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"RO" 1890-1899 Obituary


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ROBB o@ca.on.muskoka_district.huntsville_forester 1895-03-22 published
ROBB Mr Thomas page 2
indexed 1998 at Huntsville Public Library

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ROBINS o@ca.on.wellington_county.arthur.mount_forest 1898 published
d@us.il.cook.chicago 1898
ROBINS Jane Esther died 1898
contact OGS Wellington County Branch for newspaper reference

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.daily_free_press 1898-03-24 published
A Clergyman's Funeral
The Remains of Reverend Dr. SANDERSON Interred in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery
A Public Service was held in the First Methodist Church Where Many Clergymen and Others Assembled to Pay Their Last Tribute of Respect -- Eminent Divines Speak of the Work of the Deceased Many Floral Tributes -- Relatives Present from Distant Places
The remains of the late Reverend George R. SANDERSON, D.D., were interred in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon. At 2 o'clock a private service was held at the family residence on Wolfe street, Reverend George JACKSON, Chairman of the London District officiating, and Reverend Dr. DANIEL, Reverend J.G. SCOTT, of Guelph; Reverend James KENNEDY, Reverend A.G. HARRIS and Reverend E.B. LANCELEY, of this city, assisting. The public service was held at the First Methodist Church at 3 o'clock, Reverend Stephen BOND, of Seaforth, President of the London Conference in charge.
The attendance at the funeral included many old and warm Friends of the deceased, among them being a number of clergymen from distant points. The relatives were -- Reverend Fred. H. SANDERSON, Omaha Neb., son of deceased; George R. SANDERSON, Des Moines, Ia., son; and Mr. and Mrs. Atwell FLEMING/FLEMMING, Toronto, son-in-law and daughter respectively of deceased.
Mrs. HOWELL, the eldest daughter of the late clergyman, of Des Moines, was unable to reach London in time for the funeral. There were two sets of pall-bearers -- an active set, composed of laymen, and an honorary set, composed of clergymen, as follows: -- Laymen Messers. George ROBINSON, R.J.C. DAWSON, John GREEN, Thomas McCORMICK, Samuel McBRIDE and Sam W. ABBOTT. Clergymen -- Rev. Dr. HENDERSON, Berlin; Reverend Dr. PARKER, Toronto; Reverend Dr. GRIFFIN, Toronto; Chancellor BURWASH, Victoria University, Toronto; Dr. James HANNON, Stratford; and Reverend E. HOLMES representing the London Conference.
Among the clergymen in attendance were Chancellor BURWASH, of Victoria University, Toronto; Dr. BURNS, of Hamilton; Dr. GRIFFIN, Toronto, treasurer of the superannuation fund, and an acquaintance of Dr. SANDERSON for half a century and an intimate friend for forty years; Reverend Dean INNES and Reverend Robert JOHNSTON, representing the Western Ontario Bible Society, the former in the place of His Lordship the Bishop of Huron, who was unable to attend; Dr. W.R. PARKER, Toronto; Mr. WOODSWORTH, Woodstock; Dr. J.V. SMITH, Hamilton; Dr. HANNON, Stratford; J.E. HOLMES, Mount [...]; W.G.H. McALLASTER, Watford; John HENDERSON, Shedden; R. REDMOND, of Dorchester; T.W.J. BLATCHFORD and [...] Lambeth; R.J. GARLAND, Birc[...]; W.W. SHEPPARD, [...] Dr. HENDERSON, Berlin; J.W. HOLMES, Mitchell; George RICHARDSON, Ingersoll; Jasper WILSON, Strathroy John LEARDYD, St. Mary's; W. RIPLEY, Blyth; J.W. PEDLEY, R. HOBBS, A.G. HARRIS, Bill MIDDLETON , Dr. Daniel E.B. LANCELEY, G.B. SAGE, W.J. CLARK, Canon RICHARDSON, J.H. MOORHOUSE, A.L. RUSSELL, W.J. FORD, George JACKSON, Canon SMITH, J.H. ORME, city; and Rev. B. CLEMENT, Clinton.
