BARNARDO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-23 published
Elsie Maud MILES
By John HIPKIN Monday, June 23, 2003 - Page A16
Mother, grandmother, wife, friend and survivor. Born November 11, 1909, in Hackney, London. Died April 27, 2003, in Moncton, New Brunswick, of natural causes, aged 93.
My mother Elsie's birth in a gaunt Victorian hospital almost a century ago was shrouded in secrecy, so we shall probably never know how she came to be the child of maidservant Alice Maud HOLLOWAY and an anonymous father. Consistent with her unknown origins, she was shifted throughout her infancy and girlhood by a remote and faceless authority from one foster home to another, in one at least of which she was routinely subject to unspeakable abuse.
Such were her difficult beginnings, but as the hundred-plus family members and Friends who attended her funeral can testify, hers was a life of triumph over adversity and an inspiring example of how a person can actively fashion their own fate.
At the age of 14, Elsie became a trainee maid in a London gentleman's household, where she learned the domestic arts that she scrupulously and proudly practised throughout the rest of her life as a wife and mother.
My father Jack was a regular customer at a tobacconist's opposite Hammersmith police station, where my mother later worked as a sales assistant. He was a mounted police officer with a tall and manly figure, jet-black hair and a winning way with women. My mother fell for him and they had three children: myself, Naomi and Anthony. But Jack left my mother, and during the Second World War, she was unsupported, unemployed and homeless. These were the days before the welfare state as we currently know it, so we were often forced to sleep in the waiting rooms of London train stations, which invited the stern attentions of the magistracy, who insisted that we children be taken into care. And so we were: I went to Dr. BARNARDO's children's home and my brother and sister went into adoption.
In 1941, mother joined the Auxiliary Territorial Services women's army. During her service years she met, fell in love with and married Paul MILES, an army captain and son of a Sussex clergyman. She had three children with him: David, Pamela and Hugh.
I didn't keep in touch much with my mother after I went to university in the immediate postwar years, but by the early Seventies I had re-established contact. I learned that she and her husband had emigrated to Canada in 1956, where Paul had taken up a position with a refrigerator company. In the 30 or so years that followed, we restored our relationship, and I was also reunited with my sister, living with her own family in Nottingham.
A year and a half ago, I was also reunited with my brother, who is now a deacon at the Grace Cathedral in San Francisco. And so it was that at mother's funeral, all six of her children and many of her grandchildren were present to bid her farewell.
Mother gladdened the hearts of all who knew her. She was filled with joy, despite a life that began with difficulty, and which had known disappointment and destitution. But she was finally fulfilled in motherhood, marriage and Friendship.
Death's claim is only a partial one. What remains in us and in our hearts is the living spirit of a woman who overcame adversity and took delight in her good fortune and her large and reconciled family.
So even in that most awesome encounter of all -- with death itself she has finally triumphed.
John HIPKIN is Elsie Miles's eldest child.

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BARNES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-24 published
Truth is emerging in Trinidad deaths
By Colin FREEZE Crime Reporter; With a report from Ken THOMAS in Port of Spain. Friday, January 24, 2003, Page A5
The bruised and bloated bodies of the young newlyweds washed ashore on a remote beach in Trinidad.
Even in death, they lay close together. Inside the woman's belly was their unborn baby. A suspicious double drowning cruelly ended the promise of a new family.
Today, one veteran homicide investigator says that the 1994 honeymoon deaths of Geoff BARNES, 23, and Sherelle Ann IMPERIO- BARNES, 22, are the result of one of the most elaborate conspiracies he has witnessed. Yet another theory calls the tragedy an accident. Only now is the truth beginning to surface in court.
For years, criminal investigators have believed that the vacationing Toronto couple was drugged and drowned in a scheme hatched by conspirators intent on collecting life-insurance money.
Yet only one man has ever been formally accused of murder: Roland (Bobby) DOORGADEEN, whose trial has begun in the capital of the Caribbean island nation of 1.5 million people.
After a lengthy investigation by Trinidadian authorities, Mr. DOORGADEEN was charged with the murders in 1998. The former Trinidadian police officer and convicted car thief has pleaded not guilty. But he will be hanged if a jury finds him guilty.
On the witness stand yesterday was the prosecution's star witness his estranged wife.
Nicole DOORGADEEN testified that in May, 1994, two men in a rental car came to pick up her husband. She said he returned much later in the evening, bellowing from the car: "Don't come outside. Send a scrubbing brush for me."
After the two men drove away, Mr. DOORGADEEN came into the house in his underwear, Mrs. DOORGADEEN testified. He held a bottle of chloroform, she said, adding that she later found his clothes covered with sand.
She also testified that her husband later said he was expecting a "large sum" of about $50,000. And that "one day, while looking at television, he told me that he killed the Canadians and explained how he did it," she told the court.
Her husband said he and two other men drugged the couple and dragged them into the sea, she said. A previous witness has testified he saw Mr. DOORGADEEN with the Canadian couple at a beach house.
Next week, the jury is expected to hear from former Toronto homicide detective Tom KLATT. "I had given my word to the family that I would follow this through to the end," Mr. KLATT said a few hours before boarding his flight to Trinidad yesterday.
Working with insurance adjusters and Trinidad police, Mr. KLATT said he discovered that a former boyfriend of Sherelle-Ann IMPERIO- BARNES had taken out a $100,000 life-insurance policy on her. The insurance, which would have paid double if her death was ruled accidental, survived the relationship.
Despite the breakup and Ms. IMPERIO's marriage, the ex-boyfriend didn't sever his ties. In fact, Mr. KLATT said, he bought the newlyweds tickets to his home country -- Trinidad.
The ex-boyfriend still lives in Canada and has not been charged in connection with the deaths.
"There's a simple explanation," he told a Toronto Star reporter a year after the killings. He then referred questions to his lawyer, who refused to say anything more.
With matters still before the courts, Mr. KLATT did not want to discuss the investigation further, except to say the insurance was never collected. But the veteran of 70 homicide investigations called the Barnes' case "one of the most complete conspiracies that I've ever been involved in."
The nine-year wait for justice has been excruciating for the victims' families.
"From the day it happened we said it would take a long time," Tom BARNES, Geoff's 60-year-old father, said in an interview from his home in Georgetown, Ontario
The court has already heard that autopsies uncovered traces of cocaine in the dead couple's systems. The judge has asked the jury to consider whether the couple might have accidentally drowned.
But Mr. KLATT, who once investigated international drug networks, said this theory is inconsistent with his investigation.
"There was zero information, evidence, hearsay, assumption or guesses that would suggest that either one of these two had ever been involved with drugs, or alcohol for that matter," he said.

