toronto, B.A., M.A., PhD (French)
Died July 1, 2003 in Paris, France. A professor, liturgist, hymnist and church musician of international renown,
George taught French Language and Literature, Latin, Church Music and Liturgies at Huron College, London, Ontario retiring in 1995. After a long and distinguished joint tenure in the Departments of French and Theology, he ended his academic career in the Chair of Liturgy and Church Music. The Faculty of Theology conferred on him the extraordinary honour of Doctor of Divinity (honoris causa) - only the second election to that degree of a lay person in College history.
He served on the Doctrine and Worship Committee for the National Anglican Church of Canada and was instrumental in the development of the Book of Alternative Services for the Anglican church. He also chaired the Hymn Book Task Force which published Common Praise in 1998. Both National and Diocesan Synods have made George a member of their Merit orders. George also served as President of the Hymn Society in United States and Canada.
He served as Assistant Organist at Saint Thomas Church, Toronto, Organist and Choir Director St. Edmund the Martyr, Toronto; All Hallows, Toronto; Saint Mary the Virgin, Toronto; St. James (Westminster), London; Director of Chapel Music, Huron College, London and Coordinator of Music, ChristChurch, London. He also conducted the London Singers and the George Black Singers.
Musical compositions commissioned include John Cook Missa Brevis, Barrie Cabena, Te Deum, Derek Healey, Summer, Philip Ross and Rae Davis, South Pole, Barrie Cabena, Psalm 141. Published music includes Music for Sunday Psalms (Anglican Book Centre) and Holding in Trust: Hymns of the Hymn Society (Hope Publishing).
He is survived by his wife Margaret McLEAN, son Hugh and his wife Carole, daughter Clare and her husband David BOWLEY and grandchildren Nathan, Lauren, Kate and Liz. Predeased by Adrienne Salmond BLACK. Cremation held July 8, 2003 at Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, Paris France. A memorial service will be held July 19, 2003, 11.00 a.m. at the Church of the Redeemer, Avenue Road and Bloor Street, Toronto, Ontario with private internment at Park Lawn Cemetery. Remembrances may be made to the libraries of Trinity College, 6 Hoskin Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1H8 and Huron College, 1349 Western Road, London, Ontario N6G 1H3.

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BLACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-24 published
Ian ROSS
By David ROSS Thursday, July 24, 2003 - Page A18
Son, brother, uncle, friend, wildlife biologist. Born December 16, 1958, in Goderich, Ontario Died June 29, near Nanyuki, Kenya, in a light-aircraft accident, aged 44.
Ian ROSS died at the peak of his career, doing what he loved.
Born in Southern Ontario, he was a true outdoorsman from the beginning, running a trapline even during high school. He graduated from the University of Guelph with an honours degree in wildlife biology in 1982. There being few jobs in his chosen profession at that time, he was a lost soul when he drove his pickup truck, packed with all of his possessions, out to Alberta looking for work. A short stint working as a beekeeper in Peace River was followed by his being hired as a wildlife biologist by a small private consulting firm in Calgary. His joy was quickly, and prophetically, short lived when his mentor died in a plane crash while conducting a wildlife survey in the Rockies shortly after Ian started work.
Ian and a colleague continued the firm, conducting environmental impact studies in Western and Northern Canada for government, the oil industry and, latterly, Canada's fledgling diamond industry. While rapid expansion of human activities in these areas had put his services in great demand lately, it was not always so. In the early years, Ian and his partner filled their spare time conducting a non-funded study of cougars in the area southwest of his home in Calgary. His work on the cougar project received national recognition as he appeared on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Morningside with Peter GZOWSKI. Arthur BLACK followed along while the partners radio-collared a cougar and recorded the event for an episode of Basic Black. Last year, he did a Discovery Channel show on the great bears.
A true, committed conservationist, Ian did not fit the typical mode. He hunted, legally, deer and moose for his own table. One never knew what to expect for dinner at Ian's and usually didn't ask. At the same time, he vigorously opposed the senseless trophy killing of wolves, bears and cougars. He was a major researcher on the eastern slopes grizzly-bear project currently underway in Alberta and British Columbia. His work with cougars led the Alberta government to introduce a conservation plan for these animals.
