ANDERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-13 published
ANDERS, Eunice Biggar
Age 84, of Leamington, died February 11, 2003. She was the wife of the late Franklin O. ANDERS (1994.) Born in Windsor, Ontario, daughter of Thomas and Mary BIGGAR, Eunice was a graduate of the University of Wisconsin in 1939. She and her husband owned and operated Point Pelee Orchards.
Eunice is survived by her son Franklin H. and daughter-in-law Barbara of Danbury, Connecticut, and her daughter Mary and son-in-law David HUTCHINGS of Cairo, Egypt. In addition to her husband, she was predeceased by her elder daughter Martha (1990). She also leaves grand_son Franklin J. and his wife Theresa of Walnut Creek, California, granddaughter Catherine ANDERS of Richmond, Virginia and grand_son John HUTCHINGS of Montreal.
Eunice was a weaver and charter member of both the Leamington Weavers Guild (1953) and the Ontario Handweavers and Spinners (1955). She was President of the Ontario Handweavers and Spinners from 1967-1969. A gifted artist, her award winning weaving was shown at the International Exposition held in Brussels in 1958. Her weaving was also exhibited in galleries throughout Ontario, Michigan and as far west as Seattle, Washington culminating in her one-woman exhibition at The Art Gallery of Windsor in 1983.
Eunice was also an accomplished musician, playing the organ at Saint John's Anglican Church as well as the Christian Science Church for many years. She was a longtime patron of the Leamington Choral Society.
At Eunice's request, there will be no funeral service. The family will receive Friends at the Reid Funeral Home, 14 Russell Street, Leamington, on Friday, February 14 from 7 to 9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Sun Parlor Home for Senior Citizens, 175 Talbot Street East, Leamington, Ontario N8H 1L9. Friends may send condolences at: www.funeral-cast.com

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Vina Mary LANGANKI
November 17, 1931 to January 12, 2003
It is with great sadness that the family announces the passing of Vina Mary LANGANKI, who passed away suddenly on January 12th, 2003.
Vina was born in Sucker Creek, Manitoulin Island on November 17th, 1931. It was there that she enjoyed visiting her grandmother who taught her many life lessons. At the age of 16 she moved to Cleveland, Ohio where she cared for a family who taught her about the many facets of the Jewish religion and traditions. In 1963 she moved to live with her sister Viola, and her brother-in-law Willi HACKL. She met her husband Paul LANGANKI in 1965 and they were married at St. Luke's Anglican Church in Dryden. In 1966 they had their first child Roger David, followed by Gregory Wayne in 1967. Vina enjoyed spending time with family and Friends, gardening, baking, cooking and her dedication to her faith, which lead her to pursue a commitment as a layreader for St. Luke's Anglican Church. Her work with the church involved her in all aspects of church life, as well as, several charitable foundations. She was very appreciative for the fellowship of the church. Her trip to the Holy Land in 2001 was a perfect culmination to her faith. However, her greatest joy was spending time with her grandchildren. Vina was predeceased by her husband Paul, and her mother May and her father John, her brother Clarence and her niece Katherine. Vina is survived by her devoted sons Roger (Debbie) and Wayne LANGANKI both of Dryden. Brothers: Ted NAHWEGHOW of Six Nations, Robert (Delores) NAHWEGAHBOW of Mississauga and Garry NAHWEGAHBOW of Sudbury. Sisters: Viola (Willi) HACKL of Dryden, Beaulah NAHWEGAHBOW of Montana, Colleen (Jack) ANDERSON of Moose Jaw. Grandchildren Zachary and Amy LANGANKI and Dylan HALE, numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held on Thursday, January 16th, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m. at St. Luke's Anglican Church. Interment at the Dryden Cemetery.

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-19 published
Andres KRAMER 1908-2003
Andres KRAMER (Andy to all his Friends,) came to Canada at the age of 18. Andy was born in Sonderburg, Denmark, December 14, 1908. Settled in Toronto, was employed by the Robt. Swipson Co. as a radio technician also doing house calls in the evenings. He met Walter BENNETT, soon to become his brother-in-law. Andy married Marguerite Jane BENNETT (Daisey to all her Friends,) in 1934 at South Baymouth, where Daisy was born. Wedding took place at Huron Lodge. They went to Denmark on their honeymoon, taking their car with them.
About ten years later they moved to New York, where Andy was employed by the BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation). The time they spent there was very enjoyable. Later they returned to Toronto. Andy attended the University of Toronto and graduated with honours as an electrical engineer. They returned to the USA and settled in Stanford County where Andy was employed by Audio Magnetics manufacturing recording tape. Their vacations were always returning to Manitoulin Island. Later they moved back to Toronto where Andy founded Kramer Magnetics 1963, manufacturing various types of recording tape. He engineered and built all the equipment personally. Eric STILLWAUGH, his great nephew was one of his first employees and remained with him until Kramer Magnetics was sold in 1971 after about 10 years of operation. They moved to South Baymouth, built a home and retired, only to start another home on South Bay waterfront, along with a hangar where he proceeded to build a home-built Mustang float plane. Andy had previously obtained his pilot's licence. The government inspector said it was the best plane he ever checked out. Daisey, Andy's wife passed away in May 1986. In 1994, he sold his house in South Baymouth and settled in a retirement home in Goderich. Andy eventually due to eye failure was not able to drive his car. However, his two nieces Joyce McDONALD and Lena SAUDERS taxied him when necessary. Andy passed away peacefully at Huronview Rest Home in Clinton, Ontario after spending eight years in Goderich Place. He is survived by Erling ANDERSON and Jutta KRAMER, Joyce McDONALD, Lena SANDERS, Helen McQUAT, Georgina STILLWAUGH, Kenneth BENNETT, and many nieces and nephews. He also had two nephews, Gerald LEHMAN and Haus KRAMER, both deceased. Andy also had one sister, Missa KRAMER (deceased.)