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BARON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
Linda STEARNS: 1937-2003
As ballet mistress and artistic director of the esteemed Montreal company, she nurtured personality, flair and a risk-taking approach to dance
By Paula CITRON Wednesday, August 6, 2003 - Page R5
In the cutthroat, competitive world of dance, Linda STEARNS was an anomaly. As artistic director of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, she never played games or held grudges. Whether good or bad news, she bluntly told her dancers what they had to hear, and in return, her open-door policy allowed them to vent their own feelings. National Ballet of Canada artistic director James KUDELKA, who spent almost a decade as a member of Les Grands Ballets, likens her approach to wearing an invisible raincoat upon which unhappy dancers spewed their venom. At the end of their tirades, she would serenely remove the garment and say, "Now let's talk."
Linda STEARNS died at her home in Toronto on July 4, at age 65.
She was born into privilege on October 22, 1937. Her father, Marshal, was an investment broker; her mother, Helen, was heavily involved in charity work. The family lived in the posh Poplar Plains area of central Toronto, where Ms. STEARNS attended Branksome Hall.
Despite their wealth, the STEARNS children (Linda, Nora and Marshal) were expected to earn their own livings. Helen STEARNS had studied dance in her youth, but a career was never an option. When eldest daughter Linda showed a strong talent, history might have repeated itself had not Marshal Sr. set aside his reservations after seeing his daughter perform.
After graduating from high school, Ms. STEARNS went to London and New York for advanced training. It was the great Alexandra Danilova, one of Ms. STEARNS's New York teachers, who pointed the young dancer in the direction of the upstart Les Grands Ballets Canadiens. Ms. STEARNS joined Les Grands in 1961, and was promoted to soloist in 1964. In a Who's Who of Entertainment entry, Ms. STEARNS was once listed as joining the company in 1861, and she liked to joke that, at 103 years, she held the record for the longest time spent in the corps de ballet. In fact, one of Ms. STEARNS's hallmarks was her sense of humour, much of it at her own expense.
Les Grands was known for taking dancers who did not necessarily have perfect ballet bodies, but had personality and flair, a policy Ms. STEARNS continued during her own administration.
Although Ms. STEARNS had very unballetic, low-arched feet, she was a fine classical dancer. She excelled, however, in the dramatic repertoire: Mother Courage in Richard Kuch's The Brood, or the title role in Brydon Paige's Medea. In later years, while teaching and coaching, Ms. STEARNS wore high heels to conceal her hated low arches -- while showing off her attractive ankles.
Her performing career was cut short in 1966 when artistic director Ludmilla CHIRIAEFF recognized that Ms. STEARNS would make a brilliant ballet mistress, and by 1969, Ms. STEARNS was exclusively in the studio. In fact, giving up performing was one of the great disappointments of her life, although she did in time acknowledge that she had found her true destiny. Ms. STEARNS's astonishingly keen eye allowed her to single out, in a corps de ballet of moving bodies, every limb that was out of position. She could also sing every piece of music, which saved a lot of time, because she didn't have to keep putting on the tape recorder. Because of her intense musicality, Ms. STEARNS also insisted that the dancers not just be on the count, but fill every note with movement.