At one time a bit of a loner, Ian had grown to become a committed and emotional friend and family man. Having no children of his own, he was a hero to his young nieces, nephews and children of Friends who thought that his was the most important job of all. What uncle could match Ian when he produced the perfect fossilized albertasaurus tooth found on one of his Alberta expeditions?
Last year, Ian was approached to lead a study of large African predators, funded partly by the University of California and the National Geographic Society. Ian's time was largely volunteered. The purpose of the study was to learn how to reduce the number of domestic livestock killed by these magnificent animals so that the local farmers, some of the poorest on Earth, would not have to kill the lions, leopards and hyenas. Ian understood that if these predators were to survive in the long run they had to be able to exist outside of the national parks or face extinction due to inbreeding.
Ian's dry sense of humour was famous. We will never forget the letters describing the goat stew (scavenged from a lion kill) or the haircut performed by his mechanic.
Two days before his death he was on top of the world having collared his first leopard and was busy planning for our families' upcoming trip to visit him at the research station in August. On the evening he died, Ian was tracking a radio-collared lion from a light aircraft. Its wreckage was located by searchers the next morning. As he wished, he was cremated and his ashes dispersed in Kananaskis country where he had spent so much time with his cougars.
David ROSS is Ian's brother.

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BLACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-28 published
He had a passion for big cats
Canadian wildlife biologist pioneered long-running cougar project, radio-tracked lions in East Africa
By Allison LAWLOR Monday, July 28, 2003 - Page R7
Ian ROSS, a Canadian wildlife biologist whose love of big cats took him deep into the bush in East Africa, has died after his small plane crashed in central Kenya. He was 44.
Mr. ROSS was radio-tracking lions in Kenya's Laikipia district as part of a research study aimed at improving the conservation of large carnivores in Africa, when the two-seater Husky aircraft he was a passenger in crashed and burned.
The plane, which was flying at a low altitude in order to allow him to track the animals, crashed in the early evening of June 29. Mr. ROSS and the American pilot who was flying the plane were killed instantly, said Laurence FRANK, director of the Laikipia Predator Project and a research associate at the University of California at Berkeley.
Mr. ROSS, who arrived in Kenya from Calgary in January, had intended to stay there working on the project for at least a year.
"He had this real passion for big cats. He wanted to study them around the world," said Vivian PHARIS, who sits on the board of directors at the Alberta Wilderness Association, of which Mr. ROSS was a member for close to 20 years.
"Large carnivores are interesting because their populations tend to be the first to suffer from human activities," Mr. ROSS said a few years ago in a short article written on the occasion of a high-school reunion. "They require huge land areas and some of their characteristics are very similar to and conflict with our own."
Although Mr. ROSS had spent considerable time in the field researching several wild animals, including lions, grizzly bears and moose, Mr. ROSS was best known for his expertise on cougars.
In the mid-1990s, he and colleague Martin JALKOTZY, with whom he ran a small Calgary-based consulting firm called Arc Wildlife Services, completed a 14-year study on cougars.
The study, considered the longest-running cougar project and the most intensive of its kind, looked at everything from cougar population dynamics, to the effects of hunting, to food and habitat use.
The intensive fieldwork took place in the winter in the foothills of Alberta. Winter allowed the researchers to follow a cougar's tracks in the snow. Once a cat was tracked, with the help of dogs, the animal would be tranquillized before it was radio-collared and its measurements were taken.
"We worked really well as a team," Mr. JALKOTZY said. "It was something Ian did quite well."
The cougar project received wide public attention when Mr. ROSS appeared on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's Morningside with Peter GZOWSKI and Arthur BLACK, the former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio host, followed along with Mr. ROSS and Mr. JALKOTZY while they radio-collared a cougar. Mr. BLACK recorded the event for his program Basic Black.
In the mid-1980s, not long after Mr. ROSS became involved in the study, he lost his friend and mentor Orvall PALL. Mr. PALL was killed in a plane crash while tracking bighorn sheep in Alberta. At the time of his death he was working with Mr. ROSS and Mr. JALKOTZY on the cougar project.
Over the years, Mr. ROSS, who was described as quiet and unassuming, made a number of public presentations on the cougar study. He was especially in demand in 2001 after a woman was killed by a cougar while cross-country skiing near Banff, Alberta.
"Ian really believed in public education," believing it was the first step toward conservation, Mr. JALKOTZY said. Speaking publicly also helped to raise money, from individual donors, corporations and other sources, for the independent study.
