CHODOSCH m@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2003-09-13 published
DEITCHER / PASTERNAK -- Dr. Joseph and Joyce DEITCHER and Ron and Robyn PASTERNAK are thrilled to announce the engagement of their children Elizabeth (Liz) to Ryan. Proud grand parents are Bernice CHODOSCH and Henry and Ruth DICKLER. Brothers and sisters Donna, Greg, Sean, Chantal, Eryn and nephew Noah say mazel tov!

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CHONG m@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2003-11-29 published
SPANOS / CHONG - Engagement Announcement
Jim and Dina SPANOS and Ed and Janet CHONG are pleased to announce the engagement of their children Nikki SPANOS and Norm CHONG.
All our love. Congratulations Nikki and Norm!

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CHOWN m@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-28 published
Jennifer KAPLAN and Philip CHOWN -- Match
By Judith TENENBAUM, Saturday, May 28, 2005, Page M6
Jennifer Mia KAPLAN didn't make it easy on Philip CHOWN.
Having been married once already, she was happily ensconced in 2002 with the only man of the house she was interested in: her son, Lucius, who lived with her in her landmark Ansonia condominium in New York.
She was wary of any relationship that would affect her family-oriented lifestyle, or her dedication to her career as a psychotherapist, so she resisted her Toronto relatives' matchmaking efforts. "With the aunties calling, and set-ups by cousins, I've had so many blind dates a friend said I should get a seeing-eye dog for free," Ms. KAPLAN, 41, quips.
Originally from Toronto, she'd always had her eye on New York, and in 1981 won a wager with her father, Robert KAPLAN, solicitor-general in the Trudeau era, by gaining admission to Grade 12 at the Dalton School, a prestigious private academy in Manhattan.
She went on to graduate from Sarah Lawrence College and Columbia University, where she obtained a merit scholarship, and settled into life in the Big Apple. She married, gave birth to Lucius, and became a U.S. citizen.
By 2002, she was single once again, and a prime target for her relatives, who persevered in the Yiddish matchmaking tradition despite her reluctance to date.
Mr. CHOWN, a graduate of the University of Victoria and director of foundations and major gifts for the University of British Columbia, was visiting his sister at her Toronto home when Ms. KAPLAN's brother -- dispatched by his wife Julie on a scouting mission -- turned up. "Jennifer's brother John came by my sister's house to meet me for 15 minutes... kind of an old-fashioned shtetl [Jewish community] set-up, to make sure I wasn't sinister," he says with a laugh.
The relatives approved, but when Mr. CHOWN visited New York in December of 2002, a contrary Ms. KAPLAN refused an invitation to dinner. "It seemed crazy to begin anything with someone across the country, and in another," she says.
A year later, her family was still trying to promote Mr. CHOWN. "You mean he's still single?" chirped a sarcastic Ms. KAPLAN to her sister-in-law. Julie KAPLAN upped the ante, drawing on her 14 years of marriage to Ms. KAPLAN's brother. "You know I've never asked you for anything, have I?" she implored. "Well, I'm asking."
Ms. KAPLAN finally gave in and agreed to a dinner date when Mr. CHOWN visited New York at the end of 2003.