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
Lilliean "Mary" TAILOR/TAYLOR
In loving memory of Lilliean "Mary" TAILOR/TAYLOR who passed away at Saint Joseph's Hospital, Sudbury on Tuesday, June 24, 2003 at the age of 76 years.
Loving friend of James ESSERY (predeceased.) Cherished mother of Kim and husband Neil ANDERSON of Blezzard Valley, Janet and husband Bruce FOX of Azilda, Marlene (predeceased) (husband Lawrence HOWARD,) Lindsey (predeceased) (wife Irene), Michael (predeceased)(close friend Sherry). Special grandmother of Tammy (husband Steve), Cory (wife Krystal), Chantelle, Wanda (husband Larry), Dwayne (wife Heidi), Rob, Shane (wife Holly), Lori (husband Neil), Sandra, Raymond, Darren, Stephanie. Will be missed by great grandchildren Mathew, Brianna, Jamie, Nathan, Carter, Caitlyn, Tyler, Nathan, Natasha, Tamara, Lindsey, Chance, Brittany, Tiffany. Dear sister of Shirley McCULLIGH (husband Dougal predeceased) of Little Current, Elva TAILOR/TAYLOR (husband Clarence predeceased) of Espanola, "Windy" William Sr. (wife Doreen) of Wikwemikong, predeceased by brothers John TAILOR/TAYLOR, and Orion (wife Doreen.) Remembered by many nieces and nephews. Visitation was held on Friday, June 27, 2003. Funeral Service was held on Saturday, June 28, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Burial in Holy Trinity Anglican Cemetery.

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-25 published
Died This Day -- William ANDERSON, 1987
Tuesday, February 25, 2003 - Page R7
Physician and academic born in 1917; professor in pathology at University of Toronto; in 1967, revised Pathology for the Surgeon, the definitive pathology textbook for Canadian medical students eighth English edition and first published in Spanish, Italian and Portuguese.

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-26 published
BROADHEAD, William ''Bill'' David
Died in the early hours of the morning, on March 24, 2003 at St. Michael's Hospital. In his 87th year, David's health had been failing for some time. It was his greatest wish to depart peacefully. Predeceased by his first wife Kathleen (née MURRAY) and by his son Paul. David will be greatly missed by his second wife, Hazel LOIS and by his three children Anne (Joseph,) Nora ANDERSON (Robert) and John (Ana.) Also survived by his eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Dear brother to Marjory GEORGE of Chatham, Ontario. David, a graduate of McMaster University, was the last of the great Dickensians, having read most of the great classics. He had a particular fondness for Charles Dickens and Thomas Hardy. He wrote short stories and at the age of 70, continued to take courses at U. of T. Up until the end of his life, David took great pleasure in continuing to write fiction. Friends may call the Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home and Chapel, 467 Sherbourne Street (South of Wellesley Street) on Wednesday, from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. A funeral Mass will be celebrated on Thursday March 27, at 10: 30 a.m. at Our Lady of Lourdes Church (Sherbourne and Earl Street). Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations in David's name to either Covenant House or Interval House would be greatly appreciated.
''Dad was a man of honour and integrity. His sense of humour was a great delight to all who met him.''

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-06 published
His passion was coaching
He worked at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children for 40 years, but his spare time was devoted to training athletes
By Allison LAWLOR Tuesday, May 6, 2003 - Page R7
An era has ended in Canadian track-and-field athletics. Don MILLS, coach, administrator and volunteer, died in Windsor, Ontario, last month. He was 75.
The folklore surrounding Mr. MILLS, who was most recently an assistant coach with the University of Toronto's track-and-field and cross-country teams, was that he never missed a meet, often attending more than one on a weekend.
Mr. MILLS was at the Canadian Interuniversity Sport championships assisting with the university's Varsity Blues team when he died peacefully in his sleep.
"For Don, track-and-field coaching and working with young people was his passion, said Carl GEORGEVSKI, head coach of Varsity Blues track and field.
Mr. MILLS's involvement in track and field began in 1963 when he co-founded the Toronto Striders Track Club. He went on to form Track West, in the city's west end, in the 1970s and was a club coach there until the end of the 2002 season. One of his highlights as a coach was the 1978 World Cross Country Championships. Three of the six Canadian junior men there were from Track West. They took home a silver medal.
"If [a runner] didn't have a coach and needed one they would saddle over to Don, said Ian ANDERSON, a friend and fellow coach at Track West and at the University of Toronto.
Known for devoting hours of his spare time to typing out the results of athletes' workouts, giving nutritional advice, supervising workouts and attending what seemed like every track-and-field and cross-country race in the country, Mr. MILLS made each of the athletes feel they were the most important.
"You thought you were his only athlete, said Paul KEMP, a runner who trained with Mr. MILLS at both Track West and at the University of Toronto. But Mr. KEMP soon realized that the same time and individual attention Mr. MILLS gave to him, he also gave to 20 other athletes.
Jerry KOOYMANS, who ran with Track West in the late 1970s and early 1980s, remembers Mr. MILLS dropping by his hotel room the night before a big race to discuss race strategy. Mr. MILLS would pull out the list of opponents and discuss their strengths and weaknesses and how to beat them.
"By the time I got to the starting line, I felt like I was the best-prepared runner in the race, Mr. KOOYMANS said in a written tribute to his old coach.
When he wasn't busy coaching, Mr. MILLS, who lived in Oakville, Ontario, west of Toronto, was volunteering with the Ontario Track and Field Association as an official or meet director. His meticulous administrative skills and painstaking attention to detail are widely remembered. It was not uncommon for Mr. MILLS to travel across the city on a Sunday night to drop off race results to an athlete or fellow coach. He received the government of Ontario's special achievement award for his work as a volunteer administrator.
Mr. MILLS joined the Varsity Blues staff in 1999, where he focused on men's middle-distance running. But his connections with the University of Toronto go back to the early 1960s, when he spent time coaching the men's boxing team. One of the young men he is reported to have coached was former Ontario premier David PETERSON.
Outside of coaching, Mr. MILLS worked at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children for 40 years. He started out in biochemistry research in 1954 and later transferred to occupational health and safety where he was involved in purchasing radioactive materials. He routinely ate breakfast at the hospital cafeteria and, even after he retired, continued to visit the hospital daily and spend time in its library.
Don MILLS was born on August 29, 1927, in Trois-Rivières, Quebec. He lived a quiet life, never marrying or having children of his own. He acted as a father figure to many athletes and maintained connections with them. Over the holidays, he would often spend time with the families of former athletes. Not one to talk about himself, his athletes and colleagues knew little about him. Not much is known about his own athletic achievements except that he is said to have played hockey in his younger years. Mr. MILLS, however, remained fit throughout his life.
"He was very quiet, Mr. ANDERSON said. "He was never the centre of attention."
While his workouts could be tough, Mr. MILLS knew when an athlete had endured enough, Mr. KEMP said. He was not one to yell or scream.
"He was patient, he was dedicated. He was committed, Mr. GEORGEVSKI said.
Renowned for never owning a car, Mr. MILLS mastered bus and train routes from coast to coast. Being without a vehicle didn't deter him from getting to a track meet or practice session, no matter where it was held. He became legendary for his uncanny ability to get to meets without driving.
In recent years he refused to fly. Even so, that didn't stop him from attending a National Cross Country Championship in British Columbia.
In order to be with his team, Mr. MILLS left Ontario a week ahead of schedule to travel across the country by train. Two years ago, Mr. KEMP flew to Edmonton to attend a tournament only to be met by Mr. MILLS, who had arrived earlier by bus.
"He was an individual who cared deeply about all his athletes, " whether it was a young, struggling runner or one who was performing among the top at the national level, Mr. GEORGEVSKI.
A track scholarship has been established in Mr. MILLS's name at the University of Toronto. He died on March 16.