Mr. ROSS also did a lot of work with Alberta Fish and Wildlife and was instrumental, along with Mr. JALKOTZY, in getting the province to adopt a new cougar wildlife management plan to control hunting.
Ian ROSS was born on December 16, 1958, in Goderich, Ontario He was the third of four children born to Burns and Ruth ROSS. Childhood was spent in the fields of Huron County near his home, climbing through muskrat swamps and collecting pelts and animal skulls.
After high school, Mr. ROSS left Goderich for Guelph, Ontario, where he studied wildlife biology. In 1982, he graduated from the University of Guelph with an honours degree. Soon after, he packed up his pickup truck with all his possessions and drove west to Alberta. After a short stint working as a beekeeper in the Peace River area, he was hired by a small private consulting firm in Calgary as a wildlife biologist and started studying grizzly bears and moose.
In 1984, he married Sheri MacLAREN, also from Goderich. The couple separated in January, 2002.
Over the course of his career, Mr. ROSS figured he had captured and released more than 1,000 large mammals including bighorn sheep, cougars and grizzlies, for research. Not afraid of large animals, he captured and collared his first leopard two days before he died.
Andrew ROSS recalls one time his older brother was injured by a moose when it kicked him in the face after being sedated. He was left bruised and with a cracked cheekbone.
"He was extremely meticulous and careful," Dr. FRANK said, referring to Mr. ROSS's work.
Through his consulting firm, Mr. ROSS conducted numerous environmental impact studies in western and northern Canada for the oil industry and government. The work required Mr. ROSS to spend a lot more time at his office desk instead of in the field where he felt his true talent was.
"Working with these large animals is very exciting and also very dangerous," Dr. FRANK said.
Mr. ROSS loved being in the field but hated what he had to do to the animals. He knew that by capturing the large predators he was causing them trauma, but he strongly believed that what he was doing was for the benefit of research and in the end the benefit of the animals, Dr. FRANK said.
"He was just so aware of the animal's experience, the animal's dignity, if you can put it that way," Dr. FRANK said.
Mr. ROSS spent the spring of 2002 working in northern British Columbia capturing grizzly bears for research. The job meant Mr. ROSS, a man small in stature but strong and wiry, and a pilot would fly low over an area in a helicopter trying to spot bears. Once they had, Mr. ROSS's job was to lean out of the plane, secure in his harness and dart the animal with a tranquillizer. After the animal was sedated, they would circle back, land the plane and eventually radio collar the animal.
"He had great capture skills," Mr. JALKOTZY said.
Aside from being a committed conservationist, Mr. ROSS was also an avid hunter and enjoyed hunting elk, moose and deer. But he vigorously opposed the trophy killing of wolves, bears and cougars.
Andrew ROSS recalls that when his brother went moose hunting, deep in the woods, he would only bring three bullets with him. He figured that if he couldn't kill an animal with those, he didn't deserve to get one.
"He would often get the moose with one bullet," Andrew ROSS said.
While he loved to hunt, he never went out in an area he was studying, considering that to be a conflict of interest, his brother said.
"Ian cared passionately about wildlife and wild country," and tried to do what he could to conserve it, Mr. JALKOTZY said.
Next month, Mr. ROSS's ashes will be dispersed in Alberta's Kananaskis country, where he had spent so much time with the cougars.

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BLACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-08 published
Shock, sadness over ASPER
Former movie ticket taker rose to prominence as one of Canada's biggest media moguls
By Richard BLACKWELL Media Reporter Wednesday, October 8, 2003 - Page B1
Canada's business, media and political elite expressed shock and sadness at the death of Izzy ASPER, the colourful Winnipeg media mogul who died yesterday at the age of 71.
Mr. ASPER built CanWest Global Communications Corp. into a national television and newspaper powerhouse, and more recently spent some of his fortune on charitable and philanthropic causes.
Israel ASPER, known to everyone as Izzy, was admitted to St. Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg at 9: 30 yesterday morning, and died soon after, surrounded by his wife and children.
CanWest spokesman Geoffrey ELLIOT/ELLIOTT said he had no information on the cause of Mr. ASPER's death, although it was "obviously sudden."
The funeral is set for tomorrow.
Mr. ASPER smoked heavily for years and had a serious heart attack at age 50.