For his part, Mr. CHOWN, 45, didn't have high expectations for the rendezvous either. He remembers a casual conversation with his dean at University of British Columbia, at which he expressed satisfaction with bachelorhood. "I'm happily a professional single. I've got my golf, yoga, a slate of nieces and nephews nicely distributed geographically and a social life," he recalls saying, never dreaming that only a couple of weeks later he would consider changing his marital status.
He suggested meeting Ms. KAPLAN on December 29 at Pastis, which just happened to be her favourite haunt.
"I put on my French bistro dress, got there before Phil, and waited at the bar," Ms. KAPLAN recalls. "I had no idea who my sister-in-law picked for me." She expected a serious, religious type and was pleasantly surprised by a hip Mr. CHOWN.
With a mutual affinity for Ashtanga yoga and their view of Judaism somewhere between sacrosanct and secular, they agreed to another date the next night. "That was the night I gave him the talk," Ms. KAPLAN says. "I was a serious person, knew about life and didn't get involved in anything that wasn't going to last."
A beguiled Mr. CHOWN didn't analyze or strategize. "I just accepted her," he says. " I saw the possibility of my life shifting in a huge way."
After only three dates, "I was making plans," Ms. KAPLAN says, "the very thing I said I'd never do. I thought, 'Either I'm having a psychotic break, or I'm falling in love.' "
Their transcontinental romance flourished and during Passover in April of 2004, Ms. KAPLAN hosted a New York cocktail party for Friends to introduce Mr. CHOWN.
That afternoon, when supposedly shopping for a baking sheet, he purchased a 300-year-old, pink sapphire engagement ring for Ms. KAPLAN. Unexpectedly, her intuitive father had flown in. "As the party was spinning out, I asked for his blessing," says Mr. CHOWN, who proposed after the guests left.
They set a wedding date for that November in Toronto, but had to stop the printing of the invitations on the presses when revised U.S. immigration laws scuttled their plans. If they married in Toronto, "Phil would have to stay a full year in Canada after the wedding," Ms. KAPLAN says. "I was ready to run into a brick wall if he couldn't come" to New York. Three lawyers and two pounds of paperwork corroborating their romance later, the couple got the go-ahead for a New York ceremony.
Ms. KAPLAN, who is passionate about grandiose, early 20th-century architecture, booked the entire first floor of the Romanesque revival Puck Building for her child-friendly, funky-formal wedding for 300. Six nannies stood at the ready with art supplies and pillows for forts for about 40 little ones. "I wanted people to enjoy what they wore, a tuxedo and jeans," she says.
On May 8, Rabbi Chezi ZION, who once declared with certitude that his friend Mr. CHOWN would never marry, wed the couple in an Orthodox service. The bride made the chuppah, the traditional Jewish wedding canopy, by hand out of violet silk chiffon, and many guests carried through her colour theme in their gowns as a surprise. Ms. KAPLAN wore a crocheted Irish gown, more than 200 years old, that she bought when she was only 19 and had stored since then in a silk pillowcase.
Mr. CHOWN continues his employment with University of British Columbia, telecommuting from a New York office. He has received the stamp of approval from Mrs. CHOWN's son Lucius, now 8, who confided to his uncle, "I want to thank you for introducing my mother to Philip and making her so happy."