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-22 published
J. Grant MAXWELL
June 6, 1922 - May 16, 2003.
Grant died peacefully in Victoria on May 16th, 2003 in the presence of loved ones. He is survived by his his loving and supportive family; his devoted wife of 56 years, Vivian (née MITCHENER) five children; Anne, Victoria; Mary (Bill ROBERTSON,) Saskatoon James (Marjory PORTER), Victoria; Kathleen (Darrel ANDERSON), Victoria; and, Gregory (Carrie HOLMQUIST,) Saskatoon, eight grandchildren: Joshua and Katie PENDLETON; Maxwell BRANDEL; Kristin, Melissa, and Adam MAXWELL; and, Emily and Michael MAXWELL; Vivian's surviving siblings Eileen and Cecil; and, numerous Friends across Canada, U.S.A., and Holland. Grant was predeceased by his children Thomas John, Christopher, and Christine, and by his parents Gilmour and Bridgette (ZETTA) MAXWELL of Plenty, Saskatchewan.
Grant had a dignified and distinguished career and life. He was born and raised on a farm near Plenty. After he finished high school in Plenty, he attended Saint Thomas More College, at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. While at university, he met Vivian and many life-long Friends. Grant graduated from the U of S in 1944.
From 1944-45, he served in the Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve on the Atlantic Seaboard. After completing his national duty, he and Vivian married and he began his media career and family.
A print, radio, and television, journalist for over fifty years, Grant's extensive career reflected his social conscience and ecumenical beliefs. He began his career as a radio news reporter and assistant news director with CFQC Radio (1946-48.) Moving on to newspaper journalism with the Saskatoon Star Phoenix (1949-59), he was a senior reporter and feature writer, and then the chief editorial writer for the newspaper.
Grant's deep religious faith guided him down a path that utilized his journalistic expertise while nurturing his spirit. From 1960-68, he was the Lay Director at the Saskatoon Catholic Centre. He was also a regular columnist with several Catholic newspapers, including the Prairie Messenger, Canadian Register, Western Catholic Reporter, and Our Family, between 1959-69. In the same time period, Grant and Vivian were the Canadian couple on the international writing committee of the Christian Family Movement based in Chicago. In 1967 Grant with Vivian were the Canadian delegates to the International Lay Congress of the Catholic Church. Between 1962-68, Grant was a regular panelist on the CFQC-television show ''In the Public Interest,'' and a Saskatchewan correspondent to the Globe and Mail.
In 1969 Grant and Vivian and family moved from Saskatoon to Ottawa where Grant had accepted a position as Co-Director, and later Director, of the Social Action Office, Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops. While working at this position from 1969 - 77, Grant researched, advised, and prepared draft policy statements on national, social and religious issues, including Project Feedback, a qualitative ''sounding at the grassroots'' of religious beliefs and church concerns across Canada. Also during this time (1972-75), Grant was a Canadian consultant with the International Pontificial Commission for Justice and Peace, Vatican City: Grant and Vivian met Pope Paul 6th while in Rome.
From 1977-81, Grant worked in Ottawa as a freelance journalist and consultant for numerous and varied clients such as the Department of the Secretary of State, the Canadian Human Rights Commission, the Conserver Society Project of the Science Council of Canada, the Vanier Institute of the Family, and the Committee of National Voluntary Organizations. During this time, he wrote the book Assignment in Chekiang detailing the 1902 - 54 experience of the Scarborough Foreign Mission Society in China.
In 1981, Grant and Vivian moved from Ottawa to Toronto. From 1981-86, Grant served as founding editor of ''Compass, '' a national magazine published by the Jesuits of English-speaking Canada. During this time, he was also a member of the writing team for ''Living with Christ, '' a monthly missalette of scriptural texts and commentary circulated to most Catholic parishes across Canada.
In 1986, Grant and Vivian left Toronto and semi-retired in Victoria, British Columbia. Grant's faith and desire to write kept him involved in several projects. In 1987 - 88 Grant wrote At Your Service: Stories of Canadians In Missions. From 1989-91, he co-edited Forward in the Spirit, a popular history of the ''People Synod'' published by the Catholic Diocese of Victoria. From 1992 - 94 he co-wrote and edited a book entitled Healing Journeys: The Ka Ka Wis Experience, which described the history of the Aboriginal residential counseling centre for the Ka Ka Wis Family Development Centre, Meares Island, B.C.
Throughout his life, Grant was also actively involved in his communities. He was an executive member of the Saskatchewan Association for Human Rights; the Saskatchewan Association for Adult Education a founding member of the Downtown Churches' Association of Victoria an occasional commentator on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio, Western Region; and a speaker at national, regional, and local events on both civic and religious topics.
Grant spent over twenty happy summers at Emma Lake with Vivian, his family, and many visiting Friends.
A respected journalist and community volunteer, Grant always made time for family and Friends. He was a loving husband, intellectual companion, and graceful dance partner to Vivian; a gentle, fair and compassionate teacher to his children; an affectionate, singing, cartoon-drawing storyteller to his grandchildren; and was warm and accepting of his relatives. He was a stimulating conversationalist and a loyal friend. Grant will be greatly missed by all until we meet his gentle soul again.
There will be a prayer service in Saskatoon at St. Philip's Church at 1902 Munroe Avenue (at Taylor Street) at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 22, 2003.
The funeral and celebration of Grant's life will be held in Saskatoon at St. Philip's Church at 1902 Munroe Avenue at Taylor Street at 10 a.m. on Friday, May 213, 2003. A memorial celebration will be held in Victoria in the fall of 2003, and prior notice will be provided in this paper. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Development and Peace and/or the Friendship Inn, Saskatoon. Arrangements are entrusted to the Saskatoon Funeral (306-244-5577).