The service at the church was very impressive, a large congregation assembling to pay a last tribute of respect to one who for sixty years had been a faithful worker in the cause of Methodism in Canada. As the casket was carried up the aisle, Mr. J.T. WALCOTT, played Beethoven's funeral march, and when the congregation was seated, a quartette, composed of Messers. W.T. STENBERG and George HAYES, and Mrs. HARVEY and Miss Inez SMITH, sang Ogden's beautiful composition, "Gathering Home." The congregation sang "Oh God, Our Help in Ages Past," and "Almighty Maker of My Frame," and Rev. Dr. PARKER of Toronto, read appropriate passages of Scripture from John 14 and I. Corinthians 15. Dean INNES was the first speaker called upon, and he read a copy of a resolution adopted at a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Western Ontario Bible Society, held on Tuesday afternoon. The resolution was as follows: --
"Resolved, that the Board of the Western Ontario Bible Society place on record their deep sense of loss in the death of the late Reverend George R. SANDERSON, D.D., senior vice-president of the society. During many years the deceased had taken a most active part in the work of the society. No object was dearer to his heart than the circulation of the Bible throughout every part of the inhabitable globe. While they grieve over the loss of a beloved colleague, they rejoice in his long and useful Christian life, and in the progress he was permitted in his more than fourscore years to witness in the Christian development of Canada, the conquering march of worldwide missions, and the almost universal diffusion of the Holy Scriptures. The directors with pleasure recall the fact that the year 1897 was taken advantage of by the society to present their late associate with a jubilee copy of the Bible, as an appropriate mark of their affectionate regard.
"And further resolved, that the President of the Western Ontario Bible Society, the Bishop of Huron, and Reverend Robt. JOHNSTON be requested to represent the society at the funeral."
Dean INNES said he could add nothing as to the high estimation in which the deceased brother was held.
Rev. Robt. JOHNSTON, the second representative of the Bible Society, said his acquaintance with the Reverend Dr. SANDERSON was brief. "I knew him as one who loved the Bible," continued the speaker, "because he knew it, because he found it a source of comfort and strength in all times. His sympathies were broader than any one denomination. His heart was too great to be limited by any one denominational line. He loved all churches, and above all that work which he found so pleasant -- the spreading of the Gospel throughout the world. He had the joy of seeing the almost universal spread of the Bible and the translation of it into nearly all tongues. When he commenced his ministry only a very small portion of that work was accomplished, but during his many years his sympathies were with the society, and during the last few years in particular he proved a source of great strength. He seemed to devote himself more earnestly than ever to the society during the last four or five years. No member was more regular in his attendance, and the directors feel that they have lost one whose sympathies they were always sure of, and whose heart was so much in the cause. Earth is the poorer by his removal, but heaven is richer."
Chancellor BURWASH, of Victoria University, paid an eloquent tribute to the departed. "There is something very impressive," he said, "in the thought of a long life such as that which has just closed, stretching over fourscore years and being a personal witness of so many wonderful things in the world's history, in the history of the country, and in the history of our church. Sixty-two years ago, when our college was opened at Coburg, George R. SANDERSON, Stephen MILES and James SPENCER were among the first students whom Dr. RITCHIE met as Principal of the college. In beginning his work there, Dr. SANDERSON was a lad of twenty years, just in the beginning of his religious life, and he took to preparing himself for the life of usefulness to which God had called him, and which stretched out so far into the coming years -- much further than he could know. The necessities of work then were so pressing and there were so few young men to occupy the fields opening up on every hand, that after the brief year of college life, Dr. SANDERSON was taken, according to the custom of the day, and sent out in connection with the other two men I have just mentioned to commence his work as an itinerant in the ministry. That was two years before I was born. My first acquaintance with him was in 1851, when after service as editor of the Christian Guardian for four years, he was appointed to the college station at Coburg. In the following year under that pastorate the blessed light of divine love and mercy came to my own soul, and in the next year his labors in Coburg were crowned with the greatest and most wonderful success. In company with Rev. Dr. CARMAN, the general superintendent, Reverend Dr. RYCKMAN, well-known in this as well as other conferences, who has filled out so long and honored a ministry, and nearly 100 other college students I was received into the Methodist Church and then I received my first ticket signed with the name of George R. SANDERSON. That ticket I preserve to this day, as a memento of one of those points in human life which the man who has felt the power of divine love cannot think of without emotion. For forty years the doctor was a member of the Board of Regents of our college, and I think no other man was as long and intimately an occupant of that position as he. For many years he was the secretary, and took an active part in the efforts