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CHRETIEN m@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2003-10-17 published
Long marriage follows accidental meeting
City couple celebrates diamond anniversary
By Jonathon JACKSON, Sun Times Staff, page A3
Helen VERMILYEA remembers telling the minister of her church in Toronto that she had been married for six months and thinking that was a long time
He said that was not a particularly long time, telling her he had been married for 10 years.
That's not a long time either, at least not in the eyes of VERMILYEA and her husband Doug. Thursday was the Owen Sound couple's 60th wedding anniversary.
They celebrated a few days early, with a party last Saturday at Harrison Park. Most of their family was able to attend, filling the community centre beyond capacity.
"Some had to eat outside at the picnic tables, (the hall) was so full," Helen said.
Doug VERMILYEA and Helen McGREGOR met entirely by chance in about 1940. Doug, a native of Regina, was in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He was looking for a girl named Helen when he knocked on his future wife's door, unaware the girl he was looking for lived next door.
Helen, an Annan native who was working as a nurse at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, was captivated by the handsome serviceman. He came back the next day to invite her to church and they married about three years later near Annan, at the Johnson Presbyterian Church, which is no longer standing.
After a honeymoon near Bracebridge, she went back to Toronto and he went overseas. She came home after giving birth to the first of their six children and they were reunited after he left the air force in 1946.
"We bought a house from Helen's father and that's why we moved from Toronto up to Owen Sound," Doug said.
In Owen Sound, the VERMILYEAs owned Hatton Hall Catering for 33 years while Doug also worked at the RCA plant. After the factory closed in the mid-1970s, he went to work as a caretaker at the Knox church in Owen Sound, finally retiring at age 77.
"The time goes, raising a family. It was time consuming," said Doug, now 85. "You get old before you realize it, but we still don't feel old."
"I don't know where the time has gone," said Helen, also 85. "We've had a very very busy life."
It was during their career as caterers that they first heard of a couple who had been married for as long as 50 years. As she had done early in her marriage, Helen's commented it was a long time for a couple to have been married.
"1 thought that was wonderful, to have a couple married that long," she said.
The VERMILYEAs, who have 12 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren, are proud of the seven certificates they received in commemoration of their milestone anniversary. They're from Owen Sound Mayor Rick BEANEY, Bruce-Grey-Owen Sound Member of Provincial Parliament Bill MURDOCH and Member of Parliament Ovid JACKSON, Premier Ernie EVES, Prime Minister Jean CHRETIEN, Gov. Gen. Adrienne CLARKSON and Queen Elizabeth.
It's very special," Helen said.