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-16 published
Dorothy Mae SEALE
By Grace STEVENSON Monday, June 16, 2003 - Page A18
Teacher, student, writer, wife and mother. Born December 7, 1907, in Chisholm Township, Ontario Died April 6, 2003, in Oshawa, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 95.
'Fifty years ago, a neighbour seeing my three small children said, 'Dorothy, this is the best part of your life.' She was wrong. Being alive right now is the best part of my life."
Dorothy SEALE wrote this two years ago in an assignment for the Creative Writing class she was enrolled in at the Oshawa Senior Citizens Centres. At the time, she was 93.
Confined to a wheelchair a great part of the day because of the ravages of peripheral neuropathy, Dorothy never lost her interest in life. Another of her articles focused on the many disturbing happenings in the world and complained that she was suffering from "a malady with no cure in sight called Too Much Information." But, much as it worried her, she made no effort to escape the information overload. She watched television, listened to radio broadcasts and ingested news reports daily. She also read and discussed with her many visitors the latest books. The day she went to the hospital and, with little warning, died, she left an atlas opened to a map of Iraq propped on a stand near her chair in her apartment.
Born to Tom and Annie ANDERSON, Dorothy grew up on a farm in Chisholm Township in Ontario. She took her nursing training at Riverdale Hospital, attended the University of Toronto, and then taught anatomy at a hospital in Quebec City. When she married Lewis SEALE, they bought a house in Sillery, a suburb of Quebec. Lewis worked in his father's lumber mill during the years their two sons and one daughter grew up. Later, he did auditing for the provincial government. Dorothy often went with him on these jobs and, while she waited in the car, made beautiful sketches of anything that caught her fancy. In 1983, they moved to Oshawa, Ontario, to be near their children, but Dorothy always retained a deep concern for the problems of the province where 53 of her 95 years were spent.
In 1987, when the program director of the Senior Citizens Centre suggested Dorothy join a memoir writing group, she protested, "I can't write; I never could write; and I come from a long line of people who didn't write." But she did join the class and, delving into her past, discovered more than one writer in her family. Her great-great-great grandfather, John THOMAS, head factor at Moosonee, Ontario, for Hudson Bay Co. between 1769 and 1813, wrote copious notes to head office. His extensive reports, now in the Hudson Bay Company archives in Winnipeg, continue to be a valuable source of research information on the era. About him, Dorothy wrote, "At this time, the company did not allow European women at its posts. So John married a native woman, Margaret (whose name he anglicized), and had nine children by her." Dorothy was very proud of her native genes.
Charles THOMAS, John's oldest son and Dorothy's great-great grandfather, was sent to England to be educated, but returned to take charge of several trading posts across Canada. He kept detailed diaries, now lost, but his life story, too, is well documented in the Hudson Bay Company archives. In more recent years, Dorothy's cousin, Stanley ANDERSON, received an Ontario Heritage Foundation award for his help in compiling a history of Chisholm Township, and a "first cousin once removed" married writer Carol SHIELDS. Dorothy was certainly wrong when she said there were no writers in her family.
Like other seniors who join writing groups, Dorothy made many new Friends and found an added dimension to her life through her writing. Although unable to attend the classes in person the last months of her life, she continued to enroll, receive the assignments, and send her submissions to the teacher every week.
Grace STEVENSON is a friend of Dorothy's.