Ms. STEARNS loved playing with words -- she was a crossword-puzzle addict, for example -- and gave the dancers nicknames, whether they liked them or not. Catherine LAFORTUNE was Katrink, Kathy BIEVER was Little Frog, Rosemary NEVILLE was Rosie Posie, Betsy BARON was Boops, and Benjamin HATCHER was Benjamino, to name but a few. One who escaped this fate was Gioconda BARBUTO, simply because Ms. STEARNS loved rolling out the word "G-I-O-C-O-N-D-A" in its full Italian glory. The dancers, in turn, called her Lulubelle, Mme. Gozonga and La Stearnova or, if they were feeling tired, cranky and hostile -- and were out of earshot -- Spoons (for her non-arched feet) and even less flattering names. As reluctantly as she became ballet mistress, Ms. STEARNS became artistic director, first as one of a triumvirate in 1978 with Danny JACKSON and Colin McINTYRE (when Les Grands and Brian MacDONALD came to an abrupt parting of the ways;) then with Jeanne RENAUD in 1985 and finally on her own in 1987. She retired from Les Grands in 1989. Both Mr. JACKSON and Mr. McINTRYE still refer to Ms. STEARNS as the company's backbone.
These were the famous creative years that included the works of Mr. KUDELKA, Paul Taylor, Lar Lubovitch, Nacho Duato and George Balanchine. Les Grands toured the world performing one of the most exciting and eclectic repertoires in ballet. It was a company that nurtured dancers and choreographers, many of whom reflected Ms. STEARNS's risk-taking, innovative esthetic.
She also had time to mentor choreographers outside the company, including acclaimed solo artist Margie GILLIS. Her post-Grands career included writing assessments for the Canada Council, setting works on ballet companies, coaching figure skating, and most recently, becoming ballet mistress for the Toronto-based Ballet Jörgen. When she was diagnosed with both ovarian and breast cancer two years ago, she continued her obligations to Ballet Jörgen until she was no longer able, never letting the dancers know how ill she was.
Ms. STEARNS loved huge dogs -- or what Ms. GILLIS refers to as mountains with fur -- and always had at least two. Her gardens were magnificent, as was her cooking. Her generosity was legendary, whether inviting 20 people for Christmas dinner, or hosting the wedding reception for dancers Andrea BOARDMAN and Jean-Hugues ROCHETTE at her tastefully decorated Westmount home. After leaving Montreal, whether, first, at her horse farm in Harrow, Ontario, or at the one-room schoolhouse she lovingly renovated near Campbellville, northwest of Toronto, former colleagues were always welcome.
She continued to keep in touch with her dancers, sending notes in her beautiful, distinctive handwriting. Her love of sports never left her, and after a hard day in the studio, she would relax watching the hockey game. Religion also filled her postdance life, with Toronto's Anglican Grace-Church-on-the-Hill at its epicentre. Ms. STEARNS was very discreet in her private life, although another disappointment is that neither of two long relationships resulted in marriage or children.
Ms. STEARNS was always ruthlessly self-critical, always striving for perfection, never convinced she had rehearsed a work to its full potential. As a result, she never made herself the centre of her own story. Her homes, for example, did not contain photographs glorifying the career of Linda STEARNS. Only at the end of her days, as she faced death with the same grace with which she had faced life, was she finally able to appreciate how many lives she had touched, and accept her outstanding achievements with Les Grands Ballets. Linde HOWE- BECK, former dance critic for the Montreal Gazette, sums up Ms. STEARNS perfectly when she says that she was all about love -- for her Friends and family, for life, but most of all, for dance.
Paula CITRON is dance critic for The Globe and Mail.