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CHRÉTIEN m@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-11 published
Gay marriage is legalized
Ontario appeal court rewrites law, says couples must be given licences
Activists are ecstatic, Ottawa faces tight deadline to decide on appeal
KLEIN rejects ruling, says he'll invoke notwithstanding clause in Alberta
By Kirk MAKIN Justice Reporter; With reports from Mark HUME in Kelowna, and Canadian Press Wednesday, June 11, 2003 - Page A1
The exclusion of gays from the institution of marriage is illogical, offensive and unjustifiable, the Ontario Court of Appeal said yesterday in a historic judgment that makes same-sex marriages legal for the first time in Canada.
The ruling took effect immediately in Ontario -- two gay men were married yesterday in a Toronto court -- increasing the pressure on the federal government to consider legislation on same-sex unions or go to the Supreme Court. A decision on the latter option must be made by June 30.
Alberta Premier Ralph KLEIN boosted the stakes further, saying his province is not about to recognize same-sex marriages as legal, and will invoke the notwithstanding clause of the Constitution to override any court ruling recognizing a right to such marriages.
"If there is any move to sanctify and legalize same-sex marriages, we will use the notwithstanding clause, period, end of story," Mr. KLEIN said at the Western Premiers Conference in Kelowna, B.C.
The Ontario court methodically dismantled every argument made before it in support of heterosexual-only marriages. It refused even to permit a grace period for Ontario to bring its laws into conformity with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Courts in British Columbia and Quebec have also struck down marriage laws, but gave the governments time to rewrite their legislation.
The Ontario judges said denying same-sex marriage is tantamount to declaring homosexuals a lesser order of being, helping to perpetuate an impression that gays and lesbians are incapable of forming loving relationships.
"A purpose that demeans the dignity of same-sex couples is contrary to the values of a free and democratic society and cannot be pressing and substantial," said Chief Justice Roy McMURTRY, Mr. Justice James MacPHERSON and Madam Justice Eileen GILLESE.
"Same-sex couples are capable of forming long, lasting, loving and intimate relationships. A law that prohibits same-sex couples from marrying does not accord with the needs, capacities and circumstances of same-sex couples."
The judges ordered Toronto's city clerk and the provincial registrar-general to issue and accept marriage licences for two couples married under the Christian tradition of publication of banns in 2001 -- Joe VARNELL and Kevin BOURASSA; and Elaine and Anne VAUTOUR -- making them the first gay marriages in the country.
Henceforth, the court ordered the definition of marriage in Ontario to be "the voluntary union for life of two persons to the exclusion of all others."
The ruling was the culmination of decades of strategic prodding by gay couples, associations and legal activists. All were ecstatic yesterday over the strength of the Ontario ruling.
"This is why people come to Canada," said Michael LESHNER, who married his partner, Michael STARK, within hours of the ruling. "They marvel at our values. We have sent an unmistakable message that love can conquer all."
"It's a momentous day," said Kyle RAE, a gay Toronto city councillor. "It is a great day for equality in Canada."
A lawyer for the couples, Martha McCARTHY, predicted many more marriages in the days ahead, while the federal government ponders a possible appeal. "The more marriages we get, the more inevitable this is," she said in an interview. "The time to be right is ripe, as Martin Luther KING would say."
Courts in Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec have now overturned marriage laws. But the rulings in British Columbia and Quebec did not take effect immediately because they allowed governments until mid-2004 to redraft the laws.
A final clash is now possible before a Supreme Court of Canada bench that has steadily established a reputation for defending gay rights. The federal government has only until June 30 to decide whether to appeal the British Columbia ruling. The Liberal government is also expecting a report this week from a parliamentary committee examining same-sex marriage.
Prime Minister Jean CHRÉTIEN said yesterday Justice Minister Martin CAUCHON is looking at the judgment along with the other rulings, and said it is too early to know whether it will be appealed.
Mr. CAUCHON said Ottawa recognizes it must move quickly toward a "national solution" to the same-sex debate.
"We see the direction that the courts are taking now," Mr. CAUCHON said after a cabinet meeting. "I'm asking for a little bit of time to look at the decision and to come back with a statement."
The Ontario Court of Appeal was not in a mood for patience, and it was not willing to run the risk that provincial legislators would devise wording to circumvent their ruling.
"A temporary suspension allows a state of affairs that has been found to violate standards embodied in the Charter to persist for a time despite the violation," the court said.
It also pointed out that were it simply to render the entire law invalid, gay people would be vulnerable to the wrath of heterosexuals who found themselves temporarily denied the benefits of marriage.
The decision rested on the constitutional right to equality and emphasized the "dignity" of individuals.
Launched by eight same-sex couples, the litigation had targeted a common-law definition of marriage as a union between "one man and one woman." The couples won their challenge in Ontario's Divisional Court, but it, too, suspended its ruling for two years.
Yesterday, the Court of Appeal specifically rejected arguments that procreation is an integral pillar of marriage.
"Same-sex couples can choose to have children through adoption, surrogacy and donor insemination," the judges reasoned. "Importantly, procreation and child-rearing are not the only purposes of marriage, or the only reason why couples choose to marry. The opposite-sex requirement in marriage is not rationally connected to the encouragement of procreation and child-rearing."
They said government lawyers offered mere speculation instead of proof to show why the exclusion of same-sex marriages was a valid social objective -- and that the definition of marriage was far from a minimal infringement.
What Canadian think about gay issues
The Ontario Court of Appeal ruled yesterday that the right to marry should be extended to same-sex couples.
Recent surveys have produced the following results:
Do you support or oppose gay marriage?
Support Oppose
Males (18-34) 61.2% 33.9%
Females (18-34) 69.2% 22.2%
If the Supreme Court of Canada said that the federal government had to give gays and lesbians the right to be married, do you think that the government should or should not use its power to overrule the court's decision?
Should Should not
The Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees equal rights for women and ethnic and religious minorities and other groups. In your opinion, should the Charter also guarantee rights for gays and lesbians?
Yes No
Note: Graphic does not include respondents who did not know or who refused to answer.
source: Centre For Research And Information On Canada