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-22 published
MATHER, Naomi
Peacefully, at her home in Waterloo, surrounded by the love of her family, Naomi died early Monday morning, July 21, 2003. She was 20. Naomi struggled with Ewing's Sarcoma since January of 2002. Her indomitable spirit sustained all who knew her. Precious daughter of Susan (COOKE) and Fred MATHER and dearest sister of John. Naomi will be lovingly remembered by her Paternal grandmother, Ivey MATHER of Perth; her special friend Marjorie MALLORY, Aunts and Uncles, Marilyn CURRY of Headingly, Minnesota, Catherine and Richard FREEMAN of Vancouver, Lorna and Jim PEDEN and Sheila PRESCOTT (Dave McGRATH) of Perth; cousins, Tyler, Jennifer and Andrew CURRY, Harry and Gabby FREEMAN, Corinne, Trent and Colin PEDEN and Patricia PRESCOTT. Naomi's life included a wide circle of Friends, especially Cara DURST. Her Scottish Terrier Ghillie and Tabby cat Tamara had a special place in her heart. She was predeceased by Maternal grandparents, Roy and Edith COOKE and her Paternal grandfather, John MATHER. In Naomi's short life, she involved herself in many activities. She was a graduate of Waterloo Collegiate Institute and was enrolled in Science studies at Queen's University when she became ill. Some of her involvements and interests included Strathyre Highland Dancers, Children's International Summer Villages, working as a lifeguard and swimming instructor and playing the piano. Friend's and relatives are invited to share their memories of Naomi with her family at the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo from 7 to 9 pm this evening (Tuesday) and 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 pm Wednesday. A service to celebrate Naomi's life will be held on Thursday, July 24, 2003, 11 am, at Westminster United Church (The Cedars,) 543 Beechwood Drive, Waterloo, with Reverend John ANDERSON officiating. A committal service will follow in Parkview Cemetery Crematorium Chapel, Waterloo. Following the committal at the Cemetery, Friends and relatives are invited to return to Westminster United Church for refreshments and a time to visit with the family.In Naomi's memory, in lieu of flowers, donations to the Sarcoma Fund at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto or the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and can be arranged through the funeral home, phone (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-28 published
Elizabeth A. ANDERSON, Stratford, Ontario.
Elizabeth-known as Libby by all who loved her-died on Saturday, July 26, 2003. She was 59. Born, raised and schooled in Montreal, in her earlier years she was an exuberant member of the Island City Singers and was often called upon for solo work, her clear gentle soprano voice filling the hearts of many. Libby had a successful professional career: first as a banker in Montreal, England and Vancouver. Then, after a complete switch in direction, she turned her talents to what was to become the love of her life-administrator for some of Canada's leading theatres; Playhouse Theatre, Vancouver; Phoenix Theatre, Edmonton; English Theatre at the National Arts Centre, Ottawa; Canadian Stage, Toronto and most recently, the Stratford Festival of Canada. Her life was one in which she breathed the heart and soul into these organizations, nurturing the close Friendships of her theatre family. Her humour and inner strength continued to sustain her family relationships, long Friendships from Montreal days, Vancouver days and on. Her generosity knew no bounds. Libby is survived by her brother Jim (partner Christina and daughter Cassandra) of Montreal and Vermont and her sister Jane (husband Gerry and daughter Elizabeth) of Kona, Hawaii and San Diego. At her request, there will be one heckuva party to rejoice in Libby's life in both Stratford and Vermont, to be announced at a later date. Memorial tributes in her name may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society Huron/Perth, the Stratford General Hospital or the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals-Perth County Branch through the Heinbuck Funeral Home, 156 Albert Street, Stratford, Ontario N5A 3K4 (1-519-271-5062). Her family and Friends will miss her warm heart and beautiful smile.

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-21 published
Donald MacPherson POLLOCK
By Jack POLLOCK Thursday, August 21, 2003 - Page A22
Company founder, humanitarian, storyteller, vehicle aficionado, husband, father, grandfather. Born July 22, 1917 in Kerwood, Ontario Died May 27, in Strathroy, Ontario, of natural causes, aged 86.
Born the second of four sons to William Raymond POLLOCK and Minnie Esther MacPHERSON, Donald was raised in Kerwood, Ontario, in a household that valued family, community service, music -- and horse racing. A childhood tumble from a tree resulted in a broken arm that was set improperly. For the rest of his life, he would work around this hindrance with characteristic aplomb.
Donald attended the butter maker's course at Ontario Agricultural College and joined his father in the family business, the Kerwood Creamery. Changing times brought the sale of the creamery to Carnation Milk Co. in 1943. Donald bought his first delivery truck and set out on the road to building Pollock NationaLease, the largest family-owned full-service truck leasing company in Canada (celebrating its 50th anniversary this year).
Donald (Don) was exacting in his expectations of himself. He believed in hard work, loyalty and courage. In the early years, he hauled milk to the local depot. He operated an egg-grading station and cold storage plant with his father. And he delivered television cabinets to manufacturers such as General Electric and Philips Electronics.
By 1958, his company owned 12 tractor-trailers. In the 1960s and 1970s, he expanded into other areas such as funeral coaches and ambulances. Donald enjoyed this business -- particularly when he clinched the sale of a new Cadillac hearse. But he judged that the truck market had more potential for growth. He was right. Today, Pollock NationaLease has a fleet of 3,500 vehicles and six locations from Windsor to Toronto, and in Moncton, N.B.
None of this was accomplished alone. In 1942, he married Margaret ANDERSON, known to all as Peg, a woman of considerable wit and facility with a golf club. In 1992, Donald and Peg celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. At 80, in 1996, Peg succumbed to cancer.
They raised three children - -- Jim, Bill and Anne -- in their Strathroy home. In time, four grandchildren would join the family. The couple shared a love of travel and knew how to enjoy life, passing easily from their working years to the freedom of a genial retirement. The daily business of the company shifted into the capable hands of Donald's eldest son, Jim, and an experienced management team.
Donald was increasingly active in community causes, contributing to the Lion's Club for some 60 years. He was a dedicated Mason and a Shriner. He had a special fondness for Jeepsters. He loved to entertain the crowds at carnivals, parades and other community events. A soft touch for antique cars, he prided himself on having the spiffiest convertible in the parade, complete with musical horns.
Donald collected and restored other vehicles, including a 1915 Ford Brass Rad Speedster and a 1932 Model B Roadster. He entered competitions at the Canadian National Exhibition and elsewhere, filling his den with victory cups and trophies.
His other passions included bridge, gin and poker and any kind of gambling. He had his own house rules: "Quit when you're up because that's the only way to beat the bastards!" His favourite game was blackjack and he was well-known at the local casinos.
He enjoyed his last game a week before his death, playing out his hand from his wheelchair in the company of his son Bill, a devoted caregiver.
To the end of his life, Donald's mind and sense of humour remained fully intact -- his body just wore out.
Jack POLLOCK is Donald's brother.