A tax lawyer who for a time was leader of the Liberal Party in Manitoba, Mr. ASPER built CanWest Global from a single television station in Winnipeg into its current status as one of Canada's biggest media empires.
Colleagues and Friends praised him for his business successes and community work.
Conrad BLACK, who sold Mr. ASPER the Southam newspaper chain in 2000 to cement CanWest's position as Canada's leading media company, described him in an interview yesterday as "a charming informal character [with] never a hint of self-importance despite his great success." And that success was legendary, Lord BLACK said.
"The man started out taking tickets in a cinema in Minnedosa, and he, as of this morning, was the premier figure in the Canadian media. That's quite a career."
Lord BLACK noted that Mr. ASPER "had a reputation, in some circles, for being very litigious [but] I always found him a joy to deal with."
"We never had any difficultly reaching an agreement, and you never had to worry for an instant that the agreement would be followed up by him to the letter. "
Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN issued a statement in which he called Mr. ASPER "a great personal friend and one of the finest and most able individuals I have ever had the privilege of knowing."
Ivan FECAN, president and chief executive officer of Bell Globemedia and Chief Executive Officer of CTV Inc., described Mr. ASPER as "a great entrepreneur, a brilliant competitor, and a true original."
Onex Corp. chief executive officer Gerald SCHWARTZ, who was a protégé of Mr. ASPER's and helped found the CanWest empire, said he "left a legacy of pride for his family, a television network for all Canadians, and a business empire for his colleagues. His leadership in the Canadian Jewish community is a loss that will not easily be overcome."
Mr. ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, who has worked with Mr. ASPER for the past four years, described him as "a visionary, but at the same time he was very human and very approachable."
Mr. ASPER's death raises questions about the future of CanWest Global, the conglomerate that owns Southam newspapers, the National Post, the Global television network, specialty television channels, and broadcasting operations in New Zealand, Australia and Ireland.
While Mr. ASPER was chairman of CanWest, he had given up the chief executive officer responsibilities to his son Leonard ASPER in 1999, and retired from day-to-day management responsibilities earlier this year.
His main preoccupations were two charitable foundations, the ASPER Foundation and the CanWest Global Foundation.
Still, Mr. ASPER was seen as the driving force behind the company's strategy, right up to the end.
Some people close to the company said yesterday that Mr. ASPER exercised so much strategic control, even in retirement, that the company could be plunged into turmoil. Operations could be restructured, and new partnerships and financings put in place.
CanWest's Mr. ELLIOT/ELLIOTT said a succession plan has been in effect for "quite some time," and there are unlikely to be any significant changes in the strategy of the company because of Mr. ASPER's death.
"There's a strong depth of long-term management at CanWest at the corporate level," he said.
The CanWest world
Canada
Publishing
-National Post
-CanWest Publications (Incl. 16 daily newspapers and 50 other publications)
Media Marketing and Sales
-CanWest Media Sales
-Integrated Business Solutions
Entertainment - Production and Distribution
-Fireworks Entertainment (film and television production)
Television Broadcasting
-Global Television Network (Incl. 11 television stations across Canada)
-independent stations (Incl. Hamilton, Montreal and Vancouver Island)
-Canadian Broadcasting Corporation affiliate stations (Incl. Kelowna and Red Deer)
-Specialty Television (Incl. Prime TV, Fox Sportsworld Canada, Mystery -45% Xtreme Sports, Men television - 49% Deja View, Lonestar)
Radio Broadcasting
-CJZZ FM Winnipeg
Production Services
-Apple Box Productions (commercial production)
-StudioPost Film Labs (post-production services)
-CanWest Studios (sound stage)
-WIC Mobile Production (live event mobile units)
New Media
-CanWest Interactive
-canada.com Interent Portal
-Financial Post Data Group
-Informart
International
Entertainment - Production and Distribution
-Fireworks Pictures (U.S., feature film distribution)
-Fireworks Television (U.S., television production)
-Fireworks International (Britain, International television distributor)
-CanWest Entertainment
International Distribution
(Republic of Ireland)
New Media
-Internet Broadcasting Systems (U.S. - 18%)
-LifeServ Corp. (U.S. - 25%)
Television Broadcasting
-Five stations in: New Zealand (2); Australia 57.5%; Northern Ireland 29.9%; Republic of Ireland 45%
Radio Broadcasting - New Zealand
-More FM (five stations)
-Channel Z (three stations)
-The Breeze (Wellington)
-4 National FM Networks
Out-of-Home Advertising - Australia, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar, Vietnam
-Eye Corp. (100% owned by Network Ten)

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BLACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-08 published
Observers hail ASPER contribution
But views on Israel and direction of news coverage also provoked controversy
By Richard BLOOM and Paul WALDIE Wednesday, October 8, 2003 - Page B7
In its early days, CanWest Global Communications Corp. may have had the dubious moniker of The Love Boat network, but there is no doubt Izzy ASPER made "very significant" contributions to Canadian media, industry observers said yesterday.