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CHRISTIANSEN m@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-01 published
Anna Ruth CHRISTIANSEN and Paul Charlton DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS -- Match
By Judith TENENBAUM, Page M6
After hosting a pool party in the summer of 2003, Joanie SKINNER persistently nudged her divorced brother-in-law, Paul DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS, toward her neighbour, tall, blond, beautiful Anna CHRISTIANSEN, a divorcée who was happily raising daughters Corrine and Vanessa, now 15 and 13. Ms. SKINNER would invite Ms. CHRISTIANSEN to her soirees, then insist that a genial Mr. DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS escort her on the brief trek home. "Joanie wanted us to hook up, and it got to the point where I was even checking out plumbing in Anna's basement," he laughs.
When Ms. CHRISTIANSEN, who is now 44, downsized from an unmanageable large home and was selling off her furniture, she recalls the furtive glances they exchanged. "Paul came over, stood in the doorway with his girlfriend -- and was uncomfortable because dating wasn't an option at the time."
A year and a half later, free of other relationships, they finally began to see each other, somehow avoiding Ms. SKINNER's radar until October, 2004, when their incandescent glow at the birthday party of Mr. DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS's niece provided evidence that the mission had been accomplished. "Anna walks into a room, and lights up the place. My Friends call her exotic. She has a great sense of humour and is always smiling," a beaming Mr. DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS explains, before going on to describe himself as "a 200-pound, 6-foot-2 inch guy who looks like a Mafia hit man."
Ms. CHRISTIANSEN, in contrast, characterizes Mr. DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS, who had no children of his own, as "gentle, kind-hearted and easygoing," and delights in the fact he has a great relationship with her daughters. When the two girls chose to experience living with their remarried father in his new home, Ms. CHRISTIANSEN was "crushed." But Mr. DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS's support helped her adapt to weekend parenting. "Now I know what it's like for a dad -- but I probably see them more than I did, because it is every weekend. We go shopping, have fun, and they enjoy fine dining," she explains.
An honours graduate of Halton Business Institute, and also a graduate of design at Humber and Fanshawe Colleges, Ms. CHRISTIANSEN has interests that are more vroom than Vogue. "I was raised on the water, always had a boat and can carry on a conversation about cars and boat motors…" she notes. Employed in the family business, Bronte Outer Harbour Marina, she was "tired of doing the boy thing all my life," so in 2002 she took on supervisory responsibilities at the marina's new conference centre.
A branch manager for Yellow Transportation, Mr. DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS, 43, shares her interest in all things automotive, and he is particularly dazzled by the 1958 Biarritz convertible in her parents' collection of 65 classic cars.
In March, 2005, still feeling the effects of an earlier car accident, Ms. CHRISTIANSEN required spinal surgery. Mr. DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS was panicked by the attendant risk, but obliged her by going to work: "I called the hospital every five seconds, until I was told not to call. My heart was broken. I was on edge -- I thought what would I do if I didn't have her?"
By September, he was determined to merge their destinies. Home from work one day, she was greeted by her pug Lucy (who had a diamond ring affixed to her dog collar), champagne on ice and Mr. DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS, anxious to pledge his troth.
"We didn't want to put everyone through a second marriage and thought we'd just elope," she says. But plans for a Vegas/Elvis nuptial package were vetoed by elder daughter Corrine. "I've been through seven years of your being divorced and dating, and I want to be in your wedding!" she insisted.
At the Harbour Banquet and Conference Centre, on February 25, in a candlelit ceremony before 90 formally attired guests, the pair were married by Rev. Bethany BEATTY- CHIRE to the accompaniment of a harp and violin quartet. With "feet on the ground," Mrs. DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS says, "we get it more than the younger ones do."