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-06 published
BUREY, Reverend Owen Leslie (Jack)
A resident of Chatham, died in Toronto on Thursday, October 2, 2003 at the age of 67. Born in Saint Ann, Bamboo, Jamaica, son of the late Viola and Joseph BUREY, and step-son of the late Doris BUREY. Beloved husband of Detha (ANDERSON) BUREY of Chatham. Dear father of Karen BUREY and Wayne BUREY (Toronto,) Steven BUREY (London), Richard BUREY, Esther BUREY, and Florence BUREY (Toronto), and predeceased by an infant son. Loving grandfather of Troy, Tyla, Trystenne, and Tasia. Brother of Madge, Rose, Lil, Cynth, Laurel, Charlie, Lloyd, David, Owen and John, and predeceased by 1 sister and 2 brothers. Also survived by several aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews. Reverend BUREY had been Pastor of Sandwich Baptist Curch, Windsor and member of the Free and Accepted Masons. Family will receive Friends at the McKinlay Funeral Home, 459 St. Clair Street, Chatham on Wednesday 2-4: 30 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service from St. Paul's Congregational Church, 450 Park Avenue West, Chatham, on Thursday, October 9, 2003 at 11 a.m. Interment Memorial Cemetery, North Buxton. Donations made by cheque to the Canadian Cancer Society appreciated. The Free Masons will conduct a Memorial Service at the Funeral Home on Tuesday at 7: 30 p.m. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-29 published
Three men sought after east-end death
By Jonathan FOWLIE, Wednesday, October 29, 2003 - Page A15
Police are looking for three men thought to have caused the death of David ANDERSON, a 42-year-old man who lived in east-end Toronto.
witnesses: saw Mr. ANDERSON in an argument with three men outside a hair salon near Gerrard Street East and Pape Avenue at about 7: 05 p.m. on October 20. Police say the men pushed Mr. ANDERSON to the ground. An autopsy showed he died from a skull fracture he suffered when his head hit the sidewalk.
Police have set up a command post near the scene, which will be open daily this week from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. They are urging anyone with information to go to the command post, or to call Crime Stoppers.

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ANDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-12 published
A tragic last drive for a car lover and his wife
By Christie BLATCHFORD, Friday, December 12, 2003 - Page A1
Toronto -- At the beginning of October, Stella ANDERSON took her dad to get his driver's licence renewed: He was turning 82, and Ontario law calls for seniors to be tested every two years after their 80th birthdays. So they'd been through it before, but it didn't make it any easier.
"It's so traumatic for these seniors," she said last night, "a waiting room filled with these nervous old people. But he passed, without his glasses. It was pretty amazing. And happy? This was a guy who has been driving since the early fifties, when a lot of people didn't even have cars."
Steve YAREMA always drove with his right arm, Mrs. ANDERSON said with a catch in her throat -- the other out the window, perfecting his perpetual driver's tan. For years, because he loved to drive and because in his job he got a new company car every two years, he was pretty much the neighbourhood chauffeur.
That Mr. YAREMA, and his wife of more than 50 years, Tekla, died in their car seems particularly cruel. As Mrs. ANDERSON's husband, Lance, put it last night, referring to his father-in-law's war years in his native Ukraine, "He made it through Stalin and Hitler but not through the streets of Etobicoke."
Mr. and Mrs. YAREMA -- she was 78 -- went missing last Thursday. They were found six days later in the blue 1995 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme that was Mr. YAREMA's last car; it was spotted by a soccer field not far from the couple's neat-as-a-pin bungalow.
Toronto police now believe that the YAREMAs somehow lost their bearings, and ended up where they did, the car travelling through the bushes, down a hill, and coming to a stop by the soccer field.
It was clear that Mr. YAREMA had tried to back the Cutlass out. It was neither badly damaged nor stuck, but it appears that in the anxiety of the moment, he suffered a fatal heart attack: He'd had an arrhythmia this summer. Mrs. YAREMA had glaucoma, and may have passed out or been knocked out when the car went out of control: In any case, she stayed with her husband, and died of hypothermia.
He worked for Dufferin Construction, in the days when the company did many of the major road projects in the Toronto area, and it seems in retrospect Mr. YAREMA's whole working life was tied up with highways and paving:
He was the superintendent for the 400 Highway project that went north from the city; he was the boss for the airport, back when it was called Malton; his last big job was Canada's Wonderland.
He had the sort of real, visceral connection to the city as a living, changing beast that only those in the building business have.
Mrs. ANDERSON, who spent an awful day yesterday, "picking out two of everything" for the coming double funeral, was last night beating herself up a little.
"Who's the one who took him to get his licence renewed?" she said. "You know, shoulda, woulda, coulda." If only she'd been home that Thursday at noon, when her parents phoned. If only she and her sister Irene had got her folks OnStar (the on-board system which locates vehicles and allows its operators to talk to motorists in distress).
I told her not to feel guilty, and meant it: There is no one who loves his car as much as an old man, or an old woman.
I had one of each once -- my own parents -- and I know what the car meant to them, and it was a hell of a lot more than it means to most of the rest of us.
They may write songs about teenagers and their cars, but they could write grateful odes about the elderly and theirs.
My father always named his: There was Cleverly (a Ford of some sort, blue, I think); Handsomely (a Mustang). The last one he owned, which he bought when still in relatively good health but obviously knowing it wasn't going to last, he called with great amusement, Finally.
He loved Finally the most, I think. It was a big sedan-type car, also blue, and he was able to drive it almost until he died, in 1986. My mother, who died almost two years ago, was not so lucky: She had to give up hers (and yes, it was still Finally) about two years before her death.
She had been diagnosed with emphysema, and put on oxygen 24 hours a day, and as portable as her traveller was, and as adept as she became, she couldn't manage it and the wheel.
She'd always been a nervous if excellent driver, and only ever ventured out within about a two-mile radius of her apartment anyway, and had all sorts of self-imposed rules: She wouldn't drive after dark; she wouldn't drive in traffic; she wouldn't go on highways. And she depended a lot on me, in any case, so stupidly, I didn't anticipate what an enormous loss it would be.
It knocked the stuffing out of her. She stalled as long as she could, finally selling Finally in exchange for a charitable receipt, and giving up her parking spot. She was depressed for months, and really never recovered. Even for my clingy, dependent mom, who phoned me a couple of times a day, who only ever drove to the Dominion and the drugstore, the car was a symbol of her independence and pride.
Steve YAREMA was the same, Mrs. ANDERSON said. He and her mom only ever did a little circuit of doctors, banks, and grocery stores. Once in a while, they'd venture over to the Cloverdale Mall area -- not so far from where they were discovered two days ago -- and she figures they might have been heading there or to a nearby supermarket.
"When I realized they were late coming home," she said last night, "I thought, 'I'm making them get a brand-new car' ", as she had thought about before, maybe with OnStar. But the mileage on the Cutlass was ridiculously low, because they really never went anywhere.
The YAREMAs were still living in their own home. Mr. YAREMA was still taking in his neighbour's garbage cans when he was feeling up to it, and they still kept the garden beautiful and the lawn trimmed. After he got out of hospital in the summer, neighbour Natalie CHYRSKY noticed that he'd get his wife mowing the lawn, but would follow behind, pointing out spots she'd missed. They had two loving daughters -- Irene would phone at least once a day, Mrs. ANDERSON at least a couple of times a week -- and five grandkids they adored.
And they were still driving. It was a lousy bit of bad luck that killed them, but they died with their hard-won pride intact. There are worse deaths.