and struggles connected with the college's progress in those years. But perhaps the most characteristic thing I can remember was that wonderful success in [...] during his ministry -- not only at Coburg and amongst the young [...] were far from being amenable, but in Port Hope, in Belleville, in Picton, and other places I have very distinct recollections of the great number gathered into the church and saved as a result of his proclamation of the gospel. A long life of this kind witnesses: wonderful changes. Dr. SANDERSON entered the world when Methodism was small, when the numbers in church membership were counted by the few thousands, and when the entire following did not amount to more than fifty thousand in this country. Now when he passes away, the membership is numbered by the hundreds of thousands, by more than a quarter of a million. He passes away from a people whose churches stand every-[...] and the Pacific; he passes away, having witnesses: a growth of and extension of the Church of God that was beyond the hope of any person when he commenced. Nearly all upon whose faces I look were boys when he was grown and busy in the work, and upon us rests a responsibility such as we may well remember and pray for grace that we may discharge it as well as he who has gone."
Rev. Dr. BURNS of Hamilton; spoke as one of the boys referred to by Chancellor BURWASH, although his head was whiter. His earliest recollections of the Methodist Church were associated with Dr. SANDERSON. "He was one of the first preachers I knew," said Dr. BURNS, "and I am glad he was, for I do not think any young man could get a false impression of Christianity from him. He always had a pleasant smile and a grip of the hand for the boys in the fifties. I will never forget him." Dr. BURNS could bring up nothing of an unpleasant character in his long recollections of Dr. SANDERSON, who was a child of God and as broad as the Church of Christ. It was a blessed thing to have an intimate acquaintance with such a man as Dr. SANDERSON. The whole family of God suffered a loss by his departure.
Rev. Dr. GRIFFIN, of Toronto, whose acquaintance with Dr. SANDERSON extended over a larger number of years and was more intimate than that of any other clergyman present, was the last speaker, and when he was called upon he said he thought in coming to the funeral he would be dealt with as relative, almost as one of the family; that he would sit silently and listen to whatever might be said relative to the character and the history of his dear old friend. Dr, GRIFFIN thought he was about the last of that great army -- not great in numbers -- that regiment of grand old men which did so much for the country and so much for the church. He was associated with Dr. RYERSON, Wm. RYERSON, Edgar RYERSON, James ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, Dr. RICE, Dr. NELLES, Richard JONES, and he was a man as worthy to carry any titles the church might give as any of those who received them. It was a great number of these excellent men -- Henry Wilkinson, Lewis Warner and others whose names would occur to the elder members of the congregation -- with whom Dr. SANDERSON was associated, who laid the foundations of the church so deep and broad through the length and breath of the Dominion. These were an extraordinary class of men, and those who succeeded them could only try to be as good, for they would make a mistake if they tried to be as great. Those men, Dr. GRIFFIN felt assured, were endowed with extraordinary gifts for the extraordinary times in which they labored and lived. He believed that a man's heart and soul should be larger than his creed, and he believed that Dr. SANDERSON's was. He thought nevertheless, that Dr. SANDERSON's was thoroughly and intensely, and always Methodist. He did not lose sight at all of events in his own denomination, nor have any less regard for his own church. Ne was a Methodist. He believed in Methodist doctrines he believed in the Methodist discipline, and he did as much as any other man to make them. The church was indebted first to John Ryerson more than to any other man, perhaps, for framing the book of discipline, but in its remodelling in many particulars could be seen the impress of the hand of Dr. SANDERSON. He (Dr. SANDERSON) loved the itineracy, as he believed it was essential, and that it was a system with which the church would not part. The church had grown to be the strongest in the Dominion, and it was owing to the itineracy as much as to any other part of the government of the church. Dr. SANDERSON was a preacher whose voice never failed, but up to the last was full, round and strong. He hated the modern methods called "sensational preaching," for he had a conservative nature, and was careful and anxious to preserve the church in its purity and integrity, and he believed that if the story of the Cross and the doctrine of Redemption were preached there would be no need to resort to methods adopted in modern times to fill the churches. His work was prosperous. The membership of the church was increased in every particular wherever he was appointed to labor. This was the case wherever he was found. The Christian Guardian was never a more powerful witness for the truth than when it was edited by Dr. SANDERSON. In the management of the book establishment in Toronto he was successful. "And during all these long years that I had the unspeakable privilege, the invaluable privilege of associating with the late Geo. R. SANDERSON, I never heard a censorious word from his lips," concluded Dr. GRIFFIN, "never heard unkind criticisms of his brethren, never heard anything but respect, good will to all. Now my brother has gone. He has gone to his reward, and lives in the presence of God."
