Posts Tagged ‘genealogist’s reference shelf series’

OGS/Dundurn Publications: The Genealogist’s Reference Shelf Series

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

Genealogy and the LawGenealogy and the Law in Canada

Dr. Margaret Ann Wilkinson

$19.99

Digital records and broad access to the Internet have revolutionized the ways in which genealogists approach their investigations — and has made it much easier to locate information relevant to any particular genealogical inquiry from sources often separated by vast distances. The law, on the other hand, remains very connected to particular geographic locations. There are legal differences depending on whether you are doing personal research or working for others for pay.

This book will discuss the relevant laws — access to information, protection of personal data and copyright — applicable to those working within Canada with materials that are located, at the time you are doing the work, in Canada. The opinions expressed in this book are not intended as legal advice.

2010 125p glossary

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OGS/Dundurn Publications:Genealogist’s Reference Shelf Series

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

Standards OGS DGenealogical Standards of Evidence: A Guide for Family Historians

Brenda Dougall Merriman

$19.99

“… should be considered a must-read by anyone doing family history research in Canada. This easy-to-read book makes it simple to understand the different record sources, and the limitations and possibilities of each one.” –Dave Obee, Times Colonist

Genealogical evidence is the information that helps us to identify an individual or the relationship between individuals. In describing how we establish or argue points of identification through the use of various sources, we often use such words as “evidence,” “proof” or “documentation.”

Brenda Dougall Merriman takes readers through the process of research and identification, along the way examining how the genealogical community developed standards of evidence and documentation, what those standards are and how they can be applied.

As a supplement to courses, workshops and seminars, this book provides both an in-depth and inexpensive reference, perfect for compiling and checking research notes.

2010 116p illustrated

OGS/Dundurn Publications:Genealogist’s Reference Shelf Series

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

Education HiistoryEducation and Ontario Family History

Marian Press

$19.99

Many family researchers with Ontario roots discover they have ancestors who were teachers. Those with no teachers in the family may have ancestors who were part of the Ontario education system as students. Today there are numerous varied resources available to find information on teachers, pupils, schools, textbooks, and curricula in historical Ontario.

Education and Family History outlines the resources available for education from about 1785 to the early twentieth century, not only for genealogists, but also for other historians with an interest in educational records. Many historical resources are currently being digitized, and Ontario and education are no exceptions. These electronic repositories are examined in author Marian Press’s book along with traditional paper and archival sources.

2011 169p illustrations

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OGS/Dundurn Publications:Genealogist’s Reference Shelf Series

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

Crime and PunishmentCrime and Punishment in Upper Canada

Janice Nickerson

$19.99

Crime and Punishment in Upper Canada provides genealogists and social historians with context and tools to understand the criminal justice system and locate sources on criminal activity and its consequences for the Upper Canada period (1791-1841) of Ontario’s history

2010 242p illustrated

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OGS/Dundurn Publications: Genealogist’s Reference Shelf Series

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Conserving259Conserving, Preserving, and Restoring Your Heritage

Kennis Kim

$19.99

“We all have archives of one form or another, and need to know the best way to keep them intact.… will help just about everyone.” –Dave Obee, Times Colonist

History surrounds us, in museums, in our community and in our homes. Whether objects were bought, found or inherited, these artifacts offer glimpses into the past — a time, place, event or person we wish to remember and share with the future.

As custodians of pieces of our history, we are faced with how to maintain these items. Professional conservator Kim tells us how. Topics discussed include:

  • Creating an accession list
  • What are conservation, restoration and preservation?
  • Deciding on display, storage or using the artifact
  • Common threats, such as light, humidity, insects and rodents
  • When to call in a professional

Here’s all you need to determine what you can do yourself to preserve your precious things for future generations.

2010 171p glossary appendices illustrations

Click here to order this book from the OGS eStore