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BARON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-11 published
GUTMAN, Adam (George Adams)
In Montreal on Sunday, August 10, 2003. Beloved husband of the late Ida Baron GUTMAN. Father of Betty, and Dr. Jimmy GUTMAN. Father-in-law of Susan SCHAFER and Greg KUDRAY. Brother-in-law of Albert BARON and Sylvia GUTMAN. Grandfather of Evan and Bianca. Uncle of Debby, Judy and Stephen MERLMELSTEIN, Fran PARKER and Shelly COHEN. Admired by thousands. Died gently in the presence of his family. Leaves behind a legacy of art, music and poetry. An accomplished and charitable mentor for the entire community regardless of colour, race or creed. Our greatest thanks to the loving and caring staff of Manoir Pierrefonds. Funeral Service from Paperman and sons, 3888 Jean Talon W., Montreal on Tuesday, August 12, 2003 at 10: 45 a.m. Burial at the Rodomer Society Section, Mount Pleasant Cemetery Duvernay. Shiva at his son's home. Donations may be made to the Montreal Symphony Orchestra in memory of Adam GUTMAN. (514-842-3402.)

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BARR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-03 published
Valetta May ROSE
By Jim PATTERSON Thursday, April 3, 2003 - Page A22
Valetta May ROSE
Domestic worker, farmer and comic writer's muse. Born in Warsaw, Ontario, January 9, 1912. Died January 16, in Toronto, of a stroke, aged 91.
On January 16, 2003, Valetta ROSE, 91, spoke with her brother, Ken DRAIN, and her niece, Dora BARR, by phone from her home in Norwood, Ontario Then she got into a limousine to go to a large family party in Toronto, to celebrate her nephew David PATTERSON's birthday. On the way, she sat with her great-nephew Paul, his partner Cathy and their six-week-old daughter, Kira, and was delighted to have the baby beside her for the trip.
There were more than 100 people at the party, but Valetta held court, greeting family members. Then, at 7 p.m., she suffered a stroke, and died instantly in her daughter Beattie's arms.
Born on January 9, 1912, Valetta was the second child of David DRAIN and Christina EDWARDS, who farmed near Warsaw, Ontario The DRAIN household was full of fiddle, piano and song; people arrived by horse and sled for music in the parlour, food in the kitchen and children everywhere. When Valetta's mother went into labour to deliver her sister Cora, Valetta's older brother Ivan was told to take his 20-month-old sister to grandma's house. Ivan was 3 and the house was two kilometres away -- but those were different times. Off the pair toddled, perfectly capable and perfectly safe.
As teenagers, Valetta and Cora set off for Toronto to work as domestics, eventually earning a respectable $25 per month plus room and board.
In 1943, Valetta married the love of her life, Ted ROSE. They farmed together outside Warsaw for 32 years. One night just after they were married, they went to Peterborough to see a movie. Afterward, walking up George Street, Valetta mused aloud about how lovely it would be to own a bedroom suite like the one in a store's display window. The next day, Ted came home with the furniture. Valetta never did discover how he'd afforded it.
In 1975, Ted and Valetta sold the farm and retired to Norwood. Ted died in 1987.
Last year, Valetta set off for Scotland with her daughters Beattie and Judy, their husbands, Bob BECHTEL and David GORDON, and Judy and David's two sons, Ian and Paul. Valetta announced, "On this trip, I just want to enjoy being all together." For three weeks, they drove around staying at bed and breakfasts and exploring the islands off the north coast. She was planning another trip this year -- to Judy's home in Vancouver.
For 40 years, Valetta followed the advice of one Dr. JARVIS, whose book Folk Medicine taught the benefits of lecithin, and she followed his prescription for a daily teaspoon of apple cider vinegar mixed with honey in a half glass of water to keep herself free from the worst of arthritis and other afflictions. Valetta knew that the secret of caring for others was simply to enjoy their company and, as the family "Information Central," loved to share stories of their successes.
She had her own place in Canadian cultural history. Filmmaker Norman JEWISON, a cousin, mentioned Valetta to writer Don HARRON, who immediately claimed her for use as the wife of his fictional character Charlie FARQUHARSON. Soon Valetta was credited with writing down Charlie's Hist'ry of Canada on those days when it was "too wet to plough." A highlight of Valetta's 90th birthday party was a card and framed photo from her "second husband."
Valetta made the best of every minute. She spent her last night on the bed that Ted had bought for her so many years before. Her spirit will delight family and Friends for years to come.
Jim PATTERSON is Valetta's sister Cora's youngest son. He was helped by Beattie, Ken, Cora HENDREN and Stephen PATTERSON.

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BARR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-26 published
BARR, Robert Matthew (October 15, 1918 - May 23, 2003)
Bob died peacefully at the Southlake Regional Health Centre on May 23, 2003, surrounded by his family. Predeceased by his loving wife of over 50 years, Christine Philp BARR; he will be lovingly remembered and missed by his five children and their spouses: Brian (and Joan) BARR of Toronto, Janice FOX (and Bill HOWLETT) of Toronto, Brenda TOOMBS- ERNST (and Bob ERNST) of Newmarket, Colleen McCONNELL (and Sam FUNK) of Pt. St. Lucie, Florida, and Robert (and Dawn SIMKIN) BARR of Barrie. Treasured by his grandchildren: Patty (and Graham) ASCOUGH of Brisbane, Australia, Michael (and Andra) BARR of Toronto, Jeffrey FOX of Toronto, James FOX of Toronto, Matthew (and Brandy) McCONNELL of Pt. St. Lucie, Florida, Christine McCONNELL of Tennessee, Darcy TOOMBS of Newmarket. Beloved great-grandfather of Jonathon and Andrew ASCOUGH of Australia, Kristopher and Meghan BARR of Toronto. Bob's wide ranging interests were pursued with larger than life passion; baseball, music, parties, horse racing, golf, cars, boating, bridge, gambling and travel. His entrepreneurial business career spanned 50 years and was equally successful and prolific: tool and die making, furnaces, foundries, golf courses, coal mines, oil wells and fitness clubs. He was the epitome of the song ''My Way''. Friends may call at the Roadhouse and Rose Funeral Home, 157 Main Street South, Newmarket, on Monday, May 26 from 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Tuesday, May 27th at 2: 30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Southlake Regional Health Centre Foundation, Newmarket, Ontario, would be appreciated.