The remains were then conveyed to the Mt. Pleasant, where a brief service was conducted by Reverend Dr. DANIEL. Many floral tributes were placed on the casket. Mr. and Mrs. George ROBINSON sent a pillow; Dr. and Mrs. ECCLES, ferns and spray; John W. POCOCK, cross; Sir John and Lady CARLING, cross; Mrs. WILSON, New York, pillow and cross; Mrs. J.C. HAZARD, spray; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. T. MANN, spray; Miss SANDERSON's Sunday school class, scythe and sheaf; Mrs. J.H. FLOCK, spray, and a pillow from the family.
Mr. John T. STEPHENSON, the well-known funeral director of Dundas St., had charge of the obsequies.
Page 5

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.daily_free_press 1898-03-24 published
A Clergyman's Funeral
The Remains of Reverend Dr. SANDERSON Interred in Mount Pleasant Cemetery
A Public Service was held in the First Methodist Church Where Many Clergymen and Others Assembled to Pay Their Last Tribute of Respect -- Eminent Divines Speak of the Work of the Deceased Many Floral Tributes -- Relatives Present from Distant Places
The remains of the late Reverend George R. SANDERSON, D. D., were interred in Mount Pleasant Cemetery at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon. At 2 o'clock a private service was held at the family residence on Wolfe street, Reverend George JACKSON, Chairman of the London District officiating, and Reverend Dr. DANIEL, Reverend J.G. SCOTT, of Guelph, Reverend James KENNEDY, Reverend A.G. HARRIS and Reverend E.B. LANCELEY, of this city, assisting. The public service was held at the First Methodist Church at 3 o'clock, Reverend Stephen BOND, of Seaforth, President of the London Conference in charge.
The attendance at the funeral included many old and warm Friends of the deceased, among them being a number of clergymen from distant points. The relatives were -- Reverend Fred. H. SANDERSON, Omaha Neb., son of deceased, George R. SANDERSON, Des Moines, Ia., son, and Mr. and Mrs. Atwell FLEMING/FLEMMING, Toronto, son-in-law and daughter respectively of deceased.
Mrs. HOWELL, the eldest daughter of the late clergyman, of Des Moines, was unable to reach London in time for the funeral. There were two sets of pall-bearers -- an active set, composed of laymen, and an honorary set, composed of clergymen, as follows: -- Laymen Messers. George ROBINSON, R.J.C. DAWSON, John GREEN, Thomas McCORMICK, Samuel McBRIDE and Sam W. ABBOTT. Clergymen -- Rev. Dr. HENDERSON, Berlin, Reverend Dr. PARKER, Toronto, Reverend Dr. GRIFFIN, Toronto, Chancellor BURWASH, Victoria University, Toronto, Dr. James HANNON, Stratford, and Reverend E. HOLMES representing the London Conference.
