Posts Tagged ‘FYI’

OGS is now on Pinterest!

Saturday, September 27th, 2014

The OGS provincial office has now joined the Pinterest community www.pinterest.com.

What will you find there? Our Librarian has created 14 boards — so far — including:

• Welcome to OGS
• OGS Branches (those on Pinterest)
• OGS Special Interest Groups
• OGS Conference 2015 – Tracks Through Time
• OGS Publications
• Interesting Articles
• Historic maps
• Heritage photos
• Ancestral lands

Pins are for sharing — pin our stuff to your boards, pin your stuff to some of our boards. Share your heritage photos. Have you travelled to your ancestral lands? Taken photos? Pin them to our Ancestral Lands board — maybe find some new neighbours. Search for us under The Ontario Genealogical Society.

Happy pinning!

Reminder: OGS on Facebook

Saturday, September 27th, 2014

Have you liked the OGS Facebook page yet?: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ontario-Genealogical-Society/259163438258

Find us on Facebook and “Like” our page to get the latest OGS news and genealogical information delivered to your Facebook newsfeed.

Many of our branches are already quite active on Facebook; Niagara Peninsula, Quinte and Nipissing are but a few.

Click here to view other branches on Facebook.

Genealogy and the Law in Canada

Saturday, September 27th, 2014

Gen and Law258

The September issue of e-Newsleaf had a very interesting editorial on how copyright laws may affect the sharing of electronic files. It mentioned the book Genealogy and the Law in Canada.

This book was published jointly by OGS and Dundurn Press and is part of the Genealogist’s Reference Shelf series. The author, Dr. Margaret Ann Wilkinson, is a professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Western Ontario who has taught, written and spoken widely about intellectual property, privacy protection and legal ethics.

The book explores Canadian law and how it pertains to copyright, information found in cemeteries, genealogy and libel, and the publication of genealogical material. For individual family historians or professional genealogists, the book contains a wealth of information.

It is available through the OGS e-store.

How to Research Your Family History: Part 5

Saturday, September 27th, 2014

Now that we have laid the ground work on the How of starting your family history research – it’s now time to look at the Where.

Records:Where to Look

Vital Stats, Land Records, Wills and Probate Records, Military Service Records – the list goes on. With so many records to hunt down – just where does one start? In a word – Archives! Start with your local Archival Institution – not just for the records, but for the invaluable assistance you will receive from the Archivists. Yes, you could go online and start your search there, especially if accessing an Archive is not easily accomplished. Just keep in mind though, you might not know what – or who – you are looking for BUT you do need to know what – and who – you have found. This may be the most important distinction between doing your research solely on-line vs utilizing an Archive or even a Library: Guidance. Archivists and Librarians not only know their collections – they know how to search – consulting these professionals will save you time, effort and perhaps even money.

Being the Ontario Genealogical Society, our primary focus is on Ontario records. For these, your point of reference will be the Archives of Ontario. Here is a basic guide of the genealogical resources you will find here:

Ontario Births:

  • Prior to 1869
    • Civil registration for births in Ontario did not come into effect until 1869, so you will have to rely, where possible, on church records.  The Archives of Ontario (AO) website offers some tips on how to search for church records.
  • 1869-1913
    • Reading Room at the Archives of Ontario
    • Local Library, Archives or Family History Centre
    • Through the AO’s Interlibrary Loan Service, provided your local library or archival institution is a member of the Interlibrary Loan Network
    • Microfilm reels – index and registration –  may be purchased through the Ontario Genealogical Society (Pending approval of the Archives of Ontario)
    • familysearch.org (free genealogy website)
    • Paid subscription to genealogy website (check your local library to see if they subscribe to any of these sites)
  • 1914-1916
    •  Reading Room, Archives of Ontario.
    • Through the AO’s Interlibrary Loan Service, provided your local library or archival institution is a member of the Interlibrary Loan Network
    • These records are not available for sale.
  • 1917
    • These records are closed for scanning. According to their website, the AO is planning to make 1917 births available in microfilm format sometime in late 2014.

Ontario Marriages:

  • Prior to 1869
    • As with births, the civil registration of marriages in Ontario began in 1869. The Archives of Ontario has some marriage registrations dating back to 1780, but the collection is not extensive.  As with pre-1869 births, you will have to rely on church records for early Ontario marriages where possible.
  • 1869 -1928
    • Reading Room, Archives of Ontario
    • Local Library, Archives or Family History Centre
    • Through the AO’s Interlibrary Loan Service, provided your local library or archival institution is a member of the Interlibrary Loan Network
    • Microfilm reels -index and registration –  may be purchased through the Ontario Genealogical Society (pending approval of the Archives of Ontario)
    • familysearch.org
    • Paid subscription to genealogy website
  • 1929-1931
    • Reading Room, Archives of Ontario.
    • Through the AO’s Interlibrary Loan Service, provided your local library or archival institution is a member of the Interlibrary Loan Network
    • These records are not available for sale.
  • 1932
    • These records are closed for scanning. According to their website, the AO is planning to make 1932 marriages available in microfilm format sometime in late 2014.