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BARR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-31 published
BARR, The Honourable Mr. Justice John Roderick (Rod), Q.C., L.L.D.
Born in Toronto on September 9, 1921, died in St. Catharines, Ontario May 30, 2003. Devoted and loving husband to the late Rhoda Marshall BARR. Predeceased by infant daughter Jane. Dearly loved by his son Peter, daughter Elizabeth and their spouses, Sharon BRODERICK and Stephen PERRY. Adoring grandfather to John BARR and Nicholas, James and Christopher PERRY. Brother and great friend of his sisters, Margaret RHAMEY and the late Isabelle MARSH. As dear as a brother to sisters-in-law, Helen CAUGHEY and Nellie MARSHALL.
Rod was grateful for a full and happy life. He grew up in Hamilton, Ontario and enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force at the outset of World War 2. Rod first served as a Flight Instructor in Trenton, Ontario, where he met his future wife Nursing Sister Rhoda MARSHALL. Obtaining the rank of Flight Lieutenant, he served in 426 Squadron as a pilot with Bomber Command at Linton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire.
At the end of the war, Rod studied law at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto and was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1948. At that time, he and Rhoda established their home in St. Catharines where he enjoyed many years practicing civil litigation and where as a trial lawyer he earned the respect of his colleagues. Rod served as a Bencher of the Law Society of Upper Canada and was a member of the American College of Trial Lawyers and the Advocates Society. He was appointed to the Supreme Court of Ontario, Trial Division in 1983.
Rod received an Honourary Doctorate of Laws from Brock University. He was an active member of the St. Catharines Flying Club and proud member of the St. Catharines Rowing Club. He took up sculling at the age of 52 and participated in Masters Rowing in Canada and the United States.
He supported a large range of charities. No one less fortunate was ever turned away. Rod's insight and kindness was matched only by his wonderful, inimitable sense of humour. Above all, he loved and was loved by his family.
The family is deeply grateful to Dr. R. MacKETT, Dr. F. MacKAY, Dr. J. WRIGHT, Dr. FERNANDES and Dr. W. GOLDBERG, and to gentle caregivers Virgie PEREZ, Marylou and Risa.
''Pray for me, and I will for thee,
that we may merrily meet in heaven.''
The family will receive Friends at the Hulse and English Funeral Home, 75 Church Street, St. Catharines, on Sunday, June 1, from 7-9 p.m. and Monday, June 2, from 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held at Knox Presbyterian Church, 51 Church Street, St. Catharines, on Tuesday, June 3, 2003 at 11 a.m. A service will also be held in St. Paul's Presbyterian Church, Amherst Island, on Wednesday, June 4, 2003, at 3 p.m. Interment to follow.
Donations may be made in Rod's memory to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Knox Presbyterian Church.

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BARR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-05 published
Kenneth Peter BARR
Died peacefully at home on Monday, June 2, 2003 with dignity and courage, after a brief battle with cancer, his wife Trish by his side. Ken was born November 25, 1949 and raised in St. Catharines, Ontario. Predeceased by his mother Isabel. Ken is survived by his father David BARR, wife Patricia, sons Paul and Craig HANSON and grand_son T.J. Also survived by his sister Judy and family, father-in-law John STOTT, and extended family members Normande GAUDETTE and Margaret HANSON- BROWN. Ken spent 35 years in the telecommunications industry in Canada and is well respected by colleagues, customers and business partners. Ken's caring, Friendship and respect for all individuals are hallmarks of his personality and his leadership style. Ken's extensive career included President of CTI, President of Lucent Canada's, Business Communications Systems, and a variety of sales, marketing, regulatory and management roles at American Telephone and Telegraph, TTS, Nortel, BCSI and Bell Canada. Most recently Ken was President and Chief Executive Officer of Vancouver based Security Biometrics. Ken's involvement with the community included the United Way, Junior Achievement, the Bay Street Rat Race and Ronald McDonald House. Ken balanced his business life with his love for his family. His special place for himself, family and Friends was Oak Lake, where he loved to relax and appreciate the wonders of nature. Ken's love of life is exemplified by his genuine concern for family and Friends and his many hobbies and interests including flying, boating, snowmobiling. His spirit will live on in all of us. Funeral service will be held at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West on Monday, June 9th at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Ken's memory to the Canadian Cancer Society, 20 Holly Street, Suite #101, Toronto M4S 3B1 or the Ronald McDonald Children's Charities of Canada, McDonald's Place, Toronto, Ontario M3C 3L4.