At the same time, his actions as head of the media empire weren't without controversy.
Mr. ASPER died yesterday at 71. A tax lawyer by training, he is more commonly known as the founder of Winnipeg-based CanWest the parent of the Global network of television stations, and which, in 2000, engineered a multibillion-dollar purchase of Southam Newspaper Group, National Post and other assets from Conrad BLACK's Hollinger Inc.
Glenn O'FARRELL, president and chief executive officer of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters, said Mr. ASPER left a huge broadcasting legacy.
"The Canadian broadcasting system has been built over the last number of decades through the efforts of some fairly significant entrepreneurs, and Izzy ASPER was clearly one of those," Mr. O'FARRELL said. "He brought an incredibly astute vision of what could be done and what should be done in the name of strengthening Canada's place both domestically and internationally."
Mr. O'FARRELL worked at CanWest for 12 years and said working for Mr. ASPER was stimulating. "It was absolutely a privilege to work with somebody who possessed the depth and the breadth of his intellectual curiosity and interests."
Mr. ASPER also provoked controversy over the years with his views on Israel and his drive to converge news coverage at CanWest's newspapers.
In 2002, he fired Russell MILLS, publisher of the Ottawa Citizen, after an apparent conflict over editorial independence. At the time, CanWest forced papers across the chain to carry editorials written by officials in the company's head office. The policy sparked a barrage of complaints about a lack of editorial freedom at the papers. The removal of Mr. MILLS prompted a wave of protests against CanWest from Parliament to media organizations around the world. Mr. MILLS sued and reached a settlement with the company a few months later.
Mr. ASPER's staunch defence of Israel also left him open to charges that CanWest's papers do not fairly cover events in the Middle East. In a speech last year, he attacked media coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and accused several media outlets of having an anti-Israel bias. He singled out coverage by CNN, The New York Times, British Broadcasting Corp. and Canadian Broadcasting Corp. and said anti-Israel bias was a "cancer" destroying media credibility.
He has often criticized the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. in particular for what he has called the broadcaster's anti-Israel coverage. Yesterday, a Canadian Broadcasting Corp. official declined to comment on Mr. ASPER's views.
Still, amid the controversy, Christopher DORNAN, director of Carleton University's School of Journalism and Communication, praised Mr. ASPER's role in Canadian journalism.
"We're still, in the entertainment area, overshadowed by the exports of the juggernaut to the south. What's really ours is non-fiction, it's journalism... in as much as Israel ASPER built CanWest into a major, major player in that sector, his contribution is clearly significant."
Added Mr. DORNAN: " There are uncharitable souls that would argue that CanWest's contribution to the Canadian cultural landscape was negligible.
"Because when CanWest built itself as a network, in the early days, it was known as The Love Boat Network -- all they did was buy cheap, populist American programming, got ratings and contributed very little to Canadian cultural production. They made very little programming of their own and what they did make was in grudging compliance with Canadian content regulations," he said.
Mr. DORNAN argued that the Canadian media industry is not about keeping the Americans at bay, but instead about funnelling in highly desired American content in the most advantageous way possible.
Mr. ASPER built a television network that now employs "people from network executives to janitors. Those jobs would not have existed had he not done that. And now, of course, they do actually make some programming," Mr. DORNAN said.
Vince CARLIN, chairman of the School of Journalism at Ryerson University in Toronto, agreed, noting that history books won't likely describe him as a great endorser of Canadian culture.
"That's not what he was about. He was a businessman," said Mr. CARLIN, the former head of Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Newsworld, who had met with Mr. ASPER on numerous occasions.
"He learned how to use those [business] skills to create very dynamic business enterprises, but [CanWest] would never put cultural considerations ahead of business considerations," Mr. CARLIN said.