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ANDERSSEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-28 published
Veteran of First World War dies at 104
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail with wires Tuesday, October 28, 2003 - Page A10
Victoria -- Myer LEWIS, who served in two world wars and lived in three centuries, has died in California at the age of 104.
Mr. LEWIS, who was known as Jerry, was one of the last Canadian veterans of the First World War.
Last November, The Globe and Mail found 16 Canadian veterans of that war still alive. At least five of the group, which was profiled in The Globe for Remembrance Day, have since died.
Mr. LEWIS enlisted at 19 and was kept from the deadly trenches of the Western Front because he failed a medical test: He had flat feet. Instead, the army ordered him to drive trucks in England.
He had become a U.S. citizen by the time his adopted homeland became embroiled in the Second World War. At 43, he joined the U.S. Navy.
"My part in World War I and World War 2 was very small," Mr. LEWIS said three years ago, "but I was happy to do what I could for these two great countries."
Even though his contribution to the war efforts was admittedly minor, Mr. LEWIS was honoured for his service in recent years. He became a regular at veterans events and served as grand marshal for Memorial Day parades in his home of Cupertino, Calif.
In 2000, Mr. LEWIS was recognized by the Canadian government in a ceremony held at Good Samaritan United Methodist Church in Cupertino. Canadian consul Handol KIM presented him with a Queen's certificate and a John McCrae medallion.
The commemorative medallion, produced by the Royal Canadian Mint, was presented to veterans two years earlier on the 80th anniversary of the end of the war. Because no central record of Great War veterans is kept, Mr. LEWIS was not honoured until after his family and veterans groups contacted the government.
At the same ceremony, he also received awards from the U.S. Navy, and city, county and state governments.
"This is the greatest honour I have received in my 101 years," a nostalgic Mr. LEWIS said after the ceremony.
Myer Gerald LEWIS was born in London on May 24, 1899. His father was a career British army officer, and the boy moved with his family to postings in Malta and South Africa before emigrating to Ottawa in 1910.
He enlisted in 1918 and was posted to Honiton, in Devon, England, where he drove hand-cranked, two-ton trucks for the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps. The private was responsible for clerical and supply duties, a humdrum assignment but one safer than life in the trenches.
Decades later, he enthused about the delirious celebrations in London after the announcement of the armistice.
"The lights had been turned off during the war," he told The Globe's Erin ANDERSSEN last year. "And they turned all the lights on again. It was a big, big thrill."
He returned from the war to work as a clerk in Ottawa. He moved to the United States in 1924, became a citizen in 1932, and married a dietitian in 1933.
In 1942, he signed up with the navy and served with Fleet Air Wing 7, taking part in antisubmarine patrols in the Atlantic. His unit marked V-E Day, on May 8, 1945, by escorting a surrendered German submarine to port.
After the war, he sold stocks and bonds, as well as life insurance, for Metropolitan Life in the Chicago area. He retired in 1965, the same year in which he left the naval reserve, where his rank was Aviation Storekeeper 1st Class.
The couple moved to Florida, where his wife, Emily, died in 1984.
The childless widower then moved to California to be closer to family members. He died of causes associated with old age on October 15 at a retirement home in Los Gatos, Calif. He leaves two nephews and two nieces.
A memorial service was held Sunday.