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BARRACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-04 published
First World War veteran dies in Toronto at age 105
By Gloria GALLOWAY Tuesday, February 4, 2003, Page A4
The sparse ranks of Canada's living First World War veterans have been further diminished by the death of Iden Herbert BALDWIN, who emerged from the conflict with a medal for his heroic capture of a German machine-gun post.
Mr. BALDWIN died Friday in Toronto at the age of 105.
When interviewed by a reporter just before Remembrance Day last year as part of The Globe and Mail's tribute to Canada's oldest veterans, he recalled the day an enemy shell blew him into the air.
The blast threw him into the newly formed crater, and a mound of earth buried him alive. Fortunately, his helmet had fallen over his nose, creating a small air pocket that kept him conscious until "some fellow's fingers moved some dirt away from my mouth and I was able to breathe."
His death reduces to 12 the number of living First World War veterans located by The Globe. When stories about their lives ran in mid-November, there were 16.
Until the end, the war remained a major event in his life, Michael BARRACK, his step-grand_son, said after the funeral yesterday.
"It would bring back vivid, vivid memories, you could tell, right until the day he died."
In recent days, fatigue often confined Mr. BALDWIN to a hospital bed set up in the dining room of the midtown home he shared with his second wife, Anna, but he remained lucid and full of humour.
"On his 105th birthday last November, I said to him 'You look great today, Uncle Herb,' Mr. BARRACK said. "And he looked at me and said: 'I look great every day.' "
In 1999, France honoured Mr. BALDWIN and 110 other survivors as Knights of the Order of the Legion of Honour, "and he was counting heads then," Mr. BARRACK said.
Mr. BALDWIN was born in Kent, in southern England, in November of 1897 and emigrated to Canada in 1911. He settled in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, where he found work as a plumber's helper.
At 17, he enlisted in the army and was quickly sent to France. He asked to be sent to the front lines in place of a friend who was a family man. He saw action in several battles, including the infamous Vimy Ridge, where he was injured.
When the war ended in 1918, he served another two years, in Germany, then returned to Prince Albert to be a plumber.
Mr. BALDWIN moved to Toronto in 1922, and got a job distributing essential oils. He remained single until 1954, when he was 57. After the death of his first wife, Elaine, he married Anna, a family friend.

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BARTHA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-22 published
WANKE, Vera (née BARTHA)
Died peacefully March 19th, 2003, in Toronto, joining the souls of husband Lorand and daughter Andrea. She is remembered with love by daughter, Bea INGRAM, grandchildren Tina, Patrick, Sara, Kate and great-grandchildren Massimo, Talio, Daryl and her relatives in Budapest, Hungary. Her beautiful art, independent spirit, curious intellect, integrity and deep spirituality remain our heritage and inspiration. Memorial service at 1: 30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 26th, at St. Monica's Catholic Church, 44 Broadway Avenue, near Yonge. Instead of flowers, donations may be made to Alzheimer Society of Ontario.

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BARTHOLOMEW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-14 published
STEVENS, Margaret (née VANTREIGHT)
Died peacefully Sunday August 10, 2003 at Trillium Mississauga Hospital in Mississauga, Ontario at the age of 88. She leaves her children, Jane (Compton, Quebec), Herb (Waterloo, Quebec) and Geoffrey (Calgary, Alberta), their families, her sister Elsie LOKER (née VANTREIGHT) and the extended BARTHOLOMEW and VANTREIGHT families. Those who wish may make a contribution in Margaret's memory to the Maud Vantreight Memorial Fund at the Queen Alexandra Hospital For Children, 2400 Arbutus Rd., Victoria, British Columbia V8N 1V7.

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BARTLETT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Elizabeth Fay (Beth) BARTLETT
In loving memory of Elizabeth Fay (Beth) BARTLETT who passed away suddenly at her home on Friday, January 3, 2003. Beth AINSLIE in her 86th year, beloved wife of George BARTLETT. Loving mother of George and Anne of Stittsville, Mary and David PETTIGREW of Alliston, and the late Tom BARTLETT. Dear mother-in-law of Marion BARTLETT of Churchville. Loved by her 7 grandchildren and 2 great grand_sons. Dear sister of Naomi, Leone (Joe,) Norton and the late Bernard (Sandy) AINSLIE. Rested at Rod Abrams Funeral Home, Tottenham on Sunday, January 5, 2003. Funeral service was held in the chapel on Monday, January 6, 2003 followed by cremation.
A springtime memorial and interment service will be held in Elizabeth Bay United Church and Cemetery.