He explained how in his company's early days, Mr. ASPER insisted to government officials that his chain of television stations was not a "network" but instead a "system," because being dubbed a network was less advantageous from a business perspective. When regulations shifted, Mr. ASPER changed gears, calling the stations a network, Mr. CARLIN said.
Mr. ASPER was also involved in a bitter legal battle with Robert LANTOS, a prominent Toronto-based filmmaker. Mr. ASPER sued Mr. LANTOS for libel over comments he made during a speech in 1998. In the speech, Mr. LANTOS described Mr. ASPER as "the forces of darkness, whose greed is surpassed only by their hypocrisy." Mr. ASPER said the comments left the impression he was dishonest and disloyal.

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BLACKBURN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-09 published
BLACKBURN
-In loving memory of a dear wife, mother and grandmother, who left us July 4, 1980.
Dear Lord, please take a message to our loved one above.
Tell her how much we miss her and give her all of our love.
We do not need a special day to bring you to our minds.
A day we do not think of you is very hard to find.
They say that time heals all sorrows and helps us to forget.
But time so far has only shown how much we miss you yet.
God give us strength to bear it and the courage to stand the blow.
For what is meant to lose you, no one will ever know.
If tears could build a stairway and heartaches could make a lane,
We'd walk the pathway to Heaven, and bring you home again.
-Remembered by husband Lloyd, son Tom and his wife Robin, granddaughters Kerry and Cassie.

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BLACKBURN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-20 published
Lottie Mae McDONALD
In loving memory of Lottie Mae McDONALD, July 29, 1922 to August 14, 2003.
Lottie Mae McDONALD, a resident of Meadowview Apartments, Mindemoya, passed away at her residence on Thursday, August 14, 2003 at the age of 81 years. She was born in Gordon Township daughter of the late William and Sarah (STRAIN) SCOTT. Lottie Mae had been very active in her community, having been a member of the Horticultural Society, The Agricultural Society and a School Board Trustee for 18 years. She had many hobbies, including gardening, knitting, sewing, and quilting. Well known and respected in her community, she will be sadly missed by all who knew her. A loving mother, grandmother, sister and friend, many fond memories will be cherished. She was predeceased by her husband Jack McDONALD in 1984. Loving and loved mother of John and his wife Anita of Sioux Lookout, Peter and his wife Nancy of Kenora, Carey of Orillia, Penny and husband Milford of Barrie, Paul and his wife Christine of Sudbury and Adam and his wife Kathy of Mindemoya. Proud grandmother of Bonnie, Jason, Jacqueline, Sean, Jane, Casey, Scott, Lindsay, Ben, Kaitlyn and T.J. Dear sister of Beatrice BEANGE, Ted SCOTT (predeceased,) Margie BLACKBURN, Maria McDERMID, John SCOTT and Fred SCOTT. Friends called the Salem Missionary Church, Spring Bay, on Friday, August 15, 2003. The funeral service was conducted at the Church on Saturday, August 16, 2003 with pastor Al WILKINSON officiating. Interment in Providence Bay Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home.

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BLACKBURN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-15 published
SIRMAN, Catherine Jean (née MacARTHUR)
Born January 23, 1911 in Orillia, Ontario, Jean died peacefully on March 13, 2003 at the Bennett Care Health Centre, Georgetown. A retired teacher of the Toronto Board of Education she was a proud member of Glenview Presbyterian Church for over half a century. Jean was the beloved wife of the late W. Farrell SIRMAN, loving mother of Bill (Carol) Napanee, Eleanor (Dr. Les JOHNSTON) Limehouse and John (Clare) Mississauga. Dear grandmother of Lindsay, Graham (Allison) and Hilary SIRMAN, Ian (Lara) and Kirsten JOHNSTON and Matthew and Michael SIRMAN, and great-grandmother of Will SIRMAN and Catie JOHNSTON. Predeceased by sisters Eileen BLACKBURN and Edythe JERMEY and brothers Gord, Bill, Grant and Archie MacARTHUR. Visitation Sunday, March 16 2-4 and 7-9 at Trull 'North Toronto' Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence). Funeral Service will be held at Glenview Presbyterian Church (Glenview Avenue at Yonge Street, 3 blocks south of Lawrence), on Monday March 17 at 2 o'clock. Interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. Following Interment a reception will be held at the Church. In lieu of flowers, a donation, by those who so wish, to either the Glenview Presbyterian Church Fund or The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be respectfully appreciated by the family.