Among the clergymen in attendance were Chancellor BURWASH, of Victoria University, Toronto, Dr. BURNS, of Hamilton, Dr. GRIFFIN, Toronto, treasurer of the superannuation fund, and an acquaintance of Dr. SANDERSON for half a century and an intimate friend for forty years, Reverend Dean INNES and Reverend Robert JOHNSTON, representing the Western Ontario Bible Society, the former in the place of His Lordship the Bishop of Huron, who was unable to attend, Dr. W.R. PARKER, Toronto, Mr. WOODSWORTH, Woodstock, Dr. J.V. SMITH, Hamilton, Dr. HANNON, Stratford, J.E. HOLMES, Mount [...], W.G.H. McALLASTER, Watford, John HENDERSON, Shedden, R. REDMOND, of Dorchester, T.W.J. BLATCHFORD and [...] Lambeth, R.J. GARLAND, Birc[...], W.W. SHEPPARD, [...] Dr. HENDERSON, Berlin, J.W. HOLMES, Mitchell, George RICHARDSON, Ingersoll, Jasper WILSON, Strathroy, John LEARDYD, St. Mary's, W. RIPLEY, Blyth, J.W. PEDLEY, R. HOBBS, A.G. HARRIS, Bill MIDDLETON , Dr. Daniel E.B. LANCELEY, G.B. SAGE, W.J. CLARK, Canon RICHARDSON, J.H. MOORHOUSE, A.L. RUSSELL, W.J. FORD, George JACKSON, Canon SMITH, J.H. ORME, city, and Rev. B. CLEMENT, Clinton.
The service at the church was very impressive, a large congregation assembling to pay a last tribute of respect to one who for sixty years had been a faithful worker in the cause of Methodism in Canada. As the casket was carried up the aisle, Mr. J.T. WALCOTT, played Beethoven's funeral march, and when the congregation was seated, a quartette, composed of Messers. W.T. STENBERG and George HAYES, and Mrs. HARVEY and Miss Inez SMITH, sang Ogden's beautiful composition, "Gathering Home." The congregation sang "Oh God, Our Help in Ages Past," and "Almighty Maker of My Frame," and Rev. Dr. PARKER of Toronto, read appropriate passages of Scripture from John 14 and I. Corinthians 15. Dean INNES was the first speaker called upon, and he read a copy of a resolution adopted at a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Western Ontario Bible Society, held on Tuesday afternoon. The resolution was as follows: --
"Resolved, that the Board of the Western Ontario Bible Society place on record their deep sense of loss in the death of the late Reverend George R. SANDERSON, D.D., senior vice-president of the society. During many years the deceased had taken a most active part in the work of the society. No object was dearer to his heart than the circulation of the Bible throughout every part of the inhabitable globe. While they grieve over the loss of a beloved colleague, they rejoice in his long and useful Christian life, and in the progress he was permitted in his more than fourscore years to witness in the Christian development of Canada, the conquering march of worldwide missions, and the almost universal diffusion of the Holy Scriptures. The directors with pleasure recall the fact that the year 1897 was taken advantage of by the society to present their late associate with a jubilee copy of the Bible, as an appropriate mark of their affectionate regard.
"And further resolved, that the President of the Western Ontario Bible Society, the Bishop of Huron, and Reverend Robt. JOHNSTON be requested to represent the society at the funeral."
Dean INNES said he could add nothing as to the high estimation in which the deceased brother was held.
Rev. Robt. JOHNSTON, the second representative of the Bible Society, said his acquaintance with the Reverend Dr. SANDERSON was brief. "I knew him as one who loved the Bible," continued the speaker, "because he knew it, because he found it a source of comfort and strength in all times. His sympathies were broader than any one denomination. His heart was too great to be limited by any one denominational line. He loved all churches, and above all that work which he found so pleasant -- the spreading of the Gospel throughout the world. He had the joy of seeing the almost universal spread of the Bible and the translation of it into nearly all tongues. When he commenced his ministry only a very small portion of that work was accomplished, but during his many years his sympathies were with the society, and during the last few years in particular he proved a source of great strength. He seemed to devote himself more earnestly than ever to the society during the last four or five years. No member was more regular in his attendance, and the directors feel that they have lost one whose sympathies they were always sure of, and whose heart was so much in the cause. Earth is the poorer by his removal, but heaven is richer."