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BARTLETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-10 published
Civil servant moonlighted as a master of municipal politics
From global matters to local logjams, he excelled at finding common ground
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, January 10, 2003, Page R11
David BARTLETT wasn't comfortable in front of a stove, and couldn't carry a tune or run a hockey practice. But he excelled at most other pursuits, whether he was drafting memos to cabinet ministers, mediating disputes between neighbours at township council, or square dancing at a local community centre.
Of local politics, he once told his wife, Betty, "I can't coach sports teams, bake cakes or sing in a choir, but I can do this."
Mr. BARTLETT, a career civil servant in the federal government and also a long-serving municipal politician, died of cancer at his home in Manotick, Ontario, on November 8, aged 76.
During a career that began in Ottawa in 1948, the Toronto native was secretary-general at the Canadian Commission for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, which advises the government on its relations with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, and coordinates its activities in Canada.
He was also secretary of the Canada Council for the Arts, the arm's-length funding agency, and was acting commercial secretary in the office of the High Commissioner for Canada in Pakistan.
He was active in municipal politics for two decades, including eights years as a member of the board of trustees of the Police Village of Manotick, and six years as mayor of Rideau Township, both south of Ottawa. During and after his mayoralty, Mr. BARTLETT was easy to locate in the community: His licence plates read "RIDEAU."
"One of the most striking things about David was that he could turn his hand to almost anything and do it well," said close friend Douglas SMALL.
Friends, family and colleagues said another of Mr. BARTLETT's strong suits was an ability to understand complicated issues and then come up with solutions satisfactory to all sides.
Bill TUPPER, a former Ottawa-area Member of Parliament and also a past mayor of Rideau Township, remembers how Mr. BARTLETT once settled a dispute between two farm families over drainage.
"The issue was who would keep the drain clear. Both parties were almost foaming with venom but David, who was mayor at the time, listened to both sides and said, 'I think I see a solution and with a little luck, it might work.' He told them his plan and the farmers looked at one another and asked, 'Is it that simple?'
"They shook hands on the way out of the meeting."
Mr. BARTLETT graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in political science and economics. He worked with the federal Civil Service Commission for two years before winning a scholarship at the London School of Economics, where he earned a master's degree. He married Betty PEARCE in 1950.
Prior to working with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Canada Council, he was chief of the Technical Co-operation Service, Colombo Plan Administration, in Canada, precursor to the Canadian International Development Agency; and he was executive officer to the federal deputy minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources. He retired in 1986 after seven years as assistant director and secretary at the Canada Council, but continued to do contract work.
His government jobs were administrative in nature, says Mrs. BARTLETT, "but not in a routine sense. He had a variety of interesting projects," including the task of helping Governor-General Georges VANIER and his wife, Pauline, tour northern Canada.
In the early 1990s, he conceived a plan to rescue the World University Service of Canada from receivership. At the time, he was interim executive director of the organization, which is a network of individuals and institutions that foster human development and global understanding through education and training. From 1991 to 1998, he sat on World University Service of Canada's board of directors.
Mr. BARTLETT entered municipal politics in 1965 while still working for the government, which meant he often came home from work after 6 p.m., grabbed a bite to eat, and was off to a meeting that could last until after midnight. He bowed out of politics in 1985 after losing an election.
"His motivation was that he loved the work," said Mrs. BARTLETT. "He never fretted about things, there was never any tossing and turning at night. He had this talent for dealing with all things in a balanced way and coming up with a fair solution."
Mr. BARTLETT also contributed his time to a local Scout troop, and the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, and wrote columns for a local newspaper. After retiring, he was appointed to a number of task forces that studied taxi services at Pearson International Airport in Toronto, the ward boundaries in Ottawa and the workings of regional governments.
In retirement, he and his wife spent part of each year on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick. Mr. BARTLETT leaves his wife, Betty, and sons Michael and Peter.

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BARTLETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-11 published
BREYFOGLE, Elizabeth ''Betty'' (née HOPWOOD)
Peacefully on March 5, 2003, at home in Victoria. Betty has gone to join her beloved husband, William A. BREYFOGLE, who died in Vermont in 1958. She is fondly remembered by her nieces and nephews, Peter and Jo BREYFOGLE, Joan and Derek BARTLETT, Christopher WILLIAMSON and their families. Many thanks go to her friend Joan MOODY and to Bruce CALE of Victoria for their Friendship and support.

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BARTLETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-10 published
CARSWELL, Frederick W. (Honours B.A. - University of Western Ontario 1935)
Long time resident of Ste-Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, died peacefully in Toronto on Tuesday, April 8, 2003 at the age of 90. Beloved husband of Anne for over 64 years. Loving father of Mary Anne CARSWELL and Robert S. CARSWELL and his wife Carol Ann BARTLETT. Cherished grandfather of Janet A. CARSWELL and her husband Rob BOSINGER and Andrew J. CARSWELL and his wife Sara Rose CARSWELL. Proud great-grandfather of Sophia Rose CARSWELL. Dear brother of Robert. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, from 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 12, 2003 until the time of the Memorial Service in the Chapel at 3 p.m. Cremation. If desired, donations may be made to the Victorian Order of Nurses.