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BLACKMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-09 published
Ernestine Millicent BLACKMAN- SMITH
By Mary Anne TOPERCZER Tuesday, September 9, 2003 - Page A24
Daughter, sister, wife, mother. Born November 30, 1912, in Toronto. Died February 10, in Brampton, Ontario, of congestive heart failure, aged 90.
Ernie was the third of eight children born to Rosalie and Ernest BLACKMAN who emigrated from England to Toronto in the early 1900s. Ernie's ambition in life was to marry and be a mother. At the age of 18, she set her sights on John Clare KRAWCZYK- SMITH and in 1932, at the age of 19, Ernie converted to Catholicism and they married. Their love affair lasted until John's death in Ernie always said that she was lucky -- not everyone takes to motherhood and homemaking but she did. Lucky for us that it was my mother's natural vocation. Ernie's life had meaning and purpose through meal preparation, housekeeping and the love and care of her children.
She gave birth to nine children within 21 years -- and this included two sets of twins!
She was organized and had a routine. Monday was wash day and for many years that meant a wringer washer and clothes on a line. Friday was the day for grocery shopping.
Sunday was Mass at 9 a.m. and dinner at 6 p.m. consisting of a roast, potatoes and homemade pie. The parish pastor was a regular guest at these dinners. The remainder of the week was filled with cooking, cleaning, baking, sewing and the supervision of her large family.
Her nurturing extended to her ailing sister and aging mother, as well as neighbours and the community at large through her work for the church and the missions. When we arrived home for lunch and returned from school each day, she greeted us with her warmth and we felt safe, loved and secure.
I can never recall that Ernie had an idle moment. She thrived on being needed and engaged in a meaningful task for someone.
When she needed a rest she put the kettle on, as she had learned from her mother the importance of a cup of tea. This break for tea each afternoon refreshed her and became the social framework for every visit with family and Friends throughout her life.
We were kept busy during the summer because of Ernie's job jar. We would blindly choose pieces of paper from that jar each morning and our selections determined the household tasks that would occupy us until lunch. We learned skills that prepared us for raising our own families.
Our summers were highlighted by two weeks at a cottage on Lake Simcoe where our days were magically filled with swimming, new Friends, seasonal fruit and parents who were relaxed and enjoying their offspring. Even though a rental cottage meant more work for Ernie, she was not deterred as she realized that the cottage experience would have long-term benefits for the family.
She found each one of her children special in their own way and we all had our own unique connection with her. There was a sense of stability in our family because of her. Ernie felt that there was no greater purpose in life than to be responsible for the lives of others.
After her husband's death, she lived in her home for three years with the assistance of her children and spent her final declining year in the home of one of her daughters.
Her funeral was attended by her family of more than 50 people her granddaughters served as pallbearers.
A son wrote her eulogy and a grand_son played the bagpipes -- a fitting tribute to a grand lady.
Mary Anne is Ernestine SMITH's daughter.

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BLACKWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-08 published
Shock, sadness over ASPER
Former movie ticket taker rose to prominence as one of Canada's biggest media moguls
By Richard BLACKWELL Media Reporter Wednesday, October 8, 2003 - Page B1
Canada's business, media and political elite expressed shock and sadness at the death of Izzy ASPER, the colourful Winnipeg media mogul who died yesterday at the age of 71.
Mr. ASPER built CanWest Global Communications Corp. into a national television and newspaper powerhouse, and more recently spent some of his fortune on charitable and philanthropic causes.
Israel ASPER, known to everyone as Izzy, was admitted to St. Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg at 9: 30 yesterday morning, and died soon after, surrounded by his wife and children.
CanWest spokesman Geoffrey ELLIOT/ELLIOTT said he had no information on the cause of Mr. ASPER's death, although it was "obviously sudden."
The funeral is set for tomorrow.
Mr. ASPER smoked heavily for years and had a serious heart attack at age 50.
A tax lawyer who for a time was leader of the Liberal Party in Manitoba, Mr. ASPER built CanWest Global from a single television station in Winnipeg into its current status as one of Canada's biggest media empires.
Colleagues and Friends praised him for his business successes and community work.