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ANDERSSEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-08 published
'There are too many ruined boys'
By Erin ANDERSSEN, Saturday, November 8, 2003 - Page F6
Parry Sound, Ontario -- Clara WHITE/WHYTE began her voyage into war by losing her purse on the way to the train. It was September 15, 1915. Her diary names it "a bright sunshiny day" and notes the crowd's "rousing send off." The soldiers and nurses, Ms. WHITE/WHYTE among them, left Toronto for a Montreal military ship and a voyage, beyond Wales and icebergs, to a continent of falling bombs and death.
She landed in London first, with time on her hands, as she wrote in her red, leather-bound diary, to shop, sip tea and tour the galleries.
Clara WHITE/WHYTE was not one to sit idly by. At times, her account of the First World War -- enlivened by daily weather reports, notes on the cost of things (60 cents then for a pie) and the "peculiar" fashion of the day -- reads more like a Grand Tour than a Great War. She wanders the Zoological Gardens in London, dines at the Grand Hotel du Louvre in Boulogne and climbs the 1,224 steps of the cathedral in Rouen, making it to the top even when "the other girls gave up the ascent."
Nursing the sick and wounded in camps at Rouen and Solonika, Ms. WHITE/WHYTE surely would have seen the cost of war, but her diary focuses instead on the bits of life she could find in the midst of it.
"There are," she writes in one letter home, "too many ruined boys around now." But she barely details in her diary what has ruined them. She tells in spare sentences of working in the German measles tent or waiting for the typhoid patients to arrive; she makes antiseptic note of bombs overhead. Two stitches in her own cheek merit a single line and no explanation.
Maybe you didn't talk of such things then, her great-niece, Phyllis GERHART, speculated. And perhaps this is what Ms. WHITE/WHYTE wanted to remember: the cherry-strawberry supper in her tent on Dominion Day, "the boys" caroling on Christmas Eve, tea with the other nurses to plan for a "grand masquerade to celebrate the closing of 1915" -- even as bombs fell nearby, injuring some men and killing a shepherd and six sheep.
Her descendants don't know much about her, beyond the small diary. It sat for decades in a dresser drawer in the bedroom of her niece, Laura BAKER, and was eventually passed to her daughter, Ms. GERHART, who lives now in Parry Sound.
Ms. WHITE/WHYTE's mother is believed to have died when she was young, and her father to have been connected to the silk trade. The family lived in Toronto, near the Danforth, and Clara and her sister, Alice, were raised in a proper, middle-class Victorian household.
The sisters were close, but took separate paths: Alice helped at home and eventually married and had a family, while Clara escaped to school and nursing.
On April 7, 1915, she volunteered to go to war. According to military records at the National Archives, she was 41. She was paid $50 a month.
In a faded picture from that time, Ms. WHITE/WHYTE stares back with a half-smile, standing near woods in her nurse's uniform, the belt cinched tight around her thin waist, dark bangs poking out beneath her veil.
The impression left by her diary is of an energetic woman, keen for an adventure. At the masquerade party on New Year's Eve, 1915, she reports that she took first prize, dressed as John Bull (the British version of Uncle Sam). She makes note of having a hearty laugh at the sight of a Frenchman hoisting his wife up on a cart by her backside.
Many of her days were spent walking into the village to do laundry, and writing letters; at home, they received postcards, rose bulbs and a box of soldier's buttons. She took pictures too, touristy shots collected into an old album her relatives still own, of the ship that took her across the ocean, of the camp in France and of the scenery.
In one picture, she is sitting on stone steps, the only woman with a dozen soldiers. One of her wartime possessions was a bullet with a cross carved into its tip. The story behind it has been lost, though Ms. GERHART likes to imagine it was a gift from a grateful patient.
Ms. WHITE/WHYTE's last entry is dated May 8, 1916. But the military records say she was still in Europe in 1918, when she contracted influenza. She didn't sail home until the summer of 1919. A year later, with the war over, she was discharged from service. She never married.
Her fate is the subject of some confusion: Ms. GERHART had always understood that her great aunt died of influenza, after contracting the illness while nursing patients. But a handwritten note on one of the folders in the archives says she passed away in 1930. The diary of an independent woman, spirited in the midst of hardship, is the only trace she left behind.
Erin ANDERSSEN is a reporter in The Globe and Mail's Ottawa bureau.

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ANDERSSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-23 published
Rolf O. KROGER, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Psychology University of Toronto
Rolf died, as he lived, with grace, courage, humour and dignity, at home on April 18th, 2003, of advanced prostate cancer. He was the devoted and beloved husband of Linda WOOD. He was the cherished son of Erna KROGER and son-in-law of Adele WOOD; loving brother of Harold and Jurgen KROGER; dear brother-in-law of Wilma KROGER, Edelgard DEDO, Lorraine WOOD, Robert and Deborah WOOD, and Reg WOOD; much loved uncle of Andrew KROGER and Stephen KROGER, Christina and Linda JUHASZ- WOOD, Taylor, Genna and Devon WOOD, Jonathan and Nicole WOOD, Phillippe NOEL, and Jose and David TILLETT, and nephew of Liesl WINTER, Otto WINTER and Alf and Sue MODJESKI. Rolf was born in Hamburg, Germany, on September 28th, 1931. He emigrated to Canada in 1952, and completed a B.A. in psychology at Sir George Williams College (now Concordia University) in 1957. Following his M.A. (1959) at Columbia University, New York, he received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1963. His advisor, Prof. Theodore R. SARBIN (Prof. Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz,) has continued to be a valued colleague and dear friend, together with Rolf's fellow graduate student, Prof. Karl E. SCHEIBE of Wesleyan University and Karl's wife Wendy. Rolf joined the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto in 1964 and continued his research and writing in social psychology after retiring in 1996. Rolf's work addressed a variety of topics concerning the individual in the social system. His articles and papers on the social psychology of test-taking, hypnosis, history, epistemology, methodology and the discipline of social psychology all reflected his dissatisfaction with the status quo combined with proposals for new directions. For more than 20 years he has worked with Linda A. WOOD (University of Guelph) on topics in language and social psychology (e.g., terms of address and politeness), and most recently on a book on discourse analysis. At the time of his death, he was working on a discursive critique of the 'Big Five' personality theory enterprise and on stories of his experiences growing up in Germany during the Second World War. Rolf also took great pleasure in teaching and greatly valued the opportunity to work for almost forty years with so many talented and enthusiastic students, both undergraduate and graduate. Rolf was privileged to have many long-lasting Friendships, and he was grateful for the encouragement, help and comfort given by so many, especially Bogna ANDERSSON, Eva and Fred BILD, Clare MacMARTIN and Bill MacKENZIE, Frances NEWMAN and Fred WEINSTEIN, Jesse NISHIHATA, Anne and Michael PETERS, Andrew and Judi WINSTON and Lorraine WOOD. We have also been sustained by the kindness of our neighbours on Walmer Road. We express our particular thanks and appreciation to family physician and friend, Dr. Christine LIPTAY. Our thanks go also to the staff of Princess Margaret Hospital, to the physicians and nurses of the Hospice Palliative Care Network Project, especially Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and nurses Francine BOHN, Joan DYKE, Dwyla HAMILTON, Lynda McKEE and Ella VAN HERREWEGHE, and to the nurses of St. Elizabeth, especially Liz LEADBEATER, Sylvia McCALLUM and Cecilia McPARLAND. Cremation was private. There will be an Open House for remembrance and celebration on Sunday, April 27th (3-7 p.m.), Monday, April 28th (4-8 p.m.) and Tuesday, April 29th (4-8 p.m.) at 98 Walmer Road, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2X7. Please direct any queries to Frances NEWMAN (416-351-0755.) In lieu of flowers, donations to Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care (700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z5) or Amnesty International would be appreciated.

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