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BARTLETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-01 published
Linda Margaret Bowring TANNER
By Daphne BARTLETT Wednesday, October 1, 2003 - Page A22
Wife, mother, daughter, palliative-care specialist, friend. Born April 19, 1948, in Birmingham, England. Died July 5 in Camlachie, Ontario, of cancer, aged 55.
She saw herself as a very ordinary working mom, wife, and Christian, living an unexceptional life. Well, let me tell you about this ordinary woman. Her name was well chosen. Linda means beauty and with that surely goes warmth, energy and radiance -- the essentials of Linda TANNER. She was born at the height of the post-war baby boom, and raised in a flat with her mom and grandparents. She graduated from medical school, at a time when working-class youth could, and married Mike, an engineer, in 1974. They worked for a year in Africa, with Canadian University Services Organization, before emigrating to Sarnia, Ontario
With three young daughters, she worked as a locum and in the emergency department, but it was in the early 1980s that she was to find her calling. Her vision, energy and wisdom were fundamental in the founding of Sarnia's palliative care services, including a residential hospice and out-patient cancer pain clinic. Under her guidance, it was to become a model for many treatment centres around the country. Her teaching, motivation and innovation in the management of the terminally ill have affected countless people within and beyond our own community. Recognition of this came with the Dorothy Ley Award for excellence in palliative care, and the naming of the palliative care wing in Sarnia in Linda's honour.
The shock came with the pathology report, which identified a leiomyosarcoma -- a rare but vicious cancer with a 5 per cent survival rate. After further treatments, a scan revealed that she was not to be part of that 5 per cent. Linda knew better than anyone the challenges ahead. The person who had reassured and assuaged the fears of so many people and their loved ones as they faced death, turned to Friends, family, and faith for her own comfort.
Linda chose seven Friends to share this journey and in the last months, four more joined us. For more than a year, a day with Linda was on the calendars of "Linda's Ladies" as we took turns to take her to various treatments, to work, maybe a pedicure or shopping (a pack rat, she couldn't resist a bargain). Sometimes we would have a day in her garden, where she knew the names of all of the plants, and the people who had given them to her. Perhaps a morning would be spent cleaning out a cupboard, but nothing was ever thrown out. It was more a morning of inventory-taking, and redistribution.
Afternoons were kept free for "her soaps" for she was a devotee of Coronation Street and Emmerdale. She had a butterfly tattoo on her thigh and a passion for red shoes. In the last week of her life she ate, when she could, a diet solely of strawberries and ice cream. "How decadent," she would say, with the widest and naughtiest grin. These were days of Friendship and fun, days of tears and fears, days of laughter, days of doubt and courage, days of humility, discovery and learning. How enriched we have been by her request to share this voyage.
Linda's love and respect for people was endless, never impatient or judgmental; her humour wicked, but never unkind; her compassion creative, never sentimental or bland. She is survived by her husband Mike, her mother Joan, and three beautiful daughters: Sarah, Kate and Amy.
This ordinary woman will continue to give us beautiful light, she will continue to give us warmth, and she will continue to give us strength. For she was a person of grace who showed us how to live, and showed us how to die.
Daphne is Linda's friend and one of "Linda's Ladies."

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BARTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-13 published
BOYD, Professor Robert Gavin
Died unexpectedly at his home in Halifax on Wednesday, December 10, 2003. Born in Brighton, Victoria, Australia on May 16, 1924, he was the eldest child of the late Robert Gavin and C. Margaret BOYD. He was educated at St. Patrick's College and graduated in Political Science from the University of Melbourne. He became a Research Officer for the Joint Intelligence Bureau of Australian Government and served on the S.E.A.T.O. Research Team in Bangkok, Thailand from 1956-1959. He returned to the Australian National University In Canberra where he wrote his 1st book. ''Communist China's Foreign Policy'', which earned him a Fullbright Fellowship to Notre Dame University, Indiana for two years. He spent a summer semester at Stanford University's Hoover Institute for Peace and moved to George Washington University, Washington, D.C. with the family and taught there. The family returned to Canberra in 1965 and he resumed his research studies and writing at the A.N.U. A Canada Council Fellowship took him to Carleton University in Ottawa following a lecture tour in the Maritimes, he was asked to join the Political Science faculty at Saint Mary's University where he taught from 1967 to 1989. On retirement he taught at Rutgars's University, New Jersey and was named Honorary Professor. He returned to Halifax and Saint Mary's in 1991 and taught part-time in the M.B.A. programme until his death. He wrote and also collaborated on many books in his field of Political Science and organized a most successful series of fall seminars at Saint Mary's to which distinguished guest scholars contributed. He is survived by his wife, Margaret; his children, Angela, Stephanie (Peter HORA,) Dominic (Theresa FOX), Mary Catherine, Austin (Beckett FICHTER), Christopher, Felicity and Hilary (Bret BARTON.) He was grandpa to Alexander and Lawrence HORA, Frances, Katie and Michael BOYD, Andrew and Connor BOYD, Matthew and Julia BARTON. He is survived by his sister, Carmel RYAN (Peter,) Canberra, A.C.T. Australia three nieces and two nephews. He was a man of strong faith, generosity of spirit and loyalty to his Catholic beliefs and principles. Family will be re ceiving Friends at J. A. Show Funeral Home, 2666 Windsor Street, Halifax on Monday, December 15, from 2-4, 7-9 p.m. Memorial mass will be held 10 a.m. Tuesday, December 16, in Canadian Martyrs Roman Catholic Church. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Saint Mary's University Faculty Women's Association Scholarship Fund or to Hope Cottage.
Well done thou good and faithful servant, Cavin.

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BARYSHNIKOV o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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