Posts Tagged ‘ancestors’

Profession or Trade: Researching your ancestors’ working past

Monday, July 9th, 2012

Over the next few weeks, we are going to take a look at the various resources in our collection that will assist you in determining just exactly what your ancestors did for a living. For many of us, this will be a fairly straight forward exercise, particularly if farmers, blacksmiths and shop keepers populate your family tree. But what if you come across some one that was listed as an Ale-Conner in the 1861 or 1871 Canadian census? According to this handy online resource, Ancestral Occupations, an Ale-Conner is basically an “official who tests the quality and measure of ale served in public houses.”  This was probably not your first guess, right?

If you really want to delve into your family’s working past, our library collection contains a wealth of information that will assist you in researching this topic. Here are just a few to get you started

  • Researching Local Craftsmen and Industries
    • Elizabeth Quance
    • Call # 929.3 713 016 Quan 1984
  • Occupational Resources for Genealogists
    • Stuart Raymond
    • Call # 929.3 41 016 Raymo 1992
  • Trades and Occupations shown on rubbings of English Monumental Brasses from the 14th to 18th Century
    •  Jane Plante
    • Call # 929.3 42 Plant 1976
  • An Introduction to……:Occupations, a preliminary list
    • Joyce Culling
    • Call # 929.3 42 03 Culli 1999
  • Yorkshire Occupations: A genealogical guide
    • Stuart Raymond
    • Call # 929.3 428 016 Raymon 2000

For a full listing of all titles in this category please check our catalogue.  Next week’s Professions topic: Apprenticeships.

Where were your ancestors on July 1st, 1867?

Thursday, June 28th, 2012

Whether it is a personal or a global phenomenon, the anniversary of a momentous event will often trigger that “where were you when…” moment of introspection.  As we approach the 145th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, have you ever pondered where you’re ancestors might have been on July 1st, 1867?  According to Statistics Canada, there were 3,463,000 people living in Canada at the time of Confederation, with an estimated 1 million in Ontario alone.  Were any of these perhaps your ancestors?  Maybe you’ve discovered a United Empire Loyalist or two in your family tree, or perhaps you just followed the census trail back to 1861, if you had ancestors who where there when Canada entered confederation, we would love to hear about them.

Did you also know that having an ancestor in Canada on July 1st, 1867 makes you an excellent candidate for membership in the Ontario Genealogical Society’s Centenary Club? Please visit our website for more details on how to get your Centenary Certificate.

We will be closed on July 2nd,

Have a safe and happy Canada Day.