Chancellor BURWASH, of Victoria University, paid an eloquent tribute to the departed. "There is something very impressive," he said, "in the thought of a long life such as that which has just closed, stretching over fourscore years and being a personal witness of so many wonderful things in the world's history, in the history of the country, and in the history of our church. Sixty-two years ago, when our college was opened at Coburg, George R. SANDERSON, Stephen MILES and James SPENCER were among the first students whom Dr. RITCHIE met as Principal of the college. In beginning his work there, Dr. SANDERSON was a lad of twenty years, just in the beginning of his religious life, and he took to preparing himself for the life of usefulness to which God had called him, and which stretched out so far into the coming years -- much further than he could know. The necessities of work then were so pressing and there were so few young men to occupy the fields opening up on every hand, that after the brief year of college life, Dr. SANDERSON was taken, according to the custom of the day, and sent out in connection with the other two men I have just mentioned to commence his work as an itinerant in the ministry. That was two years before I was born. My first acquaintance with him was in 1851, when after service as editor of the Christian Guardian for four years, he was appointed to the college station at Coburg. In the following year under that pastorate the blessed light of divine love and mercy came to my own soul, and in the next year his labors in Coburg were crowned with the greatest and most wonderful success. In company with Rev. Dr. CARMAN, the general superintendent, Reverend Dr. RYCKMAN, well-known in this as well as other conferences, who has filled out so long and honored a ministry, and nearly 100 other college students I was received into the Methodist Church and then I received my first ticket signed with the name of George R. SANDERSON. That ticket I preserve to this day, as a memento of one of those points in human life which the man who has felt the power of divine love cannot think of without emotion. For forty years the doctor was a member of the Board of Regents of our college, and I think no other man was as long and intimately an occupant of that position as he. For many years he was the secretary, and took an active part in the efforts and struggles connected with the college's progress in those years. But perhaps the most characteristic thing I can remember was that wonderful success in [...] during his ministry -- not only at Coburg and amongst the young [...] were far from being amenable, but in Port Hope, in Belleville, in Picton, and other places I have very distinct recollections of the great number gathered into the church and saved as a result of his proclamation of the gospel. A long life of this kind witnesses: wonderful changes. Dr. SANDERSON entered the world when Methodism was small, when the numbers in church membership were counted by the few thousands, and when the entire following did not amount to more than fifty thousand in this country. Now when he passes away, the membership is numbered by the hundreds of thousands, by more than a quarter of a million. He passes away from a people whose churches stand every-[...] and the Pacific, he passes away, having witnesses: a growth of and extension of the Church of God that was beyond the hope of any person when he commenced. Nearly all upon whose faces I look were boys when he was grown and busy in the work, and upon us rests a responsibility such as we may well remember and pray for grace that we may discharge it as well as he who has gone."
Rev. Dr. BURNS of Hamilton, spoke as one of the boys referred to by Chancellor BURWASH, although his head was whiter. His earliest recollections of the Methodist Church were associated with Dr. SANDERSON. "He was one of the first preachers I knew," said Dr. BURNS, "and I am glad he was, for I do not think any young man could get a false impression of Christianity from him. He always had a pleasant smile and a grip of the hand for the boys in the fifties. I will never forget him." Dr. BURNS could bring up nothing of an unpleasant character in his long recollections of Dr. SANDERSON, who was a child of God and as broad as the Church of Christ. It was a blessed thing to have an intimate acquaintance with such a man as Dr. SANDERSON. The whole family of God suffered a loss by his departure.