Ontario Deaths:

  • Prior to 1869
    • Deaths were not registered in Ontario before this date. Your best bet is to try to locate Estate Files from the Surrogate and Probate Courts. For more information on how to search for and locate these records, follow this link to the Archives of Ontario’s pathfinder page for Ontario Court of Probate and Surrogate Court Records: Wills and Estate Files.
  • 1869-1938
  • 1939-1941
    • Reading Room, Archives of Ontario.
    • Through the AO’s Interlibrary Loan Service , provided your local library or archival institution is a member of the Interlibrary Loan Network
    • These records are not available for sale.
  • 1942
    • These records are closed for scanning. According to their website, the AO is planning to make 1942 deaths available in microfilm format sometime in late 2014.

Vital Stats are of course not the only sources genealogists may use when documenting their family histories.  Crown Land and Land Registry records, as well as divorce records and of course newspapers, are but a few of the resources available to genealogists and family historians.

The Archives of Ontario is your best resource for accessing all of these record collections. Click here for the Research Guides and Tools page on the AO website. Don’t forget to check out the Citing Archival Records guide-book as well.

Contact Information for the Archives of Ontario:

Mailing Address:

The Archives of Ontario (map)

34 Ian Macdonald Boulevard

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

M7A 2C5

Email Address:

reference@ontario.ca

Telephone

1-800-668-9933 Toll-Free Number (Ontario only)

416-327-1600

Website

http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/en/index.aspx 

If you are searching for service records for Canadian Soldiers of the First World War, Library and Archives Canada has digitized many of the records and continue to do so as part of the Government of Canada First World War commemoration initiative. You can find out more about this initiative, and access the database by visiting the Library and Archives of Canada website.

If you are researching ancestors from a specific region in Ontario, you will find that nothing beats local knowledge. OGS has 33 branches and special interest groups spread across Ontario. Click here to see if we have a branch in your region of interest.

FYI: Mississauga at War – New Online Exhibit

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

This is part 1 of an exhibit that will introduce historic Mississauga’s experience of the First World War. The site will grow until it covers 1914-1918 as seen through the pages of The Streetsville Review, photographs, and personal stories. The direct link is:
http://www.mississauga.ca/mississaugaatwar

The site is a beginning look at these years. To learn more about local consequences of the conflict, the public is invited to contact the Canadiana Reading Room, Mississauga Central Library, at 905-615-3200 ext. 3660 or history.library@mississauga.ca.

FYI:Posts by Others on the OGS Facebook Page

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

It seems Facebook has undergone another face lift and things have shifted a bit. The posts by others is now called Posts to this Page and is located at the left hand side of the page – you might have to scroll down a bit. Lots of interesting stuff gets posted here, including requests for help with brickwalls. Check this area often as you never know who you might be able help – or who might be able to assist you with your brickwalls.

Have a genealogical or heritage event you wish to promote? These can be posted in our Posts to this page as well – the more the merrier!

Heritage St. Clair launches ‘Men of World War I’

Saturday, September 20th, 2014

The Township of St. Clair has compiled the names of all of the 400 men who, from a population of 5000 at the time, joined the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during the First World War. Many of these men joined the Lambton 149th Battalion and 36 made the ultimate sacrifice in service to their country.

If you have ancestors from the former townships of Moore and Sombra in Lambton County, they may have made this list.

For more information, visit their website at: http://www.twp.stclair.on.ca/world_war_i.htm

How to Research Your Family History: Part 4

Saturday, September 20th, 2014

Maps

Location is one of the most important things to determine, since so many records are location based. Tax and census records are clearly location based, but so are church registers and many wills. Always identify, as closely as possible, exactly where an ancestor lived, and when.

When you know the location, one of the handiest things you can have is a contemporary map. Unfortunately, old maps are not easy to find and usually do not show what you want to see. Probably the best source of Ontario maps are the county atlases. These large books were produced in the 1870’s and 1880’s for most –  but not all –  Ontario counties. Many were reprinted as a historical project in the 1970’s and 1980’s. They contain excellent township and community maps and often include some of the names of the more prominent members of the community. Check out your community library as well as they tend to have local atlases.

You can find a number of county atlases on line at In Search of Your Canadian Past: The Canadian County Atlas Project.

Other online sources of maps include:

Map of the Province of Upper Canada – 1800

District Maps Of Canada West/ Upper Canada /Ontario – 1836 and 1845

A gazetteer will provide the location of every named feature. There are a number of them, some more complete than others, and of course old ones will provide old names that are no longer in use. A good modern one the Canada Gazetteer Atlas. If you are researching locations in Ontario, check out the Ontario Locator.

Natural Resources Canada’s website Querying Geographic Names of Canada offers a search name of present and past names. For current Ontario locations, use the Ontario Ministry of Transportation’s online road maps.

OGS Monthly Webinar Series for 2015

Thursday, September 18th, 2014

OGS Members, here’s your chance to have your say about the topics for the 2015 OGS Monthly Webinar Series.

Take the short survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/PMTT5TC

Introductory Membership Grants Access to Webinars

Saturday, September 13th, 2014

OGS Webinars are open to members only and now is the perfect time to join for the first time.

Our partial year membership launched June 1 and we welcome new members to join us for the rest of 2014 for $35.70 rather than waiting till the New Year. Partial year Members receive all the benefits of Individual membership including our quarterly mailing for August and November, as well as the upcoming OGS Research Day at the Archives of Ontario scheduled for November.

This offer is also available to those who have not been an OGS member since 2011 and would like to come back.

Join now: http://www.ogs.on.ca/integrated/integrated_account_new_step1.php