Conrad BLACK, who sold Mr. ASPER the Southam newspaper chain in 2000 to cement CanWest's position as Canada's leading media company, described him in an interview yesterday as "a charming informal character [with] never a hint of self-importance despite his great success." And that success was legendary, Lord BLACK said.
"The man started out taking tickets in a cinema in Minnedosa, and he, as of this morning, was the premier figure in the Canadian media. That's quite a career."
Lord BLACK noted that Mr. ASPER "had a reputation, in some circles, for being very litigious [but] I always found him a joy to deal with."
"We never had any difficultly reaching an agreement, and you never had to worry for an instant that the agreement would be followed up by him to the letter. "
Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN issued a statement in which he called Mr. ASPER "a great personal friend and one of the finest and most able individuals I have ever had the privilege of knowing."
Ivan FECAN, president and chief executive officer of Bell Globemedia and Chief Executive Officer of CTV Inc., described Mr. ASPER as "a great entrepreneur, a brilliant competitor, and a true original."
Onex Corp. chief executive officer Gerald SCHWARTZ, who was a protégé of Mr. ASPER's and helped found the CanWest empire, said he "left a legacy of pride for his family, a television network for all Canadians, and a business empire for his colleagues. His leadership in the Canadian Jewish community is a loss that will not easily be overcome."
Mr. ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, who has worked with Mr. ASPER for the past four years, described him as "a visionary, but at the same time he was very human and very approachable."
Mr. ASPER's death raises questions about the future of CanWest Global, the conglomerate that owns Southam newspapers, the National Post, the Global television network, specialty television channels, and broadcasting operations in New Zealand, Australia and Ireland.
While Mr. ASPER was chairman of CanWest, he had given up the chief executive officer responsibilities to his son Leonard ASPER in 1999, and retired from day-to-day management responsibilities earlier this year.
His main preoccupations were two charitable foundations, the ASPER Foundation and the CanWest Global Foundation.
Still, Mr. ASPER was seen as the driving force behind the company's strategy, right up to the end.
Some people close to the company said yesterday that Mr. ASPER exercised so much strategic control, even in retirement, that the company could be plunged into turmoil. Operations could be restructured, and new partnerships and financings put in place.
CanWest's Mr. ELLIOT/ELLIOTT said a succession plan has been in effect for "quite some time," and there are unlikely to be any significant changes in the strategy of the company because of Mr. ASPER's death.
"There's a strong depth of long-term management at CanWest at the corporate level," he said.
The CanWest world
Canada
Publishing
-National Post
-CanWest Publications (Incl. 16 daily newspapers and 50 other publications)
Media Marketing and Sales
-CanWest Media Sales
-Integrated Business Solutions
Entertainment - Production and Distribution
-Fireworks Entertainment (film and television production)
Television Broadcasting
-Global Television Network (Incl. 11 television stations across Canada)
-independent stations (Incl. Hamilton, Montreal and Vancouver Island)
-Canadian Broadcasting Corporation affiliate stations (Incl. Kelowna and Red Deer)
-Specialty Television (Incl. Prime TV, Fox Sportsworld Canada, Mystery -45% Xtreme Sports, Men television - 49% Deja View, Lonestar)
Radio Broadcasting
-CJZZ FM Winnipeg
Production Services
-Apple Box Productions (commercial production)
-StudioPost Film Labs (post-production services)
-CanWest Studios (sound stage)
-WIC Mobile Production (live event mobile units)
New Media
-CanWest Interactive
-canada.com Interent Portal
-Financial Post Data Group
-Informart
International
Entertainment - Production and Distribution
-Fireworks Pictures (U.S., feature film distribution)
-Fireworks Television (U.S., television production)
-Fireworks International (Britain, International television distributor)
-CanWest Entertainment
International Distribution
(Republic of Ireland)
New Media
-Internet Broadcasting Systems (U.S. - 18%)
-LifeServ Corp. (U.S. - 25%)
Television Broadcasting
-Five stations in: New Zealand (2); Australia 57.5%; Northern Ireland 29.9%; Republic of Ireland 45%
Radio Broadcasting - New Zealand
-More FM (five stations)
-Channel Z (three stations)
-The Breeze (Wellington)
-4 National FM Networks
Out-of-Home Advertising - Australia, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar, Vietnam
-Eye Corp. (100% owned by Network Ten)

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BLA surnames continued to 03bla002.htm