Rev. Dr. GRIFFIN, of Toronto, whose acquaintance with Dr. SANDERSON extended over a larger number of years and was more intimate than that of any other clergyman present, was the last speaker, and when he was called upon he said he thought in coming to the funeral he would be dealt with as relative, almost as one of the family, that he would sit silently and listen to whatever might be said relative to the character and the history of his dear old friend. Dr, GRIFFIN thought he was about the last of that great army -- not great in numbers -- that regiment of grand old men which did so much for the country and so much for the church. He was associated with Dr. RYERSON, Wm. RYERSON, Edgar RYERSON, James ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, Dr. RICE, Dr. NELLES, Richard JONES, and he was a man as worthy to carry any titles the church might give as any of those who received them. It was a great number of these excellent men -- Henry Wilkinson, Lewis Warner and others whose names would occur to the elder members of the congregation -- with whom Dr. SANDERSON was associated, who laid the foundations of the church so deep and broad through the length and breath of the Dominion. These were an extraordinary class of men, and those who succeeded them could only try to be as good, for they would make a mistake if they tried to be as great. Those men, Dr. GRIFFIN felt assured, were endowed with extraordinary gifts for the extraordinary times in which they labored and lived. He believed that a man's heart and soul should be larger than his creed, and he believed that Dr. SANDERSON's was. He thought nevertheless, that Dr. SANDERSON's was thoroughly and intensely, and always Methodist. He did not lose sight at all of events in his own denomination, nor have any less regard for his own church. Ne was a Methodist. He believed in Methodist doctrines, he believed in the Methodist discipline, and he did as much as any other man to make them. The church was indebted first to John Ryerson more than to any other man, perhaps, for framing the book of discipline, but in its remodelling in many particulars could be seen the impress of the hand of Dr. SANDERSON. He (Dr. SANDERSON) loved the itineracy, as he believed it was essential, and that it was a system with which the church would not part. The church had grown to be the strongest in the Dominion, and it was owing to the itineracy as much as to any other part of the government of the church. Dr. SANDERSON was a preacher whose voice never failed, but up to the last was full, round and strong. He hated the modern methods called "sensational preaching," for he had a conservative nature, and was careful and anxious to preserve the church in its purity and integrity, and he believed that if the story of the Cross and the doctrine of Redemption were preached there would be no need to resort to methods adopted in modern times to fill the churches. His work was prosperous. The membership of the church was increased in every particular wherever he was appointed to labor. This was the case wherever he was found. The Christian Guardian was never a more powerful witness for the truth than when it was edited by Dr. SANDERSON. In the management of the book establishment in Toronto he was successful. "And during all these long years that I had the unspeakable privilege, the invaluable privilege of associating with the late Geo. R. SANDERSON, I never heard a censorious word from his lips," concluded Dr. GRIFFIN, "never heard unkind criticisms of his brethren, never heard anything but respect, good will to all. Now my brother has gone. He has gone to his reward, and lives in the presence of God."
The remains were then conveyed to the Mt. Pleasant, where a brief service was conducted by Reverend Dr. DANIEL. Many floral tributes were placed on the casket. Mr. and Mrs. George ROBINSON sent a pillow, Dr. and Mrs. ECCLES, ferns and spray, John W. POCOCK, cross, Sir John and Lady CARLING, cross, Mrs. WILSON, New York, pillow and cross, Mrs. J.C. HAZARD, spray, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. T. MANN, spray, Miss SANDERSON's Sunday school class, scythe and sheaf, Mrs. J. H. FLOCK, spray, and a pillow from the family.
Mr. John T. STEPHENSON, the well-known funeral director of Dundas Street had charge of the obsequies.
Page 5

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.muskoka_district.huntsville_forester 1897-06-11 published
ROBINSON George page 2
indexed 1998 at Huntsville Public Library

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.muskoka_district.huntsville_forester 1898-04-08 published
ROBINSON {?} Mrs Mary M page 2
indexed 1998 at Huntsville Public Library

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.wellington_county.arthur.mount_forest 1898 published
d@ca.on.york_county.toronto 1898
ROBINSON James died 1898
contact OGS Wellington County Branch for newspaper reference
also OGS Toronto Branch

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ROBINSON o@ca.on.wellington_county.guelph 1890 published
d@ca.mb.winnipeg 1890
ROBINSON George died 1890
contact OGS Wellington County Branch for newspaper reference

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ROME o@ca.on.muskoka_district.huntsville_forester 1897-10-01 published
ROME Mr Alex S page 2
indexed 1998 at Huntsville Public Library

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ROSE o@ca.on.muskoka_district.huntsville_forester 1897-06-11 published
ROSE Mr David page 2
indexed 1998 at Huntsville Public Library

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ROWE o@ca.on.muskoka_district.huntsville_forester 1897-09-17 published
ROWE Alexander page
indexed 1998 at Huntsville Public Library

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ROWE - All Categories in OGSPI