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CHRISTIE m@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-07 published
SALOMAA / CHRISTIE -- Engagement Announcement
Ivan and Jacquie CHRISTIE are pleased to announce the engagement of their son Warren to Sonya SALOMAA, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. SALOMAA, Calgary, Alberta. Love and Best Wishes from Mum and Dad, sister Jannine JENKEN and her husband Dan. Niece Rachael, nephews Cole and Matthew JENKEN. Also sister Natalie and nephew Nicholas DEANS.

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CHRISTIE m@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-07 published
SALOMAA / CHRISTIE -- Engagement Announcement
Ivan and Jacquie CHRISTIE are pleased to announce the engagement of their son Warren to Sonya SALOMAA, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. SALOMAA, Calgary, Alberta. Love and Best Wishes from Mum and Dad, sister Jannine JENKEN and her husband Dan. Niece Rachael, nephews Cole and Matthew JENKEN. Also sister Natalie and nephew Nicholas DEANS.

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CHUDY m@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-27 published
Naomi Malka SHUPAK and Mark DRIMAN -- Match:
By Judith TENENBAUM, Saturday, August 27, 2005, Page M4
Born just nine days apart and together since they were teens, the only thing Naomi Malka SHUPAK and Mark DRIMAN seem to be at odds about is how they met. "I remember distinctly being introduced to her on the beach my first year at [Timberlane] summer camp," Mr. DRIMAN says. Ms. SHUPAK, on the other hand, says she didn't notice her future husband until 10th grade at the Community Hebrew Academy of Toronto.
But since the pair's first official outing -- to their Grade 10 prom -- they have been exclusive. "I don't really know anything about dating, because I never really dated," admits Ms. SHUPAK, 25. "But I don't feel at all like I'm missing out."
After graduating from Community Hebrew Academy of Toronto in 1998, he did a year at Thornlea Secondary School, while Ms. SHUPAK began studying at York University. The following year, they both enrolled at the University of Western Ontario in London.
Mr. DRIMAN graduated with an honours degree in business administration and was awarded the University of Western Ontario Scholarship of Distinction in 2000. Ms. SHUPAK completed first a B. Sc. in psychology, then an M. Sc. in medical biophysics and won both the University of Western Ontario Chancellor's Prize in Social Science and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Canada Graduate Scholarship in 2003, as well as several other research awards.
Despite hard work at school, the couple did find time to spend with Friends, attend charity balls and participate in a memorable, and moving, tour called March of the Living, which brings Jewish youth from all over the world to Auschwitz and Birkenau on Holocaust Memorial Day and then to Israel for Independence Day.
Upon graduation, the couple were separated again when Mr. DRIMAN took a position as an investment banker at Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce in Toronto. On weekends, Ms. SHUPAK, still at University of Western Ontario, visited him, and he spared her the lonely schlep home by accompanying her back to London on Sunday evenings. On Monday, he would wake up early and whistle back to the city on the train just in time for work.
On March 18, 2004, on the eve of Ms. SHUPAK's master's dissertation, Mr. DRIMAN made their separation that much easier -- by bringing her an engagement ring. "I think we have known forever that we wanted to get married," Mr. DRIMAN says. "All the things that happen in life, the big steps -- moving away to go to university, going on your first trip without your parents, graduating, moving out, milestones in one's life -- we've been through them together."
Mr. DRIMAN has been helping Ms. SHUPAK with yet another milestone. Following in the footsteps of her father, aunt and uncle, Ms. SHUPAK is currently studying medicine at the University of Toronto. To keep her at her best, Mr. DRIMAN provides some "chicken soup for the fiancée." Says Ms. SHUPAK: "On many occasions, he'd come from work to prepare a meal while I was studying for exams and then return for what could result in extremely late nights for him at the office."
The two were wed on July 10 at Adath Israel Congregation, with Rabbi David C. SEED officiating. Included in the wedding party was four-month-old Madeline Anne, the bride's niece, who was carried down the aisle by her parents Debbie and Marc BAKER. The bridesmaids held rose bouquets, each in a different hue of pink. The bride wore a strapless dress adorned with crystals and pearls, designed by Jim Helm, underneath a bolero jacket.
The celebration was not without some sadness. Ms. SHUPAK's grandmother passed away in January. "They had talked on the phone many times a day," Mr. DRIMAN says. In tribute, the ceremony was performed with her wedding ring and the bride wore her heirloom pearl earrings, complemented by a pearl necklace from the bridegroom's grandmother, Ray CHUDY.
Under the chuppa, the bride symbolically circled her bridegroom seven times. This tradition is said to represent creativity (the earth being created in seven days) and a sevenfold bond between the couple and their families. Now, the two just need to agree on their own creation story.

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CHUNG m@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-08 published
Christine CHO and Jamie PARK -- Match:
By Judith TENENBAUM, Page M4
For Christine CHO and Jamie PARK a platonic test cruise soon had their transmissions in overdrive.
They met at church, where she played softball on a co-ed team that he coached. Eventually they became part of a group that explored the Toronto scene.
On Valentine's Day, 2002, their paradigm tilted. "About four of us were all single at the time and decided that we'd hang out, have a nice dinner and enjoy each other's company," recalls Ms. CHO.
The following day when the pair, who rarely chatted on MSN, connected, she confessed that as a girlfriend she would be difficult -- high maintenance, and with lofty expectations. Risking a wounded ego but looking for validation, Mr. PARK suggested a week-long experiment, in which he "would play her boyfriend."
Despite misgivings about spoiling a great Friendship, Ms. CHO agreed: "Both mature adults, we'd test the waters and wouldn't tell any of our Friends. Because if we broke up they might feel awkward having to choose sides."
Early that summer, Mr. PARK recalls, "I meant to say I like you," but instead his heart spoke, "I love you." Two weeks of torment ensued as Ms. CHO pondered her response. "I didn't want to say it unless I really meant it," she explains, adding, "Jamie was extremely patient, understanding and concerned with my being happy."
Born in Etobicoke, Ms. CHO, who is a prodigious violinist with virtuoso potential, exhibits many exceptional attributes. She was Canada's representative in the Miss World competition in 2000, and as the first woman of Asian descent to win the Miss Canada International title in 2001 she was feted here and in Korea.
After an honours B.A. in English from the University of Toronto, she considered a masters degree, but pursued a certificate to teach English as a second language instead. "Teaching new adult immigrants made me more appreciative of being Canadian and the immigrant struggle."
Meanwhile, when her mother began O'Happy Day Daycare, Ms. CHO again switched direction and became its administrator. Accustomed to rendering support to family enterprises, she observes: "You plan your future, but you have to be flexible."
A financial planner at Scotia McLeod, born in Korea and with a Bachelor degree in Science from York University, Mr. PARK, 35, says, "I knew Christine before and after she ran for the pageants. It was an accomplishment for her, her family and the Korean community, but never a deciding issue as to why I was attracted to her." Their philosophical interconnectedness includes respect for their Korean heritage, faith as their bedrock and volunteering at Mil Al Church and the Woodgreen Red Door Shelter.
Playing on her empathy for the underdog, Mr. PARK concocted a tale about sharing a lonely friend's birthday, luring Ms. CHO to a table set for four at the Fairmont Royal York's Epic restaurant on June 10, 2005. Asked to critique the spelling on the birthday card, which included the question "Will you marry me!," she noted he'd used an exclamation mark in lieu of a question mark -- and then accepted the proposal.
On May 20 at Garden Korean Church, personal vows were exchanged before Rev. Danny CHUNG. "It was a good exercise to think about why you are marrying and what you promise. It wasn't just to ourselves but to God, as well," says the bride, 27, who designed her ivory lace gown and the yellow silk charmeuse bridesmaids dresses.
After a luncheon at the Mandarin restaurant, dinner at Kleinberg's Copper Creek Golf Club was revved up by the Lady Kane band and surprise pyrotechnics. "Initially, we both thought that it wouldn't work. But when a relationship is meant to be, a lot of things just fall into the right place," says Mr. PARK.

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CHURCH m@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-10-14 published
BOLTON / TUSTIN -- Forthcoming Marriage
It is with great pleasure that Connie BOLTON, daughter of Fred BOLTON and the late Janice BOLTON, and Derek TUSTIN, the son of Vera CHURCH and step-son to Robert CHURCH announce their forthcoming marrige on Saturday, October 28, 2006 in Claremont. May they have a lifetime of happiness together.

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CHUTE m@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2003-02-14 published
Engagement - BAXTER / BOGART
Mr. and Mrs. Brian BAXTER and Mrs. Ruth CHUTE, would like to announce the engagement of Cindy BAXTER and Tim BOGART.
The wedding is to take place, June 14, 2003. We wish you all the happiness you deserve.
Love Mom and Dad.

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CHWIECKO m@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2003-04-12 published
Wladyslaw and Anastazja CHWIECKO, 50th Anniversary
April 18th, 2003.
With Gods blessing, we celebrate this Golden Wedding Anniversary. Congratulations and best wishes from all your Friends and family including Richard and Lorraine, and Aleksy, Andrzej, Alyssa, and Henry and Michelle, and Barbara and Arthur, and Adam, Brandon, Brittany, Brianna.

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CHWIECKO m@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2003-08-23 published
VAN BOMMEL / CHWIECKO
Joe and Joey VAN BOMMEL and Chester and Krystyna CHWIECKO are pleased to announce the marriage of their children Jennifer and Mark. The wedding took place at St. George Catholic Church on May 31, 2003.
Your family and Friends wish you the very best.

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CHWIECKO m@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-03 published
CHWIECKO, Chester and Krystyna - Happy 40th Anniversary
September 4th, 1965 Love Mark and Jennifer, Andrew and Linda, Robert and Amanda, and your grandchildren.

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